24/01/2017 BBC News at One


24/01/2017

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The Government loses its appeal at the Supreme Court -

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only parliament has the power to trigger the Brexit process.

:00:07.:00:10.

Eight of the eleven judges agreed that MPs and peers,

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not the Government, should be responsible

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The Government cannot trigger Article 50 without Parliament

:00:16.:00:22.

Outside the court, the ruling was welcomed

:00:23.:00:27.

by Gina Miller, the woman who'd challenged the Government.

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Today's decision has created legal certainty based on our democratic

:00:32.:00:35.

process and provides the legal foundations for the Government

:00:36.:00:40.

David Davis tells MPs that there is no going back on Brexit and

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legislation seeking their approval will be introduced quickly. We will

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within days introduce legislation to give the government legal power to

:01:00.:01:03.

trigger article 50 and begin the formal process of withdrawal.

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We'll be examining the significance of the Supreme Court ruling

:01:05.:01:07.

and asking what impact it will have on Brexit.

:01:08.:01:09.

President Trump tells car manufacturers, put your

:01:10.:01:13.

The massacre on a Tunisian beach - an inquest into the deaths of 30

:01:14.:01:21.

British tourists hears from a woman who played dead to survive.

:01:22.:01:25.

On the up - speeding fines for motorists driving well over

:01:26.:01:28.

In sport on BBC News, Bernie Ecclestone says

:01:29.:01:36.

he was forced out as chief executive of Formula One

:01:37.:01:38.

after 40 years following a takeover by Liberty Media.

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Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

:02:04.:02:06.

In a landmark ruling, the government has lost its appeal

:02:07.:02:10.

at the Supreme Court over who has the authority to start the process

:02:11.:02:13.

of taking the UK out of the European Union.

:02:14.:02:15.

Eight of the eleven supreme court judges ruled that

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only MPs and peers, not the Government,

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have the authority to trigger Article 50 and begin two

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The president of the Supreme Court, Lord Neuberger, said that leaving

:02:30.:02:33.

the EU would change UK law and the rights of UK citizens -

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which meant parliament must be consulted.

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A short time ago, MPs were told the government would introduce

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legislation within days to stop the formal process of leaving the EU.

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Our political correspondent Carole Walker reports.

:02:46.:02:49.

This was a case with profound implications. Who should decide the

:02:50.:02:55.

process for taking the UK out of the EU? The decision, taken by 11 of the

:02:56.:03:00.

most senior judges in the land, was delivered to the hushed courtroom.

:03:01.:03:06.

Today, by a majority of 8-3, the Supreme Court rules that the

:03:07.:03:11.

government cannot trigger Article 50 without an act of Parliament

:03:12.:03:16.

authorising it to do so. Article 50 begins the formal negotiations for

:03:17.:03:20.

leaving the EU, a process which the judges said would fundamentally

:03:21.:03:27.

change UK law. The referendum is of great political significance, but

:03:28.:03:30.

the act of Parliament which established it did not say what

:03:31.:03:34.

should happen as a result. So any change in the law to give effect to

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the referendum must be made in the only where permitted by the UK

:03:39.:03:44.

constitution, namely by an act of Parliament. The verdict was clear -

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the judgment spells out why the court had rejected the government's

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case. The government will comply with the judgment of the court and

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do all that is necessary to implement it. The woman who brought

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the case said the ruling reaffirmed that Parliament is sovereign. This

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ruling today means that MPs we have elected will rightfully have the

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opportunity to bring their invaluable experience and expertise

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to bear in helping the government select the best course in the

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forthcoming Brexit negotiations. Is this a blow to the government's

:04:23.:04:26.

