05/05/2017 Westminster in Review


05/05/2017

Keith Macdougall and Alicia McCarthy present the highlights and key moments from the last two years in a look back at Parliament since the 2015 election.


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Transcript


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Hello and welcome to our look back at the UK's 56th Parliament.

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It was the shortest parliament for more than 40 years,

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But although it was short, the parliament witnessed

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extraordinary upheavals in British politics.

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Two years ago, we had different party leaders,

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the UK was a solid member of the European Union and the Brexit

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In the 24 months, there have been departures.

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As I once said, I was the future once.

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In accordance with the wishes of the British people,

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the United Kingdom is leaving the European Union.

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They hold our values in contempt, they hold our belief in tolerance

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..a new approach to Prime Minister's Questions...

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Maureen wrote to me today and she writes with a heavy heart.

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..and robust exchanges at Westminster's committees.

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You said you don't want to be here all day, true.

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Few could have predicted what events lay in store,

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as the ancient ceremony of the State Opening of Parliament

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went ahead on the 27th of May 2015, the 52nd time that Her Majesty

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Against most expectations and the predictions of the pollsters,

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David Cameron won an outright general election victory

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No coalition with the Liberal Democrats would be needed this time.

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Following Ed Miliband's resignation, Labour was led by its acting

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No words were exchanged between the party leaders as MPs

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filed through Parliament to hear the Queen's Speech and

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the legislative plans for a government expected

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My government will renegotiate the United Kingdom's relationship

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And pursue reform of the European Union for the benefit

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As she congratulated the Prime Minister, the acting

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Labour leader made a remark that would turn out to be

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Although he and I have many differences, people have pointed out

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One of the things that we have in common is that we are both by our

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So we will support the government's bill for a referendum

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We believe it will be better for Britain if we stay

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We have a strategy, a very clear strategy of negotiation,

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The bill in this Queen's Speech makes it clear that the referendum

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must take place at the latest by the end of 2017.

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The new third party with 56 MPs was the Scottish Nationalists.

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May I congratulate the Prime Minister for his election success.

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It is an honour to reply to the Queen's speech on behalf

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of the third party in the Houses of Commons, the Scottish

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Can I say at the start of the Parliament that the convention

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that we don't clap in this chamber is very, very, very long established

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and widely respected and it would be appreciated if members would show

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The Queen returned to politicians' minds in September 2015

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when she became the longest reigning monarch in the country's history,

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surpassing the record of Queen Victoria.

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Her Majesty had reigned for 63 years, seven months and two days.

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On the day she was opening a new train line to the Scottish borders.

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The Prime Minister talked about her many duties.

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Whether it is something we suspect she enjoys,

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like the Highland games, or something we suspect she might be

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slightly less keen on, such as spending New Year's Eve

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in the Millennium Dome, she never ever falters.

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We on these benches had hoped that she would now be on her 13th.

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She reigns over 140 million people, that is a huge number,

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nearly as many as the number of the Labour Party's

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That remark about the size of Labour's membership was a none

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too subtle reference to the long, drawn-out labour leadership election

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To enliven a potentially dull contest, Labour MPs had let

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into the race the backbencher Jeremy Corbyn, a veteran with a long

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And to the consternation and amazement of most Labour

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MPs, Mr Corbyn quickly became the favourite.

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He won by a landslide and soon he was doing his first

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I have taken part in many events around the country and had

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conversations with many people about what they thought about this

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place, our Parliament, our democracy and our conduct

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And many told me that they thought Prime Minister's Question Time

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was too theatrical, that Parliament was out of touch and too theatrical,

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and that they wanted things done differently.

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But above all, they wanted their voice heard in Parliament.

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If we are able to change Prime Minister's Questions to make

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it a more genuine exercise in asking questions and answering

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questions, no one would be more delighted than me.

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So a new approach to Prime Minister's Questions

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and a fresh look to the House of Commons generally.

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177 new MPs had been elected in May and they all had

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By convention, these are noncontroversial.

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But a new Conservative MP decided to dispense with that tradition.

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Heidi Allen use her maiden to launch a withering attack government smack

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announced cuts to tax credits for working families.

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The Prime Minister has asked us that everything we do must

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Cutting tax credits before wages rise does not achieve that.

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Showing children that their parents would be better off not working

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Sending a message to the poorest and most vulnerable in our society

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that we do not care does not achieve that either.

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In previous parliaments, Conservative governments assuming

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they could always count on the support of peers.

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Not these days, they are no longer at Tory majority in the Lords.

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The leader pleaded for compromise on the tax credits issue.

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I had been to see the Chancellor this morning at number

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11. And I can confirm that he would listen very carefully,

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were the House to express its concern in the way

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that it is precedented for us to do so.

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A Labour peer said that the Lords could support the government.

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Or we can be supportive instead of those 3 million families facing

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letters at Christmas telling them on average they will lose

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A letter which will take away 10% of their income.

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Peers voted down the tax credit changes.

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So what would the Chancellor do in the face of that Lords rejection?

