18/01/2017 BBC News at One


18/01/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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The EU will seek a balanced deal for Britain after Brexit says

:00:00.:00:07.

Jean Claude Juncker says he'll try to ensure a good deal -

:00:08.:00:15.

but Malta's Prime Minister says it shouldn't be better

:00:16.:00:17.

We want a fair deal for the United Kingdom. That deal necessarily needs

:00:18.:00:29.

to be inferior to membership. Here, Theresa May Defensor Brexit

:00:30.:00:46.

plan to MPs, but is accused of bypassing Parliament over any

:00:47.:00:49.

eventual deal. We will have the latest from Westminster and

:00:50.:00:51.

Brussels. Also on the programme

:00:52.:00:54.

this lunchtime... Thousands of British tourists

:00:55.:00:55.

are being flown out of the Gambia after a state of emergency

:00:56.:00:58.

was declared there. Unemployment falls to its lowest

:00:59.:01:00.

level for more than a decade - with 1.6 million people now

:01:01.:01:03.

out of work. And shock at the Australian Open

:01:04.:01:05.

as Britain's Dan Evans pulls off the best win of his career,

:01:06.:01:08.

beating seventh seed, Marin Cilic. And coming up in sport come's Ryder

:01:09.:01:13.

Cup captain Thomas Bjorn gets an extra world card -- wild card choice

:01:14.:01:16.

in a revamped accommodation for next year.

:01:17.:01:25.

-- revamped competition for next year.

:01:26.:01:32.

Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

:01:33.:01:35.

The President of the European Commission Jean-Claude Juncker has

:01:36.:01:39.

told the European Parliament that he will do everything he can

:01:40.:01:42.

to ensure that the negotiations over Britain's exit

:01:43.:01:44.

from the European Union end in "a good result" for all concerned.

:01:45.:01:47.

But he also admitted the negotiations would be "very,

:01:48.:01:49.

Our Europe correspondent Gavin Lee reports.

:01:50.:01:59.

A clear view from Westminster, cold comfort to EU officials meeting in

:02:00.:02:06.

Strasbourg's European Parliament today. A sad, surrealist state of

:02:07.:02:13.

affairs, that was the brief tweet from Donald Tusk, and when the

:02:14.:02:18.

sudden clarity was welcomed here, seven months after the Brexit vote,

:02:19.:02:23.

the verdict from Joseph Muscutt, the Maltese president, is that he will

:02:24.:02:26.

work to make sure that Britain doesn't get a better EU trade deal

:02:27.:02:30.

than what is already available. This is not a happy event for us. We want

:02:31.:02:37.

a fair deal for the United Kingdom, but that deal necessarily needs to

:02:38.:02:47.

be inferior than membership. This should not come as a surprise to

:02:48.:02:54.

anyone. TRANSLATION: Over the last years, I have been sorry to see that

:02:55.:02:57.

solidarity was not always forthcoming. And I deplore the fact

:02:58.:03:04.

that for the first time in the history of Europe, some countries

:03:05.:03:12.

have not applied the decisions taken in an area as sensitive as asylum,

:03:13.:03:18.

although significant progress has been made in other places. There was

:03:19.:03:23.

reason for optimism elsewhere. Hungary's Foreign Minister called

:03:24.:03:27.

for the widest possible trade deal, warning of the risk of making Europe

:03:28.:03:30.

less competitive if forcing Britain to make quick trade deals elsewhere.

:03:31.:03:36.

The clarity of Theresa May's message has brought more questions, and the

:03:37.:03:39.

scepticism across Europe about whether a clean break from the EU is

:03:40.:03:44.

possible. There are less than ten weeks to go until Article 50 is

:03:45.:03:47.

triggered, and with what Theresa May has now clearly set out, negotiators

:03:48.:03:51.

on both sides will beginning to starting to formulate their opening

:03:52.:03:53.

positions. Theresa May has been

:03:54.:03:55.

defending her plans for the UK During Prime Minister's Questions,

:03:56.:03:57.

she told MPs that she wanted to put the divisions over Brexit

:03:58.:04:02.

in the past, and work for an "outward-looking, prosperous,

:04:03.:04:06.

tolerant and independent" Britain. But she was critisised by the Labour

:04:07.:04:08.

leader, Jeremy Corbyn, for not giving MPs a proper

:04:09.:04:10.

opportunity to scrutinise the deal. Here's our political

:04:11.:04:15.

correspondent, Iain Watson. If newspapers had a vote, Theresa

:04:16.:04:26.

