02/06/2017 The Papers


02/06/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Kevin Schofield, editor of PoliticsHome,

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and Camilla Tominey, deputy political editor

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Welcome to you both, lots to talk about, as usual! We will start with

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the front pages. The Mirror leads with

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the Conservative candidate for South Thanet, Craig

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Mackinlay, being charged The Tories have said

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the allegations are unfounded. The election is also

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the main story on the Express, with SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon

:00:35.:00:37.

saying she'd be willing to enter coalition talks with Labour

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if the result is inconclusive. The Mail cites research

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which suggests statins can dramatically cut the risk

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of dying from breast cancer. Theresa May has vowed

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to consult businesses at every step

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of the Brexit negotiations, in an interview with

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the Financial Times. The i leads with the

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Conservative candidate for South Thanet, Craig Mackinlay,

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being charged with allegedly overspending in

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the 2015 general election campaign. The Telegraph shows a picture

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of the Prime Minister And the Guardian says Labour

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has accused the Tories of using fake-news ads

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to attack Jeremy Corbyn. All the stories, in some form or

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another, are connected to the election of people standing in it. A

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lot of interesting stuff for you both this week, as political

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correspondence, the Daily Telegraph is where we will start, Theresa May

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on Question Time this evening, and of course Jeremy Corbyn appeared

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later, 445 minutes, not facing each other but tough questions at times

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from the audience. Brilliant for the Daily Telegraph to get this in their

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first addition, and I thought it was a really interesting format, much

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more valuable than the debate on Wednesday, because it was them

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facing questions, and the public have played a blinder in this

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election, as far as I am concerned, on TV and radio, it has always been

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a member of the public - as well as good jurors -- good journalism,

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don't get me wrong - that have given a good account of themselves. I was

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in a taxi for some of Jeremy Corbyn's appearance, but Theresa May

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appeared a bit more human and early in the week, addressing questions,

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we will have to see what the papers make of it tomorrow. Obviously,

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Twitter has its own bias in one direction or another, but really

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interesting, a really good format for both of them to face some quite

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tough grilling. In particular, for Theresa May, it seemed to be this

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issue of, why should we trust you? For Jeremy Corbyn, will you or would

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to ever press the nuclear button if it came to it? I think more pressure

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on the Prime Minister tonight, she has not had a great campaign, to put

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it mildly, whereas Jeremy Corbyn has. She had to pull it out the bag

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a little bit tonight, given that polls have narrowed, if they are to

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be believed, obviously, and I think she gave a reasonably decent account

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of herself, her best performance, I think, of the campaign, although

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that is not saying awful much, I guess. But how have things changed

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in the course of it! It is remarkable, the received wisdom now,

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before the election was called in Westminster, was, if Jeremy Corbyn

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is leader of the Labour Party come the next election, he would crumble,

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you know, the Tories would hammer him about the IRA, his past dealings

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with how mass, what have you. And the opposite has been the case, he

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has really thrived, I think in the intense battle of the election

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campaign, and I think that is a lot to do with the fact that the polls

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have narrowed in the way they have. Yes, to burying extents, it has to

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be said. Let's look at the Telegraph, Tory tax pledge to high

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earners, the Labour manifesto includes this idea of anyone earning

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above ?80,000 would pay more tax. above ?80,000 would pay more tax.

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This is seen as a key part of their plan, the Conservatives saying they

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will not hammer higher earners, putting clear blue water between

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them and labour, who say they will increase taxes on those earning over

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?80,000 a year. It is quite significant, because the Prime

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Minister has announced that the triple lock, which was in the

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manifesto in 2015, that has been ditched, but this is the first time

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that they have confirmed that income tax will not go up for higher

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earners. But I guess the devil will be in the detail, we do not know

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what the figure would be. Labour put that figure at ?80,000, we do not

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know how high is high for the Conservatives. It was not long ago

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that the alarm was saying, look, I want to have room to manoeuvre if I

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needed, to change the tax situation. -- that Philip Hammond was saying.

