17/07/2016 The Papers


17/07/2016

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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me recently, because I'm sure it will be in the back of their minds,

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as well. That is all the sport. Hello and welcome to our Sunday

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morning edition of The Papers. With me are columnist and author

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Yasmin Alibhai-Brown A dramatic picture on the front

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of the Sunday Times - Turkey anti-coup protesters

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seize control of a tank - as the government there

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reasserts its authority. An image of dozens of

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soldiers surrendering is on the front of the Telegraph -

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the paper reports almost 3,000 troops have been arrested in a drive

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for revenge by President Erdogan. The Observer calls

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it a "brutal purge" It reports around 2,700

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judges have been dismissed warning from the new so-called

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"Brexit secretary" David Davis - that new EU migrants could be sent

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home to avoid an immigration surge. The new Foreign Secretary

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Boris Johnson is the lead for the Sunday Express -

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"we're ready to go global", is the headline - as he says Britain

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has the opportunity to be more active on the world

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stage than ever before. And the Mirror leads

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with the Nice attack - it has a picture of the alleged

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killer of the 84 people who died - and reports that he told

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family he was happy, Turks crushed coup, that you Matic

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on the front of the Sunday Times. And the Sunday Telegraph, revenge on

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the plotters, 2700 judges facing arrest. Such a terrible thing. --

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Turks crushed coup on the front page of the Sunday Times. A part of me

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really wanted it work. I think current regime is appalling. More

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journalists are imprisoned in Turkey than in any other nation on earth.

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Behind-the-scenes this man is a megalomaniac and about as ruthless

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as Gaddafi. But he does it under the veneer of his particular brand of

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democracy. You must never wish for a coup because of what happened in

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Egypt. And part of me is so ashamed of being Muslim at the moment. There

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is not a single Muslim nation now on our planet, Turkey was the one big

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hope, and what is going to happen now is it will show the true

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colours. Awful situation. One could say, Turkey, economically, had this

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incredible boom at the start of President Ida Gann's rain. He

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stabilised things and made it clear that the army was out of politics,

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which it appears to be. -- president Erdogan. But there is this crackdown

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on Civil Liberties, journalists being arrested. The irony is what is

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happening after this coup is he will be more anti-democratic. Arresting

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soldiers. Arresting journalists. Extraordinary. I am afraid this

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coup, which looked amateurish to me, what were they trying to do? It was

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bizarre! They didn't have all of the army behind them, what was the game?

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This amateurish coup has become counter-productive and made it a lot

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worse. My reaction, when I started to hear about this, it was Friday

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night, wasn't it? I was dismayed. As much as I dislike Erdogan. I just

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thought, please, no more stability in this region, when you store have

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the Syrian civil War completely resolved. The Hauritz there. And

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still the horrors of the refugee crisis. Completely unresolved. --

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the Syrian war completely unresolved. As far as the European

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Union is concerned, that is a very big concern. And I am sure later,

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the US. All of them didn't want this to happen. But I have to kind of say

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that Turkey, like the UK, like the US, is one of those nations

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absolutely divided. Absolutely, between the secularists and those

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who follow the Islamic politics of that nation. This is what is

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happening in the world at the moment. Nations which found a way of

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kind of holding it together, you are finding these deep ravine is opening

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up. France, as well, which we might get onto. -- ravines. A Turkish

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friend of mine said to media 's ago the army in Turkey is a bit like

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your father coming in when you make a mistake and tries to put things

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right, and you never grow up if that keeps happening. -- said to me a

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while ago. I think the trouble was, it didn't seem to be all of the

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Armed Forces, it just seemed that some of them stayed loyal to the

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president. What hope is there of any change? Look at what the Army has

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done in Egypt, for example. When the elections happen in Turkey,

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increasingly the state uses every means necessary to ensure that it is

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victorious. A nasty person, but perhaps the least worst option for

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Turkey, who knows? Let's go to another coup. The labour Civil War

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in the Observer. They talk about Aaron Smith running. It is amazing

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how money unity candidates you can get while the party is so divided.