Brexit timetable, Sir? But the government will be relieved that the

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court ruled that there is no legal requirement for it to consult the

:04:30.:04:33.

devolved nations, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. So the focus

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now switches to Parliament. MPs and peers will not try to block the

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Brexit process, but they could delay it. Opposition parties are already

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setting out the changes they will try to make to the coming

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legislation, changes which could affect the government's whole

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approach to the negotiations over Britain's departure from the EU. We

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are very clear. We will hold them to account to protect jobs. We will

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hold them to account to make sure British industry does have market

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access, and we will not allow ourselves to become some kind of

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offshore tax haven. That is not what people voted for. Unless the

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government concedes a new deal for the British people so that the

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British people have a say over the final arrangements between the UK

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and the EU, I will vote against article 50. The SNP say they will

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table 50 amendments. The Prime Minister set out last week a path

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towards the hardest of hard Brexits. I don't believe there is a majority

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for that in the House of Commons. I certainly don't believe there is a

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majority for that across the country, so this is an opportunity

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for the House of Commons to assert itself and to have a say not just on

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the narrow question, but on the broader terms of the negotiation as

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well. Downing Street said today's ruling will not affect the timetable

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for Theresa May to begin negotiating with other EU leaders. The

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government will introduce a bill in the Commons within days. This will

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be the most straightforward bill possible to give effect to the

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decision of the people and respect the Supreme Court's judgment. The

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purpose of this bill is simply to give the government the power to

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revoke Article 50 and begin the process of leaving the European

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Union. But the scene is set for some tough parliamentary clashes before

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the bigger battles with the rest of the EU can even begin. Carole

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Walker, BBC News, Westminster. Well, in a moment we'll talk

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to our assistant political editor Norman Smith -

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but first our legal How much of an impact could this

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ruling have on Brexit? Well, as you heard, this is a ruling

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which removes power from the government and gives power to

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Parliament. The government didn't want it this way, but they have got

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it this way. Now they have to introduce a bill to parliament that

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could be subject to a number of amendments. The real significance of

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today is that this ruling has really defined the limits of executive

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power, the power of ministers and government. And it has underscored

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the foundation of our unwritten constitution. We don't have a

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written constitution in this country, but we have one founding

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principle to our constitution, which is that Parliament is sovereign.

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Parliament creates the law and only Parliament has the power to change

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the law. And it was that that came through in the ruling of the eight

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Supreme Court justices who ruled against the government today. The

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government now has a much more difficult task ahead of it, and far

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less control over the process. Norman Smith is in Westminster. The

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government lost today. How confident is the Prime Minister going to be

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that they can still stick to the timetable, this date in March? It is

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a funny old paradox. You are right, the government was defeated, and yet

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frankly, ministers are oozing with confidence that they can get Article

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50 triggered and yes, by Mrs May's self-imposed deadline of March. The

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reason for that above all is because Parliamentary opposition in this

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place to triggering Article 50 is by and large crumbled. Tory rebels

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don't want a fight now. Peers in the House of Lords don't want to be seen

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to be defying the result of the referendum, and crucially, the

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Labour leader has said his party will not stand in the way of

:08:30.:08:34.

triggering article 50, even though some of his MPs will rebel against

:08:35.:08:38.

that. And on top of that, the court decided that the Scottish Parliament

:08:39.:08:42.

did not have a right to have a vote. So ministers are extremely

:08:43.:08:47.

confident, and the expectation is that a pared down bill will be

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introduced in the next few days. A word of warning, though. One thing

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we have learned from the whole Brexit process and successive prime

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ministers have learned in our relations with Europe - nothing ever

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goes smoothly. Parliamentary trapdoors can still open without

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warning. Norman Smith, thank you. Six months after the EU referendum,

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what the voters make of today's ruling? Our correspondent Danny

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Savage has been finding out. When it came to the decision on

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whether to leave the EU or stay, Leeds voted to remain, but only

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just. Months later, what do the 49.7% who voted to leave think now

:09:28.:09:32.

that the issue is going back to Parliament? Reverted to get out, so

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why can't we get our? It is simple. We voted for the Prime Minister come

:09:37.:09:41.

in, the Prime Minister comes in. We look to leave, and a store and

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stall. It's wrong. A lot of countries want to do business with

:09:47.:09:51.

England, Trump for starters. We don't like the guy, but that's not

:09:52.:10:00.

the point. Let's get back for us. Never mind other people, let's get

:10:01.:10:04.

this country going again. But remember, the majority in this city

:10:05.:10:07.

voted to stay and many haven't changed their mind. Shamal is from

:10:08.:10:14.

Iraq and thinks Europe should stick together. I don't know what is going

:10:15.:10:21.

to happen. Would you rather they stopped Brexit now and kept in

:10:22.:10:26.

