23/10/2017 The Papers


23/10/2017

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be

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With me is Henry Mance, political correspondent

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at the Financial Times, and Lucy Fisher, senior political

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The Metro leads with Labour MP Jared O'Mara quitting his place

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on a Commons equality committee after derogatory comments

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he made in the past about gay and overweight people

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The FT leads with the story that a Russian tycoon is looking

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to increase the value of his aluminium and hydropower

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empire, ahead of its initial public offering in London.

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The Daily Express calls for an end to foreign aid spending

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on its front page, saying it should be directed

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towards health and social care funding here instead.

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The "i" has more on Theresa May shrugging off reports

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that she asked EU Commission chief Jean-Claude Juncker for help

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The Telegraph says GPs are ignoring advice by the NHS to put more people

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on statins to decrease their risk of heart attacks and strokes.

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And the Mirror has details of a new expenses scandal

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Let's kick off, then, with the "i", on the Brexit row - Theresa May

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shrugging off the alleged Jean-Claude Juncker Lakes. It was

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alleged that she had begged for help, and needlessly, in the view of

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Jean-Claude Juncker. After the bombshell leak in April, the first

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confidential, private meeting between Theresa May and Jean-Claude

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Juncker, when he was then set out that she was delusional, combat of

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the scale of the man she was making the Brexit, and again, a leak has

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occurred to the same German newspaper. Interestingly, her former

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chief of staff, Nick Timothy, accused his European counterpart of

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being behind the leaks. The counterpart denied this and said it

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played into a broader narrative of the UK trying to characterise the EU

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as punishing the UK per Brexit. I have enjoyed their handbags at dawn

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on Twitter today. What you make of it was Mike Downing Street were

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briefing that Theresa May was going to say, I need help on this from you

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guys. It is a different -- what do you make of this? Downing Street

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were briefing... Theresa May went and talked about the divorce bill,

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and now the fallout from a dinner, the belief that communications, even

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a private dinners, are not particularly private. A lot of

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things need to be negotiated over the next year, and it doesn't look

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like the best relationship to start from. Jean-Claude Juncker denied

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this when he was doorstep by the BBC amongst other people today, 100%

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denial. With a twinkle in his eye, it might be said. Theresa May stood

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at the dispatch box today and claim she made significant progress at the

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summit last week, and Frank were, as far as I see it, Jeremy Corbyn

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called it when he said it was Groundhog Day. The Guardian, their

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headline is: To keep Britain in the single market and the customs union

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for a couple of years is that aim. What she said today in the Commons

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was, if we don't get a deal on trade that goes well beyond that, even

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those two years of standing still, giving businesses time, they won't

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exist, we will be out in March 2019, and there will be a cliff edge. That

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is a way of trying to push the EU towards negotiations on trade, but

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it creates the risk that if they don't do what she says, then we had

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a very hard exit within two years. Businesses are getting more and more

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worried that time is running out? Absolutely, the story in the last 24

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hours of five leading business organisations warning that the time

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period before March 2019, they're planning period, it's coming to a

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crunch point now when they need to know what the transition looks like,

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and beyond that, the trade deal. You mentioned Jeremy Corbyn and as a

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picture is not actually off him in the Guardian, but it looks like him.

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Amazingly, this is Tracey Ullman's new impersonation of the Labour

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leader for her new sketch show. I think it's a bit out of date. These

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days, Jeremy Corbyn is a bit smarter. He has ditched the beige

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jacket and wears a navy suit often. And the tie is done up. No top

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button undone any more? No. He has a unique, shambolic vibe, so it would

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be interesting see if anyone can take him up. I've not seen any

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impersonators manage it. It looks quite like him, though. I think

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there are prosthetics there! The Daily Telegraph: Doctors putting

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patients off stat ins, prescriptions dropping, according to the

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Telegraph. This follows up on advice a few years ago that prescribing

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stat ins might benefit more patients. A new study has found that

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it is patients themselves are deciding after advice from doctors

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that they don't want to risk the side effects because the benefits

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don't our crew to the majority of people who take statins, instead to

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a small minority. You may take them, not have a good effect and people

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say that stepping -- people are stepping back from the advice. It is

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patients failing to take them, then? It is the patients who are most at

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risk of heart attack and stroke soon appear to be shunning them, perhaps

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sold on the critics of statins, who say that the side-effects are not

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wanted. Is there a problem with saying that patients should take

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statins just because there might be some good? There is advice, and then

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it appears it changes. What you find from studies like this is where the

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blockages in the system lie. Is it the advice that is wrong, or the

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fact that doctors are relying it in the wrong way, or that patients are

