21/02/2018 The Papers


21/02/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Rachel Shabi, journalist

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and broadcaster, and Laura Perrins,

co-editor of The Conservative

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Woman website.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The Metro says police forces

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could face fresh legal action

by victims of serious crime over

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bungled investigations,

following the John Worboys ruling.

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The i has the same story,

which is summed up in its headline:

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"Landmark victory

for crime victims".

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The Mirror claims Worboys

received £166,000 in legal

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aid to defend his sex crimes.

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The Telegraph reports that

Theresa May faces a backlash

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because senior ministers claim

the Cabinet didn't sign off

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on a Brexit strategy that

would limit free trade deals.

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The Guardian carries a photo

of students marching in Florida,

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calling for tighter gun control

after last week's school shooting.

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More people should get pills

to combat depression,

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is the lead in The Times.

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The Financial Times claims

Unilever could move its HQ

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from Britain to the Netherlands.

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And finally, The Express

says an arctic storm

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is heading for the UK.

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So, the Worboys case, and pills

for depression share the headlines

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on many of the front pages, so let's

look at them in more detail.

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Let's start with the Warboys case,

in the metro, the headline, the Met

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must pay for the failure to nail

Warboys. This is the case of the

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black cab driver, John Warboys, won,

the two victims of his have won a

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law case against the Metropolitan

Police after officers failed to take

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action after they reported what

happened to them. Laura, if you can

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kick as off, according to the metro,

landmark ruling opens door for other

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crime victims to sue the police.

What are the implications?

They

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could be significant, but I don't

think there will be a huge rush of

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cases to begin with. It is a very

big case, the Supreme Court

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upholding a decision by the High

Court that the police could be

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liable under article three of the

Human Rights Act under the European

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Convention of human rights, as

opposed to a negligence claim, which

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traditionally they would lose. So

instead under article three if you

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can show in cases of serious crime

that there was a failure of

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investigation alone, and not just a

systematic failure, but you have to

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have a serious failure, also where

the crime was sufficiently serious,

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then that could lead to a

compensation claim. But I think the

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test is quite high. You have to have

a serious crime, there has to be a

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sufficiently serious breakdown in

the investigation for you to even

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consider a compensation claim

against the police. In the case of

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Warboys, they made significant

mistakes early on in the

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investigation.

Has a serious crime

actually been defined yet? I don't

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think it has, has it?

No, but in

this case you can see why these two

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women were successful at the Supreme

Court, after the High Court ruled

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they were entitled to compensation,

and that was taken to the Supreme

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Court. Obviously something has gone

wrong when someone is thought to

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have carried out over 100 such

attacks and is not caught. Obviously

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something has gone wrong with the

investigation. So I do think that

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this landmark ruling is to be

welcomed if it makes those

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investigations more rigorous, and

means that less people have to go

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through this before arrests and

proceedings are taken.

John Warboys

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is also on the front of the Daily

Mirror. The headline says black cab

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rapist given £166,000 in legal aid.

I presume he hasn't been given this

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personally, this presumably is going

to his lawyers.

A headline designed

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to in rage, but there is a legal aid

system in this country, and as the

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decision by the parole board, which

is a different aspect of this

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Warboys case, it has been judicially

reviewed not by the government but

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by two of his victims who I believe

have had to crowdfund for their

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legal fees. John Warboys was

entitled to legal representation in

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that judicial review and somehow the

Mirror have calculated it at

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166,000, which seems like a lot, but

it is not going to him personally,

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it is going to his lawyers forced up

I would be interested to see how

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they come up -- came upon that

number.

We shall see post of let's

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move on to the Financial Times and

economic news, borrowing and

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productivity figures spark double

windfall for the Treasury. This is

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that government borrowing was less

than expected but there has been a

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rise in productivity.

The FT is

reporting this as good news and a

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windfall for the Treasury, though it

might not necessarily show up in the

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forthcoming budget. They might

decide to stash it, you know, save

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it for a rainy day. But they are

reporting productivity has increased

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by 0.9%, which is the strongest six

months since before the crash.

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Obviously that is great news but in

context it is not amazing. 0.9% is

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not amazing. Britain's recovery is

still the slowest in the G-7 country

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since 2008, and low productivity is

of course keeping wages down as

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well. Productivity should be around

2%. During the 90s it was at 5%. So

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it is not great news, and you might

also argue, and some economists do,

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that the two things are linked, the

fact the government is not spending

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is what is keeping our recovery so

slow and so slow, because you need

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for the government needs to invest

in infrastructure, in major building

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products, in order to stimulate the

economy and get it out of the slump

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it is currently in, and that is

affecting semi people.

