29/01/2018 The Papers


29/01/2018

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me is the political

commentator Dina Hamdy

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and broadcaster David Davies.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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Let's look at them. The Metro shows

photos of David Beckham at the

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unveiling of his new football team

in Miami. The paper's main story

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says Angela Merkel has mocked

Theresa May for dithering over

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Brexit negotiations.

Billing an exclusive, Buzzfeed News

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says it has seen a new Brexit impact

assessment that claims leaving the

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EU will adversely hit almost every

sector and every UK region. We will

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be discussing that indepth. The

Times claims Theresa May is now

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facing calls from party donors to

resign with a number of financiers

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calling for her to leave at a

fundraising event.

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The Financial Times headlines that

MPs found guilty of bullying, sexual

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harassment could lose their seat

under new plans drawn up by MPs. The

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Telegraph leads with equal pay here

at the BBC with claims women have

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faced what it calls vailed threats

from management when asking for

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equal pay. The paper also writes

that e-cigarettes could raise the

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risk of cancer according to a new

study.

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The I says that the British have the

worst diet in Europe. We eat up to

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four times more fast food than the

French, Greeks and Italians.

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The Guardian has an exclusive

interview with the outgoing German

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ambassador in which he tells British

Brexiteers to stop fixating on the

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second world war.

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That's it for the papers tonight.

Plenty to talk about. Let's start

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with the Metro. I think it's a snide

headline, what do you make of it,

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David?

Well, these are dire times

indeed for our Prime Minister. I

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don't think there's much doubt about

that. If she was looking for a few

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friends, whether Mercury has helped

her by one of her briefings to

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journalists, apparently last week in

Davos, MrsMerkel confided that

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MrsMay responds to all her questions

by saying make me an offer and

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MrsMerkel replies, but hang on, you

are leaving, we don't have to offer

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you anything.

Dire times indeed. If

we move on to Buzzfeed, this is

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potentially explosive.

This is a

huge story. Kudos to them for

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breaking it. The most striking line,

you take out...

This is a Brexit

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analysis, they've got their hands on

it. One of the Government's own

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Brexit analysis.

It does finally

exist.

Exactly. We have been told

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maybe it does or doesn't.

Exactly.

They've seen a Brexit impact

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assessment due to be shown to

Cabinet this week. It says?

There is

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no scenario that does not leave the

country worse off. That is the

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scariest part of the story, the

whole story. The softest Brexit

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scenario leaves the country still a

lower growth by 2%. The

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comprehensive deal, if you get a

comprehensive deal, it's still 5%

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lower growth rates. The no deal

scenario, leaves you with an 8% less

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growth over that period. So it's

very dire. It's been kept secret so

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far and the reason is it's

embarrassing, according to sources.

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But on the plus side it does say the

analysis assumes in all scenarios a

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trade deal with the US will be

concluded and that it would benefit

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GDP by about 0. 2% in the long-term.

Trade deals with other non-EU

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countries and blocs such as China,

India, Australia, nations of

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south-east Asia, would add in total

a further 0. 1, to 0. 4% to GDP in

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the long-term. But these do not

outweigh the costs.

Exactly. What's

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interesting about this is one

wonders how they thought they would

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always keep it secret, that this

existed and this was the conclusion.

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They say they're trying to keep it

secret or under wraps because they

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don't want to give away their

negotiating tactics or - the thing

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is even with the benefits that David

outlined, it comes down to less than

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1%.

If this is right.

Was this

really worth it to leave the EU, is

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the question that you would be

starting to ask immediately after

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reading this article. For me, the

biggest negative impact that comes

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from leaving the EU is you are going

to have to leave the customs union

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and the single market.

Yet those who

support leaving Brexit would say we

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have heard this before, it's not

happening at the moment, why is it

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going to happen?

That's exactly what

they'll say. They will say this is a

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draft, I am sure it will be a draft

of some sort or another. Or an early

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version or something like that. But

it is...

It's the Government's

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analysis.

Congratulations to

Buzzfeed for having something like

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this and printing it, and indeed you

may be going on to The Times. It's

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in The Times story, well down the

story, I can't believe it would have

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been had The Times had this story.

Well, exactly. You are right. Let's

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move on to The Times. It mentions it

there in the second column. It adds

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to the substance of their story, May

faces growing calls to quit. This is

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going to increase pressure on her.

Crucially, last week evidently there

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was a meeting of Conservative donors

which was very, very rough indeed.

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They do matter in the Conservative

Party, not least at a time like

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this. All this, the critics of the

Prime Minister do seem to have

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seized the initiative in the past

week-and-a-half or so and how she

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will deal with it, in this Times

story, they say one source close to

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the Brexit supporting European

research group of back bench Tory

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MPs thought her survival were no

better than 50-50.

I was talking to

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a colleague in Brussels earlier, who

was saying actually the thing that

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really spooks the EU, today we had

Michel Barnier outlining their

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negotiating position in terms of the

transition phase, but the thing that

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really worries them is how secure is

Theresa May's position and how

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stable is her Government. It's not

going to be good for anybody if in

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the middle of these negotiations we

get into another leadership crisis.

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But there is a storm brewing of some

sort, whether it culminates in a

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leadership contest, that remains to

be seen. But there has been this

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Winter of Discontent feel to

MrsMay's Cabinet for the last few

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weeks and the decisions she keeps

making are not helping, like the

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botched up Cabinet reshuffle and the

lack of vision and the lack of

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focus, the lack of a plan on what

Brexit should look like and also the

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fact that she doesn't seem to be

having a strong hold on the Cabinet

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members themselves. It's almost as

if she's paralysed with fear of

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saying the wrong thing so ends up

not saying anything at all.