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I've listened to the concerns, I hear and understand them and because

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I've been able to announce today an improvement in the public finances,

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the simplest thing to do is not to faze these changes in but to avoid

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them altogether. Tax credits are being phased out anyway as we

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introduce universal credit. That reversal was just the first in a

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series of U-turns at the Treasury. Four months later, another change

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of heart, this time over large cuts George Osborne had made

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to disability benefits. Iain Duncan Smith resigned

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from the Cabinet in protest. A few days later,

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the Chancellor dropped his While the reforms proposed

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to personal independence payments two weeks ago drew on the work

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of an independent review, We have listened and

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they will not go ahead. Even if they had, this government

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is spending more on disabled people than the last Labour

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government ever did. He has made a welcome

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U-turn but shouldn't he acknowledge that was a mistake

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and that he should say sorry for it? I have just said it,

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that's where we have made a mistake, where we have got things wrong,

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we listen and learn. But where is the apology

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from the Labour Party Earlier, George Osborne had shown

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some nifty common skills. When Labour's John McDonald read

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from Chairman Mao's little red book. So the Shadow Chancellor literally

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stood at the dispatch box and read out from chairman

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Mao's little red book. And look, it is

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personal signed copy. The problem is half

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the Shadow Cabinet have been sent This was the 56th Parliament

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of the United Kingdom but how The Scottish Nationalist group

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of MPs were now the third largest Naturally they campaigned for more

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powers for Scotland, but they also campaigned

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against something, namely changes the government wanted to make

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to the way that this place is run. Specifically, they were objecting

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to something that rather ominously became known as evil -

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English votes for English laws. For the first time, Scottish MPs

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could be excluded from voting It gave a new task to

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the Speaker and his deputies. There will now be a joint debate

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on the consent motion for England and Wales and the consent

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motion for England. I remind honourable members that

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although all members may speak in the debate,

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if there are divisions, only members representing

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constituencies in England and Wales may vote on the consent motion

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for England and Wales. And only members representing

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constituencies in England may vote For the first time in the history

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of this House, this Parliament, members of Parliament will be banned

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from participating in divisions of this House based

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on nationality and geographic One of the defeated Scottish

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politicians in the huge advance of the SNP at the 2015 election had

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been the former Liberal Democrat A short time into the Parliament,

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came the sad news that Mr Kennedy If I may, I'd like to direct

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these words at Donald. He led a party of the centre-left

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with dignity and compassion. And when you are older,

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you will know your mum and dad believed in a cause

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greater than themselves. The reality is that it is not

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what you have done, it is who you are and Charles Kennedy

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was a very, very special man. Donald, you should be really

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I love him to bits, I am proud to call him my friend,

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Away from these shores, the gruesome long, drawn-out

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The terror group Islamic State, also known as Isis or Isil had taken

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control of parts of neighbouring Iraq in 2014.

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The Commons at that time voted in favour of British air strikes

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on areas controlled by Isis in Iraq but not on territory

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So should British air strikes be extended to Syria.

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In autumn of 2015, ministers were advised strongly against.

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A night of terrorist carnage on the doorstep

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of Britain dramatically changed political opinion.

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Three teams of terrorists had carried out a planned

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and coordinated operation at the heart of Paris.

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The mood at Westminster was now different.

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A motion was put before MPs to extend British air strikes

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to cover Islamic State targets in Syria as well as.

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A marathon 10-hour debate in December 2015 turned

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into the ultimate decision for MPs, to MPs, to go to war or not.

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I hope that at the end of it all the House will come together

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in large numbers for Britain to play its part in defeating these

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evil extremists and taking the action that is needed now

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The issue now is whether extending British bombing from Iraq to Syria

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is likely to reduce or increase that threat to Britain.

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And whether it will counter or spread the terror campaign Isil

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The answers do not make the case for the government motion.

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On the contrary, they are a warning stepped back.

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A vote against yet another ill-fated twist in this

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I share the horror and revulsion of the recent atrocities in Paris,

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Beirut, Syria and elsewhere yet I have still to hear convincing

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evidence to suggest that the UK bombing Isis targets in Syria

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is likely to increase security here in Britain or help bring

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This is the toughest call I think I have ever had to make,

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maybe ever and certainly in this House.

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And what pushes me in the direction of voting for action is above all

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things of the United Nations resolution 249, which calls for us

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to eradicate the safe haven that Isis have,

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The closing words of liberated and Hilary Benn in favour of military

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action in open defiance of his party leader Jeremy Corbyn came to be seen

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as a vintage Commons performance. Revolves been defined by our

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internationalism. We are here faced by fascists. Not

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just their calculated brutality but their belief that they are superior

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to every single one of us in this chamber tonight and all of the

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people that we represent. They hold us in contempt. They hold our values

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in contempt, they hold our belief in tolerance and decency in contempt,

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they hold our democracy, the means by which we will make our decision

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tonight in content. But what we know about fascists is that they need to

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be defeated. It is now time for us to do our bit in Syria. And that is

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why I ask my colleagues to vote for this motion tonight. Afterwards, MPs

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voted by a clear majority military action. UK air strikes on biased

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targets in Syria started soon after that debate. 17 months on, the RAF

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has conducted more than 1200 air strikes across Iraq and Syria as

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part of a coalition of countries committed to defeating his neck.

