22/02/2017 The Papers


22/02/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me are the journalist Sean Dilley and The Guardian

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The Daily Mail has said that RAF drone strikes have taken out British

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jet -- jihadists. The Metro's main story

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is the killing of Helen Bailey by her fiancee Ian Stewart,

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and asks if he killed The Telegraph leads on the story

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of the British suicide bomber Ronald Fiddler,

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who blew himself up in a bombing near Mosul, and asks whether UK

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terror payouts went to the so-called The Guardian goes with the

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appointment of Cressida Dick, and Helen Bailey who was found dead

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alongside her dog. The I also features Cressida Dick's

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appointment and says she is already being criticised

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over her involvement And the Times has said that the data

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kingdom is wasting hundreds of millions subsidising power stations,

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burning pallets that do more harm to the environment than what they

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replace. The Express says a new jab

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could stop millions of people developing Type 2 diabetes and also

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speculates on whether And this is also the daily mirror.

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Also featuring that photograph of Cheryl. You do wonder... And a

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single mum has also won ?14 million. Good on her. One story dominating.

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That is terrorism. The question on the front page of the Daily

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Telegraph. Did UK terror pay outs go to Isil? Indeed. What happened at

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Iraq and thereafter. The money that was paid to this man is something

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that is going to be talked about for days. Newspapers are going to take a

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different tact, different angle. The Daily Telegraph looking at the money

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that was paid to him, and wondering if some of that was actually used to

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fund the activities of Isil. Other newspapers, my one included want to

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know why that was made. I think these are issues that are going to

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run in tandem. It is easy to say no. We know so much more about this

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particular character. But certainly are feeling, rulings that some of

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those from Guantanamo Bay were innocent. Shakily radicalised, lost

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their way. This is an example, I am afraid, and I cannot help being

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controversial and no doubt we're going to get some abuse on Twitter

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later but ultimately if somebody is not charged over criminal offence

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they cannot be convicted. Yes, National Security Agency and I think

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some measures could be taken that may or may not be ones that we would

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agree with day to day but ultimately if somebody has been badly treated

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on a circumstance that is what the courts rule. It is like seeing the

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Hugh and I wood badly interfaced appearance fees and go and do some

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illegal activity. It is nonsense. The idea of monitoring how he was

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going to spend the money, that is a secondary point. Why give him so

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much money in the first place. What were they trying to hide? I think

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people are good to look at why that payment was made. He was deemed to

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be innocent. Actually deemed to be for security. He was monitored.

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Nobody believed. It was a blemish. What it said was that they did not

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want to go to court, and have the intelligence operation and the

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mechanics of the intelligence operation discussed in open court. I

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smell a rat. The intelligence operations have been discussed in

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court cases, you have got ways of doing that with Camara hearings.

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This would not be the first time. The fact it was felt that in this

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case that could not be done, and instead they had to give him so much

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money, I think that tells you that they did not want to discuss what

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was done. Allegations about extraordinary renditions. It is a

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different point to what he did with the money. They should have watched

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him more closely. Legitimate argument. But the idea about what he

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was doing with his money, moot point. What are you doing with

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yours? Tony Blair's government lobbied for the release of

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Guantanamo Bay despite never regarding him as innocent. Something

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that Jack Straw has admitted. Again, why have they given him

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compensation? The argument was about the rule of law. Suspicions. Nothing

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proven about him. The detention at Guantanamo should not have happened.

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And they made that argument on the basis of the process. It is easy for

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us to see. We know what he has done after blowing himself up. Perhaps he

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was a terrorist all along. But he was living in Manchester for ten

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years. Tony Blair did not pay compensation. He has actually said

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that, but he has been out of power for ten years. The politics of years

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gone past, we have heard nothing and suddenly it is interesting that

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every single time something being discussed, we get more of Tony

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Blair. Connie suspicious but why is that? We will wait and see. Time

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will tell. The Metro. This is going to upset many commuters. It is an

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awful story. Did he kill his first wife? Referring to Ian Stewart.

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Killing Helen Bailey. The back story is that she was her first husband

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after a freak accident, she became lonely and went on to social media,

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talking to various people and he was one of them. Striking up a

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relationship. Seemed to be terribly happy with him and suddenly appears

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that all of the time he was planning to get rid of her and get her money.

