17/01/2018 The Papers


17/01/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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the profession than joining it.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Jessica Elgot,

Political Reporter with

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the Guardian and Henry Zeffman,

Political Reporter at The Times.

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The Telegraph covers an agreement

between the UK and France over

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Apologies that we are so laid,

Chelsea and Norwich couldn't get

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their act together in 90 minutes!

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The Telegraph covers an agreement

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between the UK and France over

migrants at the border in Calais,

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with Theresa May expected to pay up

to £44 million to keep police checks

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on the other side of the Channel.

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With the same story, the Daily Mail

says its 'Le Stitch Up' and also

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claims the offer to loan Britain

the Bayeux Tapestry is designed

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to sweeten the Calais pay-out deal.

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The Times quotes the Government's

spending watchdog saying billions

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of extra pounds are being spent

on private finance initiatives, with

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little benefit for the taxpayer.

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The Guardian also leads

with the controversy over PFIs,

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saying the projects can cost up

to 40% more than using

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government cash.

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The I headlines a pensions

shock for high earners,

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as new rules take effect ahead

for the tax return deadline

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at the end of this month.

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While the Financial Times says

Goldman Sachs is being pressured

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into changing its fixed-income

and commodities trading business,

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after a 50% drop in revenues.

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And finally The Sun claims a former

SAS soldier who helped free hostages

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at the Iranian Embassy siege

in 1980, has been left homeless

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after the local council

failed to house him.

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It's a right old mix of front page

stories our guests will be

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checking out tonight...

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One story in particular features,

and most of the front pages, and

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that is Calais. A look at the front

pages of the Telegraph. The big

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picture is of the Duchess of

Cambridge, on a visit to Great

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Ormond Street Hospital there. She is

having a high five with the little

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heart patients. The top story, £45

million to keep the border at

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Calais. Jessica, that is a lot of

money and people will be upset about

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that?

It is, you can see that The

Daily Telegraph has that in. The

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leading Brexiteers there, giving

more money to France is absurd, they

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say, they suggest it will go on to

this Brexit bill. I'm not sure that

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is how Google works but Theresa May,

the former Home Secretary, she knows

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how important the agreement is. She

knows... She probably thinks £44

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million is the price worth paying to

make this a French problem rather

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than a British problem.

One suspects

that Emmanuel Macron could have come

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up with any figure and they would

have had to have said yes. Have

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migrants that side rather than the

side?

It was important, she was the

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longest serving Home Secretary ever,

she spent a lot of time dealing with

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issues like this. From her

perspective yes, it is a lot of

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money but for the government, any

amount of money is the right amount

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to keep that problem on the French

side of the border.

The

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self-declared boys of Middle

England, the Daily Mail... Let's see

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what they think of it. -- voice of

middle England. £45 million more in

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block capitals to stop migrants at

Calais. We get to borrow the Bayeux

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tapestry as a sweetener but only if

the local murder agrees with it. --

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but only if the local mayor agrees.

But this is the prize that is to be

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paid, even if people are not

impressed?

The Daily Mail,

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consistently the most supportive of

Theresa May, championed her early in

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the leadership campaign when Boris

Johnson was the front runner. They

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are not happy. This is the kind of

thing that they have campaigned on

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for a long time, it was assigned to

Theresa May that if there are more

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capitulations or stitch ups, they

are willing to say that the

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government has gone too far.

With

the Daily Mail have been happy if

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Theresa May said no and the border

came back to Kent?

Am sure that what

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is Theresa May would say...

You can

imagine the headlines, all of the

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border posts had to be moved from

Calais to Dover, then you spend

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millions of your own money on

setting up new systems over here.

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You cannot see that the Daily Mail

would have reacted well to that

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either. Theresa May may think it is

a short-term hit but beyond that...

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What game is the Daily Mail plane?

What are they trying to say? That

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she should have accepted a lower

figure? I don't understand.

I guess

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they are saying, are we paying 45

million quid for the bare tapestry.

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That is the sweetener that they have

given us. -- the Bayeux tapestry.

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Maybe it is good PR play by Emmanuel

Macron. He has an eye for a stunt

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like that...

He didn't have to give

it!

And it was a nice story in The

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Times but the really important thing

is this border. That's what she will

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want to do when she sees Emmanuel

Macron tomorrow.

Plus onto The

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Times... Henry, this one is for you.

The Times newspaper, billions lost

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by taxpayer on wasteful PFI

contracts, public money being used

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for private initiatives, we know all

about Carillion and that, it's a

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sign of the whole debate. And PFI in

the news as a result?

There are

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extraordinary figures from the

National Audit Office, the

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government spending watchdog. They

say that they cannot find evidence

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to back up the Treasury 's gains.

With an infrastructure programme,

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that they pay back of a long period.

They cannot find evidence to support

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claims that it is cheaper than

borrowing itself. It is worth noting

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that Theresa May may get some flak

for this but the report finds that

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85% of payments made under PFI last

year were procurement decisions made

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more than ten years ago. It really

is a story about a load of public

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policy decisions made by Gordon

Brown, first in the Treasury and

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then when you move to 10 Downing St.

Yafai is not as popular with the

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government any more.

But the rent on

these buildings, the government and

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what the tax payer pays, it is

comparable to the cost of the build?

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The cost of publicly financing

projects can be 40% higher than

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relying solely upon government

money. If that was a bank offering

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you those kinds of differences, you

would always turn it down. The

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figures are quite astonishing. £10.3

billion, the annual charges for

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2016-17 for those deals. It is money

that is effectively going on

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improving health services and

schools in those companies.

John

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Major, Tony Blair, it was really

extended. You would argue that you

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would not get certain structures

built if you did not have a PR five.