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Their operations to remove items might have been more effective in

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Iraq and Syria, for the six-year long brutal civil war continues. A

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slice of regional history came to an end in 2016 with the financial

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collapse of British home stores. A familiar sight for eight decades in

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many a high street. A Parliamentary enquiry was soon underway into quiet

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BHS had collapsed with debts totalling ?1.3 billion. Its former

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owner, one of putting it in wealthiest businessmen, Sir Philip

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Green, was facing MPs. Nothing is more sad than how this has ended. We

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have a pretty good track record as a company, our existing business, the

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average day in our head office is 11 or 12 years. The mine not looking at

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me like that all the time, is truly disturbing. Why is that we did

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Saville itself BHS to a racing driver who had me they made bankrupt

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twice. Unfortunately, sadly, it was the wrong order. We can keep going

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over. You said you don't want you here all day, you'd be here for the

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rest of your life, would I do that you'll again, no. I'm sorry we did

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it. Three and half hours, you seem a very dominant personality. Ten of

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you and one of me. Believe me, you hold your own, but you seem

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extraordinarily thin-skinned to quite courteous questions in respect

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of the selling of BHS, did anybody, particularly nonexecutive directors

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say, I'm not certain this is correct, can we challenge on this.

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That doesn't seem to be the culture of the organisation. That's your

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opinion. The slow passage of the EU referendum bill in the final months

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of 2015 made certain the people of Britain would be taking part in a

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vote on putting it continued EU membership. But would it be 2016 or

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2017? With David Cameron go early goal late? And just who would be

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campaigning for Britain to stay in and who would be wanting get out? In

:18:58.:19:03.

the Commons, Labour was indulging in plenty of teasing of Cabinet

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ministers. He can't tell us in or out. Is an out, isn't it? Come out.

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The Labour Party has a leader who has changed his mind twice in the

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last few months. They claim to support reform European Union but

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won't say what they want to reform. Soon the pretence of unity was

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ended. Cabinet ministers were set free to campaign on both sides of

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the debate. And a clutch of high-profile levers were quickly in

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front of the cameras. Their campaign for a British exit from the EU was

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soon known as Brexit. The remain is never found a similar slogan. On the

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20th of February, Mr Cameron announced the date of the

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referendum, Thursday the 23rd of June. David Cameron had expected. On

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fourth cap might remain from his close friend of the Justice

:19:57.:20:02.

Secretary Michael Gove. Michael Gove had other ideas, announcing he'd be

:20:03.:20:04.

backing Leave, a beautiful friendship was never the same again.

:20:05.:20:09.

Even worse for David Cameron was the loss of support from the outgoing

:20:10.:20:15.

Mayor of London, Boris Johnson. And so the referendum arguments began.

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The claims and counterclaims were made. One pledge on the side of the

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league campaign bus stating how the weekly cost of Brit in's EU

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membership could be spent instead became especially well-known. The

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public crude suspicious of the forecasts. The committee sessions

:20:33.:20:35.

were looking at the issues both big and small. One of the rules that you

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say, one of the ludicrous rules and I quote, and EU rule that says you

:20:42.:20:47.

can't recycle a tea bag and children under eight can't blow up balloons.

:20:48.:20:51.

The European Commission in on websites as adult supervision is

:20:52.:20:55.

required in the case the use of an inflated balloons by children under

:20:56.:21:03.

eight. I have to say in my household, only children under eight

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blow up balloons. I do think that it is absolutely ludicrous to have this

:21:10.:21:13.

kind of prescription. At a European level. At a European level. Do you

:21:14.:21:18.

not see that leaving Europe puts at risk inward investment from

:21:19.:21:26.

companies? I've heard all the same stuff on the euro, I don't buy it.

:21:27.:21:30.

But one week until polling day, the increasingly bitter campaign came to

:21:31.:21:33.

a sudden shuddering halt. Report of a stabbing and shooting involving

:21:34.:21:41.

the MP Jo Cox. Various information at this stage. The country was

:21:42.:21:45.

horrified that an ordinary member of Parliament can be brutally killed

:21:46.:21:49.

while going about her normal work in her west Yorkshire constituency. A

:21:50.:21:54.

far right extremist, Thomas Maier was later jailed for life for the

:21:55.:21:59.

murder of Jo Cox. The public soon showed its huge respect for the MP.

:22:00.:22:04.

Parliament was recalled briefly from its short referendum break. On Jo

:22:05.:22:08.

Cox's empty seat on the Commons where two roses. Jo Cox believed in

:22:09.:22:15.

a better world and she fought for it every day of her life. With an

:22:16.:22:20.

energy and the zest for life that would exhaust most people. And she

:22:21.:22:26.

was brave. Her energy and effectiveness where Ana Inspiration.

:22:27.:22:31.

Last, let me say this, Batley will elect a new MP but now want... I

:22:32.:22:41.

can't ever recall seeing a sad, negative and without hope. She once

:22:42.:22:45.

told me on a one-to-one meeting at Oxfam as my manager, she didn't do

:22:46.:22:49.

touchy-feely and I was being too emotional, we needed to get on with

:22:50.:22:56.

it and we needed to sort out the campaign we were working on. The

:22:57.:23:01.

public wondered if the shock of the MP's murder might produce a quieter

:23:02.:23:07.

more considered form of politics as the referendum campaign entered its

:23:08.:23:11.

final few days. People flocked to London's Wembley Arena for a two our

:23:12.:23:17.

debate, leading figures in the leaves and Dodt Remain camp 's slug

:23:18.:23:23.

it out. The button I love works with its friends and neighbours, it

:23:24.:23:27.

doesn't walk away from them. And if we vote Leave and take back control,

:23:28.:23:32.

In both are to be on course to our country's Independence Day.

:23:33.:23:39.

In both are to be on course to victory. The polls closed at ten and

:23:40.:23:45.

counting started. First indications suggested that Leave had polled

:23:46.:23:49.

strongly. It became clear that the story was going only one way. In the

:23:50.:23:54.

small hours, Nigel Farage of Ukip, the man who had devoted years of his

:23:55.:24:02.

life to fighting the EU, was triumphant. As dawn broke, it was

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all over for rain. The British people have spoken and the answer is

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that we are out. For many, it was a bit amusing moment. Britain had

:24:15.:24:19.