Europe? Yeah. I was totally opposed to Brexit and I voted against

:10:27.:10:32.

leaving the EU. At a nearby butchers, Jim believes things would

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be different if we had known then what we know now. I know people who

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voted for Brexit who did not understand the circumstances and

:10:41.:10:42.

consequences of what we were voting for. I think before the referendum,

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we were not totally told what it implied with Brexit and what it

:10:49.:10:51.

means to stay in the EU or to leave. Do you wish Brexit would just go

:10:52.:10:57.

away? If I could turn the clock back 12 months and start all over again,

:10:58.:11:01.

I think the lead up to the referendum should be different.

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Broadly speaking, those who voted for Brexit just want the government

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to get on with it unhindered. Those who didn't are still against it, but

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see it as inevitable. Danny Savage, BBC News, Leeds.

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Let's get reaction from the rest of Europe with our correspondent Damian

:11:19.:11:23.

Grammaticas, who is in Brussels. What have they made of the ruling

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there? Here, what we have heard from the European Commission is that they

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will not comment on internal legal matters of a member state. They are

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waiting for that article 50 negotiation. But they did make clear

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in their view, once the 50 trigger happens, there will then first beer

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negotiation about separating. Only after that, negotiations on a trade

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deal. The EU commission said if you spit and want to remain on good

:11:53.:11:56.

terms, you have to settle things first and then your future

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relationship. One thing the ruling today has not clarified as whether

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once Article 50 is triggered, it can be revoked. Can you go back on that?

:12:05.:12:08.

The assumption in the ruling is that you trigger article 50 after two

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years you are out of the EU am a good deal, bad deal, whatever. There

:12:13.:12:18.

is a question that some are raising in the UK and was raised to date

:12:19.:12:21.

singer that can be revoked? Here, they would not be drawn on it, but

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expect more challenges through European courts, perhaps, on that

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issue. Damian Grammaticas, thank you.

:12:30.:12:32.

President Trump is meeting American car manufacturers today in a bid

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He's going to tell them that if they want to sell cars

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in the states, they need to build their new car

:12:42.:12:43.

Yesterday one of his first acts as President was to withdraw

:12:44.:12:47.

the United States from a major Asia pacific trade agreement -

:12:48.:12:49.

Our correspondent Richard Lister reports.

:12:50.:12:55.

If there was one thing that lifted Donald Trump to power,

:12:56.:13:01.

it was his pledge to create jobs, and the way to do that, he says,

:13:02.:13:05.

is to rip up some trade agreements and start again.

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He began by pulling America out of a deal with 11 other

:13:09.:13:11.

In truth, it had long been stalled in Congress,

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and President Trump said he would have a different approach.

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We're going to have trade, but we're going to have one-on-one.

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And if somebody misbehaves, we'll send them a letter

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of termination and they'll either straighten it out or we're gone,

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not one of these deals where you can't get out

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But some of those like Japan who signed up to the deal Mr Trump

:13:34.:13:38.

has rejected argue that it would have balanced Chinese

:13:39.:13:40.

Others say if Washington won't join their trade

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We want to have more opportunities with more markets.

:13:44.:13:53.

We already have a China-Australia free trade agreement.

:13:54.:13:55.

Certainly, there's the potential for China to join the TPP.

:13:56.:14:02.

Tackling China's economic influence is a priority for the Trump team,

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so now it has to try to fill the potential trade vacuum

:14:05.:14:07.

And it's worried about the South China Sea too.

:14:08.:14:12.

It carries 40% of the world's trade and is being fortified by Beijing

:14:13.:14:15.

If those islands are in fact in international waters and not

:14:16.:14:26.

part of China proper, then yeah, we are going to make sure we defend

:14:27.:14:29.

international territories from being taken

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China responded bluntly today that its policy wouldn't change.

:14:31.:14:33.

The Foreign Ministry warned Washington to act cautiously.

:14:34.:14:36.

Donald Trump's focus on putting business first went down well

:14:37.:14:38.

with these American union officials yesterday, but it's a strategy

:14:39.:14:41.

which will have a major impact abroad as well as at home.