Briefly,

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political journalists love a good

story and amazing story from their

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perspective would be the leadership

challenge. Is this media flam?

It

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must be seen as more than that now.

The one thing that's always kept the

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Conservative Party together,

ultimately, is what the alternative

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would be, not least at a time like

this. Just as a film doing the

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rounds at the moment about

Churchill. I happened to see it

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yesterday.

Darkest Hour.

1940.

Churchill at a moment when he didn't

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have the support of everyone on his

back benches, he had problems on the

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front bench as well. Ultimately, and

he definitely dithered for a moment.

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Ultimately, there was a moment when

he was bold. He decided, I am going

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to go for it. Now at what point is

MrsMay going to stand up and say,

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whatever the cost of this, this is

what is right for this country.

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That's what people are crying out

for.

Theresa May's Churchill moment.

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I have my doubts she's going to this

moment and I have doubts there are

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many people in the Tory Party and

this Cabinet that are putting the

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country first.

Where is the

alternative?

We could talk about it

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all evening if we had time, we don't

unfortunately. The Financial Times.

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A couple of stories vaguely related

in terms of equality. Let's start

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with the MPs risk losing their

seats.

Yes, which is drastic

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actually. It's a good thing I

suppose that somebody's finally

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decided to do something and take

some sort of action on the whole

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issue of the sexual harassment

that's been brewing over since 2017,

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since the wine teen thing. This is

supposed to -- Weinstein thing, this

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is supposed to be a cross-party

working group of MPs and staff. It's

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going to have a phone line,

dedicated phone line for reporting

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and resolutions and independent

investigators to consider evidence.

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If there are offenders after the

investigations and everything, the

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decision could be taken by the

parliamentary commissions for

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standards, which is independent, to

suspend so-called said MPs. That is

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huge. People have to worry about

their careers now and losing their

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seats and that is a good thing.

It

sends out a very firm message.

Yes.

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Interestingly, in a softer way, but

still a strong message, this story

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they've put up in the briefing

column, page 18, story about

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easyJet's chief, his pay. He has

opted to lower his salary.

Well, I

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talked about boldness and the

inequalities of pay, the extremes of

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pay and lack of pay in this country

continue.

He brought down his pay

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because he was awarded, when he came

into the post, he was awarded far

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more than his predecessor who was a

woman. It actually leads on to The

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Telegraph and this splash they have

about women at the BBC facing

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threats over pay.

I don't know.

Originally I come - my family cops

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from Egypt and Egypt is a developing

country, and since the 60s, men and

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women have had equal pay, so I come

from a place where I don't

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understand how in the developed

world, in Britain, and in other

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western countries this situation

could exist where a woman is paid

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less than a man doing the same job.

I know that there could be other

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subjective factors into it like

years of experience or different

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backgrounds and what not. But this

seems to be larger than the BBC,

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it's systemic. Private sector and

public sector alike, it's a mindset.

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For me, I cannot wrap my head around

this mindset, I don't understand how

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you can justify it.

David, you were

at the BBC back in the day.

A long,

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long time ago.

Perhaps you

understand a little bit of how the

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BBC operates and you also understand

how the outside world operates.

I

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do. Those of us who were around in,

dare I say it, the 1970s and 80s at

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the BBC, do find it remarkable how

these disparities have been created.

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I do get that there are many issues

about how do you reward, how do you

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evaluate experience? But however

it's been allowed to happen, why is

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this very prevalent at the moment,

this story, yes, because of Carrie

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Gracie and China, and how she's

spoken out, but also because the

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director general of the BBC is to

appear before a Select Committee, I

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think it's tomorrow, and he will -

we are told he is going to say some

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presenters' pay has been got wrong,

but that pay is largely fair in the

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BBC. So there is going to be a

defence of it. But there is no doubt

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that somewhere along the lines

something has gone radically wrong.

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When those outside the BBC have this

light shone on what's going on

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inside the BBC, when people are

told, as our media editor in his

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reporting at the BBC, saying

presenters' salaries are capped over

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£300,000, how does that play, that's

still a lot of money.

There is also

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this perception now that with people

have huge salaries and is it right

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at this time of financial crisis,

2008 financial crisis, the freeze on

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wages throughout the country for so

many sectors and so many people, is

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it right that people who have high

profile jobs get this amount of

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money? There is a perception, there

are those people out there who say

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no, as a public broadcaster perhaps

people shouldn't be paid these huge

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salaries and it is a bit ridiculous.

Is there a market out there, David?

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Well, that is the question. Most

certainly. Sometimes, the BBC is in

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the unfortunate position of its

competitors are widely perceived to

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be Sky and ITV and the rest, and the

truth is they don't make salaries

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public and people do get offered

more and yet the BBC is widely seen

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as no more, no less than somewhat

related to civil servants.

Let's

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wind up with someone who doesn't

have a pay ceiling, one would

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suspect, David Beckham. His

unveiling of a new team. Had

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fantastic for

S David, for four

years this is what he has wanted to

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do. He stuck at it, when they

couldn't find the right area of

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Miami, and the mayor here and there

said you can't come, not in my

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backyard.

Now he has a football

team. He has thelands.

Soccer is for

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men and women, is unbelievably

popular in Florida.

I remember going

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to games in the United States where

it was just packed. And big money

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maker. Thank you both very much

indeed. Rekind of you to come in.

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That's it for the papers tonight.

You can see the front pages of the

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papers online on the BBC News

website. It's all there for you

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seven days a week.

If you missed the programme any

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evening you can watch it later on

the BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you, Dina and David.

Goodbye.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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