27/01/2017 BBC News at One


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27/01/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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Theresa May is to become the first foreign leader to meet Donald Trump,

:00:00.:00:08.

hoping to open the way to a trade deal after Brexit.

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But will, in Mrs May's words, opposites attract, after President

:00:14.:00:17.

Trump's controversial support for waterboarding?

:00:18.:00:20.

We'll be live in Washington and in Westminster asking what each

:00:21.:00:23.

side hopes to achieve in this crucial first meeting.

:00:24.:00:25.

Plans to ration knee and hip surgery in Worcestershire

:00:26.:00:30.

to save money are described as alarming by surgeons.

:00:31.:00:34.

Tesco's share price has risen sharply after the supermarket

:00:35.:00:37.

chain said it was buying the food wholesaler Booker.

:00:38.:00:41.

Six years in jail for the former judge and his assistant

:00:42.:00:44.

who defrauded their firm out of hundreds of thousands of pounds.

:00:45.:00:49.

And could Rafa Nadal be the latest comeback kid -

:00:50.:00:51.

as he fights for a place in the men's Grand Slam

:00:52.:00:54.

Coming up in the sport on BBC News, Anthony Joshua's title fight

:00:55.:01:02.

against Vladimir Klitschko at Wembley in April will be watched

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by the biggest post-war British boxing crowd of 90,000.

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Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

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Theresa May is preparing to meet Donald Trump in the White House

:01:32.:01:35.

in a few hours' time - the first foreign leader to visit

:01:36.:01:38.

Global security and a trade deal after Brexit are likely

:01:39.:01:42.

In a speech to US Republicans last night, Mrs May said the UK

:01:43.:01:47.

and America could not return to failed military interventions

:01:48.:01:50.

Her visit comes amid ongoing controversy over President Trump's

:01:51.:01:55.

support for the waterboarding of terror suspects and his war

:01:56.:02:00.

of words with Mexico over the building of a border wall.

:02:01.:02:02.

Here's our correspondent Richard Lister.

:02:03.:02:10.

She will hope the blustery conditions aren't a portent for the

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meeting to come. Washington has rolled out the red carpet for

:02:16.:02:18.

Theresa May but the Prime Minister will have to tread carefully with a

:02:19.:02:23.

controversial President who is used to getting his own way. Her priority

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is to lay the groundwork for a trade deal with the US to counterbalance

:02:27.:02:33.

Britain's departure from the EU. On the key side in Liverpool cars

:02:34.:02:38.

bound for the United States and construction equipment too.

:02:39.:02:40.

President Trump has promised a building boom and Britain wants a

:02:41.:02:44.

part of that. For us as a company if we can get a slice of that we can

:02:45.:02:47.

export the goods that he needs to carry on with that construction he

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is looking at. Britain's trading relationship with

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the United States is already a healthy one. The value of our

:02:54.:02:59.

exports to the US is ?45 billion. That's a fifth of UK global exports

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and we sell them more than we buy with imports totalling 35 billion,

:03:05.:03:09.

we export more to the US than we do to any other country. But we are

:03:10.:03:12.

only America's fifth biggest market. We need them more than they need us.

:03:13.:03:18.

In his first week as President, Donald Trump has said repeatedly his

:03:19.:03:22.

strategy will be buy American, hire American. And although he wants

:03:23.:03:27.

bilateral trade deals they'll come with conditions attached. We want to

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deal with the ones that treat us well and finance they don't treat us

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well we terminate for give them a notice and if they want to negotiate

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we get a better deal. Until we leave the EU only Brussels can make UK

:03:44.:03:47.

trade deals. The Chancellor's there today and he accepted Britain's

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hands are currently tied. We will continue to abide by the rules and

:03:53.:03:56.

regulations and laws of the European Union for so long as we are members.

:03:57.:04:02.