:14:42.:14:46.

Well, let's speak to our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue,

:14:47.:14:53.

We know from his Twitter feed that he has been up for a while, but

:14:54.:15:02.

President Trump's first on his agenda are the car manufacturers. He

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certainly has a busy day ahead. Yeah, he is hauling in Ford, Fiat

:15:08.:15:10.

Chrysler and also General Motors into the Oval Office this morning.

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Effectively, they were on the receiving end of some of his

:15:17.:15:20.

harshest criticism during the campaign for shipping jobs and

:15:21.:15:23.

manufacturing out of the United States to Mexico in particular. He

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has also claimed credit for some of those jobs coming back subsequently,

:15:29.:15:33.

and those big manufacturers have announced some investments in the US

:15:34.:15:38.

as a result of Donald Trump's win. But there are still a lot of

:15:39.:15:41.

manufacturing going on outside. Ford employs something like 8000 people

:15:42.:15:46.

in Mexico and is building a new plant there. Donald Trump is

:15:47.:15:50.

threatening to impose huge terrace if they continue to assemble those

:15:51.:15:55.

cars and bring them in, 35% tariffs. Of course, he has got the unions on

:15:56.:15:59.

his side on this one and he will know that. The other thing to

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remember is that the American people know that the auto industry was

:16:05.:16:07.

bailed out big time after the financial crisis. So they have a lot

:16:08.:16:13.

of pressure on them at the moment to deliver what Trump once. Gary, thank

:16:14.:16:16.

you. A woman who was on holiday

:16:17.:16:18.

with her husband in Tunisia to celebrate their 30th wedding

:16:19.:16:21.

anniversary has been describing what happened when a gunman

:16:22.:16:23.

started shooting at tourists Allison Heathcote

:16:24.:16:25.

was shot five times. She told an inquest that

:16:26.:16:27.

she played dead as she lay next to her

:16:28.:16:30.

husband's body. Our correspondent Richard Galpin

:16:31.:16:32.

is at the Royal Courts of Justice. We are in a very important phase of

:16:33.:16:44.

this inquest is now, it began this week, this particular phase, looking

:16:45.:16:47.

into the evidence relating to the deaths of each of the 30 British

:16:48.:16:53.

tourists who were attack back in 2015. This morning we heard a very

:16:54.:16:58.

moving statement by the daughter of a couple who were killed, this was a

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Raymond and Angela Fisher. She, the daughter, read out the statement

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itself in court. It was a very brave thing to do, spoke about how her

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parents had been planning their 50th wedding anniversary during their

:17:16.:17:19.

holiday in Sousse. And also said that they had never been able to see

:17:20.:17:24.

their first grandson, who was born, actually, just before this inquest

:17:25.:17:27.

began earlier this month. And she then went on to ask the court to

:17:28.:17:33.

read out the very graphic details of the postmortem is carried out on

:17:34.:17:37.

both her parents so that everybody would know what the impact those

:17:38.:17:43.

high velocity rounds would be on the body, and everyone would know,

:17:44.:17:47.

therefore, what the gunman had done to her parents. Also, we've heard

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some critical evidence coming from some witnesses, who have talked

:17:51.:17:56.

about, really, the absolute pandemonium at the hotel, the fact

:17:57.:17:59.

that the staff were panicking, had no idea what to do to try and help

:18:00.:18:03.

the people who were running, and trying to escape from the scene. And

:18:04.:18:09.

also saying how there had been absolute no lockdown procedure at

:18:10.:18:13.

the hotel, so some very damning evidence of what the staff should

:18:14.:18:17.

have been doing but were not capable of doing at this critical time.

:18:18.:18:19.

Richard Galpin, thank you. The Government loses its appeal

:18:20.:18:20.

at the Supreme Court - only Parliament has the power

:18:21.:18:25.

to trigger the Brexit process. And coming up,

:18:26.:18:30.

how much is your signature worth? Here at a unique auction,

:18:31.:18:34.

1000 signatures are going under the hammer from some

:18:35.:18:36.

of the most famous names in history. In sport, Roger Federer

:18:37.:18:41.

is through to the semifinals of the Australian Open after beating

:18:42.:18:44.

