01/03/2018 The Papers


01/03/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Coming up in a moment, The Papers.

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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Rachel Cunliffe,

Comment and Features Editor

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of CityAM, and Henry Zeffman,

Political Correspondent

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at the Times.

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Many of tomorrow's front pages

are already in, let's

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take a look at them.

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Starting with The Express,

which carries the warning

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from the National Grid over gas

supplies as Storm Emma sweeps in.

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A picture of a farmer

leading his pregnant ewes

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to shelter is on the front

of the Telegraph while the i reports

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that Britain is encountering

the coldest temperatures

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for 27 years.

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The Metro has a satellite images

from Nasa apparently showing

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the snow that swept

across the UK today

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on its front page, and sticking

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with the severe weather,

the Sun dubs the arrival

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of Storm Emma as EMMA-GEDDON.

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While The Times warns that

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worse could follow -

with the Environment Agency

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issuing six flood warnings.

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Concerns over Russia's nuclear

weapon capability leads the FT -

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following the Russian President's

annual state of the nation address

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earlier today, and The Mirror

tell their readers that a man

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who lost both his arms in a bomb

attack in Iraq 15 years,

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and who the Mirror brought

to the UK, has become a father.

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So the weather leads the majority

of the front pages tomorrow -

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with more to come over

the next few days.

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The's dip into those with both of

you, you will have to become weather

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experts. Rachel, take us to the

Telegraph, Winter in control.

It is

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called! I do not think I realised

quite how cold and how much affect

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it was having on their is part of

the country until I read this glory.

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It is very comprehensive, 1000

schools have closed, the cold Spring

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on record, coldest temperature in 27

years, and if you want that figures

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on this, in terms of car accidents,

in three days, it has already done

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£10 million worth of damage and 8000

car accidents. Pappas in context. We

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have all been whether crazy over the

last couple of days but you can see

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why, it is consumed everything, and

you have got sheep there as well!

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Henry, by all means add further

facts and figures to back!

There is

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this amazing disconnect between the

amazing photos, not just on

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newspaper front pages, but seems we

have seen from our windows of snow

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carpeting the country, but it is

actually quite serious. I know you

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mentioned on the times' front page

the Environment Agency has put out a

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series of coastal flood warnings. We

have seen how serious in the West

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Country, which is where some of

these warnings are, floods have been

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before. All sorts of disruption on

the roads, most train services,

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warning of disruption, or

cross-border trains between England

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and Scotland suspended. There is a

disconnect between the fun of snow

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days as it is for the kids who

schools have been called off and the

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kind of serious effects.

There is a

line at the end there, yesterday

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expected to set a record for the

UK's coldest spring day. It is the

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first day of spring today, which

would greet the previous record low

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of -4.6 degrees in Sunderland in

March 2000 and one. We have not had

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confirmation of that but it could

be.

It could be. The Met Office have

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said, winter is clinging on, giving

us a right old kicking, it is still

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in control. That is the official

view!

On the front of the Metro,

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they have taken the satellite image,

a Nasa satellite image, showing us

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how it looks from up in space.

Rather amazing. I am very far from

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being a meteorological expert. It

appears to be carpeting the North

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Sea here as well so I wonder whether

some of the whitest cloud. It is a

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really striking image. It does show

this combination of the beast from

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the east and Emma is quite

devastating.

One more of this before

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we move on, this is the express.

This is the reference to what might

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be happening all though we are told

this is not affecting domestic

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supplies but there is a warrior of

the gas.

Last night, we were warned

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that the spike in demand might lead

to gas shortages. I read since then

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it is mostly industrial businesses,

factories have been asked to close

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and they think now, having looked at

it, it will not threaten national

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supply, but we are British, we love

to moan about the weather, this is

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different, we do not normally run

out of gas during cold months so

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this is something spectacular.

There

is an interesting point here about

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British reliance on foreign gas. In

2004, Britain was entirely

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self-sufficient in gas from the

North Sea but now imports 60% of it

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so there is also a problem of supply

from the Netherlands and Norway. It

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is not just Emma and the beast from

the East but something to do with

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Britain's gas supply which might

need sorting out. Norway is not in

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the EU, anyway.

Let's move onto

other matters because you just

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mentioned Brexit. Henry, take us

back to the Telegraph because this

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is where Theresa May's speech

tomorrow is featuring. Made's five

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tests to make Brexit a success.

This

is not disconnected from the weather

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either because the speech was meant

to be taking place in Newcastle and

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either because she could not get

there or get back it is now taking

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place in Mansion house in central

London. The five tests are quite

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interesting. They are to respect the

result of the referendum that any

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deal must ensure, protect jobs, be

consistent with a modern outward

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looking Britain and strengthen the

union of the UK. They failed the

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test of reversing any of those

tests, I do not think anyone would

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expect's to strike a deal which does

not respect the referendum will does

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not insure and so on, but the

government wants this to be a

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moment, this is the third of one of

her major Brexit speeches.

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Certainly, the government wants it

to be a moment but the question is

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whether she can find a way to set

out a vision which is satisfactory

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both to Jacob Rees-Mogg and Anna

Subaru.