Of course we want to strengthen our trade ties with the very many trade

:04:03.:04:05.

partners we have around the world but we are mindful of our

:04:06.:04:09.

obligations anned the treaty and we will follow them precisely. For now,

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the key players in Europe are wary of what MrTrump has to offer.

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TRANSLATION: Let's speak frankly, there are challenges that the US

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administration poses to our trade rules. So we of course have to talk

:04:24.:04:28.

to Donald Trump, he was elected. But we also have to promote our interest

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and values as Europeans. Back in Liverpool, this golden eagle

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marks the US kons lat established here in 1790. A reminder of

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long-standing Anglo American trade ties. Today, it's a French

:04:43.:04:46.

restaurant. That's a reminder the relationship can't be taken for

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granted. The assumption that everything will be fine with British

:04:51.:04:55.

trade is assuming that the Trump and his administration are rationale

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actors, they'll behave rationally but they might not. The picture may

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become clearer later today. In a moment we'll get

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the latest from Westminster, but first to Washington

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and our correspondent Theresa May is the first foreign

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leader to visit, does this mean that the special relationship does count

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for something there? Well, I just asked Donald Trump's spokeswoman

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that question and she said it's as important to America as to Britain,

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she said Donald Trump would use this meeting to assure MrsMay of that and

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she made the comparison with Brexit and his election, she said both

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leaders have been propelled into power and leadership by a populous

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wave that was to shake up establishment institutions, but,

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frankly, it's obvious that there is much more at stake here from MrsMay

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than MrTrump because Britain's other strategic relationship with the

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European Union is in flux, she can't afford to have this relationship

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look like it's getting weaker. She needs to show it's getting stronger,

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to demonstrate that Britain has options outside of the EU. Whatever

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MrTrump might say about similarities, he is quite different

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in the sense that he is a protectionist, he is a hard

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nationalist and MrsMay is not. She's already tried to encourage him not

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to turn his back on the world. I think she will continue that today.

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Then the question of how much she wants a personal special

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relationship with this man who is criticised even reviled in Britain

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for his positions from everything from Muslims and women, to torture.

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So, that news conference later today will be an important test of how

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she's going to handle this relationship.

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And what has MrsMay got to do to come away from feeling this first

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meeting was a success, Carole? Well, I think the Prime Minister will want

:06:42.:06:45.

to establish that personal relationship, a rapport with the new

:06:46.:06:49.

American President. She will want to build the basis for a future trade

:06:50.:06:55.

deal. She will want to, frankly, navigate her way through this mine

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field of different areas where she and the American President

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profoundly disagree. As you heard there, they are two very different

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characters but on the plane on the way over Theresa May said, well,

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sometimes opposites can attract. I think she will want to look to

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economic ties, to build on President trump's offer to put Britain at the

:07:15.:07:20.

front of the queue when it comes to a future bilaterial trade deal, then

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you come to these difficult contentious issues, torture,

:07:26.:07:29.

President trump has said he would be prepared to allow waterboarding in

:07:30.:07:33.

the fight against terrorism although some senior figures in his team

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disagree. Theresa May has said that would cause huge problems for future

:07:38.:07:40.

co-operation on defence and intelligence. It will be a real test

:07:41.:07:47.

of Theresa May's diplomatic skills, whether she can build that personal

:07:48.:07:50.

relationship without appearing too much to pander to a man with such

:07:51.:07:58.

contentious views so she would face a backlash when she gets home. Thank

:07:59.:08:02.

you both very much. You can see full coverage of that

:08:03.:08:06.

visit to Washington on the BBC News channel, including that news

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conference with Donald Trump which is expected around 6pm.

:08:10.:08:14.

The Royal College of Surgeons says plans to cut knee and hip

:08:15.:08:17.

replacement operations in Worcestershire are alarming.

:08:18.:08:19.

Three commissioning groups in the county say

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very obese patients - and those who are in

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only moderate pain - will not qualify for the surgery.

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They say the plan will save ?2 million a year,

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and bring them into line with other parts of the country.

