18/12/2016 The Papers


18/12/2016

A lively, informed and in-depth conversation about the Sunday papers.


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That's all of the sport, now on BBC News, Martine Croxall with The

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Papers. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the the papers will be With me are Business Journalist

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Josie Cox and journalist It's nice to know what 9:30am looks

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like! The front pages, beginning with...

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The Observer focuses on the Unite leadership battle -

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featuring an interview with the man challenging Len Mcluskey

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The Mail on Sunday leads with what it describes as the great

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foreign aid freeze - saying the government has agreed

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to halt new contracts after an investigation by the paper.

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The Sunday Times says the head of the rail union behind this week's

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industrial action has vowed to topple the Conservative

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The Sunday Telegraph also focusses on the unions -

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claiming Theresa May is facing pressure to curb

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And the Express says the High Street is heading for a record

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breaking Christmas - fuelled by Brexit.

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Let's begin with the Sunday Times. And, this idea of a loyalty oath for

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public office holders. It has been suggested by the Communities

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Secretary Sajid Javid, but following on from this report that Daimler

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Weise Casey has published into looking into how well integrated we

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are -- Dame Louise Casey. Yes, it is very far reaching. It applies to

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civil servants and even local council workers. I wonder how

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effective this would be. You can get people to swear an oath to anything

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but whether they fundamentally change their beliefs and values as a

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result is questionable. What kind of sanction would there have two B for

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it to be meaningful? We can say anything. If I want a job, I will

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say it. Do I feel it or believe it? There is a problem, there is a

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problem of integration. You know, within SummerSlam communities and

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frankly quite a lot of white people who do not want to integrate --

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within some Muslim communities. Just saying that you cannot get a job

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unless you come up with this oath? That will only end up in resentment,

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I think. And it is not just public office, it is everybody in society

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who have an investment or share in the same ideas. How do you bring it

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about? Exactly, it would apply to all migrants. Currently, it is just

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people seeking British citizenship. It is just so... Are we going to ask

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those people who happen to be indigenous Britons, right? To

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express tolerance when a lot of them are deeply intolerant of all

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backgrounds. This could be against discrimination laws and so on. What

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I think is that there was a problem and there has to be a more

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imaginative way of dealing with it. How? Louise Casey has certainly got

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the debate started... Don't get me started on her! Believe me, Yasmin,

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I won't! We have 13 minutes! There are a lot of things that we could

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actually... We have all kinds of activities. In Denmark there are

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fantastically local authority schemes to bring people together.

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Informally, casually, to be friends. We could do that. Moving on, the

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Telegraph. A fuse union stories this morning. It is nice to feel a proper

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newspaper and not just the front pages! Pressure on May.

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Prime Minister faces backlash over failure to impose emergency laws to

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curb crippling strikes. Southern Rail this week, it means a

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lot of difficulty for people trying to get about. What are the pressures

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that she is under? This has been going on for quite a long time.

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Conservative governments and successive ones have tried to curb

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the power of the unions. Now, some of these strikes are perfectly

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legal, what will we do? Change the law again... I am quite interested

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that Theresa May is refusing to curb the powers of the existing

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conditions under which strike... I would have thought she would have

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gone for it. They are quite crossed that she is not. But I think that

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she is right to not immediately step into this and make laws because of

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strikes. One of these suggestions is that critical industries would have

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to commit to maintaining a certain level of service even in the event

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of a strike, which I think would still slow people down if they are

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trying to move around on the railways for example but would not

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be quite the impact that they are facing this week? And I wonder

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whether it is the impact that is needed in order to get the point

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across, and whether keeping crucial services or at least half of them

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running would in fact defy the point of the strike will together. And the

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same with The Daily Telegraph, a picture of a mother and son but not

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any of them... The Queen and Prince trials, in a photograph taken by

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Nick Knight, a fashion photographer, prior to the final night of the

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Queen's 90th birthday celebrations. Yasmin, what do you think? She looks

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really good. I like her frock. At her age she looks really good. And

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so does trials! -- Charles. He is looking very fondly at his mum. She

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never greens a lot. I would love to know what is going on in her mind.

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-- grins a lot. This headline... This is Len McCluskey, the head of

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the Unite union facing a challenge from someone else. They are

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accusing, Jeremy Corbyn, he is accusing Len McCluskey are basically

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not doing his job as the head of the Unite union. I wonder whether this

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is not a proxy of what is happening in the broader Labour Party at the

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end of such a divisive year indeed for the whole Labour Party. Yes, but

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I think, I have never heard of this chap before. He does have a point.

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Len... I can never say his surname properly... McCluskey. He is more

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politicised than a couple of union leaders have been in the past but

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there are limits, after which he fails himself and the Labour Party.