But the sense of the world was only But the sense of the world was only

:24:20.:24:23.

added to shortly after 8:00am outside Downing Street. I will do a

:24:24.:24:29.

thing I can as Prime Minister to steady the ship over the coming

:24:30.:24:32.

weeks and months, but I do not think it would be right for me to try to

:24:33.:24:37.

be the captain that steers our country to its next destination. So

:24:38.:24:42.

now we have a Prime Minister heading for the exit. The politicians spent

:24:43.:24:45.

the weekend after the referendum recovering from a whirlwind of

:24:46.:24:52.

events. It was not the result I wanted nor the believe is best for

:24:53.:24:56.

the country I love but there can be no doubt about the result. It is

:24:57.:25:00.

quite shameful that politicians make claims that they knew to be false

:25:01.:25:05.

and promises that they knew could not be delivered. Leaving aside the

:25:06.:25:08.

constitutional turmoil, the damage to the economy and the uncertainty

:25:09.:25:11.

that hangs over Britain's place in the world, the leaders of the Brexit

:25:12.:25:17.

campaign have engendered an atmosphere where some people believe

:25:18.:25:21.

it is open season for racism and xenophobia. Does he agree with me

:25:22.:25:28.

that there should be an early general election? Can I ask to

:25:29.:25:33.

condemn clearly those people who are almost implying that decent people

:25:34.:25:37.

all over this country who voted to leave the European Union are somehow

:25:38.:25:44.

closet racists? At lunchtime, sterling fell to a 31 year low

:25:45.:25:49.

against the dollar. If you break it, you own it, so who owns this

:25:50.:25:54.

particular adjustment? Is a Prime Minister who called the referendum

:25:55.:25:57.

or the right honourable member for Oxbridge who exploited it? I met

:25:58.:26:03.

dilemma reference to Boris Johnson who people assumed was on course to

:26:04.:26:07.

fill the vacancy caused by Cameron's recognition. -- a reference to Boris

:26:08.:26:12.

Johnson. For many, the country looks to be in limbo. The Remain side

:26:13.:26:17.

looked for reasons for defeat. The Labour leader was accused of not

:26:18.:26:21.

doing enough campaigning. There was an orchestrated series of

:26:22.:26:25.

resignations from his Shadow Cabinet. Many Labour MPs urged him

:26:26.:26:29.

to resign. David Cameron joined in. I have to say to the honourable

:26:30.:26:35.

gentleman, he talks about job insecurity. It might be in my

:26:36.:26:39.

party's interests for him to sit there but it is not in the national

:26:40.:26:45.

interest. I would say, for her sake -- for heaven's sake, go. But Jeremy

:26:46.:26:49.

Corbyn stayed on. The Labour MPs eventually found one candidate, this

:26:50.:26:54.

man, Owen Smith, to fight Mr Corbyn in a second leadership battle. But

:26:55.:26:57.

the Conservatives could not afford to gloat too much. They had their

:26:58.:27:02.

own leadership turmoil. Would it be Boris Johnson in Number Ten who

:27:03.:27:10.

could stop him? I am Theresa May and I believe I am the best person to be

:27:11.:27:13.

the Prime Minister. Boris Johnson looked to be ahead of the field

:27:14.:27:18.

until the moment where Michael Gove withdrew his support for him,

:27:19.:27:24.

triggering a shock exit from the contest. What is your message for

:27:25.:27:32.

Michael Gove? Mr Gold came third in the vote, meaning that two

:27:33.:27:36.

contenders were left, Andrea Leadsom and Theresa May. Then an article in

:27:37.:27:39.

The Times forced Andrea Leadsom to quit. So after an extraordinary

:27:40.:27:45.

series of unplanned events, Britain finally had a new Prime Minister.

:27:46.:27:50.

Theresa May. Into 2007 Tony Blair left his job and Number Ten having

:27:51.:27:55.

enjoyed the sound of enthusiastic applause ringing out from all sides

:27:56.:28:00.

of the House of Commons, the end of a Prime Minister's Questions that

:28:01.:28:03.

was much more relaxed than normal. The idea appeals to David Cameron,

:28:04.:28:08.

as he considered how to bring to an end his six-year tenure at the top

:28:09.:28:14.

job. Questions to the Prime Minister. This morning I had

:28:15.:28:19.

meetings with ministerial colleagues and others. Other than one meeting

:28:20.:28:23.

this afternoon with Her Majesty the Queen, the diary for the rest of my

:28:24.:28:31.

day is remarkably light. 33 years in this House watching five prime

:28:32.:28:34.

ministers and several former prime ministers, I have seen him achieving

:28:35.:28:39.

mastery of that dispatch box unparalleled in my time. We thank

:28:40.:28:43.

the Prime Minister for his hard work and leadership. It is only right

:28:44.:28:50.

that after six years of Prime as Prime Minister -- as Prime Minister

:28:51.:28:51.

that we thank the honourable member that we thank the honourable member

:28:52.:28:59.

for his service. I remember in New York everyone knew Michael Bloomberg

:29:00.:29:04.

and no one had a clue who I was. Eventually someone said, Cameron,

:29:05.:29:08.