May would be guaranteed a landslide election victory. But there was a

:04:27.:04:31.

less dashing response when she faced MPs for the first time since her

:04:32.:04:34.

speech. The Labour leader said she should have delivered it here, in

:04:35.:04:39.

Parliament. Restoring Parliamentary democracy whilst sidelining

:04:40.:04:47.

Parliament. Mr Speaker, it's not so much the Iron Lady, as the irony

:04:48.:04:53.

lady. Jeremy Corbyn did not just attack the venue for the speech, but

:04:54.:04:58.

the content, particularly the Prime Minister's warning that Britain can

:04:59.:05:01.

become a low tax, low regulation economy if she failed to get a good

:05:02.:05:07.

deal. Can I urge her to stop her threats of a bargain basement

:05:08.:05:11.

Brexit? The Prime Minister quoted Jeremy Corbyn herself to argue that

:05:12.:05:15.

Labour had no Brexit plan of their own. She has said leave the single

:05:16.:05:20.

market then at the same time so she wants to have access to the single

:05:21.:05:23.

market. I'm not quite sure how that's going to go down in Europe. I

:05:24.:05:28.

think we have to have a deal that ensures we have access to the

:05:29.:05:37.

market. LAUGHTER I've got a plan, he doesn't have a

:05:38.:05:43.

clue. One of her own MPs urged her to debate each part of her plan here

:05:44.:05:48.

in the House of Commons. Would she consider at least publishing all of

:05:49.:05:52.

those 12 objectives in a White Paper, so that we can debate them

:05:53.:05:57.

here in this place on behalf of all our constituents? What we usually

:05:58.:06:02.

see at Prime Minister's Questions as the opposition attacking the

:06:03.:06:05.

government, and the government responding, but Brexit cuts through

:06:06.:06:09.

party lines and party loyalties, so there are some conservatives who are

:06:10.:06:15.

worried that Theresa May's decision to come out of the single market,

:06:16.:06:18.

and within the Labour Party some of Jeremy Corbyn's own backbenchers

:06:19.:06:22.

thinks he is not taking a strong enough stance and opposing the Prime

:06:23.:06:25.

Minister's approach. This former Shadow Chancellor said his own party

:06:26.:06:29.

leadership should have been more vocal in standing up ownership of

:06:30.:06:34.

the single market. For me, that is a pretty black-and-white issue and it

:06:35.:06:36.

is something we should call out and say it is bad for our economy, that

:06:37.:06:40.

is our GTI think as Labour the numbers of Parliament. Back in the

:06:41.:06:44.

Commons, it was argued that leaving the single market would hit jobs and

:06:45.:06:49.

incomes. Does the Prime Minister believes this is a price worth

:06:50.:06:54.

paying for her Little Britain Brexit? I repeat what I said

:06:55.:07:01.

earlier, we will be working for the best possible deal to get access to

:07:02.:07:05.

the single market. Sow divisions within the political parties were on

:07:06.:07:08.

display even before we begin the formal process of leaving the EU.

:07:09.:07:11.

Iain Watson, BBC News. In a moment, we'll talk

:07:12.:07:15.

to our assistant political editor Norman Smith in Westminster,

:07:16.:07:17.

but first our Europe correspondent A rather conciliar truth tone struck

:07:18.:07:24.

in the European Parliament, though it was made -- conciliar tree tone

:07:25.:07:28.

struck, though it was made clear that negotiations will be difficult.

:07:29.:07:33.

That's right, given that most European politicians, especially in

:07:34.:07:37.

a place like Strasbourg here, view Brexit with incompetence ability.

:07:38.:07:42.

There was no big well-prepared -- with incomprehensible at it was the

:07:43.:07:47.

we're working with a view snippet from a speech, and we are working

:07:48.:07:52.

with a view clips from a news Conference, but the tone from

:07:53.:07:54.

Jean-Claude Juncker, who is going to be a very important figure on the

:07:55.:08:00.

