18/06/2017 The Papers


18/06/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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My guest is wholly McNish, one of most popular performance poet. We

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will be talking about her new collection, in which she revisits

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her adolescence. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the the papers will be With me are Reuters Business

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correspondent Tom Bergin and Kate Devlin, Political

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Correspondent at The Herald. Tomorrow's front pages,

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starting with The Times. The front page of the Times

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says that relief efforts at Grenfell Tower have descended

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into chaos, with reports of survivors being rehoused

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hundreds of miles away. The Daily Telegraph focuses

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on the Conservative party leadership, reporting that

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David Davis is emerging as a unity candidate to become interim party

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leader if Mrs May steps down. The Financial Times concentrates

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on the Brexit talks due to start tomorrow, reporting

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that the Chancellor is urging The Guardian reports that European

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leaders fear the fragility of Theresa May's government makes it

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more likely Britain could crash out The Independent also looks

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at Brexit, and a report which suggests that plans to cut

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immigration could have a double But the Daily Express

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says confidence is high And the Sun has more on the news

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that the TV presenter Ant McPartlin checks into rehab for

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alcohol and drug problem. with the Metro, which has a picture

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on the front page showing the inside of one of the flats at Grenfell

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Tower following a flyer, -- following the fire, similar to the

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footage that police have released. It says it will extend of the blaze

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damages revealed and talks about the money the survivors will get. And

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also MPs condemning the treatment of those people who lived here as

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Victorian. Kate, it is hard to think that just a few days ago this was

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someone's home. Yes, and I'm not surprised the Metro has put this as

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a huge picture on their front page. It really shows the absolute

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devastation. That apartment, someone was living in it, had belongings.

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You can see things that were burned in a fire, and it really...

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Obviously we saw very horrible pictures from the outside a few days

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ago. I think this brings home again just how terrible it must have been

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to be inside that tower. It is David Lambie, the Labour MP, who is quoted

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here. He had a friend in this blog. He says while we behaving like this,

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this is Victorian England. We don't have local government able to

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coordinate. It did seem that the British Red Cross had come in to

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fill the gap. Theresa May has said that the response was not good

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enough, there is an article in the Financial Times today talking about

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how the effort is being coordinated by executives from other local

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authorities, effectively the Kensington and Chelsea local

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authority has been sidelined in its own borough. So I seem to be serious

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questions being raised about the effectiveness of that effort, and we

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have of course this mention of people receiving ?10 to help them

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tide them over. This is Kensington and Chelsea, that gets you caught

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the underclass and if you're lucky. -- that gets you a copy and paste

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review are lucky. I have seen fatal fires before, but never seen

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anything like this. The leader of the council says that they are

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involved, they are leading this effort, and he rejects the criticism

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they have received. Let's look at the Telegraph. Let in turn are

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victims of season ending arms, says Jeremy Corbyn. If you read, it says

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Jeremy Corbyn appeared to suggest that families could live in empty

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properties. This is a subject he referred to during the week, it was

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about empty homes. This is a long-running issue. We have a glut

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on the market of luxury apartments in London. The prices are weakening.

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Many of them lie empty for long periods of time, if you go by these

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buildings much of the year at night time you don't see any lights on.

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This is what economists were considered to be a market

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inefficiency. Jeremy Corbyn, not usually a fan of many economists,

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but he agrees on this point. He thinks they should not be the case,

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we should bring these into use. The question is how to do that. He does

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mention the term occupy here, I think anybody who is concerned about

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property rights would not like to see that word. But he also use a

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word that anyone concerned with public finances may be worried about

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a doctorate content compulsory purchase. I'm not sure many people

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would consider buying multi-million dollar apartments, single bedroom

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apartments, those kind of sums would release of any problems. Even with a

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surplus that we understand that Kensington and Chelsea are running.

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But it is possible for properties to be commandeered, sequestered for a

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short period, isn't it? Yes, and when Vince Cable was Business

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Secretary he was banging on about this problem a good couple of years

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ago, there are actually an awful lot, a growing number, of London

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apartments being bought unbelievably to remain empty. They are just

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investments. There is no real financial incentive. These people

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are so rich that they effectively can't even be bothered to get

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renters in there, so they just sit empty. As Thomas suggesting, this is

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cheek by jowl with, in a borough that has high inequality as well.

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Five days in the job and I was called to Grenfell Tower of is a

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young firefighter, 26, and emits catty, and less than a week as part

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of the Fire Service and yet she gets sense to this extraordinary fire,

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which sees and firefighters said they had no missing the likes of

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before. Yes, and she says it is her first proper job in which she saw

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actual flames. Hats off to all the firefighters who did such a great

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job. And she saved lives. Yes, that is certainly one area that Theresa

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May was quick to point out, that the emergency services getting a lot of

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plaudits. We will come back to the Telegraph. The Guardian, PM orders

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cash payment for Grenfell Tower move is. We know it is around ?5,500.

