20/12/2017 The Papers


20/12/2017

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 20/12/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

0:00:160:00:19

bringing us tomorrow.

0:00:190:00:21

With me are Giles Kenningham,

PR and former Conservative adviser.

0:00:210:00:24

And Jack Blanchard from Politico.

0:00:240:00:26

Tomorrow's front pages.

0:00:260:00:29

Welcome.

0:00:290:00:31

The Guardian leads

on the sacking of Damian Green,

0:00:310:00:41

That was after admitting he was

misleading about claims of

0:00:430:00:48

pornography on his computer.

0:00:480:00:54

The Metro reads "Green out".

0:00:540:00:56

The FT also pictures Damian Green.

0:00:560:01:00

It's main story is about Brexit

and a bid by UK regulators to woo

0:01:000:01:08

foreign banks with a promise

0:01:080:01:09

of easy access when the country

leaves the EU.

0:01:090:01:16

And...

0:01:160:01:18

The Express reports on research

claiming that eating salad

0:01:180:01:20

vegetables every day could help

stave off dementia by

0:01:200:01:22

boosting memory power.

0:01:220:01:23

It pictures Meghan Markle

attending a Christmas party

0:01:230:01:25

at Buckingham Palace.

0:01:250:01:34

We will start with the demise of

Damian Green. Take us to be Metro,

0:01:340:01:42

Green out.

Pretty blunt. Theresa May

has lost her closest political ally

0:01:420:01:47

and probably one of her few

political confidants. The equivalent

0:01:470:01:53

of David Cameron losing George

Osborne when he was in government

0:01:530:01:57

and for number 10 they need to spin

it as an act of strength by Theresa

0:01:570:02:02

May, showing her ruthlessness. She

got rid of her best political

0:02:020:02:06

friend. As with all these things it

was more the cover-up than the

0:02:060:02:10

original claim they did for him. It

is a metaphor for her leadership.

0:02:100:02:15

She felt she was getting momentum

and this happens.

Jack, how do you

0:02:150:02:22

see it? This is the third

resignation. Michael Fallon, Priti

0:02:220:02:28

Patel, is this the biggest of the

three?

Yes. He is heard de facto

0:02:280:02:33

number two and he stands in when she

is out of the country and hears her

0:02:330:02:41

closest ally, they have known each

other since university so imagine

0:02:410:02:44

how it feels to write the letter she

wrote to a best friend saying sorry,

0:02:440:02:49

you are out. I think it genuinely

shows a ruthless streak that perhaps

0:02:490:02:55

not everyone would know was there

but if you read the report by the

0:02:550:03:00

Cabinet Office, the summary, into

his behaviour, I am not sure the

0:03:000:03:04

Prime Minister was left with much

choice. They basically came down on

0:03:040:03:10

the side of the person making

allegations against him and also

0:03:100:03:14

said effectively he had lied. The

other allegations about pornography

0:03:140:03:19

on his computer. When that became

clear I'm not sure she had any

0:03:190:03:22

choice. It is a misleading claims

about the allegation, not

0:03:220:03:30

necessarily the allegation itself

was true.

This comes back to an

0:03:300:03:35

issue from ten years ago. Having got

rid of Michael Fallon in a ruthless

0:03:350:03:40

way, she set the bar high. If she

had not got rid of him she would

0:03:400:03:45

have faced accusations of cronyism.

And a bit of a cover-up. So

0:03:450:03:51

difficult for them. The issue is how

you get back on the front foot and

0:03:510:03:56

in a normal news cycle you would

have a rich diet of domestic stories

0:03:560:03:59

to push things on the Brexit

overshadows everything. In the

0:03:590:04:05

absence of a distinct domestic

agenda it is difficult.

We can look

0:04:050:04:09

at the front page of the Guardian

newspaper. At what point during the

0:04:090:04:16

day, Theresa May was privately

dealing with this, while she was on

0:04:160:04:20

her feet in the Commons, or sitting

on a searching committee

0:04:200:04:25

examination?

