05/03/2018 The Papers


05/03/2018

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LineFromTo

for you, it is the Papers. Have a

good one.

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Hello, and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Randeep Ramesh,

Chief Leader Writer at the Guardian

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and Martin Bentham, Home Editor

at the London Evening Standard.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in...

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Let's take a look...

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Red Spy in UK Poison Terror is how

the Sun described the Russian man

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hospitalised in Salisbury

after being exposed

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to an unknown substance.

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That story also the lead for The i,

which comments on how similarities

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maybe drawn between this case

and that of Alexander

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Litvinenko in 2006.

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The events in Salisbury also

the lead for the Telegraph,

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but the paper also reports on plans

by Saudi Arabia to strengthen

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intelligence sharing with Britain.

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The Metro takes a closer look

at some of the big winners at last

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night's Academy Awards.

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The top story in the Financial Times

is how UK airlines' transatlantic

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routes may be cut after Brexit.

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The Guardian carries a large

image of Sergei Skripal -

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the Russian man believed to be

in hospital in Salisbury.

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The Financial Times bucks the trend

and leads on how UK airlines'

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transatlantic routes maybe

negatively affected after Brexit.

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One story, unsurprisingly

dominates most of the front

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pages tonight of course -

the possible poisoning

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of a Russian spy.

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And Bill Turnbull, BBC Breakfast

presenter, opens up with his battle

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for cancer. Misses take a look at

the Russian spy story and we will go

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with the sun. The sun having a lot

of fun with this, but it is not a

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fun story. They have got a man

cleaning up their innate biohazard

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suit. It is a story that does have

echoes of Litvinenko, back in 2006.

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Yes, it plays into the idea that we

are in a sort of proxy war with

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Russia, and he is President Putin

apparently taking out one of his

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traitorous enemies, so the papers

have viewed it, and this unfortunate

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chap is a must buy at -- retired spy

Colonel, Sergei Skripal, found

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slumped outside a bench in

Salisbury, of all places. Apparently

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poisoned by a mysterious substance.

Following on from Litvinenko, if

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this is proved to be poison, and it

does seem to have been perpetrated

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by someone with connections to

Moscow, then the question is how can

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this be allowed to have happened

again, after what happened with

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Alexander Litvinenko?

There are a

lot of ifs, and clearly it may turn

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out to be none of those things, but

on the other hand if it does, I

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suppose the reality is it is not

absolutely possible to stop somebody

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who is determined to do this, and of

course we have been at loggerheads

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really with the Russians ever since

then. Our diplomatic relations have

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never recovered and this will

certainly prevent any restoration of

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diplomatic links with them, and

ultimately the Russians, if they

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wanted to do this type of thing, if

they wanted to do it, I suppose they

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are powerful enough potentially to

be altered do it. However good our

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policing, counterterrorism operation

is, which is pretty good, it is not

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fail-safe. They have plenty of other

things to be looking at as well. I

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think that is probably the reality.

This is another story where people

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think about the papers if they

wanted to make up a story can you

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could not make up a story of this

extraordinary nurse. It goes back to

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Litvinenko, there have been one or

two others, Boris Berezovsky, who

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subsequently died as well, a

businessman in Surrey, who also died

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in circumstances which some people

think of mysterious. So there have

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been a succession. Any Russian who

dies in order circumstances, the

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immediate conclusion that people

want to leap to, it may or may not

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turn out to be correct but certainly

an extraordinary concert.

The i

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going with it as well. What is

interesting about this man is that

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he was deemed a traitor by the

Russians in 2006, and he ended up in

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the UK as a result of a spy swap.

With the famous Anna Chapman, was

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part of a sleeper cell in the United

States. Somehow he was viewed as an

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essential asset, and some of the

papers are reporting he was the

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second most important after the

other Russian defector. It was

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obviously worth something, and he

provided various details of various

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Russian espionage activities. I

suppose coming back to the point is

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how do we stop any of this. You

can't really, because they only have

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to be right once, and we have to be

right all the time. That is the

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problem when you are dealing with

it. We would probably want to say to

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the Russians, two can play at this

game but I am not sure whether that

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is really a British response was top

we want to go around bumping people

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off Moscow? Probably not.

I say

probably for stop we had a very

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robust response after it was

established that Litvinenko had been

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poisoned on the orders of the

Kremlin, ultimately, as the inquest

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established. We couldn't really have

done a great deal more. It has come

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in the context of some overt

statements about the overt

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aggressive intent of Russia towards

this country. So it is not as if we

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have been soft with them. The amount

of blacklisting of Russian

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nationals, where their money goes,

where their assets are, there is a

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series of sanctions we can impose,

but we are not going to get to the

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stage and we are playing John Le

Carre novels out on the streets of

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Moscow.

No, but it does sound like

that on the front page of the

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Telegraph 's top Russian spy fights

for life after poisoning double

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agent who sold secrets to Britain

found collapsed on bench in

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Salisbury. The big worry is what

kind of chemical, as with

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Litvinenko, was potentially used to

poison this man and his companion.

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Apparently a restaurant,

late-breaking news this evening, a

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restaurant in Salisbury has been

closed as a precaution because of

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all this.

