26/02/2018 The Papers


26/02/2018

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

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to what the papers

will be bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Sebastian Payne,

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Political Leader Writer

at the Financial Times

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and Dia Chakravarty,

Brexit Editor at the Telegraph.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The Metro leads on the story of the

five-year-old who died after being

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turned away from a GP appointment

because she was late. Tamara's

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express warns of the blizzards set

to sweep the country. So cold, the

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sea has frozen at Weston-Super-Mare.

It is cold outside, but the

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financial Times says there is heat

on Theresa May as Jeremy Corbyn

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plans an alliance with rebel

Conservatives as he plans to keep

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the country in a customs union with

the European Union. The Daily

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Telegraph points the finger at the

rail companies, saying operators are

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profiting from compensation and

counselling services -- compensation

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from cancelling services for

passengers.

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And the sun has gone with the great

British flake off as snow is set to

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disrupt travel.

Let's have a closer look at those.

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Welcome to Sebastien and ten two. --

and Dia.

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Jeremy Corbyn's big speech

yesterday.

We now know that Labour

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is supporting a position where we

are to remain permanently in some

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sort of customs union. Jeremy Corbyn

said was to be some form of customs

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union. Where we allow the EU to do

trade deals with the rest of the

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world on our behalf. But as far as

Jeremy Corbyn is concerned, that is

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one way of getting around the

Northern Ireland question, about

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having a border between Northern

Ireland and the Republic of Ireland,

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and also having frictionless trade

with the European Union. But it is

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Sebastien's story.

Just looking at

this story here, do we think that

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some of these rebel Tories will

really side with Labour? The FT

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seems to suggest they will be.

The

story is whether this will mean

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anything. Jeremy Corbyn is not in

power at the moment. The only way

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this matters is because of the

Parliamentary arithmetic. Theresa

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May has a gossamer majority, so she

has to do a deal with Labour leaders

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and the DUP and so on. This is so

important for the future of our

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country. That is for one approach EU

conservative, who said they would

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vote for their conscience over the

party interest. If she was to make

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it a confidence issue, she would

play chicken with her MPs, asking if

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they were going to vote down, if

they did that they would bring the

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Conservative government down. We

will be hearing from on Friday. We

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will see how she responds.

Do you

see this as essentially a political

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move by Jeremy Corbyn, seizing the

opportunity to make life more

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difficult?

I see nothing wrong with

that. He is the opposition leader.

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For a long time, the criticism we

had, or that we have heard quite a

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lot, about Jeremy Corbyn is he is

not interested in taking power and

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doing anything. He is always talking

the big talk and not doing anything.

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Here he is, in a position where he

himself... I doubt whether he thinks

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he can get this through the EU if it

came to that. It was an interesting

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quote in that article from Frank

Field, who is also saying that he

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doesn't think the EU will accept

this proposition, but he is still

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liking what is beta is doing to

Theresa May, whose position is

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weakened since the last election.

Just to add something, I wonder

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whether if Jeremy Corbyn leases new

starts as well. He is an on reform

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socialist who doesn't like the EU,

thinks it's a capitalist club that

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is run by corporate interests. He

can see a political opportunity here

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to put some water between Labour and

the Conservatives. I think that

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makes sense politically, but in

terms of what he wants from Brexit,

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one of the things he spoke about was

reforming state a draw. He wants to

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prop up the steel industry, but the

EU won't countenance that at all.

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The other Brexit story on the front

pages of the Daily Telegraph, saying

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Brussels demand Northern Ireland

keys EU rules. This is part of the

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technical text that will come out,

putting into legal terms the deal

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that was done at the end of last

year.

in December, Britain said that

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we were going to suggest

technological solutions to a

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frictionless border, talking about

numberplate recognition and trading

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schemes and so on. What we are

hearing is that, on Thursday, the EU

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will publish... Will it be Wednesday

or Thursday? Wednesday. Publishing a

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paper where the EU built them aren't

that essentially we leave Northern

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Ireland in the EU when the rest of

the UK come out of the EU, because

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Northern Ireland in that paper, it

will be demanded that it would be

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under the ECJ jurisdiction, which

would essentially mean that it would

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still be ruled by the EU while the

rest of us would not be. That would

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create a huge problem for all of us,

but also specifically for the DUP,

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who are propping up the Government

at the moment.

