13/12/2016 The Papers


13/12/2016

No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello there. Well to Our Conor look ahead to what the papers are

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bringing us tomorrowment With me are Pippa Crerar,

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political correspondent at the London Evening Standard,

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and Neil Midgley, media commentator Let's lock at some of the front

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pages: The FT says Donald Trump has the backing of senior Republicans to

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push through Rex Tillerson's nomination. This follows criticism

:00:36.:00:39.

the oil boss is too close to Vladimir Putin. The I turns over its

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front page to the crisis in Aleppo, as people leave the war torn city.

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The Metro leads with that story. The paper says the rush is on to save

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100 children cut off from their parents and stuck in the city.

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The Telegraph claims UK taxpayers have footed a 50 million bill for

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all southern rail strikes this year. According to the Times ministers are

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considering to break up Southern and pushing for an all out ban on rail

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strikes. The Daily Mirror calls for a complete renationalisation of the

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rail network, which it says it supported by unions, MPs and the

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public. Thousands of banking jobs in the UK could be lost if ministers

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don't agree a transitional deal on access to the sing the market. The

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Express highlights a report which claims that positivity may be the

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key to living a longer life. Its headline eye catching, revealed: How

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to live longer. The secrets are in that paper. You are probably going

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to buy it now, that's the whole point.

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Onto the I. We've been hearing from our correspondents tonight, experts

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on the region, this is the beginning of the end game, it might seem. Yes,

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well weapons have fallen silent. As you say, it appears to be the end

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game for Aleppo. There's two main areas that the papers are covering

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of this story, one is of course, that the people of Aleppo themselves

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and that many have been on social media, using Twitter and posting

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videos online throughout the conflict and given people real

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insight, real civilian journalism. Many of them have said farewell,

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because they don't know what the future holds, whether they will find

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themselves escaping the city and making it through to somewhere more

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peaceful or whether they will leave and meet a tragic end. There's a

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powerful photo here of a father carrying his child through the

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rubble. It would be impossible for anybody to feel anything but gutted

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about what's gone on there. The second element of what the papers

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are covering is the blame game. British politicians in the House of

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Commons held an emergency debate in which they discussed all the

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different possibilities, aid drops, what could be done next. There were

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powerful speeches, not least from George Osborne, the former

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Chancellor who said, "We can't absolve ourselves of blame. MPs are

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deceiving themselves if they don't think they played a role in this,

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because in 2013 MPs voted against military action in Syria.

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Andrew Mitchell told me tonight that if they had the vote now, obviously,

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it wouldn't be a vote for military action, the lack of foresight three

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years ago, many people including George Osborne are pointing to as

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part of the problem here. Yes. Yes, they are. It's impossible to say how

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those air strikes, which remember were planned in retaliation for

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Assad using chemical weapons on his own people. It was nothing to do

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with Aleppo, nothing to do with Russian involvement. That has come

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subsequently, certainly military involvement on this scale.

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Therefore, I do wonder if we unpick history at our cost. Also, when has

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British military intervention in the Middle East actually done any good

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at all? That's my question. That seemed to be the point made by the

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US Congress as well. President Obama went to Congress, he didn't have to.

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He could have unilaterally done this, he felt after Iraq and after

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the mess the West has made of past engagements in the Middle East, that

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he had to do that. Congress said no, just as the British Parliament. That

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was after the British Parliamentary vote. Exactly. He decided he had to

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do that to cover his own back. And it swung between humanitarian

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intervention and not. Really British MPs and the Americans were scarred

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by Iraq. When Ed Miliband first started talking with David Cameron

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about the 2013 vote he was supportive and said he would like to

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support it in the House of Commons. Then after a series of concessions

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and then it became apparent to him he didn't have the support amongst

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his own backbenches. He took a political decision not to. They were

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hugely scarred by Iraq. You swing both ways. Nobody wants to repeat

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Srebrenica or Darfur, unfortunately, we've got to hope that what's

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happened in Aleppo, something like 5,000 people over the last month

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alone have died there. It's just a tragedy. 82 killed in their own

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homes, reminder of the Civil War in Lebanon and the massacre of

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civilians by militias linked to the Israeli forces there. Onto the

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Telegraph. The rail strike. Now rail strike costs taxpayers 50 million

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while train company saves cash. All this is over who is supposed to shut

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the doors. I mean that's what it boils down. To And who is supposed

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to drive the train ie... A driver would be good. And well, but no. Not

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one who isn't on strike. The driverless trains is what this is

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all about. Again, like my simplistic view of British military

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intervention in the Middle East, show me a an innovation that any

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trade union has ever supported. Are you calling them Luddites? RMT,

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ASLEF? Yes. Yes! I am. It's a great story showing that the taxpayer is

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footing the bill for the strike, because what we've got here is a

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situation where this line or set of lines haven't been privatised in the

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sense of sold off to the highest bidder. It's a fixed price contract

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that Southern Railway's parent has to run the services, but the

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Government maintains control of both the revenue and the cost. Well