Prime Minister's Questions, we love your show! I would like to pass on

:29:09.:29:12.

my thanks to his mother for her advice about ties and suits and

:29:13.:29:19.

songs. She is extremely kind and I would be grateful if he would pass

:29:20.:29:22.

that on to her. And I am reflecting on the lesson that she offered. I

:29:23.:29:27.

will certainly send his good wishes back to my mother. He seems to have

:29:28.:29:30.

taken our advice and is looking spider today. -- looking splendid

:29:31.:29:38.

today. As now to my people know what breaded means at the moment, we need

:29:39.:29:42.

his advice and statesmanship as much as we ever had. -- knows what Brexit

:29:43.:29:50.

means. The Tory Party has never got as far as asking Ken clerk to use a

:29:51.:29:55.

mobile phone. He briefly had one body said the problem was people

:29:56.:29:58.

kept running on it. In opposition, we had to move our morning meeting

:29:59.:30:02.

to accommodate his o'clock cigar. But I will watch these exchange from

:30:03.:30:10.

the backbenches. -- his nine o'clock cigar. I will miss the roar of the

:30:11.:30:14.

crowd, I will miss the barbs from the opposition but I will be

:30:15.:30:17.

willingly one. And when I say willing anyone I do not simply mean

:30:18.:30:21.

willing on the Prime Minister at the dispatch box or the front bench

:30:22.:30:27.

defending the manifesto I put together, but willing you are one.

:30:28.:30:31.

People come here with great love and passion for the constituencies they

:30:32.:30:36.

represent. And I will be willing on this place because yes, we can be

:30:37.:30:40.

tough and testy and challenge our leaders, perhaps more than other

:30:41.:30:43.

countries, but that is something we should be proud of and we should

:30:44.:30:47.

keep at it. And I hope you will all keep at it and I will will you on as

:30:48.:30:51.

you do. The last thing I would say is that you can achieve a lot of

:30:52.:30:55.

things in politics, you can get a lot of things done and in the end,

:30:56.:30:58.

the public service, the national interest, that is what it is all

:30:59.:31:02.

about. Nothing is really impossible if you put your mind to it. After

:31:03.:31:07.

all, as I once said, I was the future once.

:31:08.:31:21.

And without ovation ringing in his ears, David Cameron returned for the

:31:22.:31:27.

final time to Downing Street, later posing with his wife and children

:31:28.:31:34.

for those final photographs before making a car journey to Buckingham

:31:35.:31:37.

Palace to tender his formal resignation to Her Majesty the

:31:38.:31:42.

Queen. Moments later, his successor, Theresa May, made her way to

:31:43.:31:46.

Buckingham Palace where she was invited to form an administration.

:31:47.:31:50.

The Queen appointed her Prime Minister. Returning from the palace,

:31:51.:31:53.

she spoke for the first time as Prime Minister. If you are just

:31:54.:31:57.

managing, I want to address you directly. I know you are working

:31:58.:32:02.

around the clock. I know you were doing your best and I know that

:32:03.:32:06.

sometimes life can be a struggle. The government I lead will be driven

:32:07.:32:12.

not by the interests of the privileged few but by yours. We will

:32:13.:32:18.

do everything that we can to give you more control over your lives. So

:32:19.:32:25.

one Prime Minister out and one Prime Minister in. As she took over the

:32:26.:32:29.

reins of power, Theresa May made a series of bold appointments.

:32:30.:32:32.

Establishing that she was a very different sort of Conservative to

:32:33.:32:36.

David Cameron. There was a new Chancellor, a new Home Secretary, a

:32:37.:32:40.

new Justice Secretary. And of course a new Foreign Secretary in the shape

:32:41.:32:45.

of Boris Johnson. And so to Theresa May's first PMQs as Prime Minister.

:32:46.:32:52.

Speech on the steps of Downing Street she undressed insecure

:32:53.:32:54.

workers, saying you have a job but you do not always have job security.

:32:55.:33:00.

Does that mean that she is proposing to scrap the employment tribunal

:33:01.:33:05.

fees, repeal the Trade Union Act, or ban the zero hours contracts as more

:33:06.:33:09.

than a dozen European nations have already done? Again I say to the

:33:10.:33:14.

right honourable gentleman, I did say that on the streets of Downing

:33:15.:33:17.

Street and I think it is important that here in this House we consider

:33:18.:33:23.

not only what I might call the more obvious injustices but also consider

:33:24.:33:26.

the life for those people for whom they are in work but struggling to

:33:27.:33:30.

make ends meet. I am interested that he refers to the situation of some

:33:31.:33:34.

workers who might have job insecurity. Potentially unscrupulous

:33:35.:33:40.

bosses. I suspect that many members on the opposition benches might be

:33:41.:33:42.

familiar with an unscrupulous box. A familiar with an unscrupulous box. A

:33:43.:33:50.

boss who does not listen to his workers, a boss who requires some of

:33:51.:33:52.

his workers to double their workload. Maybe even a boss who

:33:53.:34:03.

exploits the rules to further his own career. Remind him of anybody?

:34:04.:34:10.

When the Commons reassembled after the summer break in 2016, there was

:34:11.:34:15.

a bright new Minister for the a bright new Minister for the

:34:16.:34:20.

Speaker to call. The Secretary of State for Exiting the European

:34:21.:34:26.

Union. During the autumn months ministers were accused of secrecy

:34:27.:34:29.

over Brexit. Was anything happening at all, one the Labour leader. This

:34:30.:34:35.

government drew up no plans for Brexit, has no strategy for

:34:36.:34:41.

negotiating Brexit and offers no clarity.