That is the Gordian

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knot of this situation. Nobody knows

how to solve this. What

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conservatives have not realised is

what they signed up to back in

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December. And they should come up

with a solution that satisfies the

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EU legal framework, it is the status

quo.

The same regulations north and

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south of the border?

Exactly.

Trading and Customs can't change at

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all. It is very much over to Mrs May

to say what she is going to do. What

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the EU is doing here is crafty, they

try to move the border from between

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Northern Ireland and the Republic of

Ireland two between the island of

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Ireland and the UK. Some of the

consequences that could lead to are

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unthinkable. It is certainly playing

with fire.

There is so much Brexit

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to talk about as ever. Lots of other

stories to get through. Let's take a

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book at the metro here, talking

about five minutes that cost my girl

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her life, that is a dramatic

headline they come up with.

An

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extraordinary story, a doctor has

been condemned for turning away this

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girl who was five minutes late for

an appointment at her surgery, and

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who then collapsed and died in

hospital. The doctor missed the

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opportunity to provide life-saving

treatment. As with all these things,

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you don't actually know what

happens. One of the things that

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happens is when you have these

systems are trying to make targets,

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trying to see times, it can have

unintended consequences. This doctor

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will be living for the rest of her

life with the knowledge that this

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girl could have been saved, had she

been seen, and recognise the fact

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that she was wheezing and struggling

to walk into the surgery. It is a

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sad one, but these things happen

when you have got very busy and

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pressured health systems.

Let's take

a look at the Guardian. An

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interesting story that we talked

about earlier here on BBC News, four

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far right plots foiled in 2017, says

an anti-terror chief.

It is the

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short version of the front page

here. Exactly as you said, the

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outgoing assistant commissioner of

the Metropolitan police, saying that

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some of the terawatts they had been

dealing with, four of those work

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from far right extremists. Later in

the article, it says that a third of

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referrals to the Prevent strategy

are actually aimed at reducing

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terrorism all forms, were actually

referring far right extremists. In

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effect, they are the same form of

terrorism. They are feeding off each

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other and we are seeing organisation

on the part of the far right

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extremists, which previously we had

not seen.

Until now, it has been

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Islamists plots that have been

seizing the headlights. Behind some

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of the serious attacks that we have

seen in this country as well.

If we

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think back to Britain first, a far

right group in Britain, they were

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very infamously tweeted by Donald

Trump. He was in a way giving

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legitimacy to these groups that are

reaching into society. They are

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organising so well, they are using

social media to spread their

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ideology of hatred, and finding a

receptive audience. It is a

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difficult one. We have had a lot of

stories about Facebook and Google

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and Twitter doing more about these

things and working with the

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authorities. I'm sure Mr Rowley

would like to see more corporation

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from the social media companies.

They do need to take an active role

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in that. The Government scheme is

something that is much criticised,

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but it is doing a good job, clearly.

We are running out of time, but we

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couldn't go without a quick mention

of the snow, which makes a few of

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the front pages here. The daily

Star, one of many that has got a

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picture that of a train in the snow,

just reflecting some of the

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difficulties that there will be for

commuters in the morning, as well as

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to night.

We have had quite a

difficult day today for a lot of

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people who have suffered because of

this sudden snow that we have seen.

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Often, we hear that we deal very

badly with a little bit of snow.

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Look at how well Canada deal with

it. That is a little unfair because

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we don't have to deal with it for

the rest of the year, so do but lots

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of money into providing for these

few days that things could go wrong,

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it is not the answer. It is also

interesting to see how we will

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react. Apparently the snow has

sparked panic buying, with one

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Sainsburys running out of bread due

to the snow.

As soon as one thing

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goes wrong, we dashed to the petrol

stations, -- diverse chops to sure

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everything will be fine. The next

few days will be interesting to

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watch.

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That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you,

seven days a week

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at bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss the programme

any evening,

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you can watch it

later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you to Sebastian Payne

and Dia Chakravarty.

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Goodbye.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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