Misha Zverev in straight sets. He'll face his Swiss compatriot

:18:45.:18:47.

Stan Wawrinka People caught driving

:18:48.:18:48.

well above the speed limit will now face much bigger fines

:18:49.:19:03.

in England and Wales. Those found to be travelling

:19:04.:19:06.

at more than 50 mph in a 30 limit could be hit with a penalty

:19:07.:19:09.

of up to ?1000. are being issued to magistrates

:19:10.:19:13.

by the Sentencing Council. It follows concerns

:19:14.:19:18.

by road-safety campaigners. Our correspondent

:19:19.:19:20.

Daniel Boettcher has more. Thousands of motorists are fined

:19:21.:19:24.

for speeding every year, and the penalties already vary

:19:25.:19:26.

depending on how bad but under changes

:19:27.:19:29.

to sentencing guidelines, exceeding the limit

:19:30.:19:33.

by a large margin Magistrates will set a sentence

:19:34.:19:35.

from a starting point that's up from the current

:19:36.:19:40.

starting point of 100%. The increase will apply to those

:19:41.:19:49.

cases judged to be the most serious, and that means on motorways,

:19:50.:19:52.

where the speed limit is 70, In a 20 zone,

:19:53.:19:55.

it would apply after 41 mph. There is, though, as now,

:19:56.:20:02.

and other limit for fines - ?2500 on motorways and ?1000

:20:03.:20:04.

on all other roads. The changes have been welcomed

:20:05.:20:08.

by safety campaigners The prospect of higher fines

:20:09.:20:10.

may change behaviours. What it will do is act

:20:11.:20:15.

as a deterrent, potentially, but what we also need is

:20:16.:20:21.

effective enforcement on our roads, and we have fewer

:20:22.:20:24.

road-traffic police officers The tougher penalties

:20:25.:20:25.

are part of broader guidelines set out by

:20:26.:20:30.

the Sentencing Council for magistrates

:20:31.:20:31.

in England and Wales. These guidelines were last updated

:20:32.:20:35.

in 2008, and while there are significant changes

:20:36.:20:37.

for motorists caught speeding, they also cover a whole range

:20:38.:20:40.

of other offences That includes the non-payment

:20:41.:20:44.

of the TV licence fee. There'll be a new option

:20:45.:20:49.

for magistrates for cases judged to be at

:20:50.:20:51.

the lowest level of offending. The Sentencing Council

:20:52.:20:56.

says the changes should help magistrates sentence

:20:57.:20:59.

fairly and proportionately. They're very important

:21:00.:21:02.

to ensure consistency, so whether you're in Hackney

:21:03.:21:04.

or Halifax, you'll have the same

:21:05.:21:06.

approach, the same starting point, the same range being looked

:21:07.:21:08.

at for a similar offence. The changes for speeding

:21:09.:21:12.

and the other offences covered by the new guidelines will be

:21:13.:21:14.

brought in towards the end of April. A barrister defending

:21:15.:21:18.

the veteran entertainer Rolf Harris has told Southwark Crown Court

:21:19.:21:23.

that the jury in his first trial in 2014 got it wrong when they found

:21:24.:21:27.

him guilty of indecent assault. The 86-year-old,

:21:28.:21:31.

who's pleaded not guilty, is being tried on seven charges

:21:32.:21:34.

of indecent assault and one of sexual assault against

:21:35.:21:37.

seven victims between 1971 and 2004. Our correspondent Dan Johnson

:21:38.:21:42.

is at Southwark Crown Court. Yes, this was the day when Rolf

:21:43.:21:54.

Harris' defence team started putting the case on his behalf, but we were

:21:55.:21:58.

told we will not hear from Rolf Harris himself, his defence

:21:59.:22:01.

barrister saying that his memory isn't good enough to recount events

:22:02.:22:06.