:34:42.:34:53.

Thank you everyone and welcome to Harold this morning. It is a delight

:34:54.:34:59.

to be there along with our fantastic candidates from across London and

:35:00.:35:03.

the south-east. We have some excellent representation already in

:35:04.:35:06.

this area but we will be determined to build on that representation in

:35:07.:35:14.

just 31 days. Just pause on that front moment. 31 days until what is

:35:15.:35:20.

undoubtedly the most important general election that any of us have

:35:21.:35:24.

faced. At this election, our country's future will really be on

:35:25.:35:30.

the ballot paper. The next five years are going to be crucial for

:35:31.:35:39.

our country and our prosperity and our society, our children and our

:35:40.:35:43.

grandchildren. What is going to be so important over that period is

:35:44.:35:53.

leadership. Leadership is vitally important as we enter those Brexit

:35:54.:35:57.

negotiations. Will it be the leadership of Jeremy Corbyn and the

:35:58.:36:03.

coalition of chaos, propped up by the Liberal Democrats and the

:36:04.:36:08.

Scottish Nationalists, or will it be Theresa May, with her proven and

:36:09.:36:14.

stable leadership, fighting on for Britain?

:36:15.:36:27.

There is no doubt how crucial the selection is. So much depends on

:36:28.:36:35.

getting it right. And I know that in Theresa May Britain has a strong

:36:36.:36:39.

leader who we can trust to deliver. But we also need, and she also needs

:36:40.:36:47.

a strong team behind her to deliver the best deal for Britain and the

:36:48.:36:52.

United Kingdom. And we have the team to do their job. I'm not going to

:36:53.:36:57.

spend any time looking at the alternative teams, you see it all

:36:58.:37:01.

the -- every day. A vote for Theresa May and candidates here in London

:37:02.:37:06.

and the south-east and across the country, will undoubtedly strengthen

:37:07.:37:12.

her hand in the EU negotiations to come. Each and every one of us who

:37:13.:37:19.

are elected will get a stronger mandate for the Prime Minister when

:37:20.:37:22.

she is fighting for Britain and the United Kingdom. And each and every

:37:23.:37:25.

one of us will be helping the Prime Minister and her team build a better

:37:26.:37:32.

future for our country in the years ahead. That is what we are fighting

:37:33.:37:38.

for in this election, a team that will deliver for Britain. And it

:37:39.:37:42.

gives me great pleasure to ask the Prime Minister to address us this

:37:43.:37:48.

morning, and give her a very ball well -- a very warm welcome. I

:37:49.:37:49.

minister. -- Prime Minister. Is great to be with you today in

:37:50.:38:14.

Harrow and this morning. We move into the next phase of the general

:38:15.:38:20.

election campaign. The local election campaigns are behind us and

:38:21.:38:22.

we must now focus on the critical general election and we cannot take

:38:23.:38:30.

a single thing for granted. We certainly not taking anything for

:38:31.:38:32.

granted as regards our team because we got together a fantastic team of

:38:33.:38:37.

local candidates for London and the south-east and my message to people

:38:38.:38:40.

in London on the south-east is that I need this team behind me to be in

:38:41.:38:45.

a strong position to ensure we get the best deal for Britain from

:38:46.:38:51.

Europe. This is the team that will go out on the streets and taking out

:38:52.:38:56.

our positive message, which is a message of strong and stable

:38:57.:38:59.

leadership in the national interest, of strengthening the UK's hand in

:39:00.:39:03.

the Brexit negotiations. Of building a better future. Yesterday, a new

:39:04.:39:10.

French president was elected, he was elected with a strong mandate, which

:39:11.:39:14.

you can take into a strong position in the negotiations. The UK, we need

:39:15.:39:21.

to ensure we have got an equally strong mandate and an equally strong

:39:22.:39:22.

negotiating position. Every vote for me and my team will

:39:23.:39:38.

strengthen my hand in those Brexit negotiations. The alternative is to

:39:39.:39:45.

risk making Jeremy Corbyn Prime Minister and just imagine, try and

:39:46.:39:50.

picture him sitting at the negotiating table with the

:39:51.:39:53.

collective mind of the European Commission and 27 other European

:39:54.:39:59.

countries against him. We now that is Patrick said, other parties are

:40:00.:40:04.

lining up to prop him up in a coalition of chaos, the Liberal

:40:05.:40:07.

Democrats, the Scottish Nationalists and others. A vote for any other

:40:08.:40:13.

party is a vote to be a step closer to Jeremy Corbyn sitting at that

:40:14.:40:19.

Brexit negotiating table. We must not let that happen and we must not

:40:20.:40:29.

letting him do that we can win support in London on the south-east

:40:30.:40:34.

and we must also make sure that we point out the non-sensible policies

:40:35.:40:39.

that Jeremy Corbyn and the Labour Party are putting forward. They

:40:40.:40:44.

simply don't add up. They would wreck the economy and render all

:40:45.:40:47.

their promises totally undeliverable. By contrast, we are

:40:48.:40:52.

putting together credible undeliverable policies. Policies

:40:53.:40:58.

that are in the national interest, policies like protecting workers

:40:59.:41:03.

pensions against irresponsible bosses, capping energy prices to

:41:04.:41:06.

support working families of bringing in new mental health laws to end

:41:07.:41:12.

injustice. Those are the positive messages that you will be taken out

:41:13.:41:17.