European side sounded pretty conciliatory. He was pleased with

:08:01.:08:03.

what he called clarifications from Theresa May, and although the talks

:08:04.:08:06.

were going to be very difficult, he was going to do his best to make

:08:07.:08:09.

sure there was a good outcome, fair for both sides. Everyone here will

:08:10.:08:13.

tell you the same thing. They can't afford to let Britain look like it

:08:14.:08:20.

is better off after leaving, so at the end of this we will be left with

:08:21.:08:26.

a semantic debate, I think, whether British negotiators and European

:08:27.:08:28.

negotiators understand the same thing when they say that a deal is

:08:29.:08:32.

fair and reasonable for both sides. That is where a lot of the talking

:08:33.:08:33.

is going to come. Our Assistant Political Editor

:08:34.:08:36.

Norman Smith is in Westminster. How much pressure is the Prime

:08:37.:08:43.

Minister and at Westminster? You would think Mrs May would be under

:08:44.:08:49.

huge pressure, that she would be really feeling the heat, because,

:08:50.:08:53.

let's be clear, she has pretty much put her head on the block with a

:08:54.:08:58.

proposed Brexit deal. More than that, she has massively ratcheted up

:08:59.:09:02.

the stakes, by suggesting will walk away from any deal if we don't like

:09:03.:09:09.

it by insisting that she wants to strike an agreement within two

:09:10.:09:12.

years, which many people think is hopelessly ambitious and

:09:13.:09:18.

unachievable, and by seeking what looks like, pretty much, a special,

:09:19.:09:22.

golden deal for Britain, where we get everything we want from the

:09:23.:09:25.

single market and the customs union, and we get rid of all the nasty

:09:26.:09:29.

things we don't like. And yet, I have to say, Theresa May was oozing

:09:30.:09:35.

confidence in the Commons today. She was on a roll, she was swatting away

:09:36.:09:40.

criticism from the Labour leader, saying I have a plan, I'm sticking

:09:41.:09:44.

to it, it's called leadership, you should try it. And I think the

:09:45.:09:49.

reason for that optimism is a view that Brussels will blink first is

:09:50.:09:55.

when it comes to Brexit, that they will not want to damage trading

:09:56.:09:58.

links with Britain, they will not want to go down the road of tariffs.

:09:59.:10:03.

Secondly, I think she knows she has to walk the walk to get her game

:10:04.:10:07.

face on, if she's going to go into these negotiations, but above all, I

:10:08.:10:11.

think she has looked at what happened to her predecessor, David

:10:12.:10:15.

Cameron, who also went to get a deal and came back with one that was

:10:16.:10:19.

widely derided, and I think she has concluded that if she is going to

:10:20.:10:24.

get a good deal, she has to be prepared to bang the negotiating

:10:25.:10:30.

table, and, if necessary, to leave the negotiating table.

:10:31.:10:33.

The Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, has said other

:10:34.:10:35.

countries are "queuing up" to sign trade deals with the UK

:10:36.:10:38.

Mr Johnson also said the UK would not be

:10:39.:10:44.

"hauling up the drawbridge", despite new migration controls

:10:45.:10:46.

He was speaking as he arrived for a two-day visit to India.

:10:47.:10:53.

I think that the Prime Minister set out a very powerful,

:10:54.:10:56.

very positive vision yesterday, for how we can do a deal that

:10:57.:11:00.

will not just benefit our friends in the rest of the EU,

:11:01.:11:05.

but also drive growth in the rest of the world.

:11:06.:11:08.

And one of the points I am going to be making here in India

:11:09.:11:12.

is that we think we can do free trade deals that will be for

:11:13.:11:15.

the benefit of both our countries, both Britain and India,

:11:16.:11:18.

Our economics editor Kamal Ahmed is in Davos.

:11:19.:11:21.

