14/03/2018 The Papers


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14/03/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are Hugh Muir,

Associate Editor at

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The Guardian and Steve Hawkes,

Deputy Political Editor at The Sun.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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Tomorrow's front pages,

starting with...

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The Financial Times,

which has a picture

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of a smiling Stephen Hawking,

who has died at the age of 76 today.

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The I has a special edition tomorrow

celebrating the life

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of the mathematician,

who was hailed as 'The greatest

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British thinker since Newton'.

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The Metro turns its attentions to

events in Parliament with a rather

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blunt interpretation of Theresa

May's expulsion of 23 Russian

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diplomats.

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'Push offski'.

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The Guardian says they treated the

British deadline with sarcasm,

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contempt and defiance.

The Sun says Jeremy Corbyn is

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eating's puppet after he refused to

accept proof Moscow was behind the

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attack.

The male says the Labour leader

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disowned by his colleagues for

failing to back Theresa May's tough

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stance against Russia.

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Meanwhile, the Daily Express claims

that a Russian businessman found

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dead at his London home earlier this

week was on Putin's 'hit-list'.

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The Telegraph has a warning from the

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson

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that Britain cannot sit back as he

unveils measures to tackle can call

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and biological warfare.

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So, Stephen Hawking and the Prime

Minister's sanctions sharing the

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front pages. Let's start with the

Metro and that stop headline Push

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Offski. 23 spies to be rejected,

talking about a boycott of the World

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Cup. The headline is Theresa May,

what she said, will make a

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difference?

It sounds robust and

they are trying to the impact in not

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any one single measure but a

complete package of measures. The

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ejection of what they call

undeclared agents. Spies, I think!

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If they knew they were here, why not

fling them out before? The Royal

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Family will be down about not going

to the World Cup. So the general

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package is supposed to provide the

force here. But it is very difficult

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because what she needs to do is to

looked off and make it look as if

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she is responding in a robust way.

-- to look tough. But there is not

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much you can do. The Russians have

given her no scope for any

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meaningful action. She does not

really have allies to go to to put

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together any real package to get

Moscow's attention. So to some

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extent, I think it is bluster and

from the reaction from the Russians

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today, they kind of know that.

That

is the big issue, how much

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international support Theresa May

can get. She spoke to various

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leaders and they sound supportive,

the question is whether it is more

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than words.

We saw friends hedging

its bets today. And the US were very

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strong that the Security Council

tonight -- two. It is the last thing

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Theresa May needs, she is stuck with

Brexit and imploding Tory Party and

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the West relations with Russia since

1985. I think the key thing is how

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Russia retaliates and what it does

tomorrow. And as the Metro picks up,

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the World Cup, we will send a team

and what happens to the fans who

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have bought tickets, now thinking

about in three months' time, can we

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be safe? What will happen in Moscow?

And they have to budget travel

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advice nearer the time.

There was

travel advice to date saying be

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aware of anti-British sentiment,

three months before the tournament

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begins.

The second page of the

Guardian. What you are talking

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about, Russia threatens retaliation.

Presumably, they will expel our

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people from Moscow, that would be

expected. The fear is whether it

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goes further. One Minister said

today, this is just the beginning,

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not the end. The UK is expecting

some kind of retaliation.

A big

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worry basing to be taking their

time. There is no particular

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pressure. So the reaction today has

been pretty much, as Theresa May

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said, sarcasm and defiance. We saw

them mocking her reaction to it so

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far. Today at the United Nations,

they have been pretty jocular to

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some extent about the way they have

reacted. If the hope was she would

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get their attention, she does not

seem to have done that in the wake

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she would have hoped.

And the other

hand, she does not have the option

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to do nothing. She has to react. A

nerve agent used on British soil.

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She has to say and do something and

a lot of MPs talking about this

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Magnitsky Act that could get to

people they have not got to before

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from Russia.

There is a limit, what

can you do to change the way Russia

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behaves?

They have invaded Ukraine

and annexed Crimea and they tried to

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assassinate, if you believe

everything, the President of

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Montenegro. There is a limit to what

she can do. This is a good day for

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Theresa May and what she does well,

we have seen her in environments

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where she does not do well, but she

has studied the evidence, she goes

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into the hand and -- house and

commands the stage and delivers. How

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much will this change behaviour? She

is under threat with Brexit, how

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does the world rally round to help?

I agree to some extent, but I think

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have seen Theresa May on the set

piece occasions looking really

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impressive. It is the delivery. You

have the sense there is a pattern of

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her having a good day and in the

days that followed, everything

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either not coming to fruition or

unravelling.

The Telegraph have a

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different angle. Something we have

heard from different Conservative

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MPs about bolstering defences, a lot

saying spending 2% of GDP on defence

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is not enough and we have to do more

when it comes to things like cyber

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attacks. Gavin Williamson the

Defence Secretary making a big

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speech tomorrow where he will call

for exactly that.

This is about the

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country want to be in the future, do

we spend more on defence or the NHS

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which marked the Defence Secretary

with a big speech talking about more

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preparation for chemical warfare.

