22/03/2017 BBC News at One


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22/03/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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The biggest fine ever handed to a British water company.

:00:00.:00:00.

Thames Water is ordered to pay ?20 million for

:00:07.:00:09.

Almost 1.5 billion litres of raw sewage was allowed to enter

:00:10.:00:16.

the river for months between Oxfordshire

:00:17.:00:17.

The fine is ten times larger than the previous record fine handed

:00:18.:00:24.

Easyjet confirms it's the first airline to introduce a ban

:00:25.:00:35.

on laptops being carried as hand luggage.

:00:36.:00:38.

Iraqi troops edge closer to the centre of Mosul as tens

:00:39.:00:41.

of thousands of civilians flee so-called Islamic State.

:00:42.:00:49.

One year on, Brussels remembers the terror attacks which killed 32

:00:50.:00:52.

And why the number of women working into their seventies has doubled

:00:53.:01:00.

And coming up in the sport on BBC News: Liverpool pay tribute

:01:01.:01:07.

to a true club legend, former coach and captain

:01:08.:01:09.

Ronnie Moran, who has died at the age of 83.

:01:10.:01:32.

Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

:01:33.:01:36.

It's the biggest fine ever imposed on a British water company

:01:37.:01:40.

Thames Water has been ordered to pay ?20.3 million for polluting

:01:41.:01:48.

the River Thames with almost 1.5 billion litres of raw sewage.

:01:49.:01:51.

The judge at Aylesbury Crown Court said the scale of the problem

:01:52.:01:54.

was such that bosses must have known about it.

:01:55.:01:56.

He called it "a shocking and disgraceful state of affairs".

:01:57.:01:59.

The ducks may be back, but this is one of the six outlets were raw

:02:00.:02:14.

sewage surged into the River Thames. For months and months of the

:02:15.:02:18.

untreated muck flowed in and this is what it looked like. The pictures do

:02:19.:02:23.

not convey the stench or the dangers, but for mile after mile it

:02:24.:02:27.

was what the judge called a catalogue of misery blighting the

:02:28.:02:31.

river, and why he imposed a record fine. It is clear from the

:02:32.:02:37.

sentencing today and the judge's powerful comment that the courts

:02:38.:02:40.

take environmental offending very seriously. This record fine and

:02:41.:02:46.

costs of over ?20 million sends a signal to the companies that

:02:47.:02:51.

safeguarding the environment is not an optional extra. It is an

:02:52.:02:54.

essential part of how businesses must operate. What was coming out

:02:55.:03:01.

was brought, untreated sewage. Dominic lives and works on the

:03:02.:03:05.

river, he was one of hundreds of people to complain and two were four

:03:06.:03:10.

months ignored by Thames water. It was awful. You live next to the

:03:11.:03:15.

Royal River Thames and you do not expect to see Royal sewage pass in

:03:16.:03:19.

your garden. When the river was in flood it was coming across our lawn

:03:20.:03:22.

and as it settled we had more sewage in the garden as well. The judge

:03:23.:03:29.

said Thames water had offended on a vast scale. It said equipment failed

:03:30.:03:34.

and alarms were ignored. He also said the company deliberately

:03:35.:03:39.

concealed the problems from the Environment Agency. Warnings laid

:03:40.:03:43.

out by staff in their logs were ignored by managers. One wrote,

:03:44.:03:49.

illegal discharge, managers aware. Another said, this was a failure

:03:50.:03:55.

waiting to happen. A third added, still discharging illegally, known

:03:56.:04:00.

to managers. It all meant the sewage continued to pour out. In the end it

:04:01.:04:13.

is thought around 1.4 billion litres of raw sewage ended up in the

:04:14.:04:15.

Thames. Anglers and fishermen were put out of business, cattle poisoned

:04:16.:04:18.

when they drank the water. The judge said he had to send a message to the

:04:19.:04:21.

water companies that this was not acceptable. Today he imposed a

:04:22.:04:26.

record ?20 million fine on Thames water, ten times larger than the

:04:27.:04:31.

previous fine. We apologise for all of those failings, but in the three

:04:32.:04:35.

years since those last incidents we have learned our lesson. There have

:04:36.:04:42.

been swooping, far reaching changes across the waste water business.