I think, Sophie, of course in this situation where you have the world's

:11:22.:11:35.

fifth or sixth largest economy, depending on how you measure it, no

:11:36.:11:39.

country is going to say to and bullion Foreign Secretary, do you

:11:40.:11:43.

know what, we don't a deal with you. Of course there are some

:11:44.:11:46.

opportunities. Boris Johnson has said that we could start sketching

:11:47.:11:49.

those possibilities out. He talks about writing on the back of an

:11:50.:11:54.

envelope what kind of free trade deal we can do, which can then be

:11:55.:11:57.

put in place once we've actually left the European Union. But anyone

:11:58.:12:02.

who has done trade negotiation now is the last thing they are done is

:12:03.:12:06.

written on the back of an amber lope. I went in a few weeks ago to

:12:07.:12:11.

see some of the officials in the US Embassy, for example, the trade

:12:12.:12:14.

deals. They brought out huge legal documents about how they approach

:12:15.:12:20.

trade deals, so the notion that we can sign these trade deals quickly I

:12:21.:12:23.

think is a difficult one to prosecute. Boris Johnson is in

:12:24.:12:27.

India, for example, where there has been big clashes on immigration.

:12:28.:12:32.

India wants to have easier access to Britain, in terms of immigration

:12:33.:12:37.

into the country of skilled workers. Britain has not given that. So on

:12:38.:12:41.

all these deals, there is always tension. Britain, of course, as

:12:42.:12:46.

well, was more attractive, maybe, to some countries, because it was a

:12:47.:12:50.

gateway into the EU. That Gateway may now be closed, but we must never

:12:51.:12:54.

forget and this is where Boris Johnson does have some leveraged,

:12:55.:12:58.

Britain has a big economy, a fast-growing economy, still robust,

:12:59.:13:04.

and it is a big consumer market. So we are an attractive proposition,

:13:05.:13:10.

but free trade deals are very difficult negotiations.

:13:11.:13:12.

Thousands of British holiday-makers are being flown home from The Gambia

:13:13.:13:15.

after a state of emergency was declared there.

:13:16.:13:16.

The Foreign Office is advising people to avoid all but essential

:13:17.:13:19.

travel to the country, after its President refused

:13:20.:13:22.

to accept that he lost last month's election.

:13:23.:13:28.

It is not very good news, it is basically that we are going to

:13:29.:13:38.

evacuate everyone back home today. Today? Yes, today. It is not what

:13:39.:13:43.

they wanted to hear, tourists in the Gambia have been told it is not

:13:44.:13:46.

safer them to stay. Thomas Cook has five aircraft to bring almost a

:13:47.:13:51.

thousand of its package tourists home. For those now gathering at

:13:52.:13:58.

Banjul airport, it's been a stressful day. We just think really

:13:59.:14:04.

it is overkill and they are just trying to frighten people. To me, it

:14:05.:14:08.

feel stupid, because this will all be over within 24 and is the 48

:14:09.:14:13.

hours. Asking us to leave is unnecessary I think at the moment,

:14:14.:14:17.

but I understand that we need to do it. Tension in the Gambia has been

:14:18.:14:22.

building for weeks. Residents are fleeing the capital, as are some

:14:23.:14:27.

government ministers, as the political crisis threatens to become

:14:28.:14:32.

violent. At its centre, this man, Azzedine Yahya Jammeh, who has

:14:33.:14:35.

refused to accept the results of last month's elections and declared

:14:36.:14:42.

a state of emergency -- President Yahya Jammeh. If it is allowed to

:14:43.:14:49.

continue, it may lead to a state of public emergency. Opposition leader

:14:50.:14:56.

Adama Barrow was due to be sworn in tomorrow. A group of West African

:14:57.:14:58.

nations has threatened military action if he is not given power, so

:14:59.:15:02.

last night the British government issued this warning to tourists.

:15:03.:15:24.

The Gambia's reputation as a safe haven in the sun is now in jeopardy,

:15:25.:15:30.

with thousands of tourists queueing up to leave, and the country edging

:15:31.:15:34.

closer to instability and conflict. Richard Lister, BBC News.

:15:35.:15:39.

Unemployment has fallen to its lowest level

:15:40.:15:42.

The jobless total dropped by just over 50,000

:15:43.:15:46.

between September and November - and now stands at 1.6 million.

:15:47.:15:48.

The figures also show that average earnings were up by 2.7%

:15:49.:15:51.

But, as our economics correspondent Andy Verity reports,

:15:52.:15:54.

after years of rapid growth, the number of people in employment

:15:55.:15:57.

is no longer growing - and hasn't done since July.

:15:58.:16:08.