30 or 40 years ago. He told the jury, if the defendant can say no

:22:07.:22:11.

more micro to Uihlein, I cannot remember being there, the evidential

:22:12.:22:17.

importance is quite weak. -- can say no more to you. They have been

:22:18.:22:22.

picking up hard evidence given when he was convicted previously, and a

:22:23.:22:29.

number of witnesses have been saying that they could not remember him

:22:30.:22:32.

being at a community centre in Portsmouth where he was convicted of

:22:33.:22:36.

assaulting an 18-year-old girl, questioning his previous convictions

:22:37.:22:39.

and whether the prosecution can rely on those convictions to show a

:22:40.:22:42.

pattern of defending in this trial as well. His defence barrister said,

:22:43.:22:46.

in short, we say the jury got it wrong in the first trial, we have

:22:47.:22:51.

enormous faith in the system, but it is not infallible. Well, Rolf

:22:52.:22:56.

Harris, appearing via video link, denies the seven counts of indecent

:22:57.:23:00.

assault. Dan, thank you.

:23:01.:23:02.

Thousands of migrants, including children on their own,

:23:03.:23:04.

are sleeping rough in the Serbian capital, Belgrade,

:23:05.:23:06.

Some of the children are as young as eight.

:23:07.:23:09.

The Serbian government says many are refusing shelter

:23:10.:23:11.

Our Europe correspondent Gavin Lee sent this report.

:23:12.:23:14.

This is how migrants are living in the Serbian capital, Belgrade -

:23:15.:23:18.

sleeping rough with temperatures dropping as low

:23:19.:23:20.

But the people here have a choice - the Serbian government says

:23:21.:23:27.

warmth and food is available in official shelters.

:23:28.:23:31.

But many fear deportation and keep trying instead

:23:32.:23:33.

to cross illegally into Hungary and on to other EU countries.

:23:34.:23:39.

6,000 migrants are housed in official centres across the country,

:23:40.:23:45.

waiting for a chance to be among 20 people a day

:23:46.:23:48.

On the Belgrade streets, eight-year-old Aziz is alone,

:23:49.:23:54.

his brother detained on the Croatian border.

:23:55.:23:59.

I mean, Aziz, you don't sound well - is he OK?

:24:00.:24:03.

Yeah, he's OK, he has a little problem of flu,

:24:04.:24:06.

he have a flu and chest problems, cough problems.

:24:07.:24:10.

He would at least be, like, safe and warm...

:24:11.:24:12.

Extremely ill, we alert aid workers to Aziz's case,

:24:13.:24:16.

We've seen, over the last few days, children that are eight, nine, ten.

:24:17.:24:25.

I was speaking to a 12-year-old Afghan boy yesterday

:24:26.:24:29.

in this warehouse that's been here for three months.

:24:30.:24:32.

He's waiting for a call from a smuggler,

:24:33.:24:34.

because he thinks that's his best option.

:24:35.:24:38.

With older migrants looking out for him, saying their chance

:24:39.:24:42.

of crossing the border is greater with him in tow,

:24:43.:24:44.

two days on, Aziz is still sleeping rough in the warehouse

:24:45.:24:47.

where there are dozens of other unaccompanied children.

:24:48.:24:50.

The head of BT Europe is to resign over an accounting scandal in Italy

:24:51.:24:57.

that will dent the parent company's profits.

:24:58.:25:01.

Well, with me is our business editor, Simon Jack.

:25:02.:25:07.

Shares in the company have fallen sharply, what is going on? Really

:25:08.:25:14.

sharply, down 20%, the worst day they have had since they were

:25:15.:25:17.

privatised, and that is bad news for the 1 million small shareholders who

:25:18.:25:21.

still own shares since then. This has been an Italian accounting

:25:22.:25:25.

scandal, they thought it was going to cost ?140 million. Now they think

:25:26.:25:30.

it is to cost ?500 million, and the head of BT Europe will be out of

:25:31.:25:35.

post, let me put it this way, by later this afternoon, I am told.

:25:36.:25:39.

Believe it or not, it is not the worst of their problems, they also

:25:40.:25:43.

said that their revenue from their biggest customers, those are public

:25:44.:25:45.

sector bodies, big international customers, which stomach will be

:25:46.:25:50.

much weaker than they thought, and that is what investors even more.

:25:51.:25:54.

What be blasting to me is that when a coming as big as BT says it's

:25:55.:25:59.

biggest customers have stopped spending money, it can be a bad sign

:26:00.:26:03.

for the economy. -- what people are saying to me is that when a company

:26:04.:26:08.

as big as BT. It is a bit of a canary in a coal mine.