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Here's our health correspondent Robert Pigott.

:08:31.:08:34.

At five feet ten inches and weighing a little over 18 stone, Gordon from

:08:35.:08:42.

Worcestershire can no longer expect swift access to the second hip

:08:43.:08:47.

replacement he needs. The pain from his osteoarthritis wakes him up at

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night and his mobility is badly compromised. But new restrictions on

:08:52.:08:55.

surgery mean he would have to lose 10% of his weight before he could

:08:56.:09:00.

qualify for surgery. It's a very sharp pain, very sharp pain. It's

:09:01.:09:08.

not an ache. It's very, very sharp. Turn over in bed... I haven't really

:09:09.:09:14.

been fully fit in terms of being able to walk properly, or go for a

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walk, pre-2013. It would dramatically change my life.

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More than 50 years on since the first operation, this revolutionary

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procedure is widely rationed. The clinical commissions groups in

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some areas will exclude from hip and knee replacement patients who rank

:09:40.:09:43.

as more bid le obese or those whose pain is not sufficiently severe to

:09:44.:09:46.

interfere with daily life. The Royal College of Surgeons says the

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restrictions are not clinically justified and will often be a false

:09:50.:09:55.

economy. The patient continues to be in pain, needs painkillers and

:09:56.:10:03.

physiotherapy, he may be unable to work. By waiting the operation may

:10:04.:10:09.

indeed become more difficult when he eventually gets it. The clinical

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commissions groups said they were bringing Worcestershire into line

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with what others do. They said if a patient feels they require this

:10:18.:10:20.

surgery but do not meet the criteria, there is a clear appeal

:10:21.:10:23.

system. Several other commissions groups in

:10:24.:10:28.

England, including in Harrogate, the Vale of York and Kent are imposing

:10:29.:10:32.

similar restrictions on non-emergency surgery. Demand for

:10:33.:10:35.

hip and knee replacements is growing with an ageing population but the

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money to pay for them is increasingly scarce.

:10:39.:10:42.

The families of four people who were killed by a runaway

:10:43.:10:45.

tipper-truck in Bath have been describing the impact the accident

:10:46.:10:47.

Four people died when they were hit by a lorry,

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The owner of the haulage company, Matthew Gordon, and a mechanic,

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Peter Wood, were convicted of manslaughter last year

:10:56.:10:57.

Jon Kay reports from Bristol Crown Court.

:10:58.:11:08.

These four families sitting together in the courtroom here holding hands,

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supporting one another, taking it in turns each to read out victim impact

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statements and some of the words extremely moving, difficult to

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listen to some of them, very emotional, very honest. In the dock

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a few feet away the two men who were convicted of manslaughter just

:11:27.:11:29.

before Christmas, Matthew Gordon and Peter Wood who will be sentenced

:11:30.:11:30.

this afternoon. They all lost their lives

:11:31.:11:32.

in a matter of seconds. Four-year-old Mitzi Steady,

:11:33.:11:35.

chauffeur Steve Vaughan and businessman Philip Allen

:11:36.:11:37.

and Robert Parker, killed by a 32-ton truck, its brakes had

:11:38.:11:42.

failed while coming down a steep Just before Christmas,

:11:43.:11:47.

these men were found guilty on four On the left, Matthew Gordon, who ran

:11:48.:11:52.

the Grittenham Haulage company. On the right, Peter Wood,

:11:53.:11:58.

a mechanic whose job Pictures of the vehicle's brakes

:11:59.:12:03.

were shown in court. The jury was told they

:12:04.:12:08.

were badly worn, rusty, The trial heard the company

:12:09.:12:11.

was a shambles, failing to carry out Today, relatives of those

:12:12.:12:18.

who were killed have told the court The mother of Mitzi Steady

:12:19.:12:24.

said her family is bereft and she finds it a struggle to go

:12:25.:12:27.

on without Mitzi's laughter Mitzi's grandmother, who was also

:12:28.:12:31.