This farmer and food processor near King's Lynn in Norfolk supplies

:16:09.:16:10.

root vegetables like carrots to all the major food retailers

:16:11.:16:13.

It is being forced to offer higher wages to attract the people it needs

:16:14.:16:20.

to do the work, regardless of the living wage.

:16:21.:16:26.

It says that is because the supply of workers from

:16:27.:16:29.

the rest of the European Union has now gone into reverse.

:16:30.:16:32.

We are struggling to fill positions at the

:16:33.:16:33.

It is a very fluid marketplace with inflation in wages

:16:34.:16:37.

in our sector at the minute, which is being driven by some EU

:16:38.:16:40.

citizens going home and moving from the UK

:16:41.:16:42.

In the three months to the end of November, the number of

:16:43.:16:52.

unemployed people dropped by 52,000 to 1.6 million.

:16:53.:16:55.

It remains at its lowest rate in 12 years, 4.8%.

:16:56.:17:00.

The average weekly pay packet was ?477,

:17:01.:17:03.

up by ?12 compared to a year ago, or 2.7%.

:17:04.:17:10.

Businesses cannot always pass on the higher cost of labour by

:17:11.:17:12.

Simon will have to wait until he renegotiates his contract

:17:13.:17:22.

with his customers, the food companies and

:17:23.:17:23.

retailers, and they will not want big price increases.

:17:24.:17:26.

All of us are looking to try and recoup some of

:17:27.:17:28.

And I think the load has got to be shared by all and that

:17:29.:17:33.

If tighter labour markets are offering modestly

:17:34.:17:35.

paid workers the chance to bid up their wages,

:17:36.:17:39.

many economists will see that as positive.

:17:40.:17:44.

I think we are seeing quite a robust end to the UK

:17:45.:17:47.

economy, it is very consistent with all the other economic

:17:48.:17:49.

Hiring has not slowed down materially, and people are finding

:17:50.:17:53.

jobs and finding jobs actually with improved wage levels.

:17:54.:17:58.

But there has been a marked change since the

:17:59.:18:01.

For 20 years now the number of people in work in the UK

:18:02.:18:05.

In the three months to the end of November,

:18:06.:18:09.

it dipped slightly and it is now no higher than it was in July.

:18:10.:18:13.

A wheelchair user has partially won his case at the Supreme Court

:18:14.:18:20.

Doug Paulley took legal action because he couldn't board a bus

:18:21.:18:24.

in Leeds when a woman with a pram refused to move.

:18:25.:18:29.

Our disability correspondent Nikki Fox reports.

:18:30.:18:31.

As he makes his way to the Supreme Court on one

:18:32.:18:34.

of the most important days of his life, Doug Paulley

:18:35.:18:36.

is about to find out whether his nearly five-year legal

:18:37.:18:39.

battle will end in victory for all disabled people who need

:18:40.:18:42.

This all began back in 2012 when Doug was unable to catch a bus

:18:43.:18:52.

because the space for wheelchairs was occupied by a mum

:18:53.:18:54.

She refused to move, which meant that Doug could not get on.

:18:55.:18:58.

Inside court, all seven judges unanimously agreed that

:18:59.:19:01.

First Group's policy of requesting and not requiring a person to vacate

:19:02.:19:05.

As it does not go as far as insisting someone

:19:06.:19:13.

I feel like it will create a cultural shift and that is

:19:14.:19:18.

So people will be aware of the fact that the wheelchair area

:19:19.:19:23.

is for wheelchair users and that they should take priority.

:19:24.:19:27.

The impact of today's judgment will still have wider implications.

:19:28.:19:31.

For example, any service provider with a space for disabled people

:19:32.:19:37.

will not just have to request that a non-disabled person move,

:19:38.:19:40.

For example, a bus driver may refuse to move from a bus stop in order

:19:41.:19:45.

First Group admit they may have to amend the training

:19:46.:19:52.

they provide their bus drivers following the verdict today.

:19:53.:19:55.

We really welcome the fact that the court has confirmed that

:19:56.:19:57.

a driver is not required to remove a passenger from a bus

:19:58.:20:00.

if they are refusing to move from this space.

:20:01.:20:02.

That is really important for drivers to have that clarity.