on the streets over the next few weeks. When I see taking out on the

:41:18.:41:21.

streets, I mean taking them out on the streets. We must take absolutely

:41:22.:41:29.

nothing for granted. And it is only by working flat-out tween now and

:41:30.:41:35.

the 8th of June that we can gain the trust of the British people and gain

:41:36.:41:39.

the support of the British people. We must go out there, we must leave

:41:40.:41:46.

no stone unturned, no street not mocked down, no door not knocked on

:41:47.:41:51.

course every vote counts, every vote counts because every person counts

:41:52.:41:57.

and every community counts. I've been a member of Parliament for 20

:41:58.:42:01.

years, I had the privilege to be a member for 20 years, and I've

:42:02.:42:07.

learned how important it is to get out there, to speak directly to

:42:08.:42:10.

voters and to listen to their concerns. That's my instruction to

:42:11.:42:15.

candidates at this election. It's to go out there and to earn the support

:42:16.:42:20.

of the British people. I've also learned over the years that you

:42:21.:42:28.

can't predict election results. The polls got it wrong in 2015, they got

:42:29.:42:32.

it wrong in the EU referendum and Jeremy Corbyn was a 200-1 outside

:42:33.:42:38.

chance to win the Labour leadership. Take nothing for granted. As I say,

:42:39.:42:45.

go out there, take our positive message to people, earned the

:42:46.:42:48.

support of the British people, show that they can trust you, that they

:42:49.:42:54.

can trust me and my team in taking those Brexit negotiations forward

:42:55.:42:59.

and getting the best deal for them. That's the positive message that we

:43:00.:43:03.

must take out on the streets in the coming weeks. And if we do that, and

:43:04.:43:08.

if we win their support, if we show that every vote for me and my team

:43:09.:43:13.

is able strong and stable leadership in the national interest, that every

:43:14.:43:19.

vote for me and my team is a vote for strengthening our hand in those

:43:20.:43:20.

Brexit negotiations, for getting the Brexit negotiations, for getting the

:43:21.:43:24.

best possible deal for Britain from Europe, that every vote for me and

:43:25.:43:28.

my team is a vote to lock in economic security for a better

:43:29.:43:31.

future across the whole of the United Kingdom. If we do that and if

:43:32.:43:36.

we win the support of the British public, then together we can strive

:43:37.:43:41.

for Britain, together we can fight for Britain and together we will

:43:42.:43:46.

deliver for Britain. Thank you. APPLAUSE

:43:47.:44:16.

You've said the Tory party is working up credible policies but

:44:17.:44:29.

what is the point of sticking to an immigration target that many of your

:44:30.:44:33.

colleagues think is unworkable, some people think it's even pointless and

:44:34.:44:38.

when you were in charge as Home Secretary, it's a target that has

:44:39.:44:43.

been missed for six years. He might ask, would you commit an Billy King

:44:44.:44:46.

to ending freedom of movement as soon as we leave the European Union?

:44:47.:44:51.

First of all, what we've seen happening to the immigration figures

:44:52.:44:53.

over the last six years, we saw them coming down, we then saw them going

:44:54.:44:57.

back up and then recently some of those figures coming back down

:44:58.:45:01.

again. I think it's important you talk about the net migration target,

:45:02.:45:07.

let's look at why we have a net migration target, why we have said

:45:08.:45:11.

it's important to reduce immigration to bring control into the

:45:12.:45:14.

immigration figures that it's because of the impact that it has on

:45:15.:45:18.

people. The impact it has particularly on people at the lower

:45:19.:45:22.

end of the income scale and in terms of the pressure on public services.

:45:23.:45:25.

I think it is important that we continue and we will continue to say

:45:26.:45:31.

that we do want to bring down net migration to sustainable levels. We

:45:32.:45:35.

believe that is the tens of thousands and of course, once we

:45:36.:45:38.

leave the European Union we will have the opportunity to ensure that

:45:39.:45:43.

we have control of our borders here in the UK because we will be able to

:45:44.:45:47.

establish our rules for people coming from the European Union into

:45:48.:45:50.

the UK. That's a part of the picture we haven't been able to control

:45:51.:45:53.

before and we will be able to control it and leaving the EU means

:45:54.:45:58.

that we won't have free movement as it has been in the past and when it

:45:59.:46:02.

comes to voting on the 8th of June, people have a very clear choice, is

:46:03.:46:06.

between a Conservative Party, me and my team who are committed to

:46:07.:46:10.

ensuring we bring back control of our borders and Jeremy Corbyn who

:46:11.:46:13.

just wants to carry on with the movement as it always has been.

:46:14.:46:20.

Emily Morgan from ITV News. NHS service provider say that staff are

:46:21.:46:27.

leaving to go and stack shelves in supermarkets because of poor pay and

:46:28.:46:32.

that is leading to risks in safety. Will you commit to ending the 1% pay

:46:33.:46:38.

cap and if so when? It is right that the public sector as a whole has had

:46:39.:46:43.

to play its part in dealing overall with what we were left by the last

:46:44.:46:46.

Labour government which was the worst deficit position that we've

:46:47.:46:53.

seen in peacetime and we've had success in doing that in bringing

:46:54.:46:56.

the deficit down by two thirds but there is more to be done. In

:46:57.:47:02.

relation to NHS pay, actually if you look at not just the basic pay

:47:03.:47:06.

increase but progression pay, about half of NHS staff get an annual

:47:07.:47:12.

increase of de-4% in their pay. But of course, we want to see more stuff

:47:13.:47:18.

and good stuff in the NHS and that's the record we have as a Conservative

:47:19.:47:23.

government, more doctors, nurses, midwives because we put the extra

:47:24.:47:26.

funding into the NHS we've been able to do that for that you can put

:47:27.:47:29.

extra funding into the NHS if you have a strong economy. Jeremy Jeremy

:47:30.:47:35.