hit by the truck, needed to have She described the physical

:12:32.:12:37.

and emotional pain she's been left with, saying life

:12:38.:12:43.

has changed completely. The wife of Steve Vaughan told

:12:44.:12:45.

the court about the moment she went She said as she held him she played

:12:46.:12:49.

songs they had only recently At the end of the trial she told me

:12:50.:12:56.

about the void now in her life. We were only married for six months

:12:57.:13:04.

and especially having to spend your first wedding

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anniversary alone was just so far removed from the one

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that we had planned. It's just been

:13:14.:13:16.

absolutely horrendous. The widow of Phil Allen said she had

:13:17.:13:22.

been robbed of her soulmate in an horrific accident that should

:13:23.:13:25.

never have happened. She said those responsible had

:13:26.:13:28.

shown a total disregard And Robert Parker's widow said

:13:29.:13:32.

she had thought of nothing else since the moment he was killed

:13:33.:13:36.

by the runaway truck. She said the wreckless actions

:13:37.:13:39.

of mothers means her life She said the wreckless actions

:13:40.:13:43.

of others means her life Matthew Gordon, who ran that haulage

:13:44.:13:52.

company will be sentenced this afternoon. He had said during the

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original trial last year that he was dyslexic and that caused him

:13:57.:13:59.

problems in running the company. But perhaps one of the most poignant

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moments was when Shaun Vaughan who you heard speaking in that report,

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looked him in the eye talking about the death of her husband and said I

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am dyslexic too but I have never made that an excuse for many of my

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actions. Matthew Gordon and Peter Wood sentenced here this afternoon.

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A former judge and his assistant have been jailed for six years

:14:21.:14:25.

for defrauding their own law firm out of more than ?600,000.

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The pair syphoned off the money to pay for a lavish lifestyle.

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Let's speak to our our correspondent Dan Johnson who's

:14:32.:14:33.

Tell us more about the details of what they did. Well, homes, holidays

:14:34.:14:44.

to Barbados, a Range Rover, even a log cabin with a hot tub, some of

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the luxuries bought with this money Simon Kenny and Emma Coates took

:14:51.:14:55.

from their own law firm in Sussex. The judge said that they had used

:14:56.:14:59.

the firm as their own personal piggy bank. This began as a way of

:15:00.:15:05.

propping up the firm, of keep solvent, it extended to treating the

:15:06.:15:08.

solicitor and his assistant who he was having an affair with at the

:15:09.:15:13.

time, the judge said that Emma Coates was drawn to excess and

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extravagance and if there was money there for the taking she took it.

:15:17.:15:21.

The judge said it was difficult to imagine a more spectacular breach of

:15:22.:15:25.

trust. One theft involved ?85,000 being taken from the will of an

:15:26.:15:29.

elderly woman. They told colleagues in the law firm they were moving the

:15:30.:15:33.

money offshore because of the banking crisis, to keep it safe. One

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particularly sad aspect of this case has been that the company accountant

:15:39.:15:41.

belatedly realised what was going on and he had been duped by the pair,

:15:42.:15:46.

he then took his own life. The judge in sentencing the pair said they

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would to deal with that for the rest of their lives. There is a third

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employee called Steven Heis man yet to be sentenced for his part in this

:15:55.:16:00.

fraud and the deputy district judge that Simon Kenny was in his previous

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life and a solicitor, the judge said that meant that he had brought shame

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on the entire legalal -- legal profession. He has had to be kept in

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special protection at the jail because word got around about what

:16:16.:16:16.

he used to do. Thank you. Theresa May is preparing

:16:17.:16:19.

to meet Donald Trump, the first world leader to meet

:16:20.:16:25.

the new president. The profoundly deaf boy whose

:16:26.:16:27.

family escaped Iraq, Coming up in the sport at 130 can

:16:28.:16:51.

Rafa Nadal reaches first grand slam final since 2014 comment he faces

:16:52.:16:53.