:20:03.:20:06.

I'm really happy with today's ruling.

:20:07.:20:08.

It's great that after five years of fighting and campaigning

:20:09.:20:11.

by so many people, that we have got a ruling that says that disabled

:20:12.:20:15.

people to have the right to catch a bus and that the bus company must

:20:16.:20:19.

make all reasonable efforts to make that possible.

:20:20.:20:24.

Today's Supreme Court ruling is not clear-cut but it does pave the way

:20:25.:20:27.

for a closer look at legislation when it comes to prioritising access

:20:28.:20:30.

The EU will seek a balanced deal for Britain after Brexit says

:20:31.:20:49.

the head of the European commission - but any deal has to

:20:50.:20:52.

be "inferior" to full membership of the EU.

:20:53.:20:54.

Our American road trip has become a river trip today. Donald Trump says

:20:55.:21:05.

he wants to get the country moving again but how is he going to do that

:21:06.:21:07.

and how can he afford it. Dan Evans earns the biggest win

:21:08.:21:10.

of his career, stunning 7th seed Marin Cilic in the second

:21:11.:21:15.

round of the Australian During the US election campaign

:21:16.:21:17.

Donald Trump pledged to make America great again,

:21:18.:21:30.

but as he prepares to take office In the week that Donald Trump

:21:31.:21:32.

will be sworn in as the 45th President of the United States,

:21:33.:21:38.

Jon Kay is on a road trip through the heart of America

:21:39.:21:43.

on 'Route 45' to find out how Americans are feeling about Trump's

:21:44.:21:45.

presidency and whether he can deliver what he's pledged to when it

:21:46.:21:48.

comes to rebuilding America. Today as he continues

:21:49.:21:52.

on his journey south - If you want to understand

:21:53.:21:54.

Donald Trump's election win, Next to Route 45, the Ohio River

:21:55.:22:05.

meets the Mississippi. It's an essential artery for the US

:22:06.:22:17.

economy, carrying 18 million tons But things aren't

:22:18.:22:22.

what they used to be. The locks which boats pass

:22:23.:22:31.

through here have seen better days. Nearly 100 years old,

:22:32.:22:36.

they regularly break down, A boat could be waiting out for 52

:22:37.:22:39.

hours before coming through? Mark, the lock keeper,

:22:40.:22:52.

says it's a struggle The concrete is starting

:22:53.:22:55.

to break up and crumble. Every time it gets hit

:22:56.:22:58.

by a boat as it lands on it, it puts pressure on it and causes

:22:59.:23:01.

more cracks and more stress on it, we patch it together

:23:02.:23:05.

and try and keep it going, Donald Trump has pledged $1 trillion

:23:06.:23:08.

to rebuild America's rivers, A promise that's won him plenty

:23:09.:23:16.

of support round here. But he hasn't said where

:23:17.:23:22.

the money will come from. We drive on, into

:23:23.:23:28.

America's rural South. There are two million

:23:29.:23:32.

farms in this country. Will a property developer president

:23:33.:23:36.

understand this business? At the University of Tennessee,

:23:37.:23:46.

students are learning how to weigh Stick it in, press it

:23:47.:23:49.

forward, pull it out. There are going to be some are gonna

:23:50.:23:58.

be more willing to go forward Donald Trump won nearly 80%

:23:59.:24:02.

of the vote in the Martin area. They like his confidence and in turn

:24:03.:24:10.

they have confidence in him. He might have a few mess-ups

:24:11.:24:17.

on the way, but eventually But is farming compatible

:24:18.:24:20.

with Trump's plans for building? What about the land,

:24:21.:24:26.

the environment? Donald Trump is a man

:24:27.:24:30.

you associate with skyscrapers and New York City, not with farming

:24:31.:24:33.

and places like this. Do you think he understands

:24:34.:24:36.

you and what you want to do? I think he's going to help the small

:24:37.:24:40.

town people also out. I don't think he's just

:24:41.:24:43.

going to be the big city man What about farming, does

:24:44.:24:46.

he understand farming? Not as well as some

:24:47.:24:52.

agriculture people. Whether it's agriculture

:24:53.:24:56.

or infrastructure, in these communities away from Washington,

:24:57.:24:59.

many feel Trump will be a president Someone not just following

:25:00.:25:01.

the political herd. And we continued the road trip

:25:02.:25:22.

tomorrow, continuing south to Mississippi.