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-- Owan Smith. And we have a similar story in The Mail on Sunday. Page

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13. Is it the Kinnock and Paddy party? They are suggesting a

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realignment of the centre-left. Plotting breakaway if Jeremy Corbyn

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clings onto power, these 150 Labour MPs. A picture of Kinnock here, and

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Paddy Ashdown on the right. What do you make of this? It is ironic that

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the two unity candidates are falling out. In other words, Smith, who was

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launching today, he was going to do it on Friday but then there was the

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niece tragedy. Against Angela Eagle. According to one of the people in

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Smith's camp, they just want candidate to stand up against Jeremy

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Corbyn. -- Nice tragedy. But it turns to this idea of having a

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breakaway party, if Corbin stays as the leader of the Labour Party I

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think it will split the party. -- Jeremy Corbyn. But as John Mills

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says, and he is one of the Labour Party donors, splitting the party

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would be a disaster under first past the post because it would make it

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even harder for them to win. So if they do go along with the Kinnock

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and Paddy party it would be more unlikely they will stay out of

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power. Are they a split party? They are. People look back at the SDP and

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talk it down. But there is no other party that those people who are on

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the centre, who worked for Remain, who have shared views, and Paddy

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Ashdown is not Labour, let's remember, but there are many Tories

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who feel disgruntled. Maybe it is time. Maybe for ten years it will

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get nowhere. But, certainly, we have no proper centre party in this

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country. You have never been a friend of the Conservative Party

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exactly, but do you think they settle their scores much better and

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in the country's interests much better than other parties? They move

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on. It was pretty ropey for some time. Remember when we had the

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dramas. I was thinking about this week. This week they sorted it. I'm

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glad they did for the national Grid. I think the Conservative Party has

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come together. -- national good. The cabinet is miraculous. I don't know,

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there are some angry people. Iain Duncan Smith. His face looks like it

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is going to burst. The party has come together to refit two. Theresa

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May's cabinet I think is masterful in its balancing of the Brexit

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candidates. -- has come together fantastically. Amber Rudd and the

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various others, as well, are in there. A sensible way to move ahead.

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I think it has been masterful. I don't think with Boris Johnson and

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Liam Fox back in it would be called masterful, but you are right, they

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come together. They come together. Minister for Brexit. One of them

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David Davis. We will send EU migrants -- we will send EU migrant

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surge. People hoping to get the right to remain in some kind of

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surge... I don't think he said it like this. The newspapers are...

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Writing it up? Writing it up. In some ways he sounded quite

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considerate -- quite consolatory. We have many of our citizens living in

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Europe. They want to know if there will be this enormous exchange of

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people. We have seen it in previous point in history. He is saying that

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won't happen. And he mildly said if there was a surge of entry into the

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UK then they will have to have a look at the new arrivals. But they

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cannot stop it. We are still in the EU, remember, we are in until... As

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an economist, the pull factor is if the economy is doing well, if there

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is uncertainty about the economy, people are less likely to come.

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That's right. I think these are warning shots. Perhaps migration, if

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the economy is going to start falling apart, as all of these

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dreadful campaigners said so before the referendum, we won't be having

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them. I was a Brexiter con and I thought people would still come in,

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and that will be good. -- I was a Brexiter, and I thought. I voted for

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independence and democracy. Democracy, my dear. We have two

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undemocratic institutions in this country. Who are they? The Royal

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family is one. We are on the way. We are not, we are not, we are not.

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Perhaps we are on our way to a republic. Perhaps she did not say

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that. This is the Telegraph. Brexit trade deals with the US and

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Australia. To be fair, there not any, actually, with the US and

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Australia. This is about how we might have them. This is the

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optimistic case people for Brexit. This was one of the reasons for

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leaving the EU. When Barack Obama came here he said we would be at the

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back of the Cuba trade deals. The laughable thing was at that time

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they were only negotiating one trade deal. -- back of the queue for trade

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deals. Now we will be back at the front. Australia, they have said,

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come on, let's have a trade deal. And the Canadian Trade Minister

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said, there is no use going through the EU, we could just continue with

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the UK. That would be all right and we could take benefit of that. This

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is excellent news and exactly what we want to see. And it is in Liam

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Fox's territory because he is the international trade Secretary. It is

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fantasy at the moment. It isn't. It is going to happen. Will we be at

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the front of the queue with the US? Yes. ?10, I put it on the table.

