30/06/2017 The Papers


30/06/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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We are usually late but tonight we are six minutes early. Sorry about

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that. Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the the papers will be With me are David Wooding,

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political editor of the Sun on Sunday, and Katie Martin

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from the Financial Times. Tomorrow's front pages,

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starting with... We start with the Daily Mail,

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which looks at the rising staff costs at the foreign aid department

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which have gone up sharply over The I features a picture

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of a still smouldering Grenfell Tower with the warning

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that the insulation used in tower blocks may be as flammable

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as the cladding. The Express leads with the claim

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that Brussels still wants to exert control over the UK once

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the country has left the EU, through European Court

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of Justice rules. The Daily Mirror follows up on it's

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campaign yesterday to change The Telegraph is leading

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with the concerns expressed by senior city figures

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that the government is focussing too much on trade talks and is failing

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to prioritise the financial services industry, one of the

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largest contributors The Guardian leads on the council

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head who has stepped down. The Sun has a large picture

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of tennis world number one Andy Murray urging readers to rub

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the picture and assist him in recovering from a hip injury,

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ahead of the Wimbledon tournament He has got a bad hip. He did not

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look good. We can start with the price. -- we can start with The i.

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The threat in high-rises is being ignored by the government. It is not

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just the cladding, it is what is inside the cladding, the insulation.

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From what I understand every single tower block's cladding that has been

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tested has failed. There is clearly a serious problem on our hands here.

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Every single one is taking it to quite some level. There is a failure

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somewhere in the building industry but also a problem within the

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Council. Many papers are running on the fact that the head of Kensington

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Council has quit and so has his deputy. There is a lot of criticism

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about how the council dealt with the fire and housing the residents whose

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lives have been disrupted. We are spoken to residents tonight who are

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concerned that this is a sop. They have stepped down from the

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leadership positions but they have not left those councillors, there

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will not be an election triggered to replace them. Where does this leave

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the leadership? The state of the Cabinet? They may have had something

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to do with it. This brings the total number of people who have gone to

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four. The leader and the deputy leader also the chief executive of

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the council and the head of the organisation that ran the tower

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block. The very least they can do is to go. They need to fall on their

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swords but why has it taken them so long, it has been two weeks. From

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what Nick Pagett-Brown was saying, once last night's meeting became

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another political story, the fact he was intending for it to be a private

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meeting and journalists got a court order to be allowed to attend to

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make it a public meeting, he felt suddenly there was another issue

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that was taking over rather than the problems itself that needed to be

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resolved. If it had not been this meeting that had broken the camel's

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back it would've been something else soon. The meeting went very badly. A

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number of John Ellis had permission to be in the room. You can find the

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footage online. There were questions about whether journalists were there

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and it was very scrappy and promptly called to an end. The council did

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not look in control. Not only have we had this massive tragedy but the

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handling offer it afterwards by the government and the local council,

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the way the whole thing has been handled in the aftermath has been a

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shambles and it has put more agony on the per families. Theresa May is

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under pressure. The Mayor of London says that should be independent

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counsel was brought in to run the council and Jeremy Corbyn

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questioning the scope of the inquiry. There have been moments

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when people have gone over the top. John MacDonald the Shadow Chancellor

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called a murderer, which is unwise. There is a bit of political

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posturing on this. People died because of problems with planning,

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sifting rules, fitting in contracts, whatever it was. A lot has gone

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wrong. We need to look after these families and get them rehoused and

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then we need to make the other tower blocks safe. We hear their is too

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much red tape, but it seems there is a lattice where there are gaps that

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these things can fall through. Buildings can be built or renovated

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and they are not safe. Regulation and red tape has a bad reputation,

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but this is the kind of situation that could have been prevented if

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the materials had been fit for purpose and the building had been

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fit for purpose. It is the same in financial services, there is a lot

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of red tape out there but they are trying to stop people from losing

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all their money. Can we look at The Financial Times for some stories.

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Household savings rate at 50 year low. That is quite shocking when you

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think that if interest rates go up people might have to rely on the

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money they have saved to bridge the gap, but will be dear to put

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interest rates up to control inflation if it will put an extra

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squeeze on households? Interesting figures from the Office for National

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Statistics. 1.7% of income is left unspent and has full budgets

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according to numbers that came out for the first quarter. The average

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for the last 50 years is more than that. It might be happening for a

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number of reasons and you cannot draw a straight line between living

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standards and saving rates, but this is like the situation will is to pay

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-- it is a situation where limits to pay is making people very close.

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There is also the suggestion that the UK consumer can get the UK out

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of a hole. We are quite good at shopping and we have done well at it

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over the last year. We have still gone shopping, but you have to

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wonder at what point that will run out of road. We will have to make

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some difficult choices. Probably some underlying issues here. If that

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is the amount of money that they are putting away to save, how much I be

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putting into pensions? Some people are withdrawing their cash lump sum

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is out of their pensions to do work on their homes and so forth. Are we

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building up another problem, which going back 15-20 years we were being

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told we had not saved enough for our pensions but now because of the

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taxes on pensions and the squeeze on income Ebor may not be saving enough

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for their pensions. It seemed that the Bank of England which may be

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drifting towards an interest rates sooner rather than later said it

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will be later. It has been a big week for central banks this week.