:25:23.:25:23.

Latest figures show Accident and Emergency departments

:25:24.:25:25.

in Wales have again failed to meet their targets

:25:26.:25:27.

Meanwhile, the Chief Inspector of Hospitals in England has

:25:28.:25:30.

warned that patient safety is being compromised

:25:31.:25:32.

Our health editor, Hugh Pym, is with me.

:25:33.:25:40.

The system in Wales is under a lot of pressure. All reminders about

:25:41.:25:47.

pressure right across the system across the UK. Today we have figures

:25:48.:25:55.

from December in Wales, and the key for hours percentage of patients

:25:56.:25:58.

treated or assessed should be 95% but in December it was 81%, well

:25:59.:26:03.

short of that. No other part of the UK it has to be said is hitting 95%

:26:04.:26:09.

of England and Scotland are ahead, Northern Ireland is behind Wales. We

:26:10.:26:12.

also learned from Wales that possible chiefs are saying in

:26:13.:26:16.

December of those admitted to A 20% of patients were over the age of

:26:17.:26:22.

85. That was double normal levels. Another indication of the kind of

:26:23.:26:26.

pressure that the NHS is facing. There has been a high-level warning

:26:27.:26:34.

that the NHS needs more money. So Mike Richards 's chief inspector of

:26:35.:26:38.

hospitals in England at the Care Quality Commission. So not just a

:26:39.:26:41.

warning from another think tank, this is a regulator saying because

:26:42.:26:45.

of the strain on the NHS he is concerned about patient safety and

:26:46.:26:49.

thinks that more money will be required. This is what he had to

:26:50.:26:51.

say. I believe the government will need

:26:52.:26:53.

to put more money into the NHS, but if it does, and when it does,

:26:54.:26:56.

I think it's very important I think we need to transform

:26:57.:26:59.

the NHS, we need to have much greater integration between GPs,

:27:00.:27:04.

primary care, care homes and hospitals,

:27:05.:27:05.

and that is beginning to emerge. And those new models of care

:27:06.:27:10.

will are important and can deliver Now the government says it has given

:27:11.:27:26.

the NHS in England the money requires, although that is

:27:27.:27:29.

contested. The government also says it is pushing for further

:27:30.:27:32.

integration but I think this warning from a very senior player in the

:27:33.:27:36.

world of health, that more needs to be done is quite significant. Given

:27:37.:27:41.

how volatile the debate is about the NHS generally.

:27:42.:27:44.

Police say that there are now more than 1000 cases of alleged

:27:45.:27:47.

historical child sexual abuse in football

:27:48.:27:49.

The figures come from the National Police Chiefs' Council.

:27:50.:27:51.

They say the estimated number of victims now stands

:27:52.:27:53.

And almost 200 potential suspects have been identified.

:27:54.:28:01.

The Mobile operator EE has been fined ?2.7 million

:28:02.:28:03.

for overcharging tens of thousands of customers.

:28:04.:28:07.

The penalty was imposed by telecoms regulator Ofcom -

:28:08.:28:10.

after an investigation found that the UK's biggest mobile network

:28:11.:28:14.

overcharged customers using the '150' customer services

:28:15.:28:17.

number within the EU and billed them even

:28:18.:28:20.

EE has apologised and says it has put measures in place to prevent

:28:21.:28:25.

Britain's Dan Evan has pulled off the best win of his career

:28:26.:28:32.

at the Australian open as he knocked out the number 7 seed Marin Cilic

:28:33.:28:35.

Less of a surprise was Andy Murray's easy victory over

:28:36.:28:40.

Russia's Andrey Rublev which takes him through

:28:41.:28:42.

Dan Evans is no stranger to winning against the odds. On the verge of

:28:43.:28:55.

quitting tennis a couple of years ago he has now beaten to the top ten

:28:56.:28:59.

players in the world in the last couple of weeks. Today's big scalp,

:29:00.:29:04.