What does this reveal?

Very

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little. We have a series of Brexit

road map speeches. We have had one

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from Boris Johnson and David Davis

and now have this in the brisk set.

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-- her vision for Brexit. They were

quite bit woolly concepts. This is

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not telling us anything new and from

what we have here it does not set

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out anything practical. There is a

line in the way she says, it is

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achievable because it is an EU's

interest as well as ours.

You think

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that is true?

Logically, yes, it is

true, ball we have seen over the

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last week, particularly with the EU

draft of the Northern Ireland border

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is that the EU is perfectly happy to

play very dangerous games with

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something like the border. They are

happy to play dangerous games with

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trade and tariffs. They are not

playing fair and I think it is naive

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the Theresa May to assume they will

do so in the future.

I agree

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entirely with that. I think the EU

would hit back by saying, well,

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Theresa May or the UK has made its

mind up what it thinks its own

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interest is as well. There is a line

here that there was a special

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meeting of the Cabinet today to sign

of the speech, they all had their

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phones taken away and were locked in

a room in given half an hour to read

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the speech. They then had a big row

about it. David Davis and some other

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Brexiteers had a line taken out of

the speech which was a commitment to

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a binding commitment to match EU

rules on various different sectors

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going forward. They got that watered

down. The EU might say, if on the

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eve of this major speech you cannot

even decide with your Brexit

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secretary what you want how can you

tell us what is in our interest?

But

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if not a tendency for us to see a

public face of it on both sides and

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privately behind-the-scenes rather

different?

Maybe things are going

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better than they look, that is an

optimistic way of looking at it.

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There is a tendency in this country

particularly with former Remainers

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to look at what EU does and assume

they are acting in a neutral way.

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And the way you succeed in

negotiation is to play hardball and

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perhaps to ask for more than you

think you can achieve. Are we doing

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that is effectively?

Probably not.

Certainly on Northern Ireland, we

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should not see the EU is

dispassionately taking a view on

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what is best for Northern Ireland

although they may well think that

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staying in the customs union is

right. They are leveraging a very

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complicated constitutional question,

which has been live for a matter

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centuries. And they are leveraging

it to try to force a political

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crisis in the UK which brings the

UK's vision of Brexit closer to the

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UK's vision of Brexit.

Let's Pulkrab

trait in a different context. The FT

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talking about trade war fears

mounting because what Donald Trump

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said about steel water tariffs.

He

has been incredibly provocative

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towards China in particular, 25%

Paris on steel and 10% on aluminium,

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this is at the heart of American

first protectionist policy. There

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are two things interesting about

this. One is that China... It has

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been aimed at China and trumpet has

been saying to play fair when it

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comes to steel dumping, but most of

the US steel imports are not from

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China anyway, they are from the US's

allied country including the EU and

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Canada, so this will not hit the

country that Trump seems to want it

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to. The second thing I think is

interesting is that this is the same

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week that he has made statements

about government control -- gun

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control, and starting a trade war is

not in line with traditional

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Republican values so Trump is

unpredictable and volatile. Who

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knew?

I think Rachel is right to

point out that this is something

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Donald Trump has been talking about

city was in the campaign trail. His

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base support is very much not a

traditional Republican base of

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support. There are states he won

like Pennsylvania which have voted

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for Democratic presidential

candidates over a series of

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elections but have large mining

communities, blue-collar workers and

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perhaps will not enamoured by

Hillary Clinton and like Donald

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Trump's rhetoric on trade in China.

There is an interesting line here

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that says the pro-trade forces and

the White House thereby Trump

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adviser who used to run Goldman

Sachs would argue against this were

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as economic nationalists in Trump's

administration were arguing for

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this. That is a central tension

between having Donald Trump is

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having a Republican party president.

Let's conclude as talking reasonably

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briefly about Vladimir Putin, if

only because the photograph at the

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front of the is quite arresting.

This comes from his state of the

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nation address and is taken from the

back of the press room I am assuming

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as he was speaking with him on the

big screen. It is quite a haunting

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image, isn't it?

It is a very

threatening image and that is

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exactly what he's intending. You

have got to see this in the context

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of he's running for election for

another six-year term. If it gets,

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which honestly he will, he will have

run across a quarter of the century

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by the end of it. And Putin's

popularity is based on the idea he

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is strong and standing up for

Russia, and the entire speech was

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basically a threat. He said, I hope

all we said today will sober up any

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potential aggressor.

And the FT

mentions a new arms race.

There is a

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note of caution in the piece,

defence analyst saying they are

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sceptical about Putin's developing a

new nuclear power missile. But I

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think the Chinese premier has

signalled his intentions to run

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China for life this week, and Donald

Trump meanwhile sparking trade wars.

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On that uplifting note, thank you

both very much indeed for that. But

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is it that it. You can see the front

pages of the papers online. That is

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on the BBC News website, seven a

week. And if you mist the programme

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on any evening, you can watch it

later on the BBC iPlayer. Thank you

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to Rachel and Henry, and goodbye.

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