:26:09.:26:10.

Bernie Ecclestone's 40-year reign as the head of Formula One is over,

:26:11.:26:13.

after it was sold to a company called Liberty Media

:26:14.:26:16.

Mr Ecclestone, who's 86, said he'd been forced out.

:26:17.:26:20.

Our sports correspondent Andy Swiss reports.

:26:21.:26:22.

He's the former used-car salesman who came to rule

:26:23.:26:24.

But for Bernie Ecclestone, it's finally the end of the road.

:26:25.:26:33.

Over 40 years, he turned Formula One from a niche interest

:26:34.:26:36.

into a multi-billion pound powerhouse.

:26:37.:26:39.

But now it has new owners - American company Liberty Media.

:26:40.:26:45.

They believe the sport can promote itself better,

:26:46.:26:47.

and so they put a new man, Chase Carey, in the driving seat.

:26:48.:26:55.

I would expect this is difficult for Bernie,

:26:56.:26:57.

it's a big change for him, he's run the sport,

:26:58.:26:59.

he's run the sport as a one-man...

:27:00.:27:01.

he's run it as a one-man dictator for a long time.

:27:02.:27:06.

I think the sport needs a fresh perspective.

:27:07.:27:10.

Tough and uncompromising, Ecclestone's business brain

:27:11.:27:13.

brought him famous friends and huge personal fortune,

:27:14.:27:16.

but it's also brought controversy.

:27:17.:27:21.

Off the track, he had to settle a bribery case in Germany,

:27:22.:27:28.

while on it his decisions have raised eyebrows - taking races

:27:29.:27:31.

to countries like Bahrain, with questionable human rights

:27:32.:27:33.

records, tinkering with the rules, and skewing prize money

:27:34.:27:35.

After so long in power, many feel a change in direction is overdue.

:27:36.:27:41.

I think the most important thing is getting back

:27:42.:27:44.

to the basics of outright racing, engaging with the fans,

:27:45.:27:48.

engaging with the public, and perhaps de-complicating the cars

:27:49.:27:51.

a little, and going back to man and machine

:27:52.:27:55.

Ecclestone will still have an advisory role, but a man

:27:56.:28:00.

so used to being the puppet master is no longer pulling the strings.

:28:01.:28:06.

At 86, his reign is over, and Formula One, indeed sport,

:28:07.:28:09.

will surely never see his like again.

:28:10.:28:13.

A signature on a cheque from Charles Dickens,

:28:14.:28:19.

a lock of hair from the Duke of Wellington,

:28:20.:28:21.

a postcard from the great train robbers

:28:22.:28:24.

They're just part of a huge collection of autographs,

:28:25.:28:32.

letters and historic documents that are going under the hammer today.

:28:33.:28:34.

Our correspondent Duncan Kennedy reports.

:28:35.:28:38.

Which Royal do you think this is? Does this help? How about this

:28:39.:28:47.

writer? And does this help? This ruler is probably more recognisable,

:28:48.:28:55.

but what about this? In fact, they are Queen Victoria, Rudyard Kipling

:28:56.:28:59.

and Napoleon, but it is their signatures, not their faces, that

:29:00.:29:03.

often travel better through history. They are part of a unique single

:29:04.:29:09.

collection of 1000 signatures being auctioned today. There is the mark

:29:10.:29:13.

of everyone from mad King George III to the Duke of Wellington, and from

:29:14.:29:19.

Gordon of Khartoum to Ronnie Biggs, the great train robber. Some of the

:29:20.:29:24.

signatures are connected, like these three men, who all took part in the

:29:25.:29:29.

charge of the light Brigade in 1854. There is Lord Lucan, who gave the

:29:30.:29:34.

order, the Earl of Cardigan, who led the charge, and Private William

:29:35.:29:41.

Bird, one of the 600 who survived. ... Daisy, Daisy... #

:29:42.:29:46.

You might not recognise Francis Warwick, the mistress of the future

:29:47.:29:55.

Edward VII, who inspired the song. Others speak for themselves. That is

:29:56.:30:01.

one small step for man. One giant leap for mankind. It was the late

:30:02.:30:05.