Grigor Dimitrov in the last four at the Australian Open, Roger Federer

:16:54.:16:54.

awaits the winner. Tesco, the UK's largest retailer,

:16:55.:16:58.

has agreed to buy Britain's largest food wholesaler -

:16:59.:17:01.

Booker - in a deal worth It would mean Tesco

:17:02.:17:03.

gaining a massive share in supplying restaurants,

:17:04.:17:06.

pubs, and convenience News of the deal sent shares

:17:07.:17:08.

soaring in both companies. Here's our business

:17:09.:17:13.

correspondent, Emma Simpson. Tesco already has the lion's share

:17:14.:17:27.

of the UK's grocery business. Now it has its sights on serving even more

:17:28.:17:31.

customers. It has struck a deal to buy Booker. You may not have heard

:17:32.:17:39.

of it but this Wholesalers applies thousands of pubs, restaurants,

:17:40.:17:42.

caterers and corner shops. This market is growing faster than

:17:43.:17:45.

selling groceries in supermarkets and Tesco wants a slice of it. What

:17:46.:17:53.

we do see is... The two company bosses side-by-side for a

:17:54.:18:12.

webcast this morning to explain why the surprise ?3.7 billion deal makes

:18:13.:18:16.

sense. The ability to improve the core offer of both the retail

:18:17.:18:18.

operation but also the Independent and small business operation that

:18:19.:18:20.

Charles is currently serves is definitely going to drive growth,

:18:21.:18:22.

better choice, better range, better value, better price. What will the

:18:23.:18:23.

wider impact be? Booker does not only is convenience stores but they

:18:24.:19:01.

own the brands and they supply the goods to the independent retailers

:19:02.:19:04.

who run them. Tesco has 10% of the convenience food market today in our

:19:05.:19:06.

estimates, Booker has a similar share, probably bigger of the

:19:07.:19:08.

convenience markets and Tesco supplying both will make it a bigger

:19:09.:19:10.

force in convenience retail. That may prompt some concerns including

:19:11.:19:12.

from the competition authorities who are likely to scrutinise this deal.

:19:13.:19:15.

If approved it is a big bold deal by Tesco extending its already

:19:16.:19:17.

formidable reach. Emma Simpson, BBC News.

:19:18.:19:20.

The Church of England should not change its teaching on marriage

:19:21.:19:23.

as "the lifelong union of one man and one woman," according

:19:24.:19:26.

to the House of Bishops, which forms part of the General

:19:27.:19:28.

It said there was "little support" for same-sex

:19:29.:19:31.

marriage inside the Church, but urged a "fresh tone...of

:19:32.:19:33.

welcome and support" for lesbian and gay people.

:19:34.:19:35.

It acknowledged its findings could cause

:19:36.:19:37.

Here's our Religious Affairs Correspondent Martin Bashir.

:19:38.:19:39.

ancient institution three years of so-called shared conversations about

:19:40.:20:07.

same-sex relationships were not expected to radically altered church

:20:08.:20:09.

doctrine and today's report from the house of Bishops lands on the status

:20:10.:20:12.

quo, that marriage is a lifelong union between a man and a woman. The

:20:13.:20:14.

bishop who led the working group says that while the doctrine does

:20:15.:20:17.

not change, the Church must adapt its tone. It is not against the

:20:18.:20:19.

impact of cultural change. We uphold the authority of Scripture, the

:20:20.:20:22.

tradition of the Church in common with the fast and overwhelming

:20:23.:20:24.

majority of churches around the world. But what we want to do is

:20:25.:20:27.

engage with the culture of which we are apart, and that has changed

:20:28.:20:29.

radically. Lesbian and gay members of the church are disappointed,

:20:30.:20:31.

accusing the bishops to do nothing to acknowledge the sanctity of

:20:32.:20:33.

lesbian, Gay, bisexual and transgender relationships. No change

:20:34.:20:35.

