03/08/2016 The Papers


03/08/2016

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Welcome to our look ahead to the papers.

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Let's have a look at some of the front pages. Financial Times leads

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with a survey that suggests is the Brexit vote business activity has

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experienced its sharpest drop in at least 20 years. The Telegraph says a

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human rights solicitor is facing a criminal enquiry after pursuing

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abuse cases against British soldiers who served in Iraq. On the front of

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the Metro, a story of a woman who survived a life-threatening Schumer

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and in the same week a won ?61 million on the lottery with her

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family -- life-threatening tumor. The claim that Staton 's fuel the

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rise in the number of people developing diabetes. The Guardian

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leads on claims from readily -- Labour leadership contender Owen

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Smith that the party could bust apart and disappear if Jeremy Corbyn

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remains as the leader. The announcement armed police will be

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deployed on foot patrols across London for the first time is the

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main story in the Times. More on David Cameron's lead to resignation

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honours list after a Tory donor rules himself out of consideration.

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Plunging out but piles pressure on Bank of England to head off

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recession, everyone is expecting a rate cut tomorrow. Yes.

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Everyone is also expecting it to have quite a significant effect.

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This is a headline that doesn't pull its punches, the pressure is now on

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for the Bank of England and its governor, Mark Carney, to head off a

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recession. The problem is, we have had historically low rates of

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interest rates for seven years. His hands are tied. Probably he will

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announce quite a small cut. Because, they are already so low, will have

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quite a small effect. And yet everybody is now looking at the man

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who, two months ago, warned a Brexit vote could take us into recession,

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to try to get us out of it. Turning, part of the problem is, interest

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rates are so low, people are talking about getting too negative interest

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rates -- Tony. If the economy is not stimulated enough through monetary

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policy measures. Maybe the pressure is going to be on fiscal policy, tax

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cuts, great investment, maybe that is where we will have to head. That

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makes sense. The reality is since the credit crunch in 2008, they have

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been fighting off a recession all the time and keeping interest rates

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low. It is time for investment to pump some money into the economy. To

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try to build some confidence. Unfortunately with the Brexit thing,

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people are still nervous. I don't think Brexit will happen. Really?

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They will back away from it. Every indication is... Brexit means

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Brexit. She might find there is no definition of Brexit if she looks in

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the dictionary. Let's go to the Telegraph.

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Dramatic picture on the front page, armed and ready, the new face of

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Britain's anti-terror police. This is the first lot of 600 armed to the

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teeth police marksmen, Tony. This all stemming from what has been

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going on across Europe in the last couple of weeks. We live in a

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climate of fear where people now think it is acceptable but police

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armed to the teeth walk the streets. I'm not so sure it is a good thing.

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We should be looking to get guns off the streets. I am reading the story,

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the Times gives more detail, some of the things they are talking about,

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armoured BMW motorbikes that can get to the scene of the action. It

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sounds a bit like Robocop Bond, to me. I am not so sure it will enhance

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our safety. It will encourage the nightmares, the climate of fear.?

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You think it will have the opposite effect of reassuring the public?

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People will be scared. The reality is, because this is an island

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nation, despite what people think about immigration, because of the

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way we are set up at the board of control, there is less opportunity

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for outrages we have seen in Belgium and France to happen in Britain. We

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all feel under threat, now. We will feel even more under threat. I don't

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feel reassured by senior policeman with a gun on the street. If you

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look to France, Kate, they have been under a state of emergency for

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almost a year. The police are routinely armed. They have different

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levels of armed capability as far as different forces are concerned in

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France. The police are routinely armed in Germany yet this is where

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the terror attacks have been taking place. The police are also routinely

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armed in Northern Ireland where I grew up and I have to say I agree

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with Tony. It didn't do much to reassure people. I think what it

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did, it was a constant reminder of the terrorism we were facing. The

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express is very interesting with its headline, describes these cops as

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protecting us from terror. That's the problem. Terror is a feeling.

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This is absolutely what the terrorists want to do. They don't

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just to take our lives. They want to take our life, quality of life, they

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want to change how we live our lives. I am very sympathetic to what

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the police are trying to do. I think they trying to do two things, one of

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which is ace show of strength, to the terrorists. On that, they might

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be successful -- a show strength. But for the public to be reassured

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by this, that is mistaken. The key to a successful

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anti-terrorist campaign is intelligence. I think that is what

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we have in this country we had of parts of Europe. There is much more

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of a working relationship between the police, those in law enforcement

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and the public here. Certainly weigh more than in France or Belgium. In

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intelligence is important. -- certainly weigh more. Look at the

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root of why the potential terrorists come for. In Northern Ireland, the

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Catholic population at the lowest crime rates in Britain, before the

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troubles. They became the most politicised. In fact share's terms,

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criminalised community. They did not see it that way -- in Margaret

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Thatcher's terms. You need to stop the dissatisfaction, the alienation.

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You do that through education and investment. The people that were

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most at danger in this community is radicalised Britain's. We need to

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stop that, that is the most important thing -- Britain's

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population. Guardian, Labour on edge of a split that would finish the

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party says Owen Smith. Is this just rhetoric? "Vote For me and the party

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would split" or does he genuinely think this might happen? A

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combination of the two. An awful lot of Labour MPs now fear that the way

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they put it is that Labour doesn't have the God-given right to exist.

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They have seen what happened to the Democrats in the south of America.

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Only a couple of decades ago. They realise that you can lose millions

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of voters. They are very worried about this. At the same time, one of

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the rows within the leadership is about who is causing the split. Both

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sides are accusing each other. That cannot be denied that that is part

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of what is happening. Owen Smith is presenting himself as the unity

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candidate. He is the saviour. He will save the party. They reckon

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Hillary Clinton could win Texas, this year. LAUGHTER

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So, the Democrats will come back in the south. It starts in one state.