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Mark Carney give quite a strong impression this week that he would

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be minded under certain circumstances to start thinking

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about raising interest rates, which we have not done for ages. Only ten

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days beforehand he was saying that specifically that now was not the

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time to do it. There is not so much clear blue water between the

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statements as may one appear, but there is a shift in mood globally,

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both that the Bank of England and the European Central Bank and

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elsewhere to say, we might be starting to edge towards getting

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interest rates back to normal but everyone is saying but we need to do

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this very carefully because we have not been in this situation before,

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we have been sold for so long, we need to tread carefully. We can stay

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with the FT that moved to the story, the picture story on the front page.

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Pride of place, Germany legalises gay marriage despite of Angela

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Merkel's vote. She gave everyone the option of voting. She voted against

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the reforms. The first thing that shocked me was that I did not

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realise Germany did not have equal marriage. I thought we were behind

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them. A great picture on the front page, a lovely picture. It coincides

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with gay pride, celebrations going on across Europe this week. The

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shock there was Angela Merkel voting against the reform. I think it was

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an open vote, a free vote, but it is not what we expected. It passed

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pretty easily in the end, 393-226. I presume that Angela Merkel knew that

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that would happen. This has been a matter of personal conscience

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Fathauer and a reminder that a lot of social issues in Germany tend to

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have a more conservative attitude towards than we are used to hear. We

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can look at The Daily Mail. The stories also in The Sun. To do with

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the foreign aid budget. The civil service bill rockets and it should

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be spent differently. This is suggesting that the foreign aid

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department bill, the wage bill for running it, has gone up by 40% in

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seven years. The Daily Mail likes of the other newspapers has been

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questioning whether we should be spending this kind of money, at any

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kind of money. 40% of not very much is not very much. You with your

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statistics and clarity. The bill has gone up by ?38 million. It is a drop

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in the ocean when it comes to public finances. The Sun is making a

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similar point. When you are talking about amounts of this size but we

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have just given ?1 million to Northern Ireland 's, it makes you

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wonder whether we are focusing on the right numbers. It will play well

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with people who want to see the NHS is the recipient of this money.

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David Cameron brought in the 0.7% rule. He did this to try and ensure

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that the Conservative Party are not nasty and it is backed by the Labour

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Party. In the country, they say charity begins at home. When we are

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spending money on other countries they have genuine concerns about

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that. The wage bill has gone up by 40%. The public sector workers are

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all having their pay capped at 1%. That is now being brought forward.

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The Conservatives are now agonising over whether they should lift the

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cap on wages and this highlights the other side of the coin. It did not

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get much action in the House of Commons, removing the cap. There was

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a boat on that. Two stories in The Telegraph. BBC to take on net flicks

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with cliffhangers and cricket. Cricket coming back to the BBC, and

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Channel 4, it will be like the summer of our childhoods. The

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cliffhangers were in the days before boxed sets and DVDs. Now you can

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download the whole thing. You had to watch the TV at that time unless you

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were wealthy and had a video player. It is quite fun that people will

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gather around. The problem with not watching it live is that you hear

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someone talking about what you see something about a dramatic episode

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you are two episodes behind. The BBC can't be taking on some of the cost

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that the streaming services are able to put money into. It is about

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creating events and moments and being part of a family schedule, if

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you like. The cricket deal is extraordinary. A lot of money has

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gone to the England and Wales Cricket board. There is going to be

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a lot of cricket on TV. It is a sweet idea that you have everyone

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gathering around to watch the TV. Half of them on their iPhones. I

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like to thank the BBC already has a programme like that. Finally, the

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story keeps going, Rebellion spreads to the Lords. The speaker has said

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that you no longer have to wear a tie in common is now a Liberal

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Democrat peer is suggesting the same thing in the other place. It should

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not be a huge surprise because John Burkle is quite well known for

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having stopped wearing tights and wigs in Parliament. God knows what

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the rest of the world thinks about how we dress of these things. I find

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it difficult to get to animated about what people wear in

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Parliament. Clearly there is a strong school of thought that it is

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the thin end of the wedge in the usual characters are coming out to

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talk about how unhappy they are. It is clear where people are going to

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be in the debate. Apparently it is already happening on the BBC. On BBC

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News watch an editor showed up with no tie and chest here. Where do you

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draw the line? Would you be allowed to go to work without a tie? You're

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representing accompanying you need to look smart. You cannot go wrong

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with a tie, because no one will look at your hair. I think it is ordered

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that one of the Lords is going to break the rules. Can you imagine all

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the Lords wearing their costumes but not the ties. It is the way the

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world is moving. Maybe we will see Jeremy Corbyn in a sheltered. It is

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becoming more like a County Council, some have said. That is all from The

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Papers tonight. Don't forget you can see the front

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pages of the papers online It's all there for you -

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seven days a week at bbc dot co uk forward slash papers -

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and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it

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later on BBC iPlayer. Thank you for giving up your Friday

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evening. Have a lovely night. The weather is coming up

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