Every soldier will be VAX --

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vaccinated against anthrax. Gavin

Williamson again is speaking to the

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Telegraph, the mainstay of the Tory

vote, suggesting more about his

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plans for the future!

At a time of

apparent crisis, you have the

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internal Tory agony is playing out.

Gavin Williamson making a speech as

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part of his wider plan. The

Telegraph have merged this into

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their story about what is happening

with Russia.

I guess it is the time

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to strike when this is happening.

To

ask for more money. This was on the

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grid, but interesting where it has

gone. To be fair to Gavin

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Williamson, last month, he said,

Russia is a huge threat. Cyber plots

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all the time. Everybody said, what

is he on?

But look what has

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happened. It does add to the feeling

that as crises occur, what takes

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precedence is the internal

machinations of the Conservative

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Party.

The Daily Express, this is

the headline, the case of Nikolai

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Glushkov, found dead in Kingston,

London, this week, so suggestion of

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foul play. But talking to people

today, they say there is no evidence

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of that, but the counterterrorism

police had been brought in to look

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at it which is quite significant.

This goes to the idea of a hit list.

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We will get onto this with Labour.

The idea of the evidence. The nerve

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agent used as a calling card to say,

if you mess with us, Putin is

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saying, if you betray Russia, you

will come to a grisly end. Now every

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death of a Russian in England will

be perhaps linked to a hit list.

Do

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you think people are getting

alarmed? This is directed at certain

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people potentially, but the

public...

They will get alarmed

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because these are not things they

can deploy precisely. As we see with

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what happened in Salisbury, other

people were affected. Not least the

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first police officer on the scene,

said people are alarmed and they

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have a right to be so. The thing

that worries me, things do seem to

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be spiralling out of control to some

extent, in that if what we see is

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right, Russia appears to almost be

able to act with impunity. And we

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don't seem able on our own to do

very much about that. I think that

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speaks to the fact we don't have any

sort of international consensus on

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what to do about Russia. It is

difficult to deal with this on our

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own. We going to need allies and

that is something we are struggling

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with.

And in theory, there are two

killers walking around Britain with

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a bag of nerve agent.

Now, Putin's

poppet. A pretty big row in the

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Labour Party today after Jeremy

Corbyn got up and did not

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specifically blame Russia and a lot

of Labour MPs unhappy.

A huge story

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tomorrow. Near Griffiths the Shadow

Defence Secretary has come out in a

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scathing attack on Jeremy Corbyn and

Emily Thornberry made it very clear

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she disagreed with the official

stance.

His quite important speech.

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And this is going to run. We have

heard rumours of a resignation from

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the Shadow Cabinet and Jeremy Corbyn

has said, this is a despicable act,

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but he did not condemn Russia or

blame Russia.

He says there is not

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enough evidence yet.

And his Chief

of Staff said, remember the WMD, it

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was never proven, how can we prove

this? Corbyn is a pacifist but it

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will cause so many ruptures in

labour.

We need to talk about

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Stephen Hawking before we run out of

time, who died today and people talk

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about him is possibly the most

famous scientist since Newton. It is

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incredible. He had this populism

which not many scientists have.

He

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is one of the National treasures,

the national treasure's National

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treasure. He was so loved across the

country by people who probably did

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not understand the first thing! --

we are amongst them. But he was much

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loved. On personal grounds, we know

that when he was 21, he was

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diagnosed with motor neurone disease

and was told he had to agree is, an

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extraordinary thing to get to this

age. And there is his scientific

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expertise which are extraordinary.

At the Guardian, we would claim him

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in terms of the progressive things

he did, particularly his advocacy on

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behalf of the NHS. Put that

together, and you have someone that

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when they pass, you feel as a

newspaper that you really want to

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pull out all the stops and to do

them justice, and I think you'll

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find in all the papers tomorrow,

they do that.

Just quickly, another

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story which caught our eye about the

Government saving the pennies after

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a bit of a storm caused mainly by

you, Steve, that they were going to

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scrap...

The fact we can talk about

one of the greatest scientist

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honoured and we get to a row about

the pennies! This sums up the darker

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side, the black hole of government

communications! One David Treasury

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puts out a call for evidence of the

future of money which suggests one

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and to be coins will be short for

the world and then, we never said

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that! And the next day, Downing

Street says, we listen the public,

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it it is not going to happen and

they are targeting a £50 note

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because it is a bigger problem with

forgeries. I think there have been

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four budget U-turns. This went in

less than 24 hours.

We will finish

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with the cartoon. It says, the old

wishing well. And then it says, no

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copper coins, contactless card

payment only. So that is the end of

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pennies because nobody uses them any

more. Or not.

Do you like them? I

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don't think many people use them but

it is another step in the erosion of

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money.

One group is very happy,

amusement arcade operators, they are

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over the moon.

That's true.

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That's it for The Papers tonight.

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Don't forget, you can see the front

pages of the papers online

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on the BBC News website.

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It's all there for you, seven days

a week, at bbc.co.uk/papers.

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And if you miss the programme any

evening, you can watch it

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later on BBC iPlayer.

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Thank you very much. Good night.

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Thank you very much. Good night.

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