Marin Cilic, who looked too much for Dan Evans in the first set. He won

:29:05.:29:10.

it 6-3 as Evan struggled with the sinking sun. As the shadows

:29:11.:29:13.

lengthened Evans came to die. Breaking the Cilic serve to take the

:29:14.:29:19.

second set. And belief blossoming in the darkness, he dominated the third

:29:20.:29:25.

as well. The fourth set turned into a battle but Evans was edging it.

:29:26.:29:32.

And Cilic was struggling to keep up. With a wicked Cilic seven, Evans

:29:33.:29:37.

took his chance. And what to do after the biggest Grand Slam winner

:29:38.:29:42.

of your career, get straight on the phone, of course. With seven

:29:43.:29:45.

through, Andy Murray was just getting started, he beat Russian

:29:46.:29:48.

teenager Andrey Rublev in straight sets but the whack -- the match was

:29:49.:29:53.

not without drama. For a time it looked like the world number one's

:29:54.:29:59.

Melbourne chances were gone. Andy Murray has an appointment with an

:30:00.:30:02.

ice pack but Dan Evans is unlikely to be feeling any of his aches and

:30:03.:30:08.

pains tonight. Not a bad day of work for a player once described as the

:30:09.:30:11.

most wasted talent in British tennis. A train from China has big

:30:12.:30:18.

campus first ever to make the journey across Asia and Europe and

:30:19.:30:24.

arrived in the UK. The engine took 80 days to make the trip to the UK,

:30:25.:30:29.

half the time of the equivalent journey by sea. They travelled

:30:30.:30:32.

through Russia, Kazakhstan and Belarus before heading to the

:30:33.:30:33.

Channel Tunnel. At this time of the year a place in

:30:34.:30:44.

the sun might hold some appeal. Or maybe not. This is the scene from

:30:45.:30:52.

just outside Benidorm. And that train journey would have been

:30:53.:30:56.

conducted across a pretty cold Europe at the moment. Some of that

:30:57.:31:01.

cold air has made its way into the south-east. So you get a glorious

:31:02.:31:07.

start the day if frosty. -7 overnight in some places in Kent.

:31:08.:31:12.

And about 8 degrees on the other hand across many parts of northern

:31:13.:31:17.

Scotland thanks to low from the Atlantic for the high pressure still

:31:18.:31:22.

dominant, fairly settled but quite a variety. And we keep that team going

:31:23.:31:25.

over the next couple of hours. If you are thinking about the school

:31:26.:31:31.

run or a dog walk, some rain around across the Northern Isles. Coming

:31:32.:31:38.

down to be weather front then it is pretty miserable, quite murky across

:31:39.:31:48.

the West Midlands. The best of the guaranteed sunshine perhaps that the

:31:49.:31:52.

southern counties of England and perhaps just creeping into parts of

:31:53.:31:55.

Wales. But not doing much for those temperatures, stuck around four or 5

:31:56.:32:03.

degrees. And as soon as the sun goes down, the temperatures will again

:32:04.:32:06.

fall away. Not so much where you keep that cloud. Somewhere in the

:32:07.:32:14.

south again looking at around minus four degrees. So here we go again on

:32:15.:32:19.

Thursday, something of a repeat performance with the best of the

:32:20.:32:23.

Sunshine across southern counties. Some gaps further north are

:32:24.:32:27.

possible. But again the temperature is nothing to write home about

:32:28.:32:32.

despite what you see the sunshine. Five, six, 7 degrees. And the

:32:33.:32:37.

weather pretty much the same on Friday. There is a general evening

:32:38.:32:43.

out of those temperatures. And here's the thing, getting into the

:32:44.:32:48.

weekend high pressure is still the dominant feature. But if it looks

:32:49.:32:52.

threatening in the Atlantic do not worry, high pressure will be

:32:53.:32:56.

dominant on Saturday and on through the weekend which will be mainly dry

:32:57.:33:02.

with some sunshine. If you want to get involved with Weather Watchers,

:33:03.:33:06.

those are the details. A reminder of our main

:33:07.:33:09.

story this lunchtime. The EU will seek a balanced deal

:33:10.:33:11.

for Britain after Brexit says the head of the European commission

:33:12.:33:14.

- but any deal has to be "inferior" That's all from the BBC News at One

:33:15.:33:19.

- so it's goodbye from me -

:33:20.:33:23.

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