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It starts in one state and let's see how far it goes.

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Tony, it will be difficult for 170 odd MPs, Labour frontbenchers, who

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walked away from Mr Corbyn. If he wins, and it looks like he will

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probably win, it will be difficult for them to go back to the benches,

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isn't it? This party is in disarray, it is in meltdown. Corbyn appeals to

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the rank and file but he is not a leader. You can admire his

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convictions, you can admire his political views. But the Labour

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Party needs someone to grab them and say, OK, on the morning of the

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Brexit referendum, this is our best opportunity since the Tony Blair

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era. He says he did that. He didn't, he should have called a general

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election that morning, he should have made sure every one of those

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Labour MPs the night before were behind him, were going to stand and

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say the same thing, to say that they would need a general election and we

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needed now. The problem is Corbyn is not a leader. The worst problem is,

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I don't see a single Labour MP that is a leader. I wouldn't trust any of

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them. Is that the problem. We saw the line-up running against Jeremy

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Corbyn the time of the leadership campaign ten, 11 months ago and they

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didn't get a look in, did they? No, they didn't. There was a feeling

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among a lot of Labour voters that they were very... Dispassionate. No

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fire in their belly. And Jeremy Corbyn have that and he has

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galvanised tens of thousands of young people to join the party. But

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the problem is, you can follow a leader and be behind him and throw

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everything into him. If it is a bad leader, he will take you down a bad

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alley. I am sympathetic for Jeremy Corbyn, more than most, I am a

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traditional Labour heartland voter. Liverpool. I look at it and say,

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this is a party that is devoid of leadership it is untrue. People have

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rejected Jeremy Corbyn, their image of what a Labour leader image should

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be -- they have projected their image. Unfortunately he is not bad

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leader. The Guardian, Mr Murray. He has cheered us up over the last few

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weeks in this pretty wet and soggy summer and the horrible stuff as far

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as terror attacks are concerned. He will carry the flag for Great

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Britain during the Olympic opening ceremony.

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Four years ago, he has talked about Scottish independence, he was in

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favour of Scottish independence. At the next Olympics, would he be...

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Carrying the flag for Scotland? Which flag would he carry? That is

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not going to be happening in four years' time? I am not making any

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bets about that whatsoever. This is a great choice. Since then, Andy

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Murray has worked very hard on the Davis Cup team for Great Britain.

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That's true. Probably what he shows is maybe that kind of line from Walt

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Whitman, he is large, he contains multitudes. Not just one thing at

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any time. Especially given his Wimbledon win, he is a very good

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choice. One of the greatest British sports men ever. People don't warm

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to him and I don't understand why. I don't understand it either. They are

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getting warmer to him, don't you think? As time passes and he has

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chilled out, comes across as a little less surly, we have taken him

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to our hearts, haven't we? We have had to. He has pick so many. He is

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wonderful. Maybe he has a bit of... What appeals about Jeremy Corbyn. --

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he has won so many things. And Donald Trump. There is now a move

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towards authenticity. Andy Murray has never pretended as well. That is

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very true. Talking about the Olympics, the Games' legacy on the

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front page of the Guardian, odd suburb but nice park, the legacy for

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London. As always, the problem is hyping up.

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We were promised quite a lot. In order to build the political

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consensus, to spend quite so much money. As you remember. Billions.

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And then it was a more billions because it went over budget.

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You could argue with hindsight this is what politicians always have to

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do to get these big things through. The legacy questions are pretty

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serious. That will hang in the air for a long time. Same with the

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Telegraph. Mr Trump. The suggestion, Tony, that

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he might want to, possibly, if he ever became the leader of the United

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States, use nuclear weapons. He asked three times, why can't we use

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them? I think a little physics lesson might help. LAUGHTER

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What you mean, mass casualties? It will affect global weather, that

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sort of thing. He is very much... He is a can-do kind of guy. We got

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these were pinned in the locker... Come on, why not?! -- these kind of

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weapons. You hope Americans vote for him because certainly in the last

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few days, he has had a bad few days. It is beyond parody. If you made a

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film about this campaign, people will say that is ridiculous. I am

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sure someone will. That is the thing, isn't it? There are a lot of

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people, now, in the United States... Even the Republican party, they

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think he might even drop out. That is the suggestion. On the flip side,

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in the past couple of weeks, there have been a an awful lot of people

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in America saying, yes, well, that he won't be able to... -- there have

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been an awful lot. He will be curtailed by... Officials. Someone

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will stop him. He will be the president but you don't get to just

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run around and do all these things. There are officials. There is the

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Senate, there is Congress. Every time he opens his mouth, he suggests

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that argument. The brief going into the convention was that they had to

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act more presidential. He passed the period where he could

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be the wild outsider. He has to act presidential. "Why Can't we bomb

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everyone?" Interesting question. Brexit. It can help us transform our

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countryside, Kate. A fabulous story on the front of the Telegraph. A

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suggestion from the head of the National Trust that it the UK's

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farmers, who are a little bit nervous at the moment in the wake of

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the Brexit vote about what exactly will happen to their EU subsidies

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should do less food production and open up the countryside to more wild

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flowers, bees and butterflies. I just cannot see that going down

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particularly well. Not really. We will ruin the economy but get the

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English meadow back. It works for me. The head of the National Trust

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has been talking to Andrea Leadsom about this, stay tuned for your

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daisies and wild flowers. Don't forget, the front pages are

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online on BBC News, the website where you can read a detailed review

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of the papers. It is there, seven days per week. You can see us there

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with each night's edition being posted on the page shortly after we

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finish. Goodbye.

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