in the doctrine of marriage, a little warmth, a little

:20:36.:21:04.

tilt in the direction of great inclusion but we are a long way from

:21:05.:21:08.

that yet. I think that's what most people expected, a classic Anglican

:21:09.:21:10.

fudge, a sideways step and emerging to a different patch of the long

:21:11.:21:12.

grass perhaps. Conservative evangelicals have expressed relief

:21:13.:21:14.

that the bishops of uphold the authority of Scripture against the

:21:15.:21:16.

impact of cultural change. I want the church to stand with the

:21:17.:21:18.

teaching of Jesus and my understanding is that Jesus taught

:21:19.:21:20.

clearly that successful marriage and marriages a man and a woman so I

:21:21.:21:23.

want the church to continue to teach what Jesus taught on that issue,

:21:24.:21:27.

find ways of commending that living be to the world around us. This

:21:28.:21:30.

report will be debated at General Synod which begins in just over two

:21:31.:21:32.

weeks' time. Martin Bashir, BBC News, Church house in London.

:21:33.:21:36.

There's been a big increase in the number of people

:21:37.:21:38.

The figures for England and Wales show there were more

:21:39.:21:42.

than 90-thousand insolvencies last year, an increase of more than 13

:21:43.:21:44.

Our Personal Finance Correspondent Simon Gompertz is with me.

:21:45.:21:48.

Figures tell us that people are putting more on their credit cards,

:21:49.:22:09.

personal loans, overdrafts, there is a feeling that is fuelling the

:22:10.:22:11.

shopping boom at the moment, perhaps not sustainably. It could be one

:22:12.:22:13.

reason, something that the governor of the Bank of England has warned we

:22:14.:22:16.

be vigilant about, if people get into serious debt and the result is

:22:17.:22:19.

formal insolvency, those are the figures, 91,000 in the last year, a

:22:20.:22:27.

rise of 13%, as he said. And within that this 23% rise in what are

:22:28.:22:29.

called individual voluntary arrangements, which are the most

:22:30.:22:32.

flexible form. So a lot of people are moving into that. On the other

:22:33.:22:35.

hand, though, it went to a low after the recession which followed the

:22:36.:22:37.

financial crisis and we are still about 30% below the numbers of that

:22:38.:22:39.

time. So it's not the worst it's been. Also bankruptcy,

:22:40.:22:54.

debt relief orders and other arrangements, they have all become

:22:55.:22:56.

easier to do and debt advisers have been pushing people in those

:22:57.:22:59.

directions so some of it could be not as much people getting into debt

:23:00.:23:01.

but people doing something about it, which is not necessarily a bad

:23:02.:23:02.

thing. Simon, thank you. The Hamadamin family fled Iraq

:23:03.:23:06.

in 2015 because they were afraid their profoundly deaf son would be

:23:07.:23:09.

killed by so-called Islamic State. He's now at a British school,

:23:10.:23:11.

learning sign language. But the family are facing

:23:12.:23:14.

deportation to Germany, because they entered

:23:15.:23:16.

the UK illegally. He had a cochlear implant

:23:17.:23:17.

fitted when he was Now, for the first time he's able

:23:18.:23:32.

to communicate how he After learning it here

:23:33.:23:36.

at the Royal School for the Deaf in He's had to go right back

:23:37.:23:51.

from scratch, learning English, to learn to read and to write and then

:23:52.:23:55.

learn sign language as well and he's gone from reading nothing

:23:56.:23:58.

to being of an age four. The family fled Iraq

:23:59.:24:06.

after so-called Islamic State threatened to kill

:24:07.:24:08.

disabled children. They then spent one year living

:24:09.:24:10.

in a camp in Germany before making their way to France and then

:24:11.:24:13.

to England on the back of a lorry. TRANSLATION: My life and my family's

:24:14.:24:23.

lives were in danger so we had no other option but to leave Iraq

:24:24.:24:26.