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coming to the wrong decisions? It is a process of experimenting with how

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we prescribe drugs. That is the Daily Telegraph. Now, the metro, and

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they focused, as I mentioned earlier, on the MP Jared O'Mara, who

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has got into a spot of trouble, the sea. Comments he made online 13

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years ago on message board making derogatory comments about gay

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people, fat people, talking about and no orgies with girls aloud. He

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attempted to cling onto his role on the women and equality is Commons

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select committee and it was only in the face of a growing backlash that

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he finally agreed to resign from that role. And he is the MP who

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defeated Nick Clegg in Sheffield. One of the reasons why something

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like this can happen is because Jared O'Mara did not expect to win a

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seat, did not expect there to be an election, and there was limited time

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for parties to scan candidates and for opposition parties to put them

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under scrutiny, and some unexpected people, like Nick Clegg, lost, and

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unexpected people, like Jared O'Mara, won. Is it a cautionary tale

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that what you put on social media can come back to one should? You do

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think, gosh, ten years ago, what was I saying on Facebook? We will see as

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time goes on more MPs and people in public life who have come of age but

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have said the listings in their youth. Do you think that is true?

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Yes, his excuse for laying it on strongly was that he was in his

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early 20s. You will have people making comments when they are 15,

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13, for someone of the things in Theresa May's manifesto was giving

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people more privacy while they are and sharing things on Facebook and

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other platforms. It has an impact potentially if you go for a job.

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Employers can trawl through your social media history if they. Yes,

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and perhaps that is what should have happened here. People have been

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asking questions about the robustness of Labour's vetting

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process. Several news organisations to date have found a plethora of

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different remarks made in different places about different subjects by

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Jared O'Mara. Why did the Labour Party not discover that beforehand?

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OK, let's just talk briefly about Donald Trump. We've got this

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controversy over this call that he made to the widow of an American

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soldier who died in Niger, allegedly getting his name wrong and so on,

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and he has denied it in a tweet. What do you make of that? We are

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entering into a world where what is true and what's not is so difficult

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to tell. It Donald Trump goes, as he did today, and claims that he spoke

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this fallen soldier's name without hesitation from the beginning of the

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conversation, then people who just see that statement in isolation and

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I may be inclined to support Donald Trump anyway -- and may be inclined

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to support Donald Trump anyway will accept that. There are other

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sources, including the soldier's widow, and a politician, who

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contradict that. It is a he said- she said thing. Would you trust your

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president or the widow of a fallen American soldier? It is hard to

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know. One would think perhaps it would be unlikely for someone to

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make up something in that scenario, while grieving for their lost

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husband, but as we know in recent weeks, he has made comments that

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former US presidents haven't honoured US service men - blatantly

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untrue. He has also made crass, insensitive comments, I think, about

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the particular killed soldier in question, saying he knew what he

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signed up for, hardly the thing you want to say to someone who has just

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lost a loved one. A couple more stories to look at... Back to the

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Telegraph - this is interesting. The Queen's racehorses are won nearly ?7

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million in prize money over the last 30 years. I don't think she is

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pocketing it all, or any of it. A record-breaking year, ?560,000, a

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pheromone. The Queen is famously frugal and famously in love with

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horses, so this is the kind of thing that would delight. I don't think

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the costs are taken into account, or indeed inflation. The money was made

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by the trainers. I thought the Queen had made some money when I saw the

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headline. That she had been down the betting shop! Horse racing is a

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traditional form of gambling, and I like to have a flutter, and I love

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seeing the Queen, often with a headscarf on, at the races. I'm glad

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she's winning out. Somebody else who got lucky was this chap in the

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Express. A diver who was followed, he says, by a 13 foot shark as he

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swam almost five miles to shore. That's quite a chase, isn't it?

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Swimming away from a sharp five miles. I think he was only followed

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by the shark, in his account, for the first 15 minutes, then he was so

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panicked, having left the boat on a dive in at place that is wonderfully

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called Shark Bay. The shark gave up. He then swam a distance that, to be

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honest, had some volunteers in the area, people who know about swimming

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in these waters, in disbelief that he had swum so far so quickly.

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Spoilsport! It's a good story. Could you swim for five miles being chased

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by a sharp? I can't come about as a journalist, I could probably put

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menace into the tail. -- into the story. He is certainly good at

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telling the story of this incredible escapade. It is a great story.

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Lovely. Thank you for being with us. Don't forget, you can see

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the front pages of the papers It's all there for you seven days

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a week at bbc.co.uk/papers - evening, you can watch it

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later on BBC iPlayer. There's nothing too

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exciting happening Normal autumn weather,

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so a lot of cloud, quite damp,

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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