18/03/2018 The Papers


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18/03/2018

No need to wait to see what's in the papers - tune in for a lively and informed conversation about the next day's headlines.


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Hello and welcome to our look ahead

to what the papers will be

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bringing us tomorrow.

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With me are The New Statesman's

special correspondent,

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Stephen Bush and Rosamund Urwin,

Financial Services correspondent

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at the Sunday Times.

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Many of tomorrow's front

pages are already in.

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The FT leads with more

on the pressure being placed

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on Facebook to explain allegations

that data from millions of its users

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helped President Trump

win the US election.

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The Guardian also has that story.

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It says an investigation has been

launched into possible data breaches

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committed by the firm

Cambridge Analytica,

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which was used by Donald Trump's

election campaign.

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Both Cambridge Analytica

and Facebook deny any wrongdoing.

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The Metro has more on the Foreign

Secretary's rejection of claims made

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by Russia that the chemical used

to poison Sergei and Yulia Skripal

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was made in the UK.

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The I reports on President Putin's

landslide election win tonight

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along with his reaction

to the dispute over the origin

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of the nerve agent

used in Salisbury.

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The Telegraph has details on plans

by the government to introduce

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stricter regulations and taxation

on tech giants operating in Britain.

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The Times says the gambling watchdog

is to relax its drastic

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recommendation to limit stakes

on fixed-odds betting machines.

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The Mirror reports on the arrest

of TV presenter Ant McPartlin

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after he was allegedly involved

in a car accident in south-west

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London.

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And the Sun is leading

on that story too.

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It says the star was arrested

on suspicion of drink driving.

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So a fair old spread of different

stories on the front pages but, of

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course, Russia is never far away and

that is where we will begin with the

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times. A landslide victory to put on

thanks to Britain and the suggestion

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is that the confrontation with

Britain over various matters has

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boosted and bolstered the victory

that Vladimir Putin is enjoying.

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That is what people have said, that

some analysis of saying that it

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turned out to be a boost.

Ultimately, the main factor in this

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election was that Vladimir Putin was

able to choose his opponent, and

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effectively was able to run the

rules of the election. His main

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opponent was this hard because of a

fraud conviction that he says was

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false. I don't really think that

Britain's reaction one way or

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another has been that important, not

the least because it had Britain not

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reacted at all than he would have

looked even stronger going into the

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election. I don't really see what

else we might have done.

The fact

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that turnout dropped from 65 to 60%

is being commented upon.

There is a

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lovely line in this from a

spokesperson for the campaign. I

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would like to thank the UK for

helping with this high turnout which

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we ourselves could not have dreamt

of. Of course, that could quite

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easily have they meet this happened.

One of the things that they did if

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they offered little incentive to

come out and vote. Coffee,

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chocolate, whatever. Of course it is

the only way people can oppose

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Hooton's re- election, I not voting

at all. That is what you do when you

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have no choice on the ballot paper.

If it is down to 60%, I think that

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was two hours before polls closed,

so there is a chance the roads, but

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if it is that then that is a slight

dent in his otherwise unstoppable

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six more years.

Looking at the sun.

Piles of poison. The Foreign

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Secretary saying that Russia has

been stockpiling the nerve agent for

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quite sometime. I think this was

Boris this morning.

He is saying

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exactly that that they are stock

stock boiling -- stockpiling it. The

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suggestion was that it might come

from within the UK. But Boris

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Johnson says that the trail does

lead inevitably to the Kremlin.

And

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the Daily Telegraph goes one further

without saying that Russian

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dissident bodies could be exhumed to

test for Novichok. They want to look

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for traces of it.

There have been

various people critical of what you

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put's regime who have lived here in

the UK and died in mysterious

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circumstances. The Telegraph is

suggesting that some of these people

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will be dug up and have their bodies

tested for the presence of this

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nerve agent. Because it is

undetectable in its preprepared

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form. So you have two harmless

agents that are only deadly when

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combined, it could be some people

who have been attacked with it and

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we have not noticed until now. The

Telegraph suggests that we will dig

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it up. If that happens, that puts

the government in a bind because at

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the moment they have expelled 23

diplomats and there has been some

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tit-for-tat expulsion. At that

point, if things start to escalate

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it is not clear what the British

government can do that will not

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leave them looking weak and unable

to respond to the Russian

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government.