and travel to Europe. So when you see your son

:24:27.:24:28.

communicating so fluently now in sign language how

:24:29.:24:31.

does that make you feel? TRANSLATION: I'm happy that my child

:24:32.:24:34.

is making progress in Whatever I can do I will do it

:24:35.:24:36.

for him and I feel ecstatic when I see he has

:24:37.:24:41.

progressed so dramatically. They were going to be sent back

:24:42.:24:43.

to Germany last week. Ministers had argued they should

:24:44.:24:45.

apply for asylum in the first European country they had entered

:24:46.:24:48.

but at the last minute, their manner that they wish to do

:24:49.:24:51.

so, to go to Germany in another language would be

:24:52.:25:06.

detrimental to his progress. The Home Office says

:25:07.:25:09.

the family has an existing asylum claim

:25:10.:25:16.

in Germany, so it is only right, they say,

:25:17.:25:18.

their claim is considered

:25:19.:25:19.

by the German authorities. Now Lawand's future lies

:25:20.:25:20.

in the hands of a High Court judge A 900-year-old skeleton found

:25:21.:25:24.

in Hampshire has revealed important Researchers say the

:25:25.:25:34.

remains of the man, thought to be a religious pilgrim,

:25:35.:25:37.

were excavated at a burial Scientific detective work suggests

:25:38.:25:40.

he caught the highly-contagious skin disease on his travels to a shrine

:25:41.:25:43.

in Spain and brought it Many survivors of genocide

:25:44.:25:46.

are still facing discrimination because of their religion

:25:47.:25:55.

or ethnicity, according to research Across the world, there've been

:25:56.:25:57.

ceremonies to remember the millions of people who died

:25:58.:26:01.

in the Second World War, Our correspondent Holly Hamilton

:26:02.:26:03.

went to meet one survivor The door opened, three

:26:04.:26:07.

German soldiers came in. He took out his revolver

:26:08.:26:15.

and put it to my head. And people ask me,

:26:16.:26:19.

what does it feel like This wasn't the first

:26:20.:26:22.

time Gabor Lacko came This was all around

:26:23.:26:32.

us, all the time. Nothing was surprising,

:26:33.:26:43.

we were prepared for everything. It's made from bits

:26:44.:26:47.

and pieces of material His first yellow star,

:26:48.:26:49.

worn to identify him as a Jew, was A piece of history he

:26:50.:26:53.

has kept to this day. The first day I was wearing

:26:54.:26:56.

it, I had a medical At the top of the road,

:26:57.:27:00.

a lady who saw me trying to hide it Like many survivors Gabor waited for

:27:01.:27:11.

more than 20 years before talking about his experiences, motivated by

:27:12.:27:31.

a desire to help people I don't think young people

:27:32.:27:33.

appreciate how lucky they are. They worry about their mobile

:27:34.:27:44.

telephone, and their game consoles. They don't know what problems

:27:45.:28:01.

are, they don't know what it is when bombs fall

:28:02.:28:04.

from the sky and you don't know if you'll

:28:05.:28:06.

survive it and an occupying It wasn't until 1956 that Gabor

:28:07.:28:08.

decided to move to England. In those days people

:28:09.:28:12.

looked at refugees with different eyes,

:28:13.:28:15.

and they tried to make us welcome. I started a new life

:28:16.:28:17.

and I got on with it. With friends who went

:28:18.:28:20.

through the same. Whatever is the conversation,

:28:21.:28:24.

after a while, it always It's been a week of comebacks

:28:25.:28:28.

at the Australian Open this week. The Williams sisters will meet each

:28:29.:28:55.

other in the women's final. Roger Federer is through to

:28:56.:28:58.

the men's final, and he could be facing his old rival,

:28:59.:29:01.