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She killed her. Has it has just got so many elements that people are

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going to be interested in. Her celebrity, but also the sense of

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Midsummer models. She was planning the wedding, he was planning the

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murder. Facebook brought them together. So many interesting

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strands. But on the human level it is just a terribly sad story. And

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also looking into the death of his first wife. Going to re-examine

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that. Very sad. We can move to the Guardian. A lot of newspapers

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covering Cressida Dick, becoming the first woman to run the Metropolitan

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Police. I know that you were on Twitter. A lot of people upset that

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we keep mentioning that she is a woman. As the Guardian points out,

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she is a constable. Why is that such a big deal? If you are treating

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this, stop before you tweet. It is the first thing that a woman has

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been in charge of the Metropolitan Police. In the same way that Hillary

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Clinton would have been the first female president of the United

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States. Get over it. It is. It is not unique there. Woman are not very

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represented at the top as well as other groups. It is historic. People

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have pointed out that President Obama was the first black man, to be

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president of the united states. I wonder if people who tweet things

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like why are you mentioning if she is a woman, they have an issue that

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they are not wanting to admit to. It is clearly about equality. Not

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making such a big deal of this. It is a big deal. If you think about

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the organisation, policing has been a very male dominated, macho thing.

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The Metropolitan Police have had issues in the past, about treating

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female officers. And if they can get through the ranks, get a fair deal.

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So to have a woman in charge of that organisation is a significant

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advance. And when we have the stories it is important to stop,

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this is a big thing. Celebrate. Cressida Dick, nobody can deny the

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fact she has had an illustrious career. She rose through the ranks.

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I think she was Chief Superintendent at the time of the Jean Charles

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shooting. I am not sure. It could have been a promotion afterwards.

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But she was known as one of the gold commanders and was widely criticised

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for saying stop him. That was controversial because you have got

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so many interpretations of that. Very a marmite figure. Much some

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people loved her when she was in charge of Operation Trident, gun

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crime. By the same token, that expression, the rate man for the job

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can no longer apply. But looking to the future, a lot of hope that she

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can reform the Metropolitan Police, and tackle terrorism. Make not just

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London but the United Kingdom safer, and tackle racism. Absolutely.

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Nobody can look at the appointment and say it has been gun crime. --

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tokenism. She has done very significant things at Scotland Yard.

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Operation Trident, gun crime. Also counterterrorism units. She does

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have a big job because obviously the budget is going to be an important

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thing straightaway. The government is keen to keep the pot string

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state. But the Metropolitan Police have so many responsibilities, she

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has got to have the political nous to deal with that, while having

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credibility to keep the officers on her side. She is also continued ten

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a day to do a job. And we're not talking about cigarettes. The Times.

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A bigger bowl. Fruit and vegetables. How much do you eat? On none. Some,

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three. Sundays, but I am not going to have ten bananas. I would be in

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even worse shape. Ten grapes? That would be easy. Ten melons! Ten

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portions, scientists have said. Anybody wanting maximum protection

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against heart disease, cancer and early death should eat 800 grams.

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Double the government advice. It is difficult because they change the

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advice every so often. But we do need to think about what we eat. You

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think about the obesity crisis that we have. You eat several times a

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day, and if you exchange something fattening, is that a problem? They

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have sinned do not eat things like bottle. They change things.

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Recently, but is apparently fine. Then it is sugar. You have been

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reading too many of the stories. And the Daily Telegraph. Marmalade could

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be toast. Worried that we're not exposing our children to an offer

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that. National scandal. It said that young people are rejecting

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marmalade. No! Chocolate spread. Peanut butter. One percent aged

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under 28. Six out of ten, aged over 65. They have just as people and a

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sorry. If you have a really racy story on page number three, it was

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known as the marmalade dropper! Many thanks for taking us through that.

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We're going to do that again, the second round. Even more Twitter

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conversations. We will see you in a bit. That is it. We are going to be

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back later. You can see the front pages online, on the BBC News

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website. Seven days a week on the website. Thank you. We'll see you

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again in one

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