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that's all very well, if you think you know what the costs are going to

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be. You think, oh, we might get more revenue and attract a few more

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passengers onto this line. Fixed price contract with your builder,

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for example, when you renovate your house is generally a good thing,

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because your builder takes the risk of things running over. In this

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case, this has come back to haunt the Government. Of course, now there

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is less revenue, less fares being paid, because fewer people are

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travelling because no trains are running. Also the Government has to

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pay the cost of the compensation. So this atomisation of the railways

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that was the way that the Major Government privatised the railways

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is coming back to haurnt the Government now. To the Daily Mail

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then. Daily Mirror. Sorry. Renationalise - no that wouldn't be

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the Mail. That would be a story! Daily Mirror. Renationalise our

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railways now! Do you think that's been given added impetus by this?

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It's really popular with the public. A lot of people think it's just like

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the papers, lefty socialists that want to renationalise the railways.

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Loads of people do. Every poll done it suggests the majority of the

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Brits would like to renationalise. We like to complain about the state

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of the railways. These are people all under the age of 35, who don't

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remember what it was like. Quite possibly. But it is something, I

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mean, the Government is certainly thinking about doing, and the Times

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picks this up, is stripping GTR, the parent group of its massive

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franchise in the new year. Other senior rail industry figures are

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concerned that it's going to be like a poison effect and start a ripple

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affect around the industry and cause more strikes. There's a feeling that

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the unions are considering launching coordinated action in other areas as

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well. They want to nip this in the bud. What then happens to it is

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really an unknown. Sadiq Khan has called for a renationalisation of

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the Southern franchise. He wants Transport for London to run it. He

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says that's the long-term solution, more local democratic

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accountability. That's nationalisation of another sort. But

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the Government is currently discussing all options. They started

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holding talks again with unions tonight. It's something. The company

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and the unions, which won't stop this current round of strikes, but

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hopefully might prevent the action happening again at Christmas and

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disrupting the ailways then. Financial Times, Mr Trump? This is

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brilliant. I mean, he's got more millionaires in his Cabinet than you

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would see at the average country club. Billionaires! Millionaires and

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billionaires. This guy has been given an award by Vladimir Putin and

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he's putting forward as America's top diplomat. Yes. Not only is he

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putting him forward as America's top diplomat, Rex Tillerson head of

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Exxon Mobil, the oil company who is very close to Putin, or so we

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believe, not only has he got to be nominated by Trump, he has to be

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confirmed by Congress. Trump is worried that even a Republican

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Congress, which is what he's got, won't necessarily confirm him in

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this new role as America's top diplomat. Trump is rolling out, as

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the Financial Times says, heavy weights to blunt the Tillerson

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nomination revolt, including Bob Gates, former Defence Secretary and

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Condoleezza Rice who was high up in the Bush administration. Red blooded

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Republicans, both of them. Both of them unimpeachable. When you get to

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the fourth paragraph of the story, you realise that Exxon Mobil is a

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client of Mr Gates' consulting firm, whose founders include Miss Rice.

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Yeah. Millionaires and billionaires all round. I know! I know! And

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what's perhaps, I'm just trying to get my head around this, because it

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seems so bizarre that you would have someone so close to Vladimir Putin

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being put forward as America's top diplomat. The suggestion is that

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this is all Nixon going to China in reverse, this is trying to isolate

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the Chinese by co--ying up to Russia. I think the relationship

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between the States and Russia over the next few months is definitely

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the one to watch. We've had the CIA a few days ago suggesting that the

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Russians, it was proven they were interfearing with the US election.

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We've now got a Secretary of State who received a medal from Vladimir

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Putin and whose, Moscow's senior foreign policy chief is saying, he's

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not just close to Putin. He's close to all of us. He wanted sanctions

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watered down against Russia as well. Trump has made a big thing about his

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not being an outsider, that he's, Washington outsider. That would

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bring a breath of fresh air into relations. The impact of that

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relationship is massive. Not just for China, but the rest of the world

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as well. To appoint an oil executive who is close to Russia and has no

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experience is likely to cause, ruffle a lot of feathers around the

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world. It's going to be interesting. Finally, Einstein and the shrinking

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father Christmas. The faster an object travels according to

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Einstein's special theory. That object could be Santa Claus.

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Exactly! How does Santa fit down the chimney. Good question. The answer

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is that Santa and Rudolph and all the rest of them have to travel so

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fast to get presents to all the children around the world that

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Einstein's theory of relativity dictates that they get smaller,

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physically smaller, which is what happens to all objects, as you will

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know, according to the theory. It proves that father Christmas exists,

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a fact which my three young children will be delighted to hear. Exactly!

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Many thanks for looking at some of the stories behind the headlines.

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Thanks to you for watching and goodbye.

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Hello there. We start with a quick look at the satellite sequence over

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the last few hours. It shows this cloud in the Atlantic just getting

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closer and closer to us. It will bring rain with it. Ahead of that, a

:13:56.:13:57.

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