29/05/2017 The Papers


29/05/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be

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With me are the journalist and broadcaster Rachel Shabi

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and Martin Bentham, who's the Home Affairs Editor for the

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Are we going to talk to the straightaway or have a look at some

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of the papers? We will do just that. Let's have a look at some of the

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papers. The Mirror leads with

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the Manchester Arena bomber, Salman Abedi, who was seen carrying

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a suitcase days before the attack. The Guardian's top story

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is Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn taking part in live

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TV interviews tonight. The Telegraph says the Labour Leader

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refused to say in the interview if he would ever authorise

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a drone strike to kill The Times focuses on Theresa May

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trying to woo working-class Labour and Ukip voters to switch

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to the Conservatives over Brexit. An opinion poll shows the Tories

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have a 6-point lead over Labour. The Metro leads on the female

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zookeeper killed by a tiger at It also has the death of former

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Blue Presenter John Noakes. One of the stories on the FT

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is Russian President Vladimir Putin and French President Emmanuel Macron

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holding talks near Paris. And eating fish just

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once or twice a week could protect against dementia -

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that's according to research seen Well, let us begin. Let's go to this

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TB, keep trying to avoid the word debate but it's in the headlines.

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You start off with the Guardian talking about... This is Theresa

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May, Jeremy Corbyn first and then Theresa May. The interviews were

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separate and then taking questions from the audience. What do you think

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of it? I thought it was a no score draw. Jeremy Corbyn performed

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perhaps better than some people might have thought he would. I think

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he did quite well from that point of view, Theresa May did -- had some

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difficult questions about the U-turn and leading the Brexit negotiations.

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She came through it quite well and finished quite strongly. It

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ultimately probably will not affect the election a great deal which was

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a bit of a no score draw. The Guardian story is an early version.

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Jeremy Corbyn was the first person to appear. They have started with an

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account of his performance. They will catch up by updating with what

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Theresa May was saying and being questioned on. Complete a reporting

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job, which is unusual in an election campaign. Rachel, the point about

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Jeremy Corbyn, he faced quite a tough time because he was asked, did

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you support the ERA? Paxman seemed to dig into his history a great

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deal. -- the IRA. They both faced tough questioning. Corbyn about the

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thing people have been trying to get to stick to him for the last month

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has not worked about the IRA. I disagree. I think this was probably

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a win for Corbyn in the sense that Theresa May, let's remember we're

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not having debates because she didn't want them. She didn't want to

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be exposed to a live debate with Jeremy Corbyn. The more we see of

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her the more we can understand why. She doesn't do well in this format

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and she doesn't do well for the public. With Jeremy Corbyn, it is

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the opposite. He thrives in this environment. He is very natural and

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engaged when he has a chance to be with the public. The more exposure

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she has, the worse she will do and the more it will appear like her

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leadership is premised on a very thin veneer. With Corbyn, the

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opposite is true for stop the more people see the more they like him.

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Some people. There are a lot of voters. A lot of people are not

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convinced by Corbyn. That is a definite fact. He is well behind in

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the leadership. Here's behind compared with where he was before.

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It is under liable and completely unimaginable he is doing as well as

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he is doing. I certainly would do. He has improved and performed quite

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well tonight. There were some areas he was wobbly on. He ultimately came

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through well. I do think she did well. Didn't Paxman get a point over

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the Prime Minister when he said to her, listen, the way you had to

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backtrack, let's call it a U-turn over social care and things like

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that, particularly care of the very elderly. It showed in negotiations

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over Brexit, people in Europe will say, you have to stick to your guns

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and she will run away. That is truth is that she had difficult issues and

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that quote from Jeremy Paxman about a blowhard who will roll over at the

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first sign of battle, whatsoever. That was difficult for her to deal

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with. On the other hand, when she said, are you prepared to walk away?

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She gave a good answer to that. It makes no sense. Walking away from a

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no deal is really strong. You could say walking away with no deal is not

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a strong position. Let's have a look at the times. The front page of the

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times. Mae woos working class with a tough line on Brexit was that surely

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it is a tough line to say, if we do not like it, we will go. Is it tough

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to say, we will take whatever chaos that will follow a no deal. That is

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not tough. It makes you look low. Like you have no ground to stand on.

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The piece in the Times will be looking at what Theresa May is

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trying to do this week, which is re-energise her floundering campaign

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by appealing to the working class vote. A lot of the operational

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premise of this campaign has been that the Conservatives will

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basically swallow up Ukip voters now that they have moved so far to the

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right there is no need for Ukip. This is very much of them continuing

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in that same vein. The question really is, if the Labour Party voted

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for Brexit and is going for Brexit, then, it is not a given that the

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Ukip photo would automatically switch Conservative. Quite a few

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Ukip voters were traditional Labour voters. That has always been the

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case. It is true from personal experience, being on the campaign

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Trail, it has not been as much about Brexit as an issue in the election

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on the doorstep. Theresa May, despite the setback she has had but

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she wants to try to return to the agenda before, trying to present

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herself as the more compelling leader. She has had a bad week or

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so. The Manchester attack and the big wobble over social care which

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has undermined her position. She wants to get back to some of the

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issues she think she is stronger on and score points on. She still think

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she will be more effective over the area of immigration and so on with

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the Brexit negotiations. Did the issue of security, came back in some

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ways to Manchester, did security figure in it? Did once say, I am

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really tough on this or not. Security came up quite a bit from

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the audience in both the sets of questions. I think the policing

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issue came up quite a bit, that Theresa May had cut the police force

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by 20,000, especially when the police force had warned it would put

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us in danger if there were a security attack. I do not think it

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was the surprising issue of the debate. Don't say debate. Let's go

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back to the business of Manchester. Martin, perhaps you would start us

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on this one. It will be in a lot of the papers. It is a picture of some

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and a birdie with a blue case and the cops hunting for it. -- Salman

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Abedi. This is the latest bit of CCTV footage that has been released

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of his movements. You have had some in a supermarket. What is happening

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is the police and MI5 are trying to piece together exactly where he was

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at all points in the four days since he returned from Libya and also to

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trace this suitcase, which they are saying they do not believe has

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anything explosive or dangerous in it but at the same time I have

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informational something in it which is useful to them as part of their

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investigation. Basically they want to piece together every single

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detail of what happened in the period he was in the country. We see

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so many images and they come up. They said the public should not

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approach because you never know what the suitcase might contain. A

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difficult situation altogether. Let's move on. Another sad story

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here. The match around this business about the woman's zookeeper. We are

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beginning to get a few more details. A couple of the newspapers, we are

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talking about the Metro Festival. Basically, what we know about this,

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I think the woman has been named. We know a little bit about it but not a

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lot. Not a lot, except it sounds horrendous and gruesome. Zoo was

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evacuated after bloodcurdling screams were heard. This was a young

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woman zookeeper being apparently attacked and killed by a tiger. This

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was over the bank holiday. Obviously, it would have been very

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busy, I would imagine, and was very quickly evacuated. A horrible

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business altogether. As you say, lots of families around and so on.

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But a freak accident. These things hardly ever happen. That is the only

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consolation. We don't know how it did happen. It was not that the

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animal escaped. Presumably something went wrong in the procedure for

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keeping the animal London zookeeper apart, while the zookeeper was doing

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whatever she was trying to do at the time. Some suggestion that the

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zookeeper who died when to try to help somebody else. Who knows? A

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ghastly business altogether. It will be in a lot newspapers. Let's go

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back to the Times and British Airways with the most appalling

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weekend. Another line in the Times. BA accused of profiting from trapped

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passengers. What have they done wrong now? There are allegations

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that people are having to bring the premium rate hotline to register

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their compensation claims and also that people are not being reimbursed

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for having to take upgrades to find a way of getting out and getting

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away on holidays or business trips, or whatever it is they were going

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on. It just compounds what has been an absolutely disastrous few days

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for British Airways. I feel sorry for them. I quite like British

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Airways. They have been shooting themselves in the foot left right

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and centre. All these people, it is not just the fact you have had your

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flight is delayed. You can get refunds and so on. That does not

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help you if you have lost days of your holiday or you have missed the

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whole start of it. And almost certainly your luggage has gone

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somewhere else. Behind all this, there is a suggestion from the trade

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unions involved that what British Airways did was to get rid of

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skilled IT people, British Airways employees, and subcontract the work

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to India, and that is at the root of the problems. One wonders if that

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can be true but there has been a massive IT failure. It is

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interesting in this piece from the Times, the BA chief Executive, when

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he finally did appear... It is not a good look at it takes that long. He

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said something about the surge that cut out their system being so strong

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it actually cut out their back-up system as well. That seems really

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odd. It seems like a really strange setup to have and suggest some kind

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of... It is very bad business management that has a system which

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can be blown out by one power surge and the back-up as well. Clearly you

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need their resilience from a corporate point of view in the

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system so that if the main one goes down, the back-up will work,

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especially on something like the airline. The allegation is they are

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not the first people to suffer from this. D in the US had problems a few

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months ago. Quite similar system failure. The trouble with BA, when

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they are going out of Heathrow in particular where it is chock-a-block

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with planes and it is absolutely at capacity all the time anyway,

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anything that goes wrong has a massive knock on effect. It takes

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days for it to unravel, to clear the backlog. I think it is horrendous. A

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lot of people will think twice before they book with BN again -- BA

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again. On the front page of the Daily Mail. Some familiar faces. The

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Duke and Duchess of Cambridge and their two children, romping in their

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garden, I think it is. Romping in their garden in Norfolk. A really

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nice image. A nice family snap. Very relaxed and casual. I'm taken by the

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dog in motion in the middle of this shot. They have captured him

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mid-round in a very engaging manner, I think. There is a point to the

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story. I wish Diana had met my family. One must remind themselves

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it is 20 years since the Princess of Wales died. I thought it was about

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the grass not being cut. He needs to get the lawn mower house. It is a

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lovely photograph. If you were running the Royal properties, you

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would be Astroturf in them, wouldn't you? Sign up I would. As long as you

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don't suffer from hay fever, it has to be said.

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Don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online

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It's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it

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