25/10/2017 The Papers


25/10/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Kate Andrews,

director of news at the Institute

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of Economic Affairs and Joe Watts,

political editor at the Independent.

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Thank you for joining us.

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Tomorrow's front pages now.

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The Financial Times leads

with a story about how companies

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are raking in billions of pounds

from a boom in pension

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transfers, as people cash

in their schemes for a lump sum.

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The Times says the NHS could start

using spare rooms to house patients

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under a scheme being proposed

by a private company to help free up

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beds on hospital wards.

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People could be paid up to £1,000

a month to provide accommodation

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and cook food for patients

recovering from minor surgery,

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the Guardian says,

but campaigners are warning it

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could lead to patients being abused.

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The Metro have the same story about

NHS Airbnb to free up wards. Daily

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Telegraph looking at what they call

an excessive green tax.

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The story dominating many papers,

Kate, the NHS, according to the

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Guardian, might rent spare rooms to

ease the beds crisis. They are

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calling it NHS Airbnb as shorthand,

it seems and is ordinary concept.

It

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does, the Guardian leading with this

attempt by a group called Care

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Rooms, we don't know who the people

would be but offering spare rooms

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and meals, attention and time with

mostly elderly people who aren't so

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ill that they need to be hospital

but they cannot go home because no

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one else is there. I think there's a

lot to say about the story. I

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applaud the entrepreneurial spirit,

the NHS is in perpetual crisis and

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maybe ideas like this are part of

the solution. But ideas like this

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are popping up because the NHS is in

such a poor state and the article

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says 8000 deaths take place because

of bed blocking in itself.

It's a

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way of dealing with bed blocking,

moving patients out of hospitals

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while they are convalescing.

Talking

about people with minor procedures

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but what does that mean, people who

have had their appendix removed or

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are they going to have cuts and

scars that need tending? Will they

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have mental health problems? It's

difficult to know who this is going

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to be. Also is difficult to know who

the people are who are going to be

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providing the rooms. If you are a

childminder and you want children in

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your homes, you need to do more than

pass a common records check, you

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need to be licensed and inspected by

Ofsted continually, you need

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qualifications, passing tests.

Surely these people will have to

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meet those standards as well, in

which case are they going to want to

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do it, is it a viable business?

Some

people are wondering about it,

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asking if it is social care on the

cheap.

I think social care is one of

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the main thing is being targeted

here because a lot of people ending

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up using this, they note that some

people would voluntarily opt into it

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because they want this kind of

attention and company, people like

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the elderly, people who are a bit

afraid to go home themselves after a

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procedure. Not right to be alone. A

lot of things at work here. If it's

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a business model, we will find out,

with the help of NHS Southend. An

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interesting idea but it won't solve

the problems of the NHS.

Does it

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past the sniff test? When you hear

the idea, do you think it's a

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fantastic idea or are you not sure?

Do you think that Airbnb would have

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passed the test? Staying in

somebody's home.

But these people

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are ill.

These people may not be

ill, they are afraid to go home

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after soldier E. -- after surgery.

This is a story about the Tory party

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machine, looks like they might be

hiring Matthew Elliott, chief

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executive of Vote Leave, to perhaps

get some more oil into the Tory

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party machine after it didn't go

very well in the election.

Yes, he

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certainly is one of the big

political figures of our time,

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considering that he turned the

Brexit referendum around. There's no

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doubt that one of the triumphs he

had during the campaign was to steer

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the referendum and the Leave

campaign away from the high torque

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of sovereignty and the Jacob Rees

Moggs of the world to maul bread and

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butter issues like immigration and

things working class voters care

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about. That is the area that Theresa

May must be in if she wants to win

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the next election, keeping the

working class voters from going to

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Labour. In that sense it may be a

canny move but there are areas where

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it may not be so. For example, he

didn't get on with the other

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Brexiteers, such as Dominic

Cummings, who was sidelined in the

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campaign, a close ally of Michael

Gove and there are questions over

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whether that rivalry may come back

out. And the Tories must target

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young people if they want to do well

in the next election and really new

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to the kind of Corbyn threat and I'm

not sure how Matthew Elliott fits in

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-- Airbnb the threat --

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Elliott has a history of bringing

along heavy hitters to push towards

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a certain goal, he is very goal

oriented. To bring the party

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together, he does not seem like a

bad pick. Also he has a very liberal

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version of Brexit which I would

personally support, the idea that we

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won't close the borders, we will be

open to the rest of the world, we

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want to be more outward looking.

That is a nice way of looking at

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this, especially when the debate

between soft and hard Brexit is

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going on.