Moving on to look at

Facebook and, more widely technology

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firms to dig the Guardian, firstly.

Pressure on Facebook and data firm

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over a mass breach of personal data

files. This is that Cambridge

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Analytica. And a reporter who has

been looking at them for quite some

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time with some deep investigation,

what is the suggestion here?

The

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suggestion is that data was

improperly obtained by Cambridge

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Analytica under the cover of being

for research purposes. It was

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actually used to make advertisers

and influence the American

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presidential election. Alexander Nix

testified to the Commons Select

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Committee in the past and he is now

being accused of being economical

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with the truth. He and Mark

Zuckerberg will be callback to

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account for how Facebook keeps

control of the user's data and

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prevents it from being used in ways

we may not like.

Both organisations

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and Facebook say that we have done

nothing wrong at all. But it is

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quite sensitive, the use of people's

data. We are supposed to give our

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consent for how it is used.

I always

wonder if this is one of those

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things that really splits people.

Some people do seem to be rather

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blase about how their data is used,

actually. And then there is another

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group of us who really feel that

this is a pressing issue of our time

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that needs addressing. I think we

will see a lot more scrutiny of the

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tech firms in this regard. And I

think we will, you know, the whole

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thing of their original sort of

slightly idealistic fix the world...

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This is where it turns. It actually

says OK, we have some real problems

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with the way this operates --

companies operate. We have things

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like this where it comes out and we

have a light shone on them and they

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do not look great.

That leads us

nicely to the Telegraph and the wild

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West era of technology firms. A

cabinet minister responsible for

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overseeing them says that things

will get more difficult. How?

This

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is not just about regulation. It is

also talking about tax cost, of

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course, many of these companies not

only have gotten away with a

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regulation like existence for a

while, I have also not paid much in

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the way of corporation tax. And so

he is talking about looking at the

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way they operate, the major

technology firms, and looking at

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forcing them to accept increasing

regulation. Some companies are ahead

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of us. Germany has strict rules,

rules about finding tech companies

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if they do not handle abusive or

hate speech adequately.

I wonder why

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we have been behind other countries.

We have been talking about the

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problems of lack of regulation and

certainly lack of tax being paid for

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years.

It is probably because our

legal structure is permissive. If it

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is not strict forbidden you can do.

Or so, for a long time, pervading

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ideology of the government party has

been that basically freedom is great

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and, yeah, these are just wonderful

entrepreneurs. Thing the tech firms

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have been able to do and Matt

Hancock almost says this is become

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an entirely new type of company who

does not need to follow any of the

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old rules. Are Facebook pretends it

is not a publisher. Actually, as he

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says, that era of pretending that

these are not normal companies that

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should follow normal rules is, I

think, thankfully, coming to an end.

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Yes. They have really -- reached a

certain level of maturity. Looking

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at city AM added every -- different

story. Campaigners plead for a tax

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break as 18 pubs close every week.

This is a campaign that always

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fights for tax breaks at pubs. Here

they say that pubs are being hit by

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a triple whammy of high beer duty,

business rates and VAT. This is

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where it is squeezing a lot of

businesses, not just pubs. But they

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point out that 460 pubs closed in

the second half of 2017. Does

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obviously sound like a high number,

that is almost 18 a week. Most are

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in London however at the same time,

they have to find ways to operate

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and some pubs are frightening in

this environment.

How much of it is

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down to our changing habits? People

drinking at home more?

Pubs have a

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long standing problem of people

drinking less alcoholic drinks in

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general and drinking more of them at

home. However, business rates are a

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big looming problem for the high

street and a big looming problem for

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the government as well. The effect

of them so far seems to have been

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much more severe than many people

expected. ICD my own part of London,

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businesses that succeed in terms of

bums on seats but do not succeed in

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terms of making enough money because

of the raise in business rate. I

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think the lobby group has a point

here and we are in danger of having

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an homogenous high-street.

Business

rates disproportionately hit certain

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places and London would be one of

them.

That is it for the papers

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tonight. You can see all the front

pages of the papers online.

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Therefore you seven days a

[email protected], don't fret, if you

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miss it you can watch it later on I

play a. Thank you to both of you for

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sharing your Sunday night with a.

Film review is next.

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