Rafa Nadal. So would it be another day to roll

:29:02.:29:31.

back the years? At 30, Rafael Nadal's pomp, like Roger Federer's,

:29:32.:29:33.

seemed to have passed, yet now an almost fantasy final between them

:29:34.:29:35.

back and if Nadal could beat Dimitrov. The Spaniard had only

:29:36.:29:37.

recently returned from a wrist injury. You would scarcely have

:29:38.:29:39.

guessed it. Nadal cruised through first set but his opponent, once

:29:40.:29:41.

nicknamed Baby Fed, played like the grown-up version. The fans seemed to

:29:42.:29:52.

prefer Dimitrov, but Nadal held his nerve urging a third set tie-break.

:29:53.:29:55.

But Grigor Dimitrov was far from done. Another tie-break and this

:29:56.:29:57.

time he took it, dragging an hour marathon match into a decider.

:29:58.:30:03.

Earlier in Melbourne that had been British success in the wheelchair

:30:04.:30:05.

doubles, Gordon Reid's victory alongside his Belgian partner

:30:06.:30:10.

meaning that he has now won all four grand slam titles but for

:30:11.:30:22.

Nadal and Dimitrov the battle for Glory continues. After more than

:30:23.:30:25.

four hours of enthralling drama a place in the final is still there is

:30:26.:30:27.

for the taking. Andy says, BBC News. We've been freezing, this picture

:30:28.:30:47.

says it all but things are about to change. It is not cold and grey

:30:48.:30:50.

everywhere right now. We do have some sunshine but it will be

:30:51.:30:52.

replaced by thick clouds coming off the ocean over the next few days.

:30:53.:30:56.

That means temperatures will rise and even this evening if you take

:30:57.:31:00.

the walk the temperatures won't be as low as they have been in the last

:31:01.:31:03.

day or so. The clouds in the Atlantic are ready and

:31:04.:31:22.

waiting to come our way and with this also we have much milder

:31:23.:31:25.

conditions, compared to what we have had because it still won't be that

:31:26.:31:27.

desperately warm, at least in the short-term. As far as this afternoon

:31:28.:31:29.

is concerned those temperatures are still single figures, 7 degrees in

:31:30.:31:32.

the South, still nippy in northern and central areas with freezing fog

:31:33.:31:34.

although this evening and overnight that process begins where we

:31:35.:31:36.

introduced that less cold air coming in off the ocean, it is a frost free

:31:37.:31:45.

night across southern areas, in the north just about cold enough with

:31:46.:31:48.

that rain, sleet and snow mixing in but as we head into Saturday morning

:31:49.:31:51.

start to see that Atlantic weather is so we are pushing in that was

:31:52.:31:56.

Yannick air those temperatures touched that OC Alnwick air. It

:31:57.:32:00.

won't feel anywhere near as dry and better as it has done. This is the

:32:01.:32:10.

scene around midday, eastern areas still cloudy, going through that

:32:11.:32:12.

transition into the milder air, western areas already in the

:32:13.:32:14.

sunshine but also some showers coming in.

:32:15.:32:26.

So not a desperately mild stay on the way tomorrow but better if you

:32:27.:32:30.

don't like the cold. And through Saturday night that process

:32:31.:32:32.

continues, those winds off the Atlantic bringing in milder air with

:32:33.:32:35.

showers. Sadly we must pay for it because we want get the milder air

:32:36.:32:37.

for nothing. It means weather fronts coming in,

:32:38.:32:58.

temperatures are already reaching double figures in some of these

:32:59.:33:01.

southern areas, in the North still frost, still crispy but on balance

:33:02.:33:04.

not that bad. As we go through Monday and into next week it looks

:33:05.:33:07.

as if these weather fronts and this Atlantic air will be winning, it's

:33:08.:33:09.

all about the double figures. Those double figures is what many of us

:33:10.:33:12.

care about because it will feel much less cold.

:33:13.:33:12.

A reminder of our main story this lunchtime.

:33:13.:33:16.

Theresa May is preparing to meet Donald Trump, the first

:33:17.:33:17.