She didn't epically

long Prime Minister's Questions. And

0:04:250:04:33

a committee hearing that went on two

hours where she was grilled by

0:04:330:04:38

backbench MPs. Poker-faced all the

way through but she does almost too

0:04:380:04:41

well. People might say that the

Maybot came into its own today

0:04:410:04:50

because you would never have known

behind the mask she would have to

0:04:500:04:53

Cusack one of her best friends. I'm

sure she would have known this had

0:04:530:04:57

to happen today.

She got through

PMQs on that that Select Committee

0:04:570:05:03

is the most gruelling so fair play

to her. And it felt like she had got

0:05:030:05:11

into a groove but this is a bit of a

step back.

Theresa May's critics

0:05:110:05:16

would say she is a decent person,

genuine, believes in doing the right

0:05:160:05:22

thing. I think she would be not

impressed by Damian Green's

0:05:220:05:26

behaviour and in the end she is not

the sort of person who would let it

0:05:260:05:30

slide.

Donald Trump has been in the

news this evening. He has been in

0:05:300:05:36

buoyant mood as a result of tax

policy in the US but the Guardian

0:05:360:05:41

from pages concentrating on what he

said about the UN. His decision

0:05:410:05:46

regarding Jerusalem being the

capital of Israel as far as he sees

0:05:460:05:50

it and the critics who are mounting

against him.

Again with Donald Trump

0:05:500:05:58

he is rewriting rules on

international diplomacy, saying

0:05:580:06:02

countries that do not back his

resolution on Jerusalem will lose

0:06:020:06:07

aid. Quite a big move by him.

What

we are also seeing, America having a

0:06:070:06:15

different face to the world. This is

a bullying thing for someone to say,

0:06:150:06:20

saying if you do not back us every

time, all that money, aid money,

0:06:200:06:26

helping starving children and that

kind of thing, that will be gone. If

0:06:260:06:30

you think of the implications of the

withdrawal of that money, that is

0:06:300:06:34

serious, and not the sort of

language we are used to hearing from

0:06:340:06:37

the United States.

And it could

involve a country like Egypt.

A lot

0:06:370:06:44

of this money is spent in America's

interest because it is about global

0:06:440:06:50

security but I do not think Donald

Trump thinks that far in front.

0:06:500:06:54

Let's move to the Financial Times.

Two elements to this, both Brexit

0:06:540:07:01

related. We have city wooing

investment banks with promise of

0:07:010:07:08

easy access after Brexit.

Mark

Carney taking a different approach

0:07:080:07:14

to what the EU has taken. A big

battle about how much interaction

0:07:140:07:18

there will be between our financial

services industry and Europe's and

0:07:180:07:25

Europe seems to put up the barriers,

or threaten to saying if you do not

0:07:250:07:30

fall into line your banking industry

will not get anywhere near. Mark

0:07:300:07:34

Carney is saying whatever happens

after Brexit, you are welcome will

0:07:340:07:39

stop and it is throwing the ball

back to them.

It is clever power

0:07:390:07:43

play. There aren't lots of

businesses financed out of Europe

0:07:430:07:48

and he is saying, you have to sort

this out. A lot of countries will

0:07:480:07:53

want the EU to come to a deal but

countries like Japan and South Korea

0:07:530:07:57

want a trade deal and it feels at

the moment the UK has momentum in

0:07:570:08:02

this. The EU has other issues like

Catalonia so it is good to push it

0:08:020:08:09

back onto their plates.

We would

hope it is reciprocated, if not they

0:08:090:08:14

will be consequences, what do we

read into that?

There is a threat

0:08:140:08:18

from Mark Carney. We go on about how

big a deal it is for Britain to get

0:08:180:08:24

a deal on financial services because

it is a large part of the economy

0:08:240:08:27

but there is a lot of money for the

EU and they rely on our financial

0:08:270:08:34

services industry. We are the

European capital of that industry.

0:08:340:08:39

No deal would have big implications.

I think we have been far too

0:08:390:08:44

defensive and now it looks like we

are getting on the front foot and

0:08:440:08:48

framing the debate.