And Laura,

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unemployment has gone up as well

hasn't it?

It has gone up slightly.

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It is true that productivity is a

big issue in the economy first no

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one can quite put their finger on

why it has been so stubbornly low.

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Of course investing in

infrastructure is one way, but that

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of course will mean further

borrowing, and public borrowing is

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at least down. Of course another way

would be to cut taxes, and then

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employers would invest in there and

please because it is the please

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themselves, it is how much they can

produce, that is what drives

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productivity. So that is the other

way of looking at it, if you cut

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taxes, that can drive productivity.

Except it never does because

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trickle-down economics is not a

thing. It doesn't work.

That's not

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true, but anyway.

We will agree to

disagree, because I am sure we can

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all agree on Brexit. The headline,

backlash at Theresa May's plan for

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Brexit transition. This says

ministers claim cabinet never signed

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off on the strategy that could limit

free trade deals. This was the

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strategy I think that was leaked

earlier this morning and then

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finally published about five o'clock

this afternoon. This is about

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Theresa May's plan for transition

which some ministers are annoyed

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about because they say they never

signed off on it. It is really hard

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to figure out why this would have

happened. I mean, all this week, all

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we have heard is about this road to

Brexit, you know, which has been...

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Rocky.

Otherwise described as a road

to nowhere. We have had these big

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speeches from the Brexit related

ministers, this much trumpeted big

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meeting of Cabinet, tomorrow and

eight hour-long awayday in which

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they finally, a year and a half

later, tell us what they actually

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want from Brexit. And so maybe this

over the transition, maybe it just

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got sort of lost in the detail,

maybe it fell down the back of the

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sofa, maybe they just thought that

actually we don't need to agree

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anything on a transition deal,

because by definition a transition

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deal is static, nothing changes. If

it changes then you have another

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deal that you have to renegotiate

for the transition period and what

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will be the point of that. So it is

hard to figure out.

Unfortunately

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they have to still agree on how long

the transition will be and how the

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rights in that period will be

affected. For instance, a big

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sticking point is whether free

movement would continue or whether

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it would end, and also the second

issue after that would be canned the

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European Court of Justice to

arbitrate on it? It is difficult to

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come to an agreement on a transition

deal, it will be even more difficult

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to come to an agreement on what

Brexit will actually look like.

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There is no doubt there is clearly a

split within the party, and tomorrow

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at Chequers seems to be the day that

Theresa May thinks she can sort of

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nail Jell-o to the wall. That might

be quite difficult but Jacob

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Rees-Mogg of course has a piece in

the Telegraph, quoted here, saying

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the current document would lead to

Brexit in name only and was a

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perversion of democracy. He says it

has been disowned by ministers as

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not representing government policy.

He is the leading Brexiteer who

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wants a much cleaner Brexit than

perhaps is on offer. I think things

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will stay pretty difficult for

Theresa May at the moment.

The clock

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is ticking so just want to make

mention of the photograph of the

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Telegraph, which is the first lady

of farming, this is the first female

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president of the National farmers

union in over 100 years.

Yes,

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welcome to the 21st century,

comrades at the National farmers

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union! This is a very pleasing

picture, I have to say, on this grey

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day, this very green grass and blue

sky picture, it is a relief.

Ivan

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know if that Segway is well or not

well at all into The Times. More

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people should get pills to beat

depression. Laura, I think some

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people could be surprised by this

headline, but doctors are told,

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according to The Times, that

millions of sufferers would benefit.

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They have run the study, I am in no

position to second-guess. A global

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study led by researchers at Oxford

University, saying that some of

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these prescriptions for

antidepressants are affected. And I

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think the case might be that general

practitioners are still cautious, in

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terms of prescribing

antidepressants, and there may well

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be people who would benefit from it

who are currently not receiving that

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prescription. If it helps them, and

the trials are there to back it up,

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then this is something they should

be prescribed.

Rachel, you are

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nodding.

Yes, what this report has

noted is that there is still an

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ideological resistance, it describes

it as, to antidepressants. This idea

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that you should not take medicine

for issues related to mental health,

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which is a lingering stigma that

means that people are not

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necessarily getting the treatment

that they need. Apparently only one

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in six of those diagnosed with

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depression are taking the

medication.

I am being screamed at

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in my ever we have to leave it

there, which is a real shame because

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eventually interesting talking to

you both. Thank you, you can see the

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front pages of the papers on the BBC

news website. If you miss the

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programme any evening you can watch

it later on the BBC iPlayer. Thank

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you Rachel and Laura, sorry to cut

you short, always too much to talk

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and never enough time.

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