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They'll get some in cash and some into bank accounts. People's bank

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card cards will have gone up in flames. When you lose nothing, you

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need to buy the most basic things, so having a cash infusion like that

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just helps you to get by. It is not compensation, by any means. The

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other thing is this is Downing Street still scrambling to catch up

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to try to get on the front foot. It has faced an off a lot of criticism

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about how it has been handled. Theresa May herself was common for a

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lot of personal criticism about how she has handled this. It still seems

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as if they are not quite on the front foot. Still with the Guardian,

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fragile Tories warned over brittle Brexit. We have soft and hard, and

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now a brutal Draxler. The argument is that they have got such a slim

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grasp on power, not even a majority, some people saying they don't even

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have a mandate to go into the negotiations. The problem from the

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point of view of Brussels and European partners is that there is a

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slim grasp on reality. Basically because Britain may have a week

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government, when people come to Brussels to negotiate, if anything

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is agreed the concern on the part of Brussels is that this will not be

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backed up by government, because government will not be in a position

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to follow through on anything. Again the perception of Brussels is that

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the UK does not know what it wants. It has so many contradictory aims,

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it wants to participate in regulated market without following the rules,

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she was just something that is hard to get your head around. From

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Brussels' perspective, they don't know how they can make the UK happy

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with the many things it seeks to have. But they don't care about

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making us happy, do they? At the end of the day the European Union wants

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to keep itself together. This is one thing that Brussels thinks that the

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UK does not get, because the idea that it is in Brussels' interest to

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give the UK special deal, that is not something that European partners

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would agree with. They say the most important thing is to keep the

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European Union together, and a way that you do that is by not giving

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any party special deal because then everyone will ask for it. But their

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trade with us will concentrate some minds. Any trade deal with us would

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not be unique, they have two negotiate them at all countries

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outside the EU. Indeed, and it is important to understand that there

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are 27 other nations here. Tom is right, they agree on an awful lot of

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stuff but there will be times when they have to sell it to their

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electorate that they're giving us a very bad deal, but at the same time

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one of those countries that is remaining in the European Union is

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the Republic of Ireland, does have a land border with us, it has a lot of

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trade with us, and it has to at least look as if it is getting an OK

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deal out of this. And the DUP, of course, will have a say in the kind

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of Brexit. They don't want a hard Brexit because of that land border.

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They are Eurosceptic party and have been for decades. The interesting

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thing is how close the DUP are to their voters, and that is because

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the reporters are very hardline Eurosceptics. -- in their voters are

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hardline. That is one reason is the top very tough on this. It is a huge

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problem, the border. Tom, the Daily Express is more confident. They have

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been optimistic about Brexit throughout the period and see we

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want a deal that makes both sides strong. I go back to this point,

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Europe is clear what makes Europe strong, it is having a system that

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works together on common rules. And those common rules are at the basis

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of the European Union. If you start to have on common rules, a different

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set of rules for each party, then it all falls apart. I had a

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conversation with the head of the Swedish is in this lobby group and

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she said to me, it is very appealing, the idea of giving

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Britain a special deal where it can have unfettered access without

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membership, but she said the problem is, as soon as we give this

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accommodation to Britain, someone else looks for a different kind of

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accommodation, and suddenly we don't actually have a single market, we

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have many different markets. That is the difficulty and something that

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seems to be in fields to be grasped by many of our negotiators. But the

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back to the Daily Telegraph. The plight of the Conservative Party and

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the threat of another General Election is never further away.

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David Davis tipped to be interim Tory leader as the Cabinet turns on

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Theresa May. Interim, the war that nobody would want to read. I think

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you're the perfect person to keep the seat warm for me. I thought this

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was interesting, but then you look at it and it has lots of ifs and

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maybes. The thing is we know that the position of Theresa May is

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weakened, and the hour after we started to see the exit polls

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everybody was talking about her future being limited. It's

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inevitable this will come up. David Davies is popular. Six months or

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year ago he was talking about returning to the backbenches. Maybe

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that is why Boris likes the idea of him as an interim seat warmer. You

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said it! But whether this is to flush out David Davies... The source

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of the story is interesting. It was tipped by allies of Boris Johnson,

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who journalists would like to describe us on manoeuvres. But he

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has the line that. If anybody would want to be interim leader, it is a

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poisoned chalice, it will be incredibly difficult for the next

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two years. The argument about just sitting about until the Brexit deal

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is done and dusted is attractive, and that's why Theresa May is still

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where she is today. They'll tolerate it for as long as it suits them, I

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suppose. Let's go to the Financial Times. Parliamentary wing, different

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things are cross the Channel. Decisive poll victory of Emmanuel

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Macron paves the way for reform. He has got the parliamentary majority

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easily that he needs, even though a lot of people who stood for his

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party have never held office before. And his party barely existed a year

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ago. This is one of the most astonishing stories in politics.

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There were some who suggested even when he won the top job last month

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that he would be unable to pull this off. Like you say, getting a lot of

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people who have never been in office before into jobs is quite difficult.

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But he has done it. He has, and now he has to use that majority and

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follow through with the reforms he has promised. Absolutely. Theresa

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May, we saw the honeymoon period, she was strong and stable for a

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period of time, the question is whether Macron can follow through.

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He has the majority to do that. Some of the things he wants to do our

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controversial in France. Already we have the far left candidate

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threatening protests if he tries to change the Labour code. One of the

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main things that Macron wants to do is make the economy more flexible,

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especially around hiring and firing and issues around redundancy

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payments, to make the labour market work better so that this high

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unemployment rate that sticks at around ten percentage fans can come

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down to around the 5% we have in the UK. It'll be tough to do, but he has

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the majority that on paper at least should make it possible.

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Thank you Tom and Kate, you'll both be back at 11:30pm

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for another look at the stories making the news tomorrow.

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