:04:43.:04:46.

Thames Water says shareholders, not customers, will pay the massive

:04:47.:04:51.

fine. This is the Thames now, cleaner and safer, but today's case

:04:52.:04:56.

is a warning for all water companies, that their failings will

:04:57.:04:59.

not go unpunished if they soiled the environment. We can talk to Duncan

:05:00.:05:08.

in Aylesbury. The judge is clearly sending a message and that message

:05:09.:05:09.

is loud and clear. And not just to Thames water. He was

:05:10.:05:21.

sending a message to all companies. You conclude that from the size of

:05:22.:05:25.

the fine and the way he addressed the management. The fine is ten

:05:26.:05:30.

times the previous record, a ?2 million fine for Southern water last

:05:31.:05:34.

year. But the language the judge used where he spoke of their

:05:35.:05:38.

shameful actions, their disgraceful way of management, and also the fact

:05:39.:05:44.

they deliberately concealed the pollution. He said all water

:05:45.:05:47.

companies have a duty to protect the environment. You also sent this

:05:48.:05:54.

message was picked up by Thames water. Richard a large, who you saw

:05:55.:06:01.

there, he too said this was a message to all water companies who

:06:02.:06:05.

had a duty and responsibility now to protect the environment. EasyJet has

:06:06.:06:14.

become the first airline to confirm a laptop ban affecting passengers

:06:15.:06:19.

flying to the UK from six countries in the Middle East and north Africa

:06:20.:06:21.

has come into effect today. Travellers will no longer be allowed

:06:22.:06:23.

to carry electronic devices bigger The ban is also being brought

:06:24.:06:26.

into effect in America where it is being reported that

:06:27.:06:30.

so-called Islamic State has been working on ways to smuggle

:06:31.:06:32.

explosives on to planes by hiding Here's our home affairs

:06:33.:06:35.

correspondent Daniel Sandford. Beirut's Hariri International

:06:36.:06:39.

Airport this morning. As the consequences of the laptop

:06:40.:06:41.

ban start to sink in. No passenger taking

:06:42.:06:45.

a direct flight to Britain will be allowed to have any

:06:46.:06:48.

electronic devices in their hand E-readers, tablets and laptops,

:06:49.:06:51.

will all have to go in the hold. You sit in the plane

:06:52.:07:01.

for four or five hours I totally believe

:07:02.:07:06.

the intelligence it is based on is sound,

:07:07.:07:13.

so we just have to put up I do not understand

:07:14.:07:16.

the technical details of But putting something in the hold

:07:17.:07:22.

presumably has the same effect, so I do not really

:07:23.:07:27.

understand why preventing it on board, upstairs,

:07:28.:07:29.

is going to make a great

:07:30.:07:31.

deal of difference. The countries affected by the UK

:07:32.:07:34.

laptop ban are Turkey, Lebanon, Jordan, Egypt,

:07:35.:07:52.

Saudi Arabia and Tunisia. It affects all airlines including

:07:53.:07:52.

British Airways, easyJet We will continue to work closely

:07:53.:07:57.

with the wider industry over the next few weeks to ensure passengers

:07:58.:07:57.

with the wider industry over the know what is expected of them. I ask

:07:58.:08:00.

for their patience as these new measures bed in.

:08:01.:08:07.

What has been worrying ministers is a device like

:08:08.:08:09.

the one that blew a hole in the side of this Somali airliner last year.

:08:10.:08:13.

So why is a laptop all right in the hold but not in hand luggage?

:08:14.:08:22.

In the cabin a relatively small device can

:08:23.:08:27.

make a hole in the side of the plane and crash the plane.

:08:28.:08:31.

In the hold it is much less likely and the pilot

:08:32.:08:34.

has a good chance of getting the plane down on the ground.

:08:35.:08:38.

EasyJet has already started implementing the

:08:39.:08:40.

ban on its flights from Turkey and Egypt.

:08:41.:08:42.

Other airlines are expected to follow by the end of the week.

:08:43.:08:44.

Our business correspondent Theo Leggett is here.

:08:45.:08:50.

This has been brought in for safety of passengers, but it raises a lot

:08:51.:08:58.

of practical questions for travellers. Absolutely, for a start

:08:59.:09:02.

if passengers have not put their electronic goods in the hold at

:09:03.:09:06.

check-in, where will they be sifted out? Those passengers will be going

:09:07.:09:10.

along security queues alongside other passengers going to different

:09:11.:09:15.

destinations who are not covered by the band. The airlines will have to

:09:16.:09:19.

have an extra check on the gate. What happens with passengers who are

:09:20.:09:24.

travelling without baggage? EasyJet say they will make arrangements to

:09:25.:09:29.

put laptops for people who do not hold baggage in the hold. Then there

:09:30.:09:34.

is the question of endurance. Terms and conditions state if baggage is

:09:35.:09:39.

not attending, then you are not covered. That will be an issue as

:09:40.:09:41.

Iraqi forces are entering what could be the final phase

:09:42.:09:45.

of their operation to drive so called Islamic State

:09:46.:09:47.

out of Iraq's second biggest city, Mosul.

:09:48.:09:49.

It's been in the hands of IS militants since 2014

:09:50.:09:52.

and is their last stronghold in the country.

:09:53.:09:54.

The United Nations says around 45,000 people have fled the fighting

:09:55.:09:57.

in the past week alone, creating fears of a

:09:58.:09:59.

Our correspondent Wyre Davies reports.

:10:00.:10:04.

Under the protection of overwhelmingly superior airpower

:10:05.:10:11.

and coalition heavy artillery, Iraqi forces are entering

:10:12.:10:14.

what they say is the final phase in the fight to drive militants

:10:15.:10:17.

from so-called Islamic State out of Mosul.

:10:18.:10:20.

But with snipers on rooftops trying to dislodge fighters who have

:10:21.:10:24.

been dug in for months, progress is slow.

:10:25.:10:29.

In some parts of the maze of narrow streets that make up the old city,

:10:30.:10:33.

militants are even reported to have pushed government troops back.

:10:34.:10:40.

But observers on the ground and military commanders say it's

:10:41.:10:43.

We are only a few hundred metres away from the al-Nuri Mosque, says

:10:44.:10:51.

It's very symbolic and gives a huge morale boost

:10:52.:10:57.

Capturing the mosque has become a significant goal

:10:58.:11:04.

While Islamic State fighters are equally determined to defend it.

:11:05.:11:11.

It is where the IS supreme leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi delivered

:11:12.:11:14.

a famous sermon three years ago just days after a caliphate had been

:11:15.:11:18.

Many civilians have been killed by retreating IS fighters,

:11:19.:11:24.

But amid the grief and loss, there is relief and even joy.

:11:25.:11:30.

This family reunited after being separated in the bitter

:11:31.:11:33.

I haven't seen my daughter for five months, since

:11:34.:11:43.

she was trapped in western Mosul after the East was liberated.

:11:44.:11:48.

The United Nations says at least 45,000 civilians have fled

:11:49.:11:52.

135,000 since the battle for western Mosul began.

:11:53.:12:00.

Most receive basic food and shelter in camps on the edge of the city.

:12:01.:12:04.

Camps that are now almost full to overflowing.

:12:05.:12:08.

The National Governors Association has urged the government to "stay

:12:09.:12:17.

brave" and press ahead with controversial plans

:12:18.:12:20.

for a funding shake-up for schools in England,

:12:21.:12:22.

A BBC survey of 4,000 governors has revealed deep

:12:23.:12:26.

concerns about budgets, with some describing the situation

:12:27.:12:29.

What do I like most about our school?

:12:30.:12:40.

Drayton Park primary school says it's already operating on very

:12:41.:12:42.

But it predicts its budget in real terms by 2019 will be

:12:43.:12:47.