John Evans, a post-war British magician who conjured up this

:30:06.:30:09.

collection, but in a world where signatures seem to be giving way to

:30:10.:30:15.

selfies, is the intimacy of handwritten names being lost?

:30:16.:30:18.

Collecting signatures in days gone by, and I think it will continue, is

:30:19.:30:23.

on a park with selfies today. What we do today with selfies is only the

:30:24.:30:27.

same as collecting a bit of excitement decades or centuries ago.

:30:28.:30:32.

Today's auction in Worthing attracted local and international

:30:33.:30:39.

buyers. Neil Armstrong's signature went for ?2500. Ronnie Biggs' 564.

:30:40.:30:46.

There is still money in a moniker, especially from those fashioned by

:30:47.:30:50.

the hand of history. Duncan Kennedy, BBC News, in Worthing.

:30:51.:30:52.

Time now for a look at the weather with Chris Fawkes, lots more fog

:30:53.:30:56.

around today. Yes, once again causing problems for

:30:57.:31:04.

the airport in south-east England, and in the Wembley area, rather

:31:05.:31:09.

foggy conditions, the sun just trying to peep through the low

:31:10.:31:13.

cloud. There is Wembley, out in the fog banks, sunshine across good part

:31:14.:31:18.

of England, cloudy and to the north-west, a beautiful to the

:31:19.:31:21.

morning in Staffordshire. Temperatures overnight dropped like

:31:22.:31:24.

a stone to leave icy conditions, a pewter. Still today. -- a beautiful

:31:25.:31:38.

view. A few fog patches linger on to the Vale of York and the Salisbury

:31:39.:31:43.

Plains, cloudy for Wales and north-west England. Damp weather

:31:44.:31:47.

getting into Scotland. Northern Ireland should stay dry, and for the

:31:48.:31:51.

north of Scotland, sunny spells, both having relatively mild weather,

:31:52.:31:57.

10-11d. Overnight and night, risk Atlantic winds over the north and

:31:58.:32:00.

west of the UK will keep the frost and fog at bay across the north-west

:32:01.:32:06.

of the country. Indeed, a mild night here, ten or 11 degrees in the

:32:07.:32:11.

mildest spots. Cold air in central and eastern England, and again we

:32:12.:32:14.

will see a sharp overnight frost forming. Temperatures probably as

:32:15.:32:20.

low as minus four degrees Celsius, so again some icy stretches on

:32:21.:32:24.

untreated roads, and the fog will be back again, particularly across

:32:25.:32:30.

south-east England and East Anglia. There is a risk of further

:32:31.:32:33.

disruption. It will clear through the morning as low cloud comes in

:32:34.:32:38.

from the near continent, bringing drizzle, even snow is possible,

:32:39.:32:42.

don't be surprised by a bit of wintriness. Sunshine into Wales and

:32:43.:32:47.

north-west England, cloudy for Northern Ireland and western

:32:48.:32:52.

Scotland, mild weather in the West, ten or 11 degrees. Through Thursday,

:32:53.:32:55.

we started to squeeze the isobars closer together across the UK, so

:32:56.:32:59.

although the weather should stay largely dry, the winds will be a

:33:00.:33:04.

major feature through Thursday, and quite a cloudy start to the day, but

:33:05.:33:09.

things should brighten up with sunny spells coming through. Temperatures,

:33:10.:33:13.

we are looking at highs of 5 degrees or so in London, but feeling

:33:14.:33:17.

significantly colder in the wind, feeling below freezing for some.

:33:18.:33:21.

Things will change towards the end of the week and on into the weekend.

:33:22.:33:25.

We will see the temperatures generally rising, and in London by

:33:26.:33:28.

Saturday temperatures up to 10 degrees.

:33:29.:33:30.

A reminder of our main story this lunchtime.

:33:31.:33:32.

The Government loses its appeal at the Supreme Court -

:33:33.:33:34.

now only Parliament has the power to trigger the Brexit process.

:33:35.:33:40.

That's all from the BBC News at One, so it's goodbye from me,

:33:41.:33:44.

and on BBC One we now join the BBC's news teams where you are.

:33:45.:33:47.

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