16/12/2017 The Papers


16/12/2017

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LineFromTo

guest is Nick half away, Hughes new

author is set where everybody is

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under surveillance, it's meant to

tease your mind and make you wonder

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what the future's really going to be

like.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Benedicte Paviot -

UK Correspondent at the French

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broadcaster France 24.

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And the Defence Editor

of the Evening Standard, Robert Fox.

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Welcome to you both.

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Tomorrow's front pages...

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The Observer leads on Brexit,

and warnings from backbench Tory

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MPs that they will vote

against the Government in Parliament

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if the Prime Minister tries to bully

them into supporting an extreme

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version of leaving the EU.

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The Sunday Telegraph features

a column from Theresa May,

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who says she has proved her critics

wrong by achieving the first

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stage of the Brexit deal.

Boris Johnson calls

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for the Prime Minister to strike

a Brexit trade deal that gives

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Britain the power to ditch EU laws.

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That's in an interview

in the Sunday Times.

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Theresa May also writes

in the Sunday Express,

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saying she will not be "derailed"

from her duty to deliver the

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public's decision to leave the EU.

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The Mail on Sunday says left-wing

trolls sent abuse to the pregnant

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wife of a Tory MP after he heckled

Jeremy Corbyn over his age.

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So, let's begin...

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Let's start with the Sunday

Telegraph. Benedicte, Theresa May,

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I've proved doubters wrong. That

might seem to some observers like a

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bit of a rough week, but she doesn't

seem to see it that we stipulate she

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has had a rough week. Of course she

now is after that turbulent six

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months, says the

Telegraph, she is

really showing that she is confident

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and that she is claiming victory

over the doubters, not just the

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doubters in her own party, and in

Parliament, but actually I think

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she's very much referring also to

other EU leaders in a sense, not in

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the Sunday Telegraph, but she's

convinced them, persuaded them

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almost, charmed them all beat them

down, because they've been talking

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Britain down, certainly quite a few

Brexiteers are not happy at some of

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the things that have been happening

in Parliament. Yes, she's had a

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tough week and are very much so,

tough six months, certainly since

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the general election, but she is

really talking tough and defiant and

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indicating that she is moving

forward, and this is ahead of the

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French were, because we know it is

the first time in the coming days

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the Government will actually sit

down and talk about the way forward

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and the terms of what Brexit deal

should actually be.

Yes, the Cabinet

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actually getting briefed, the full

Cabinet for the first time, which is

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extraordinary. The Prime Minister is

a battler, you have to say that.

I

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thought Benedicte was about to is a

strong and stable! You know, -- was

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about to say strong and stable.

She's back to form, she is winning,

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because we're going to go through

the papers, they are all on

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manoeuvres, they are all in the mix.

Boris, Philip Hammond, not Michael

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Gove, I may say, Jacob Rees-Mogg,

who has come up with a hysterical

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one-liner for those of a less than

but more sceptical persuasion --

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less than passionate but more

sceptical. She knows what's

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happening, but what's interesting is

the brief alignment of those two

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stars, Philip Hammond Boris Johnson,

about the approach to a trade deal.

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Yes, they are going to talk about

the trade deal. But just think how

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long it to add to establish the

Canadian trade deal. This is

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immensely complex. If you apply to

be a new member, not that anybody is

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going to do that in the short-term,

but in the Balkans we may find

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somebody popping up like Kosovo or

whatever to join, the document for

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joining is huge. It's millions and

millions of words. And equally, and

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doing it is going to prove very,

very difficult. I think that's what

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we're to hear about. Sorry to break

the turkey early, and mix my

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metaphors, this Brexit thing is

going to go on and on and on. It's

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going to be irrelevant, as --

relentless.

In the Sunday Telegraph,

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referring to the Cabinet, how to

unite the Cabinet on Brexit remains

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the biggest obstacle. Isn't it

amazing that at this point this

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hasn't already been done's there is

actually another problem looming, it

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would seem, in the coming days. I'm

not even referring to the amendment

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that will be won were defeated,

we're not sure which, but it looks

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like now a possible win with some

flexibility on the exit date. But

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actually, as the Sunday Telegraph

also points out, there is the

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considerable looming challenges,

including the one about the fate of

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Damian Green. It would seem that

there would be a second inquiry. Of

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course, this is her trusty, Ally,

deputy, friend. What I would

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personally say that I have found

profoundly shopping over the last

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couple of weeks, Bob quick, former

police officers, top officers, who

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make personal breaches of

confidentiality is very worrying in

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this democracy.

We are going

backwards a bit and we must press

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pause. The Sunday Express headline

on the stories, I won't be derailed,

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she says. As Robert was saying, it

goes on and on and on. But there's a

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lot more steel than one might have

imagined.

There's lots of juice in

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the argument, we will find as we go

on.

Let's go to the Observer. They

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have a different line about this.

This is from the House of Lords,

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Conservatives there, call off the

Brexit bullies or face-to-face.

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Robert, have a go at that one --

face defeat.

It's like the famous

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Monty Python sketch of Wuthering

Heights. Because we're getting

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messages left all over the place,

all of these papers, and I really

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want to let sheep or Enigma to

decode it for us, what the hell is

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going on's the Observer story is

based on a piece for them written by

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two Tory peers. One a former editor

of the Sunday Telegraph. Talk about

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building a castle on what is barely

sticks and straws. It's very, very

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interesting. What patients with

craft and Ross Altman are

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threatening in this is that if you

mess around with people who stick up

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for a role of Parliament in all of

this, then we're going to vote

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against again and again and again.

That means Tory peers as well. Just

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to draw it in, you were getting on

to the point, what is really going

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on is the people have spoken, as

Nigel Farage would say. His line.

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But it's the role of Parliament. And

I think, you know, if you go back to

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Magna Carta, and I really mean that,

the central run of Parliament in the

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British constitution, this argument

and debate was bound to come up,

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because the one thing you didn't get

in the referendum where the terms of

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leaving Europe or the terms on which

used the end Europe. I think this is

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going to be the argument and the

debate. I think this is the splitter

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for both major parties. I think you

can split both.

Right, OK,

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Benedicte, just go through that

story, anything else about that that

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appeals to you? We've gone back to

Damian Green and then we went back

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to Magna Carta, can we come back

up-to-date?

To quote the Observer,

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and indeed Ross Altman and patients

wait, what they very much pointing

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out, what they called the resulting

appalling insults from Brexiteers,

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calls for expulsion from the party,

even death threats, what they call

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worrying symptoms of the toxic

atmosphere which has been created in

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our country. I think that is of deep

concern. To have a diversion of

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opinion is obviously totally

understandable and encouraged. But

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what is not acceptable is doing

courage people to insults, threaten

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or encourage other people to

insults. And some of these MPs, it

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is no joke, have received death

threats, or their partners, their

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wives, their husbands have received

death threats. Seen from continental

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Europe, this is actually quite

shocking, I have to say to.

Let's

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leave Brexit behind for the moment

and go to another story. There are

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other stories, thank goodness!

Benedicte, perhaps you could start

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us on this. On the front of the

Sunday Times, I hiked student loans

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now slashed them. This is Lord

Willits, who came up with the idea

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of university Jewish and fees at

£9,000. The trouble is, it is the

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interest that is charged on them,

and he says that is too high.

--

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tuition fees. He oversaw tuition

fees, universities kept on hiking

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the fees.

It made it a huge

industry.

He is now saying that it

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should be slashed for the greater

good of preserving a viable graduate

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repayment system that is politically

acceptable. The extra 3% on the

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interest rate should be dropped.

That's funny, I have consistently

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seen in the BBC paper reviews the

Riaz reviewers saying this very

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thing. Perhaps they are classed

cottoning on. It's so much easier

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when you are not in Government to

have these thoughts!

This is part of

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the Conservatives trying to appeal

to young people who might have

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drifted off.

You're absolutely

right. Every study of the last

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general election shows there is an

absolute split in this country to

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the above 25-year-olds on the below.

You are quite right, it's trying to

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make student loans cheaper, student

loans killed off any Government

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pretensions of the Lib Dems, and

they know it. This is actually, we

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are in the sunny uplands, we are

just coming into something that is

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going to be very important in the

next general election campaign.

They

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want Jewish and

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-- they want tuition these to be cut

to £3000.

They are saying, let's

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turn off the tap a bit.

This is very

much a Christmas time thing. Amazon

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are in trouble. They are facing

Christmas parcels inquiry. Robert,

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are you waiting for parcels?

One did

go a wall for four days. It was a

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straightforward report. Amazon offer

a service, to which I subscribe,

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called premium. For reviews, I do

want to be able to say, I will get

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that book in my hands or whatever

the following day. That is what

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Amazon prime promises. It is a

premium account. I think it is about

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£9. We've got a lovely story for

parcels going round the world and

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being delivered late and so on. But

I don't think anything can damage

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the fair name of Amazon at all.

Fairlane, possibly. Benedicte, do

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you think that?

I'm being sarcastic!

No company is beyond criticism and

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beyond the bridge. I think if you

promise that, you are in trouble. We

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had a story a few days ago about the

fact of how little the drivers are

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paid and how they are expected to

peak in a bottle and all kinds of

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things. Big companies like this need

to be very careful, whether it is

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Uber or Amazon or Google. Clearly

Amazon have got a problem. I would

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imagine that being a savvy company

and seeing they are on the front of

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the Sunday Telegraph, they will be

trying to put the smile back on the

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customers. I don't subscribe to

Amazon prime. Or even premium!

Let's

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go to an important story. There are

two big stories we have got to get

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to. The first one is, the royal

wedding looms. Benedicte, on the

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front page of the express, Royal

wedding fever.

Extraordinary.

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Hotels, don't even think about it.

A

hotel room is £620?

We only learnt

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yesterday afternoon, the exact date,

Saturday, made the 19th at Saint

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Georges Chapel, the big Royal

wedding, Harry and Meghan. It seems

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that hotels in winter already

feeling the Meghan effect.

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Apparently, because within hours of

that announcement, 98% of all rooms

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were fully booked. I gather up

prices have soared as high as £620

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per night. I know I will be the

reporting on it.

From the point of

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view of viewers...

I will take a

dawn train to Windsor.

They will

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want this story, between now and the

wedding itself, not just the day

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itself, you are going to be

overwhelmed with it.

I'm mostly

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reporting on Brexit, which will not

surprise you. But there is no doubt

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that we will be covering this as

well. There is great interest in

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rural stories. And of course we a

global channel.

The express have

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this story, a free glossy calendar!

They have been upstaged!

It's

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mid-December!

Can't wait!

Let's get

to the story of the night. The

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result of the Strictly Come Dancing.

Were you watching?

I have been, but

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I've been slightly put off. You can

see what a sober, restrained

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character I'm! It's the overall the

top for four months, not of the

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dancers, but of the judges. We had

Bruno Tonioli falling off his chair

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again today, and the reprises of

Craig Revel Horwood on his knees

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before one of the dancers. They were

on another planet, this lot.

What

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did you think of the man who won?

Three women rivals! I saw the last

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dance, the standard was Inc Fred

Perry high!

I must tell you, the

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Prime Minister herself, she's got

very important matters to attend to,

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but she tweeted about it saying it

has been fantastic to watch,

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congratulations to Joe McFadden and

commiserations to my constituent,

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Debbie McGee.

Debbie McGee was

fantastic!

Would you have picked

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Joe?

He did a storm, it was the

Charleston that did it!

I might not

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have, but it wasn't up to me.

It

could have been up to you, you

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should have phoned in!

Keep dancing!

Keep reviewing!

As they say at the

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end of French films... That is the

end. That's it for the papers this

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hour.

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Thank you, Benedicte

Paviot and Robert Fox.

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You'll both be back at 11:30pm

for another look at the stories

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making the news tomorrow.

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Coming up next, it's

Meet the Author.

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