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And in The Guardian, residents face

a huge bill to remove cladding. This

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is people living near or at the

Grenfell Tower?

It is extraordinary,

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these residents are living in a

building where they have the same

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kind of flammable panels as the

Grenfell Tower. The property owner,

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where they all own those flats, they

need to spend £2 million to replace

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the cladding but he will give them

the bill of £31,000 each in order to

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make the flats they own say. It is

extraordinary.

They are private

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flats?

Yes, at the moment, because

the flats are unsafe, and the

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flammable cladding, there are fire

wardens patrolling there. 24 hours a

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day, at the cost of £4000 a week.

The government will have to do

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something...

It is a flabbergasting

story. Sajid Javid, the housing

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Secretary, said that the government

told the owner of the freehold five

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months ago that the cladding was

unsafe. Imagine being a resident,

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having seen that same cladding go up

in flames at Grenfell not so long

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before. You would be petrified. For

many of them, it is more than they

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earn in a year. As just said, surely

the government will have to pay

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here.

It would be interesting, they

are not going to use public money to

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bail out Korea, why would they do

that for this guy? Or whoever has to

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service this block of flats. -- to

bail out Carillion. This is

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basically the former Chancellor, Mr

Osborne, usually they get some sort

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of nod, but that will not happen in

this case. They do not like one

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another, do they?

Some would say

that George Osborne has a lot of

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jobs and maybe he doesn't need

another one! But the two do not get

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on. As evidence by George Osborne's

entry in the Evening Standard. You

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only need to look at the front

pages...

He hammers Theresa May

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everyday!

I don't know, something

tells me that George Osborne doesn't

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necessarily consider his political

career to be over. If he was to join

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the House of Lords, then maybe that

would put the brakes on him ever

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returning to the House of Commons. I

don't know, whether this is

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something that he once?

He certainly

wasn't expecting anything from

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Theresa May, the woman who sacked

him...

In her first act as Prime

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Minister comic she didn't even let

him clear out his flat! In the

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story, friends of George Osborne so

that he never wanted a peerage. I

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can believe that, I wonder if he

considers himself a Tory still? It's

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an extraordinary thing to say about

someone who was Chancellor less than

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two years ago but his politics are

so different to Theresa May. He's

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made it clear so often. He

definitely does not see his career

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necessarily as being over but maybe

he is looking at the French

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president, looking at Theresa May --

meeting Theresa May tomorrow and

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thinking, hmm, maybe I can be the

British Macron?

I don't know if the

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country would agree... If he isn't a

Tory, what is he?

Well, there is

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this centre ground, certainly a lot

of people in Westminster think they

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fall somewhere between Jeremy Corbyn

and Theresa May. Whether the

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appetite for that in the countries

is larger, I don't know. But I think

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Osborne is part of the bridge in the

middle.

Very interesting! In the

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Daily Mail, it is the demise of

landmines... Landmines! Land lines!

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That would be a good thing! Can

nuisance callers lead to the death

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of the landline? My mum used to call

the landline, but I can talk to her

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on my mobile so it doesn't matter.

Is this really what will happen, do

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you think?

I do, I don't have a

landline either. My mum has my

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mobile number, that is fine! But

this story attributes the demise of

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the landline to nuisance telephone

calls. A survey found that of $2000,

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32% had missed calls from their

parents because they did not want to

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answer their landline in case it was

a nuisance call.

I didn't do that!

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It may be true, but the story is,

why do you need them? We have mobile

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phones.

The nuisance call thing

influenced my decision.

I don't have

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a landline but in the story, most

people have missed calls from their

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parents but 5% of people said that

they missed calls from a long lost

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love who may only have their

landline. Maybe that is an

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incentive?

So long lost that they

were together before mobile phones!

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OK...! Finally. The inside of The

Times newspaper, a big statue in the

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middle there. That is Baroness

Thatcher. Apparently, it still does

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not have a home.

Yeah...

You don't

care?

Apparently not! They say one

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of the reasons it doesn't have a

home is because it hasn't been

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rubber-stamped by Margaret

Thatcher's family, the objection is

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that she does not have her famous

handbag.

Is that the objection?

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Apparently...

Is there any reason as

to why the sculptor did not put the

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handbag in?

The sculpture was a

freelance trust and raised a lot of

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money soon after Lady Thatcher died

in 2013. Offering back they

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commissioned the sculpture. It isn't

just the handbag but the family are

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anxious about the risk of it being

vandalised. Even Winston Churchill,

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perhaps a less divisive figure, his

statue in Parliament Square, where

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they want to put it, has repeatedly

been vandalised. What is worth

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noting is she is a divisive figure

but still, there isn't a statue of a

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woman in Parliament Square but that

will be looked at in the coming

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years, more female statues.

When the

application was first submitted the

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Royal Parks Association, managing

Parliament Square, they objected it

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on the grounds that it was not

supported by Lady Thatcher's family.

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Was that on the grounds of possible

vandalism?

Yes, I think the handbag

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thing is a funny story but to me it

feels like the key objection is they

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are worried that if the statue goes

up in a place like Parliament

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Square, the site of a lot of

demonstrations, both of us work in

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Parliament, there is usually some

sort of demonstration or meeting or

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gathering in that space every day.

With Margaret Thatcher, although she

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was the first female Prime Minister

of this country, she is a divisive

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figure and I can imagine that a

statue would be a target for vandals

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and why it could be a target in a

place like that.

Thank you to both

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of you. Apologies for the late start

again.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you, seven days a

week.

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And if you miss the programme any

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evening you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer...

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Thank you Jessica Elgot

and Henry Zeffman.

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Goodbye.

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