What are the

other elements in the Brexit events

0:08:480:08:53

today? How long will the transition

period be for a example. We heard

0:08:530:08:57

from Michel Barnier, not necessarily

saying what Theresa May might want

0:08:570:09:04

to hear.

I spoke to somebody senior

in the City and they said three

0:09:040:09:10

years we wanted, two years is

acceptable. We want certainty, we do

0:09:100:09:14

not want it to be never-ending. That

is the conundrum for the government

0:09:140:09:21

how they communicate certainty.

Michel Barnier is saying maybe it

0:09:210:09:24

will be a year and nine months. The

way the story we have to cover it,

0:09:240:09:31

every twist and turn and people must

be sick of hearing it. Are they

0:09:310:09:36

rowing about whether it is 20

months, 24 months? The important

0:09:360:09:41

thing is the transition delay sorted

quickly so everybody knows the EU

0:09:410:09:45

single market will finish on this

date.

One of the elements about the

0:09:450:09:52

transition period is whether or not

if during that transition period new

0:09:520:09:59

laws appear, will they still apply

to the UK and if not will that be

0:09:590:10:04

problematic?

It will be a problem

for some in the Tory party. As Giles

0:10:040:10:11

might not. A lot of backbenchers

will not be impressed if we are

0:10:110:10:15

still taking rules from Europe after

we have left.

Some elements of the

0:10:150:10:20

party, so then it is more important

to get out rather than the deal,

0:10:200:10:25

which is problematic in terms of

scrutiny and getting a good deal but

0:10:250:10:28

that has been noticeable. How much

kick back on what Theresa May came

0:10:280:10:34

back with in the initial divorce

proceedings.

A Tory MP told me

0:10:340:10:39

today, I want to get out, I just

want to scrub the EU symbol from my

0:10:390:10:44

passport, that is all I care about.

Hopefully that is not everyone who

0:10:440:10:51

sees that issue.

Having got past

this period where these three issues

0:10:510:10:55

had to be resolved up to a point,

are we now starting afresh? The

0:10:550:11:01

sides are starting this far apart

and will move closer together?

I

0:11:010:11:06

still think the time period is

unrealistic. You speak to the people

0:11:060:11:10

who did the EE you can as a deal and

that took seven years with one

0:11:100:11:14

country and we are talking about so

many countries. The EU does not tend

0:11:140:11:23

to do things quickly.

And it is not

in their interest. Theresa May's

0:11:230:11:28

argument would be we're not at the

same starting point as Canada. We

0:11:280:11:35

can finish was something that is not

to do with the EU. Inside the Daily

0:11:350:11:39

Express to an interesting story

about a frozen embryo, a donor

0:11:390:11:47

embryo frozen for 25 years.

It is a

nice story and definitely the

0:11:470:11:53

heart-warming stuff people like to

read around Christmas time. A young

0:11:530:11:57

American couple who had a baby who

is technically almost as old as her

0:11:570:12:03

mother because the embryo was frozen

in 1992 and has now been implanted.

0:12:030:12:09

They have had a baby. An amazing

world we live in, where medical

0:12:090:12:14

science can make this sort of thing

happen.

An incredible story. A nice

0:12:140:12:19

quote from the mother, do you

realise I'm 26. If the baby had been

0:12:190:12:24

born when it was supposed to, we

could have been best friends.

I'm

0:12:240:12:28

sure we will hear a lot about this

tomorrow.

In the circumstances of

0:12:280:12:31

the couple, they were struggling

obviously to have a child of their

0:12:310:12:38

own. Benjamin the father has cystic

fibrosis which can make the father

0:12:380:12:42

infertile. Hence the arrangements we

have. It makes you wonder where this

0:12:420:12:48

will lead to.

As Jack said, it is a

feel-good factor among a lot of doom

0:12:480:12:55

and gloom at the moment. And some

great photographs. Really

0:12:550:12:58

heart-warming.

Photographs of her

pregnant and the record-breaking

0:12:580:13:06

baby. On that more uplifting note,

thank you. We will do this again at

0:13:060:13:16

11:30pm. Goodbye.

0:13:160:13:20

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS