10/03/2017 BBC News at One


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10/03/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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Plans for more cuts get the cold shoulder from head teachers. They

:00:09.:00:16.

say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut

:00:17.:00:22.

courses. We will be live at the head teachers' conference in Birmingham.

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Also... EU leaders meet in Brussels -

:00:24.:00:26.

without Theresa May - in what's billed as the last

:00:27.:00:28.

European summit before Brexit BT bows to demands to run a legally

:00:29.:00:31.

separate broadband operation, British Cycling admits not giving

:00:32.:00:34.

enough care to staff and athletes after ongoing claims

:00:35.:00:42.

of sexism and bullying. A new study aims to tell us

:00:43.:00:45.

about our musical tastes And coming up in the sport on BBC

:00:46.:00:51.

News, Owen Farrell remains a doubt for England's Six Nations match

:00:52.:00:54.

against Scotland tomorrow, but they have until an hour before

:00:55.:00:56.

kick-off to make a decision. Good afternoon and welcome

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to the BBC News at One. Schools in England are being forced

:01:21.:01:31.

to cut GCSE and A-level courses in an effort to balance the books,

:01:32.:01:38.

according to a head teachers' union. The Association of Scool and College

:01:39.:01:40.

Leaders has warned that budget pressures are causing them to cancel

:01:41.:01:45.

things like school trips. They have said budget constraints are driving

:01:46.:01:46.

up class sizes. Let's go to our education

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correspondent Gillian Hargreaves, who's at the conference

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in Birmingham. Between now and Easter there will be

:01:51.:02:01.

a number of teaching union conferences, this morning, head

:02:02.:02:04.

teachers in Birmingham. Justine Greening could have been left in no

:02:05.:02:07.

doubt about how strong their grievances are.

:02:08.:02:10.

Peter Woodman at the wheeled school might be a head teacher, but he

:02:11.:02:18.

still likes to work at the chalk face, partly because he enjoys it am

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partly because it saves money. The only reason we can't survive as we

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are carrying forward money from last year, if the Government stick to

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their pledges at the cash flow and budget, we will be making two cuts

:02:32.:02:36.

to around ?70,000 every year, year on year.

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Peter is one of dozens in heads in southern England who wrote to

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parents, informing them of the impact.

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In a poll, almost three quarters of members of this union said they had

:02:51.:02:54.

had to cut GCSE or vocational courses in the last 12 months.

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The most common web design and technology, performing arts, music

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and German and many teachers reported bigger class sizes to save

:03:01.:03:04.

money. Head teachers gathered in Birmingham

:03:05.:03:08.

this morning for the first of a series of teachers' conferences, the

:03:09.:03:12.

conversation dominated by cuts. It is the first time Education

:03:13.:03:15.

Secretary Justine Greening has laid out the Government's case in how

:03:16.:03:21.

schools should operate in these straitened times.

:03:22.:03:22.

Education Secretary Justine Greening has halted -- told head teachers

:03:23.:03:28.

that well there is no one money she will do her utmost to help them ease

:03:29.:03:32.

their way through the worst financial pressures in schools for

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20 years. It is really annoying to find

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Government constantly saying funding has never been higher, yes, because

:03:39.:03:42.

we have more students and because of inflation. We have an 8% cuts and

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are expected to continue delivering quality.

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How difficult is it? Like many schools across the country, we are

:03:52.:03:57.

all struggling to make ends meet. It is absolutely dire, we are having

:03:58.:04:01.

to make cuts to the curriculum and it is untenable.

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The Government points out that class sizes are at the lowest level for a

:04:05.:04:08.

decade and ?40 billion is being spent on schools in England this

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year, the highest cash figure ever. Now, this afternoon the new Chief

:04:11.:04:19.

inspector of schools for England, Amanda Spielman, will get up and

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make a speech to head teachers in which she says some schools are

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quite deliberately narrowing the range of subjects they are teaching

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and moving difficult pupils out of their schools to help them write up

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school league tables. Again, I suspect that will not go down well

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at all with some head teachers. Downing Street says it is confident

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it will meet its own deadline of the end of March for triggering

:04:42.:04:45.

the start of Britain's departure It comes as EU leaders met

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in Brussels to shore up unity Let's cross to Brussels and our

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Europe correspondent, Ben Wright. Well, European leaders are just

:04:53.:05:07.

leaving the summit now, having spent the morning talking about the EU's

:05:08.:05:11.

priorities, mapping out its future, a feature that will not include

:05:12.:05:15.

Britain. While the formal divorce Brexit talks have not started yet,

:05:16.:05:19.

there is a feeling that the separation has already begun.

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This is not quite as usual this morning as 27 EU heads of Government

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gathered without Britain Daesh business not quite as usual. Within

:05:32.:05:36.

weeks, the UK will start to unpick a decades long relationship with the

:05:37.:05:39.

EU and try to build a new one. Everyone expects the divorce to be

:05:40.:05:44.

difficulty. A crucial player on the EU side will be Donald Tusk,

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re-elected yesterday as President of the European Council, which

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represents EU leaders. In a fortnight, EU leaders will meet

:05:53.:05:55.

in Italy to celebrate 60 years since the signing of the Treaty of Rome, a

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foundation stone of the European unit.

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At Brexit will no doubt overshadow the party. Theresa May, who left the

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summit last night, insists she will trigger the starter Brexit by the

:06:10.:06:12.

end of the month and Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson has been

:06:13.:06:15.

clear about the future cost of access to EU markets.

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It is not reasonable, I don't think, for the UK, having left the EU, to

:06:21.:06:27.

continue to make vast budget payments. I think everybody

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understands that and that is the reality.

:06:32.:06:35.

From the other side of the negotiation, an idea from the senior

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MEP who was not a negotiator but will represent the European

:06:40.:06:42.

Parliament during Brexit. He says there could be some way for UK

:06:43.:06:47.

citizens who wanted to retain their EU identity.

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Many UK citizens say I want to continue to have my European

:06:51.:06:54.

citizenship, I think we need to examine what type of special

:06:55.:06:58.

arrangement we can make for these individual citizens who want to

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continue to have a relationship with the European Union.

:07:04.:07:06.

But how that might work in practice is anyone's guess. We are on the

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brink of negotiations that have never been attempted before. The

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risks for both sides are high. Now, EU leaders desperately did not

:07:14.:07:22.

want Brexit to happen, but now it is going to they are keen to get on

:07:23.:07:26.

with it and there is a real sense of the phoney war phase of this coming

:07:27.:07:29.

to an end. Theresa May has said for a long time she intends to get the

:07:30.:07:33.

best deal for Britain, EU leaders and people within the institutions

:07:34.:07:36.

have insisted they will get a really good deal for the EU, crucially one

:07:37.:07:41.

serving as a warning to EU countries who might think about leaving in the

:07:42.:07:48.

future. But the next time Theresa May is here, the rhetoric around

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Brexit will have been replaced by the reality of tough negotiations.

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Thank you, Ben Wright. The row continues over

:07:53.:07:55.

the Government's plans to increase National Insurance contributions

:07:56.:07:57.

for some self-employed people. Labour has accused the Government

:07:58.:07:59.

of a partial U-turn after the Prime Minister said MPs

:08:00.:08:01.

won't vote on the plan Let's speak to our political

:08:02.:08:04.

correspondent, Iain Watson. He is at Westminster for us. Has the

:08:05.:08:14.

Prime Minister blinked here? Yes, she has. She is not closing her rise

:08:15.:08:19.

to the concerns of her own Conservative MPs, but it is not

:08:20.:08:23.

clear how far she will change your view. -- she is not closing her

:08:24.:08:28.

eyes. Because this boat will now be in the autumn, to bring in these

:08:29.:08:33.

measures, it will be after a review into working practices have been

:08:34.:08:36.

published -- because this bowled. It is likely to recommend more rights

:08:37.:08:41.

for the self-employed, such as rights to maternity and paternity

:08:42.:08:44.

leave, so the Government can argue from the autumn that the

:08:45.:08:48.

self-employed are getting more value for money from the National

:08:49.:08:52.

Insurance rise. What they might do, I have spoken to potential

:08:53.:08:56.

Conservative rebels and they say the Government to be more radical, to

:08:57.:09:00.

draw a clear distinction between the genuinely self-employed and those

:09:01.:09:04.

who worked just one company, such as a career company. They say that

:09:05.:09:08.

latter category should be hit with higher National Insurance but in

:09:09.:09:12.

return for full climate rights and perhaps the chance that they could

:09:13.:09:15.

find a little bit of time and space to ease the pain on the genuinely

:09:16.:09:20.

help -- self-employed such as hairdressers and plumbers. At every

:09:21.:09:24.

Conservative MP I have spoken to has said, of the record at least, that

:09:25.:09:27.

the Government should be more upfront about the fact that it had

:09:28.:09:32.

broken a manifesto pledge to some workers and explains why. They say

:09:33.:09:36.

they are not sure that a relatively small financial gain, ultimately, is

:09:37.:09:39.

worth all of this extended political pain. Thank you.

:09:40.:09:42.

BT has agreed to set up a new company to run the UK's

:09:43.:09:45.

national broadband network after being criticised

:09:46.:09:46.

BT Openreach has been accused of looking after its own customers

:09:47.:09:50.

at the expensive of rivals like Sky, TalkTalk and Vodafone.

:09:51.:09:52.

Those companies welcomed the news, saying everyone's customers

:09:53.:09:54.

Here's our technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones.

:09:55.:10:05.

It's got a massive and vital task rolling out fast broadband across

:10:06.:10:12.

the UK. Its critics say BT's Openreach has not been up to the

:10:13.:10:17.

job, delivering poor service are not investing enough. After a long

:10:18.:10:23.

battle, office-macro has said that Openreach should be separated from

:10:24.:10:28.

BT. This is what customers have demanded. They have been concerned

:10:29.:10:32.

that open reach is not performed well enough, broadband has not been

:10:33.:10:38.

good enough and they see the greater independence as a greater means for

:10:39.:10:43.

Openreach to operate with the telecoms industry at heart, not just

:10:44.:10:47.

BT. This deal is meant to make Openreach much more independent. It

:10:48.:10:52.

will have 32,000 employees working directly for it, there will be an

:10:53.:10:56.

independent board in charge of what goes on and it will have its own

:10:57.:11:01.

brand, the BT logo will disappear. BT had been accused of taking

:11:02.:11:05.

profits from Openreach and spending them on sports rights, a charger

:11:06.:11:09.

denies. The firm could have been ordered to sell the division

:11:10.:11:13.

completely and seems content with today's deal.

:11:14.:11:17.

We have listened to the criticisms from the general public, service

:11:18.:11:21.

providers, politicians and the media and looked to address them. That is

:11:22.:11:24.

what we are doing with the fundamental reforms today.

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Around 90% of UK homes have access to fast broadband but the hope is

:11:31.:11:34.

that the roll-out will accelerate and service will improve.

:11:35.:11:38.

We hope these reforms will really lead to a big change by Openreach

:11:39.:11:43.

and make them much more focused on delivering for their customers, but

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also transformed this market so that we see more competition and

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customers having much more choice about who they get their broadband

:11:52.:11:55.

and phone services from. Even rivals like TalkTalk who had

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once called for BT to be split up of welcome this more limited move, but

:12:00.:12:03.

they are calling for Ofcom to make sure that open Reach -- Openreach

:12:04.:12:05.

delivers on its promises. In South Korea, two people

:12:06.:12:08.

have died in clashes between police and demonstrators

:12:09.:12:10.

who were protesting at the removal from office of the President

:12:11.:12:12.

by the country's highest court. Park Geun-hye was found

:12:13.:12:15.

guilty of corruption But she's refusing to leave

:12:16.:12:17.

the presidential palace, as our correspondent in Seoul,

:12:18.:12:21.

Stephen Evans, now reports. The head of South Korea's highest

:12:22.:12:28.

court says President Park committed It was against the constitution

:12:29.:12:34.

and the trust of the people. Outside the court, pro-Park

:12:35.:12:44.

protesters clashed with police. Two died, one apparently by falling

:12:45.:12:48.

from the top of the bus The central allegation

:12:49.:12:50.

is that the country's biggest companies paid money

:12:51.:12:58.

to the President's best friend So top business leaders now face

:12:59.:13:01.

awkward questions which may yet The police have been out in force

:13:02.:13:06.

because feelings run so high. There will be a general

:13:07.:13:15.

election in 60 days. One of the consequences of that may

:13:16.:13:20.

be a move to the left. If the government here moved

:13:21.:13:26.

to the left, there would be a different attitude

:13:27.:13:28.

towards North Korea, Every Saturday night

:13:29.:13:30.

for three months now, there have been huge demonstrations

:13:31.:13:40.

against President Park. But what pushed her from office

:13:41.:13:45.

was a Constitutional Court finding her guilty of crime

:13:46.:13:47.

in a country which has only been Stephen Evans, BBC

:13:48.:13:50.

News, South Korea. A short time ago, Steve went out

:13:51.:14:02.

into the streets of Seoul to gauge the atmosphere,

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and sent this update. The centre of Seoul tonight feels

:14:06.:14:08.

like a victory rally for the protesters who pushed

:14:09.:14:11.

the president from power. There are also pro-Park people

:14:12.:14:17.

who are nursing their wounds, President Park, ex-President Park,

:14:18.:14:23.

rather, is in the presidential She emerges tomorrow as an ordinary

:14:24.:14:30.

citizen and she may well face criminal charges and end

:14:31.:14:40.

up behind bars. Steve Evans in Seoul.

:14:41.:15:03.

British cycling has admitted not paying enough care and attention to

:15:04.:15:07.

the welfare of staff and athletes. It was responding to the leak of the

:15:08.:15:13.

draft report into its handling of allegations of discrimination

:15:14.:15:18.

against Jess Varnish by Steve Sutton. David Ornstein is that the

:15:19.:15:21.

National cycling Centre, tell us about what is in the document?

:15:22.:15:27.

For almost one year this has been hanging over British Cycling,

:15:28.:15:33.

Britain's most successful and well funded Olympic sport, like a dark

:15:34.:15:37.

cloud. It started when Sprint cyclist Jess Varnish made

:15:38.:15:40.

allegations of sexism and discrimination against the former

:15:41.:15:45.

performance director Shane Sutton. That is before other riders and Stav

:15:46.:15:48.

supported her, talking about a culture of fear and bullying. --

:15:49.:15:54.

other riders and staff. A report into the culture of British Cycling

:15:55.:15:59.

was commissioned, a leaked draft published in the Daily Mail backed

:16:00.:16:05.

up many of the complaints, perhaps most damningly describing certain's

:16:06.:16:11.

predecessor, Sir Dave Brailsford, as being untouchable. It said many

:16:12.:16:14.

elite riders experienced trauma while with British Cycling and

:16:15.:16:22.

confirmed that culture of fear. Today British Cycling issued a

:16:23.:16:25.

statement disagreeing with the factual accuracy of some of the

:16:26.:16:29.

points made in the report, but admitting to specific shortcomings

:16:30.:16:32.

and a failure to address early warning signs of problems. It said a

:16:33.:16:38.

39 point action plan for reform announced here last week was already

:16:39.:16:42.

under way, while many of the key staff have since departed and been

:16:43.:16:47.

replaced. For the first time no British Cycling and, perhaps,

:16:48.:16:51.

British sport as a whole, have to address that difficult balance

:16:52.:16:54.

between them no compromise approach that has brought so much success and

:16:55.:17:01.

also a duty of care to athletes and Stav. Thank you.

:17:02.:17:05.

Classes in England are going up, say headteachers.

:17:06.:17:17.

And coming up in the sport at half-past: Ireland must win

:17:18.:17:19.

in Wales tonight in the Six Nations to realistically keep

:17:20.:17:22.

Anything less and they could open the door for England to wrap it up

:17:23.:17:31.

It may be more than 60 years since the Great Smog of London,

:17:32.:17:43.

but air pollution in the capital is again a huge issue.

:17:44.:17:47.

It damages people's health and contributes towards thousands

:17:48.:17:49.

All this week, the BBC has been highlighting the growing

:17:50.:17:55.

As part of our 'So I Can Breathe' series, our correspondent

:17:56.:18:00.

Graham Satchell has been looking at the changing conditions

:18:01.:18:02.

in Britain's cities, and how to achieve cleaner air.

:18:03.:18:06.

'London has been brought to a halt by dense smog,

:18:07.:18:09.

The Great Smog of 1952, dramatised in the Netflix series The Crown.

:18:10.:18:18.

'Be careful out there, it's a real pea-souper.'

:18:19.:18:22.

Anne Goldsmith was eight in 1952 and remembers it well.

:18:23.:18:29.

We could hardly see in front of us really, and when I got to school,

:18:30.:18:33.

the handkerchief would be absolutely black.

:18:34.:18:45.

'Special filtering masks are the latest weapons...'

:18:46.:18:47.

It's now thought 12,000 people died in the Great Smog.

:18:48.:18:49.

The enemy then - coal, used in factories and people's homes.

:18:50.:18:52.

What followed the smog was the Clean Air Act of 1956.

:18:53.:18:55.

It introduced smoke-control areas, where only smokeless

:18:56.:18:59.

Fast-forward 60 years and the enemy now is nitrogen dioxide,

:19:00.:19:03.

These are the engines that have been removed out

:19:04.:19:09.

The local authority here in Birmingham has got funding

:19:10.:19:12.

to replace the diesel engines in 65 taxis.

:19:13.:19:19.

We removed 99% of the nox that the taxi was producing.

:19:20.:19:22.

There are hundreds of taxis in Birmingham.

:19:23.:19:28.

The Government's overall plan is to introduce so-called 'clean air

:19:29.:19:32.

I will look at the evidence, and when the evidence comes

:19:33.:19:38.

through as to where the key areas of pollution are, we will take

:19:39.:19:41.

the action that is needed to address the need for clean air in the city.

:19:42.:19:49.

Well, I'm afraid the Government's been hopeless.

:19:50.:19:55.

Critics like Client Earth say what we need today

:19:56.:19:57.

is a new Clean Air Act, and a scrappage scheme

:19:58.:19:59.

You have to phase diesel vehicles off our roads.

:20:00.:20:03.

But it would cost a fortune, wouldn't it?

:20:04.:20:06.

Well, yeah, it's going to take time to do it, but we've got

:20:07.:20:09.

Back in Lewisham, in London, Anne is meeting nine-year-old

:20:10.:20:15.

We called it 'smog', and you couldn't see,

:20:16.:20:19.

On days when pollution is bad, Amy and Eloise are kept

:20:20.:20:24.

indoors at playtime, just as Anne was in 1952.

:20:25.:20:27.

Sometimes, we have to stay inside because the air is bad.

:20:28.:20:30.

More than 60 years on, air pollution is still damaging children's health,

:20:31.:20:38.

A tennis coach is on trial, accused of causing child cruelty

:20:39.:20:50.

as he coached his daughters to become tennis stars.

:20:51.:20:54.

In one incident, John De'Viana from Essex, is said to have kicked

:20:55.:20:58.

and punched one of his daughters after a tennis match.

:20:59.:21:01.

Our correspondent, Helena Lee, is at Snaresbrook Crown Court.

:21:02.:21:07.

Tell us more about what was said in court. This is the second day that

:21:08.:21:15.

the defendant John De'Viana is giving evidence in his own trial. He

:21:16.:21:21.

is accused of subjecting his two daughters, now 21 and 90, two years

:21:22.:21:27.

of physical and mental abuse, in his desire to get them to become tennis

:21:28.:21:32.

champions. The girls went on to become a successful junior tennis

:21:33.:21:37.

player, but in court today, John De'Viana told the jury that it was

:21:38.:21:41.

the decision of the girls to play tennis, that he had never forced

:21:42.:21:45.

them. He was asked by his defence team, did you force Monaei, his

:21:46.:21:51.

eldest daughter, to play? He said, no, that would be

:21:52.:21:54.

counter-productive. He said, you cannot just force a child to play a

:21:55.:21:58.

particular sport, especially when that child is progressing at a rapid

:21:59.:22:02.

rate. The court also heard earlier how Mr De'Viana had written an

:22:03.:22:08.

abusive notes on the back of match reports after the girls had played

:22:09.:22:11.

tennis when it did not reach the standard that he wanted them to and

:22:12.:22:15.

he was asked in the last moments in court why he used such language. He

:22:16.:22:21.

replied, it was the only way I could vent my frustration as a coach. He

:22:22.:22:25.

denies two charges of child cruelty in the case here at Snaresbrook

:22:26.:22:32.

Crown Court, which continues. Thank you.

:22:33.:22:33.

Rugby's Six Nations returns this weekend,

:22:34.:22:35.

with England playing Scotland in the Calcutta Cup at Twickenham.

:22:36.:22:37.

Scotland are after their first Triple Crown since 1990,

:22:38.:22:41.

while England are aiming to equal New Zealand's record

:22:42.:22:44.

We'll have more on that in a moment but, first, to Cardiff,

:22:45.:22:53.

where Wales take on Ireland in a match the visitors have to win,

:22:54.:22:56.

if they're to have any chance of securing their third title

:22:57.:22:59.

Katherine Downes is at the Millennium Stadium.

:23:00.:23:01.

-- the Principality Stadium. No pressure on Ireland! Yes, as you

:23:02.:23:08.

say, the Six Nations returns after a couple of weeks away and this will

:23:09.:23:12.

be the most pivotal weekend of the tournament so far because while the

:23:13.:23:16.

Championship cannot be won this weekend, it can certainly be lost.

:23:17.:23:20.

With still over six hours until kick-off at the Principality

:23:21.:23:24.

Stadium, the city centre in Cardiff is buzzing with pre-match

:23:25.:23:28.

excitement. Perhaps even pre-match nerves, particularly if you are an

:23:29.:23:32.

Irish fan, Ireland come here knowing they must beat Wales tonight to keep

:23:33.:23:38.

alive their chances of winning this year's Six Nations title. Welsh

:23:39.:23:43.

hopes already disappointed after those back-to-back losses to both

:23:44.:23:47.

England and Scotland. If Ireland win here tonight, they set up a final

:23:48.:23:52.

weekend showdown against England and that could well end up being the

:23:53.:23:56.

championship decider in a week's time. So let's look ahead to the

:23:57.:24:01.

night, and both sides name an unchanged starting line-up. Not

:24:02.:24:04.

surprisingly Ireland given the way they have played over the last

:24:05.:24:08.

couple of weeks, but Wales have had strong criticism for making that

:24:09.:24:12.

decision and some say it shows too much of a Conservative approach

:24:13.:24:17.

under their interim coach, Rob Howley. Attitude aside, besides

:24:18.:24:22.

equally matched in terms of experience. Ireland have 715

:24:23.:24:28.

international caps in their side, Wales just one fewer, 714. Ireland

:24:29.:24:33.

playing the way they have, Wales playing here at home in front of

:24:34.:24:37.

those passionate home fans, it is set to be a fiery encounter when the

:24:38.:24:41.

lights go down here at the Principality Stadium and this place

:24:42.:24:45.

comes alive. You can watch the pre-match build-up from 7:30pm on

:24:46.:24:50.

the match kicks off at 8:05pm also on BBC One. Thanks very much.

:24:51.:24:55.

More now on England's match against a resurgent Scotland team

:24:56.:24:57.

which has just reached its highest ever world rankings.

:24:58.:25:00.

So it's a team which believes it can do what no Scottish side has

:25:01.:25:03.

done for over 30 years - beat England at Twickenham.

:25:04.:25:05.

Here's our sports correspondent, Joe Wilson.

:25:06.:25:09.

South again to Twickenham, where Scotland do win,

:25:10.:25:11.

Rugby union was strictly an amateur sport.

:25:12.:25:23.

That really was one of the great Calcutta Cup tries!

:25:24.:25:25.

Scotland winger Roger Baird worked in the grain industry then,

:25:26.:25:28.

as he does now, and the spirit of '83 lingers.

:25:29.:25:32.

I still see, you know, a lot of the guys that I played with.

:25:33.:25:38.

So I think, yeah, you know, with a smaller nation,

:25:39.:25:40.

you always feel up against it a wee bit, you know.

:25:41.:25:46.

In adversity, you know, that maketh the man.

:25:47.:25:50.

So, yeah, I think the spirit will be there in aplenty.

:25:51.:25:56.

These days, England's rugby resources are unmatched, boasting

:25:57.:25:58.

In Scotland, that figure's around 49,000.

:25:59.:26:00.

This season, Scotland have already beaten Ireland and Wales.

:26:01.:26:08.

If you can't go through your opponents, you can dodge round them.

:26:09.:26:11.

Two chances, two scores, two tries for Scotland!

:26:12.:26:19.

Vern, knowing your players as you do now, what is the key

:26:20.:26:22.

asset which will enable you to win tonight?

:26:23.:26:24.

And making sure that, um, we back each other up

:26:25.:26:37.

and we keep our heads up the paddock and see what's coming.

:26:38.:26:40.

Well, back in '83, power ballads were the rage.

:26:41.:26:44.

It was only whispered here as the team left,

:26:45.:26:49.

but if Scotland beat England here, they could win the Six Nations.

:26:50.:26:52.

Whether it's pub music, summer festivals, or street buskers,

:26:53.:27:02.

the UK is alive with the sound of live music.

:27:03.:27:05.

But what does it tell us about our musical likes and dislikes?

:27:06.:27:08.

Today, the UK is carrying out its first live music

:27:09.:27:10.

Our Scotland correspondent, Lorna Gordon, has been taking

:27:11.:27:14.

a look - and a listen - to the music scene in Glasgow.

:27:15.:27:24.

Buskers on the streets of Glasgow, passionate about their music,

:27:25.:27:26.

I love it and I do it every day, and it's a way I can play

:27:27.:27:34.

with my friends and enjoy life with other people and share

:27:35.:27:37.

From classical to contemporary, from concert halls to gigs in pubs,

:27:38.:27:40.

In our cars, at home, on our phones, we listen to plenty of music.

:27:41.:27:54.

Volunteers in six cities across the country are

:27:55.:27:58.

We're asking them how many events they go to,

:27:59.:28:06.

why they maybe go to an event, what's the main reasons

:28:07.:28:08.

There are plenty of free performances to go to but, even so,

:28:09.:28:19.

British consumers spend more on concert tickets than on physical

:28:20.:28:21.

records, digital downloads and streaming combined.

:28:22.:28:24.

And the organisers of this census say that even those who think that

:28:25.:28:27.

silence is golden should care about the state of the

:28:28.:28:29.

Music is a huge driver economically within the creative

:28:30.:28:34.

industries which are, of course, a big export for the UK,

:28:35.:28:36.

There's a lot of research to suggest that music is also important

:28:37.:28:45.

for our health and well-being but, for me, music is really

:28:46.:28:48.

important because it's part of what makes us human,

:28:49.:28:50.

it's a fundamental part of being part of the human species.

:28:51.:28:54.

Glasgow has a really active music scene.

:28:55.:28:56.

There are 70 live music events in the 24-hour period this

:28:57.:29:02.

census is taking place, but here and across the UK, the live

:29:03.:29:05.

Some iconic locations where famous groups honed their acts have closed

:29:06.:29:13.

Some smaller, more intimate, venues are only just breaking even.

:29:14.:29:23.

Surviving as a small venue is difficult at the moment

:29:24.:29:25.

because property prices are increasing, because of the tight

:29:26.:29:27.

This attempt to measure the economic and cultural

:29:28.:29:40.

benefits of live music is, census organisers

:29:41.:29:41.

Whatever they find out, that live music in all its glorious

:29:42.:29:51.

forms brings joy to many is already beyond doubt.

:29:52.:29:57.

Now, you know that saying about how showbiz and children don't mix?

:29:58.:30:07.

Our colleagues on BBC World News were interviewing a contributor

:30:08.:30:16.

live from his his home, via the internet, when one

:30:17.:30:18.

of his children decided to make a guest appearance.

:30:19.:30:22.

Not to be upstaged, along came child number two.

:30:23.:30:29.

Followed very, very, quickly by a harassed mum!

:30:30.:30:35.

The interview, of course, faultlessly continued! And I am sure

:30:36.:30:41.

nobody noticed. Well, not many millions of people, anyway!

:30:42.:30:46.

That she had a lot of people this morning.

:30:47.:30:48.

It cheered us up in the weather centre. Yesterday, we were talking

:30:49.:31:00.

about how beautiful the clear blue skies were. This is today. A layer

:31:01.:31:06.

of grey, one of our weather watchers sent this picture. This is from

:31:07.:31:15.

Wales! This is another one from Dorset. Foggy here. And a nice

:31:16.:31:27.

sunrise from Hull. I will practice that Welsh name, I promise you. Cold

:31:28.:31:32.

breaking in some areas but overcast for most of the day with a what more

:31:33.:31:37.

cloud in the Atlantic heading our way for this weekend. Quite a mixed

:31:38.:31:43.

picture overall. Let's concentrate on this afternoon first. We have

:31:44.:31:47.

established with that great picture, cloudy across most of Scotland,

:31:48.:31:52.

although I suspect the Western Isles will be getting some glimmers of

:31:53.:31:58.

sunshine now and then. And you will notice some rain across the UK,

:31:59.:32:02.

almost anywhere really. Temperatures today getting no higher than around

:32:03.:32:07.

13, 14 degrees. Still feeling relatively mild. You have got some

:32:08.:32:13.

mist along the South Coast. The weather does not change this

:32:14.:32:17.

evening, so for the Six Nations, Wales versus Ireland, that kicks off

:32:18.:32:22.

just after eight o'clock, around 10 degrees and cloudy skies. Tonight,

:32:23.:32:27.

we keep the cloudy skies and the temperatures will not take away a

:32:28.:32:30.

lot of staying around double figures in London, up to 9 degrees. Rain

:32:31.:32:37.

pushing through. For Saturday, I have mentioned a lot of cloud across

:32:38.:32:42.

the UK, more cloud lining up in the Atlantic. This will come rushing our

:32:43.:32:47.

way during this weekend, so the first weather front is here on

:32:48.:32:51.

Saturday, in the North. We will see a weather front crossing the country

:32:52.:32:55.

on Saturday, but the weather is not that bad because on one side, to the

:32:56.:32:59.

North, there is sunshine across Scotland and Northern Ireland,

:33:00.:33:02.

Edinburgh, Glasgow and Belfast gets bright weather. In the South, clouds

:33:03.:33:06.

break up, we could get temperatures up to 18 Celsius. But those weather

:33:07.:33:14.

fronts keep coming and a different picture I think on Sunday. To

:33:15.:33:18.

summarise, the weekend, Saturday is your best today and by Sunday, it

:33:19.:33:24.

looks like we will get at least a bit of rain. Back to you.

:33:25.:33:26.

A reminder of our main story this lunchtime:

:33:27.:33:31.

Head teachers say cuts in funding are leading the courses in England

:33:32.:33:36.

being scrapped and class sizes going up.

:33:37.:33:37.

That's all from the BBC News at One, so it's goodbye from me.

:33:38.:33:40.

And on BBC One, we now join the BBC's news teams where you are.

:33:41.:33:42.