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Yes, particularly with this notion of this, Croke likes of it, and the

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idea that the manifesto would have more brushstrokes than being locked

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in. Philip Hammond has not been that

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visible, has he? He has been the opposite of visible! I think Labour

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will say, if you are not going to raise taxes on the higher levels,

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will it be on the middle income earners? That could be the Labour

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attack. May reaches out to business as Brexit tensions escalate, in the

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FT, this was supposed to be the Brexit election, I wonder if there

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will be more focus on this week, the suggestion that they confer with

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business to find out what is required after we leave the EU. She

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raises the possibility of a three-year transitional phase, which

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is the first time she has gone that far, looking at 2019 when we leave,

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it could be another two or three years before we finally removed

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completely from the European Union. This was supposed to be the Brexit

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general election, that is how it was framed by the Prime Minister when

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she announced the election, and the narrative is kind of run away from

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the Conservatives, really, and in the same way that Michael Fallon

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talking about taxes is another attempt to bring it back to where

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they want the debate to be, because they want it to be about who you

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want to go into the Brexit talks, do you wanted to be the Prime Minister

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or Jeremy Corbyn? I think the Tories are confident, if that is the debate

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for the rest of the campaign, then they will come out on top.

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Businesses say they want stability and predictability, and going into

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those negotiations, nobody can put them 100% stability. Having said

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that, I think the market hasn't jitters at some of these polls

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narrowing and the prospect of Prime Minister Jeremy Corbyn in charge of

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the economy. Equally, sorry to be obsessed with the old Bill Hamid

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element of the stories, but buried at the bottom, this notion that Mrs

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May has not clearly endorsed Philip Hammond into the future at the

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Treasury. Ask if she can guarantee that he will remain Chancellor, she

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says, once again, I think Philip Hammond is doing a very good job as

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Chancellor, which is what you said in a press conference. And he has

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not been seen since! Well, they are all volunteers! Will tread carefully

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with the Daily Mirror, this is an active case, the Tory MP charged

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over an election expenses, Craig Mackinlay standing in South Thanet.

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Without talking about the details of this, because it is active, how much

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of a problem could this be, or is it just a distraction for the

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Conservatives? Probably just a distraction, and to be fair, the

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contempt laws will protect the Conservatives, because there cannot

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be much discussion about it until proceedings have been concluded.

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Equally, I think the timing is pretty appalling, they have been

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wanting this to be the only headline about it for now, to cast it aside

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and concentrate on other matters. It has to be said, innocent until

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proven guilty, as Mrs May said, they will mount a robust defence, but not

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the best timing, and he remains as the candidate in South Thanet,

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famously contested by Nigel Farage last time around, so I think it will

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be very interesting to be at that count, arguably! I saw one or two

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people on Twitter comparing it to James Comey, the FBI director

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getting involved in the American election, I don't think it is quite

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at that level, but you know, it is something that the Tories could have

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done without. Let's look at the Daily Express, Nicola Sturgeon, I

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will help Corbyn, a disaster, say the Tories. She has said this

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before, she has offered a the SNP up for coalition. The so-called

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coalition of chaos that the Tories like 2.2, that notion that they

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could thwart Theresa May's plans in a minority government. -- like to

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point too. I think this is going to be an anathema to any Brexiteers who

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think that any coalition of this think that any coalition of this

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type will thwart not only Brexit but bring about a second Scottish

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independence referendum. Corbyn said he was relaxed about that idea, so

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the Conservatives will go on the attack and say this is basically

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spelling the end of the Union and the end of our exit from the EU.

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Jeremy Corbyn said no way, would Nicola Sturgeon really want

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coalition with Labour? To be fair, she has said that she is not talking

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about coalition, not SNP MPs being in a Labour coalition cabinet or

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anything like that, but if we are in a hung parliament situation, there

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would need to be deals done by the governing party in order to get its

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programme through, and in many respects what she's saying makes

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perfect sense, they would need to be horse trading, a bit of give and

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take. But Manna from heaven as far as the Conservatives are concerned,

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this play is really badly on the this play is really badly on the

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doorsteps down here, I mean, in 2015, that famous poster of Ed

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Miliband sticking out of Alex Salmond's top pocket killed Ed

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Miliband as far as his chances, people down here did not like the

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idea of the SNP tail wagging the Labour dog, you know, and I would

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well. Great time to be a political well. Great time to be a political

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journalist, but exhausting! Thank you for staying up late!

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Don't forget, you can see the front pages

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of the papers online on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers,

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and if you miss the programme any evening,

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you can watch it later on BBC iPlayer.

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