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The Labour Party has always suffered from this thing. At the hands of the

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union. -- unions. I think that there is a point here? Not all unions are

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politically affiliated of course, but if you are, you are inevitably

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going to be quite politicised and you? Yes, but you can do it subtly.

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This guy committee just talks all the time about politics within the

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Labour Party. He is a trade unionist. You can be more subtle,

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businesses who back the Tory party do not do this upfront all the time.

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It is a lesson? And they accused of behaving in a less than transparent

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way? Yes. But I think that they could learn a little bit from the

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other sector. Let's stay with the Observer. Look at this story at the

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bottom. TUC and businesses urge Made to act now on the rights of migrants

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in Britain. -- Theresa May to act now. The rights of EU migrants

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should be guaranteed, they say, so that they can remain in the UK after

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Ore, because a lot of industries rely on those workers, don't they?

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-- in the UK after Brexit. It is some thing that Theresa May has

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addressed only last week. She said that she wanted answers to these

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questions. But, she's also said that she is basically not going to do

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anything until the talks are triggered in March. Three months is

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a long time and a lot of people will be affected by this. And over 1

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million British people are also living in Britain. 1.3 million, I

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think. I think that it is unfair and wrong to keep people in... How many

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months as it been already since Brexit? Some of these issues are, in

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a way, protected by law. Article eight of the European human rights

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Convention says that you have a right to a family life, and... These

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are often bypassed. But we would still be part of the convention

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unless they decide otherwise. You get the right to permanent

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residents. Isn't there some worry unnecessarily? A lot of it is about

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rhetoric as well. And signalling, a willingness to show that

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collaboration with EU states that had been particularly hostile in the

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aftermath of the Brexit vote. A lot of my Polish friends are very

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anxious and feel that any minute now... They feel it, emotionally

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they feel insecure at the moment. The Polish Prime Minister, when she

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came over, she was sounding rather different to a lot of EU leaders.

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Probably in recognition of the fact that there needs to be some

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reciprocity. It's an anxious time if you are an EU migrant. And the

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attitudes now developing in our country towards them. So... They do

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not feel that welcome or integrated, I think, quite a lot of them now.

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The Mail on Sunday, the great foreign aid freeze, a stunning

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victory says the newspaper, for their campaign.

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As Britain suspends new aid contracts after we expose fat cat

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dirty tricks. What are those dirty tricks? We both have mixed feelings

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about this. The big story here, Ian Birrell is a very good journalist,

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about how many executives, if you like, the CEOs of big charities, the

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bonuses that they earn, it is a fair enough story but I think that there

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is something else also happening here which makes me uncomfortable.

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It's kind of an attack on aid itself. But isn't it the right kind

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of age to the right kinds of places? Making sure money gets to where it

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is meant to be, rather than going in other directions? I would say so and

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it is such a big industry it is difficult to police as a whole.

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Transparency is so paramount. I think Ian has a good point here. The

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wording is very strong. He's talking about a dramatic halt to new

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contracts. It sells like a review going into something that has to be

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reviewed, but it would be interesting to see the outcome. We

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face cuts here on so many fronts. The best way, isn't it? To get

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people to support the idea of us giving foreign aid. Showing that it

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is properly having an effect? It is, but what is awful is that some of

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The Papers in the last few months have said, let's stop and look after

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our own. If you do not want refugees to come here, you better keep up

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with some good aid projects, actually. Otherwise, you have to

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work at the source or people will do what they've been doing and die and

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coming to Europe. You cannot have it both ways, really. Let's go back to

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the Sunday Times. Strictly winner, hip hip, Ore, our BBC Sports

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presenter... He is lifting up his partner in her spectacular yellow

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gown, it is not just a dress. She was so surprised when they won, her

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face was extraordinary! Neither of us have been committed to strictly

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watches this year... Maybe we should have been, it looked fantastic this

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year. I am so impressed at how quickly the contestants pick up

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those steps. Ore had never danced before. Some competitors have

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dancing their background. Sport is his thing, obviously. No, I think

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that the way that they do it... Ed Balls for God sake! He did really

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well. It would have thought? He certainly committed, didn't he? His

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gangland style, I watched it half a dozen times... It is so joyful! --

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here's Gangnam Style. And we've just spoken to the parents

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of JoAnn and Kevin Clifton... And those dresses! The wardrobe

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department at the BBC News Channel is not quite as well at providing

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the sequence! She says, dressed in black for this morning... --

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sequins. That's all for The Papers this morning.

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Thank you to both of you. A reminder that we look at my's front pages

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every evening at 10:40pm during the week. -- we look at tomorrow's front

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pages. A man is adrift

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after a storm at sea.

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