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Fine. That is a double bet. It is already happening. Well, if I lose,

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I don't care. Nothing about Donald Trump's choice of Vice President in

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any of the papers. Express says, we will send the EU surge back. We have

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done that one. What is next? We are going global. Yes, we are ready to

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go global, which is pretty much the same kind of story. It is a bit. The

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Sunday Mirror has got this... This story, everything is normal, the

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last words of the Bastille killer. He has had psychological treatment

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for years. Then this attack, it has been claimed by IS, and yet this

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person seems to be in a very disturbed way, a very odd

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individual. Yes. We have lots of things happening. Some properly

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organised. Isis inspired, or inspired by other terror group

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attacks. Then you have these lone wolves who are obviously having lots

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of psychodramas in their heads. They are kind of reaching out to these

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calls that are periodically made by Isis and so one. He never went a

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mosque. He was not part of any network as far as we know. -- went

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to mosque. The same with the Orlando chap. There was a lot going on in

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his head. That was the attack on the nightclub. Then we have this

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call-out, doing this spectacular thing. I think we should be looking

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at both. The planning and also the psychological profiles of some of

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these men. That is the difficult bit, isn't it? Very few people are

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involved in the terrorist networks. But there are many people who, for

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various reasons, have mental health problems, but very few do something

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like this. The problem is you cannot legislate against this type of

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personality. The French state will have to be mortgage and about

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various problems. He was driving this big van. He took it into this

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territory and then drove it off. You have to question why it was allowed

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to do that under the circumstances. It was interesting that Francois

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Hollande was about to lift the state of emergency which had been imposed

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after the shooting at the Bataclan. He will have to reimpose it. This is

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another horror story for France which tells them they are a long way

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from resolving these problems with terrorism in the country. It is a

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serious problem. I see more similarities between this guy and

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the guy in Norway. And sprayed it -- and aspiring

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the family knew that he was volatile. He was vile. To seek

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help... Maybe the Muslim families come in Europe especially, need to

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be watching out for signs of psychological disturbance in their

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children. Very few of them do that. There is so much grim news, I wanted

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to end up with some slightly positive. Book shelves hit back with

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kids classes and cocktails. A spate of openings as owners offer more

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than just a store. We see a lot of book shops close. And now invented

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book shops, including one I know very well, are doing things to get

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people in. It is great news. You want to break the power of the big,

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big... I mean, we have stopped ordering from Amazon. We have

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stopped because of some of the things that were happening in their

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company. But we are stuck. We have to find that particular book shop.

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We have some good independent ones in London. This is good news.

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Bringing children back to books, as well, which I think is really

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important. They are living in such an Internet obsessed world. It makes

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it an event. What is interesting is the decline of the book shop, which

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we have seen, has run in parallel with the rise of the literary

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Festival. People do not get literary books, but they are going to buy

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books, meet authors they like, and that is interesting and it turns it

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into an event. I wonder if people are fed up with technology. I know

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you said you don't buy things from Amazon, presumably from its

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corporation tax issue, but putting that aside I wonder if people are

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fed up with dealing with bits of technology and they want something

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physical. Some of these books are works of art. I just think of these

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children's books, beautifully illustrated. A book gives you so

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much more than just a bit of technology. There is no point

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getting the Gruffalo on Kendall, you want to show them the pictures. But

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I just wonder, is there any human activity possible now without a

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coffee? We might find the coughing becomes more expensive because of

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the drop of the pound. Is this one in Edinburgh, they don't do

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cocktails but they will put the kettle on and make you a cup of tea.

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She will grow you a cup of tea if you would like one -- grew. -- brew

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you a cup of tea. And a biscuit, hopefully.

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Thanks to Yasmin Alibhai-Brown and Ruth Lea.

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Just a reminder we take a look at tomorrows front pages

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