The other story, one of

the stories in the Times, Britain

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considering, they say, selling front

line warships. This isn't

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interesting story because we've had

a line from the MoD, the defence

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correspondent quoting them, saying

they are denying this, that there

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are no plans to go below the current

strength in the Navy of 19 frigates

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and destroyers. This story is

claiming that maybe they are talking

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to Chile and Brazil about selling

the frigates but according to the

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MoD, categorically confirming there

has been knowing casement with them.

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On the one hand --

there has been no

engagement.

Some of the ships they

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are talking about selling our

amphibious landing craft that would

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possibly drop the Marines onto shore

and potentially cutting troops. At

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the same time, while they may not be

engaging with the governments of

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Brazil and Chile, the MoD is

engaging with the Treasury over the

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budget coming up in a few weeks'

time and these sorts of stories are

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handy for putting out and playing

your violin about how much money you

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need.

So you think it's all

positioning by the MoD?

Who knows,

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it is convenient timing.

The Daily

Telegraph have a story about, well,

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excessive green tax forcing up fuel

bills. Consumers paying too much for

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their energy because of excessive

green taxes added to bills according

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to a government commissioned report.

A government commissioned report

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which has a damning take on what's

happening to consumers of energy and

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religious idiot home.

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-- and the atrocity at home.

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-- and electricity at home. The

Conservative Party are saying they

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are going to address this, they are

saying it is an attempt...

The price

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of energy is very political.

Green

taxes have been very efficient, and

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putting at least £150 on people's

household bills alone next year. We

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did a report showing that a little

city charges have risen 50% since

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2001 in real terms as these

regulations have come in. You don't

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have to be opposed to tackling

climate change to say that these are

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not efficient or good regulations.

If you want to tackle it, bring in

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the apartment tax, bringing

something that is simple and obvious

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where the charges are coming from

but there are so many regulations

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which always leads to prices going

up for people at home.

The key thing

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to draw from the article, it is easy

to draw the conclusion from the

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headline is that the report is

hitting out at the focus on green

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energy, but actually the professor

behind it focuses his fire, if you

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like, on ministerial decisions, bad

decisions, and how they handled

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policy. This is a man who published

a book called the endgame for fossil

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fuels. His focus is that coal fire

and fossil fuel power stations are

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on the way out and we need green

energy, but in the right way.

The

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FT, a fascinating week in China with

this party congress. President Xi

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Jinping, who has emerged as a figure

who is the most dominant Chinese

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figure since Chairman Mao. This

piece says there is no other are

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apparent, no one else who comes

anywhere close so he's effectively

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in power for as long as he wants to

be.

We talk so much about Brexit and

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Trump in the west but we forget that

this is a big story. Many of us hope

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that as China brought on more

liberal reforms, especially to their

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economy, allowing China to be more

globally focused, that democracy

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would come with it but here we see

there is no plan to increment a

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successor.

The party seems to be

involving itself again.

Asserting

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what they believe is the importance

of commenters, an ideology that has

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killed millions over the years. --

the importance of communism. The FT

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have done great work, saying how we

have closed our eyes to the work

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they have done in improving their

economy and expanding.

I think

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that's right, what it also says

beyond the succession story is that

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the Chinese see the next period as a

critical one in their history, where

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they are possibly going to

overshadow the United States, when

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it comes to the biggest economy in

the world and one where they need

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stability and that also speaks to

their own self-awareness of their

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country, that there may be pockets

of the stability where they need to

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be strong and push through.

It's

about self identity and strength,

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isn't it, not just about coming is

the quality because we know it is a

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country full of billionaires and

millionaires.

Absolutely, it's about

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strength and stability. The

Communist Party of China, but it is

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the single powerful body in China

and it is about keeping control and

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stability and making sure that the

movement carries on. It isn't

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recognisable compared to the

Communist Party is of the past, it's

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a new kind of fiscal movement that

embraces many of the tenets of

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capitalism but is moving forward and

I did -- undertake taught -- under

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dictatorial rule.

Fats Domino, the

Independent there, a fellow

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countrymen from America.

Yes, I'm

not from New Orleans, I wish I were.

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He outsold every other artist of the

era apart from eldest.

He seems very

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influential. Transforming modern

music in many ways.

I wasn't from

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that generation but one of the first

things I listened to on a Sony

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Walkman when I was Young was an old

Fats Domino tape that my dad had and

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old rock and roll things from the

50s and 60s. He was an enduring

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influence in music and I think that

will continue after his death.

From

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New Orleans, during hurricane

country in -- hurricane Katrina,

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they thought he was dead and he was

rescued.

An amazing story and really

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a stable in history through that

experience and much earlier on. He

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played a large role in moving blues

and jazz and rhythm into a culture

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that was predominantly focused on

white artists. So he's has had those

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influences at crucial times in

American history.

Thank you for

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joining us.

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That's it for the papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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If you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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