They are obviously

concerned as to what the substances.

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Obviously we haven't had any

information as to what the substance

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is and whether they have established

that not. It took some time with the

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Litvinenko thing to establish

exactly what would have been used.

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So it may be the case here. It is

clear from all the pictures you can

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see, and the areas that had been

cordoned off, that there is a great

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keel of concern about this.

A major

incident launched at the hospital

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where these people are being

treated. Sticking with the front

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page of the Telegraph, Trump softens

stance on Paris. Suggestions that he

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will properly and formally announce

a trade walk something he believes

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he can win.

It is an odd thing to

start a walk even for Donald Trump,

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but on the issue of trade, if you

were to clap tariffs on, that would

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hit US consumers. Politics is about

perception, and for him, his base

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has viewed itself as one of the

losers of globalisation, that they

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have pay the price well is others

have got cheaper goods. He is

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probably trying to speak to that

base was that we know there has been

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a row in the White House between

globalists on the one hand and

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economic nationalists on the other,

and economic nationalists have won.

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There has been some background to

Trump's outburst, but he has

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ploughed this furrow for some time,

and it did with him rust belt's

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vote. So I don't think he is being,

he is not reversing.

He is also

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doing that old-fashioned thing of

making a promise of an election and

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following through.

That is a

shocker, isn't it?

I suppose we

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can't blame him for doing that,

whether it turns out to be

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counter-productive or not, that is

another issue.

I suppose the eye

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given should be, should he have made

it a promise in the first place? We

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are talking about global GDP growth

rising. Anything from 1.5%, 2%,

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perhaps even more by the end of the

year. The major economist Saul, it

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seems convincing, in terms of moving

upwards. This is the kind of thing

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that could hit them.

I suppose if

it's partly because of that he can

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get away with it. Possibly.

There is

a public concern about goods which

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are made cheaper through labour

standards and environmental

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standards being low. And for

Americans that is a valid public

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concern. For too long, politicians

haven't. In some respect, give him

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credit. It may be economic nonsense.

It may benefit.

Absolutely. Onto the

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Huffington Post, Martin. A story

that has been bubbling throughout

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the day, Theresa May's housing

announcement gives no guarantee of

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more homes. This is the verdict of

the Huff Post. Theresa May and the

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government have been saying, look,

if you are a developer and you get

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land and you get planning

permission, build a house on it,

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rather than sit on it, waiting for

the land prices to go up. Umaga yes,

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there is a lot of intent from the

government. I suppose the question

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is, and there have been lots of

statement of intent from various

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governments over quite a long period

now I think. Some of them have not

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come to deliver a great deal in the

way of large and as an extra houses.

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That is obviously the allegation

here. The point you make there that

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taking back houses, land, that has

not been built on, some of the

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developers have questioned this and

have said there is not undeveloped

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land they are just sitting on. On

the other hand it is clearly

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potentially a problem, so that could

help. I think the other thing that

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is always missing from this debate

personally is if you are talking

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about house prices, which is often

what is talked about, and

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affordability, just building more

homes on its own does not address

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the full scale of things, because

you have advice led investment,

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foreign investment coming in, there

is a great money flying at housing

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in general and that gets overlooked.

You can build an awful lot more

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houses but it won't necessarily

bring houses prices down.

Clearly

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the Huff Post is a cynical beasts. A

lot of people would say this

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government, the last government

before that, the government before

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that, they have all talked about

building more houses and all of them

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have done nothing about it.

There is

an easy way of building houses,

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councils and old houses, you borrow

to invest. This government has

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refused to do that, which means it

all sounds very radical but it is

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just a tweaking of this system that

is not working.

Sticking plaster.

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People understand that they will

probably be penalised despite the

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good intentions.

OK, briefly, the

front page of the FT, Italy said for

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EU clash after winning four

populists. No suggestion that Italy

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wants to leave the European Union,

but there could be a feud dates

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there. Let's go straight to the back

page of the metro finally. Exclusive

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interview with the BBC, Dan Roan,

our sports editor. And Mr begins

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making it clear that he is not a

cheat.

This is very unsatisfactory

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all-round. Sir Bradley Wiggins is

saying that he didn't cheat, he

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absolutely didn't do what the

Commons committee has alleged, which

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was preaching the ethical

boundaries, not actually breaking

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the rules, per se, because the rules

allowed what took place, these

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therapeutic aids that he had. He is

insisting he has been thrown under

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the line, but it doesn't look great

good. You would like to think

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sportsmen and women can win without

any sort of assistance, and it does

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appear at it too much that this has

happened.

He was a shining light for

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British sport. It has dimmed

somewhat as a result of all of this.

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You would like to win in a way that

everyone thinks you deserve to win.

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Clean. And of course he maintains

his innocence. Absolutely. Good to

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see you both, many thanks for that.

That is it for the papers tonight,

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don't forget you can see all of them

on the BBC news website. If you've

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missed the papers any evening, you

know how to log into iPlayer by now

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I sincerely hope. Thanks again.

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No need to wait until tomorrow morning to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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