Corbyn would wreck the economy and that would be a worse position to be

:47:36.:47:44.

in. Lucy Fisher from the Times. Emmanuel Macron, the new France

:47:45.:47:47.

President-elect says he wants review the agreement between Britain and

:47:48.:47:51.

France throwing our border arrangements into doubt and says he

:47:52.:47:54.

wants to lure UK bankers and talented professionals to France.

:47:55.:47:58.

This election is bad news for Britain and Brexit, isn't it? He's

:47:59.:48:02.

been elected with a very strong mandate and we must make sure in the

:48:03.:48:05.

UK we also have a strong mandate to take a strong position into our

:48:06.:48:06.

negotiating table. As for the tuque agreement, it works

:48:07.:48:20.

to the benefit of both the UK and France -- two K. And the government

:48:21.:48:25.

elected after the 8th of June we will talk to Emmanuel Macron about

:48:26.:48:31.

how that system has worked to the benefit of France as well as to the

:48:32.:48:33.

benefit of the UK. Can take the Herald first. Could you

:48:34.:48:56.

explain to us why you think, and are heavily polarised Scotland, the

:48:57.:49:01.

Brexit process will strengthen the union and not strengthened the hand

:49:02.:49:06.

of Nicola Sturgeon in a drive towards a second Scottish

:49:07.:49:09.

independence referendum and what would you say to the First Minister,

:49:10.:49:13.

who asserts that from your words last week, when you set certain

:49:14.:49:19.

shady people in Brussels were intent on influencing the election, that

:49:20.:49:24.

you have poisoned the Brexit process? Possible, on the second

:49:25.:49:29.

point, I don't think I used that descriptor that you slipped in there

:49:30.:49:35.

in the question. Not sure if it was you or Nicola Sturgeon that slipped

:49:36.:49:39.

that end but I didn't use them. We have heard things being said in

:49:40.:49:43.

Brussels, what that has shown us that these negotiations are going to

:49:44.:49:47.

be tough, that means we need a strong negotiating position and the

:49:48.:49:50.

right leadership here in the UK to go into those negotiations and

:49:51.:49:54.

dastardly impact of the Brexit process on the whole question of the

:49:55.:49:58.

future of the union, now was the time that we should be working

:49:59.:50:03.

together across the United Kingdom for the best result for every part

:50:04.:50:06.

of the United Kingdom, including Scotland, not trying to pull apart

:50:07.:50:12.

and it's the tunnel vision of the Scottish Nationalists in focusing

:50:13.:50:16.

only on independence that actually means they're not focusing on the

:50:17.:50:19.

work we need to do to ensure we get the best deal for the people of

:50:20.:50:22.

Scotland and the people of the United Kingdom as a whole. Just one

:50:23.:50:31.

immigration from Sky News. Can we just be clear that you are going to

:50:32.:50:35.

stick with the target of tens of thousands in terms of use

:50:36.:50:38.

immigration target despite that being non-deliverable in the last

:50:39.:50:44.

Parliament? And if you do committed at because of Brexit and control of

:50:45.:50:47.

immigration, do you think you can hit that target by 2022? I'm tempted

:50:48.:50:54.

to say that I think if you listen to the answer I gave earlier and if you

:50:55.:50:57.

listen to things I've said previously in the campaign, it will

:50:58.:51:02.

be clear that we do believe that net migration should be unsustainable

:51:03.:51:04.

levels and sustainable levels does mean the tens of thousands. We have

:51:05.:51:10.

a local paper, the Harrow Times. The last question. I was going to ask,

:51:11.:51:20.

if you could say to you local voters why you wouldn't be taking part in

:51:21.:51:23.

televised debates, why would that be? Because I'm taking part in

:51:24.:51:26.

debates are found down the country taking questions from people are

:51:27.:51:30.

meeting people, getting and about and ensuring that I'm talking

:51:31.:51:34.

directly with photos and listening directly to voters. That's the sort

:51:35.:51:36.

of thing... APPLAUSE That's a thought of thing that Bob

:51:37.:51:50.

Blackman has done and has shown that he's done is a great member of

:51:51.:51:54.

Parliament and what Hannah David will do as a candidate. We'll take

:51:55.:52:01.

that message for the people of Harold that they have a clear

:52:02.:52:05.

choice, one of two people who can the Prime Minister on the 9th of

:52:06.:52:08.

June, me Jeremy Corbyn and the need to think he was going to ensure that

:52:09.:52:12.

we've got a strong and stable leadership, taking a strong position

:52:13.:52:15.

into the negotiations on Brexit to get the best possible deal for the

:52:16.:52:19.

people of Harrow, London, the Southeast and indeed the rest of

:52:20.:52:20.

United Kingdom. I would like to start the meeting.

:52:21.:53:17.

We are already late, so could we please stop the meeting.

:53:18.:53:29.

As thank you very much indeed. There we start our usual meeting dedicated

:53:30.:53:35.

to the discussion of the Brexit process and we today have to parts

:53:36.:53:42.

for this discussion. First of all we

:53:43.:53:43.

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