The proposed new national funding formula in England will change

:12:48.:12:55.

Ministers argue it will narrow historical inequalities in funding

:12:56.:13:01.

But schools across the country are facing rising costs.

:13:02.:13:07.

Cuts to funding mean cuts to our service.

:13:08.:13:14.

So what we will see is fewer members of staff, lower quality of service

:13:15.:13:21.

and things that we currently do that we will have to

:13:22.:13:24.

In a survey for the BBC, school governors who responded

:13:25.:13:28.

and had a view on the proposed new formula were broadly

:13:29.:13:31.

in favour of the principal, but many also expressed serious

:13:32.:13:34.

concerns about the financial pressures ahead.

:13:35.:13:36.

Some said they planned to cut back on staff,

:13:37.:13:47.

others that they were looking at ways of raising extra cash

:13:48.:13:48.

including asking parents for voluntary contributions

:13:49.:13:49.

Everybody pretty much agrees that the principle

:13:50.:13:54.

of the formula is right, the elements in the formula

:13:55.:13:56.

are right, but actually the problem is there isn't enough money

:13:57.:13:59.

The government says funding is at record levels

:14:00.:14:02.

and that the proposed formula is a fairer way to help all schools.

:14:03.:14:06.

The Institute for Fiscal Studies said the proposed changes

:14:07.:14:08.

would correct clear inequities in funding levels

:14:09.:14:09.

But that such a radical reform would necessarily

:14:10.:14:13.

Well, the new schools funding formula dominated

:14:14.:14:18.

with angry exchanges between Theresa May

:14:19.:14:21.

His Shadow Home Secretary said her child to a private school. His

:14:22.:14:33.

shadow attorney general said her child to a private school... He

:14:34.:14:42.

sent... He sent his child to a grammar school. He went to a grammar

:14:43.:14:47.

school himself. Typical Labour take the advantage and pull up the ladder

:14:48.:14:57.

behind you! I want a decent, fair opportunity for every child in every

:14:58.:15:04.

I want a staircase for all, not a ladder for the few!

:15:05.:15:08.

Our Assistant Political Editor Norman Smith is in Westminster.

:15:09.:15:12.

They certainly were angry exchanges. Just a week ago we had the

:15:13.:15:19.

government having to climb down over national insurance contributions and

:15:20.:15:22.

this week Theresa May is under pressure to climb down over the new

:15:23.:15:28.

funding formula for schools. The similarities with the U-turn over

:15:29.:15:32.

national insurers are striking. It is Conservative MPs who are most

:15:33.:15:38.

unhappy with the changes. Very often it is schools in Conservative

:15:39.:15:40.

constituencies that are hit hardest. Again there is the potential for a

:15:41.:15:48.

conservative repeat with loyal Tory MPs threatening to rebel. There is a

:15:49.:15:53.

manifesto pledge threatened to be broken and you wonder whether the

:15:54.:15:57.

government's political antenna have gone on the blink. Although this

:15:58.:16:01.

change makes sense in the corridors of the Department of education,

:16:02.:16:06.

outing or communities, head teachers, governors and local

:16:07.:16:10.

councillors are up in arms. The difficulty Theresa May faces is that

:16:11.:16:15.

in a time of austerity there is not much spare cash to put into the

:16:16.:16:20.

changes. And the government is ?2 billion further short after Philip

:16:21.:16:24.

Hammond's U-turn over national insurance contributions. But Theresa

:16:25.:16:28.

May does not want to look like a push over at Westminster because she

:16:29.:16:34.

has got difficult changes to get through, but she does not want to

:16:35.:16:39.

look like a pushover ahead of the Brexit negotiations because she

:16:40.:16:42.

knows EU negotiators are watching her to see if she cracks under

:16:43.:16:43.

pressure. The biggest fine ever handed

:16:44.:16:48.

to a British water company - Thames Water is ordered to pay

:16:49.:16:54.

?20 million for polluting Pastures new - why some farmers

:16:55.:16:57.

are turning to free range milk England manager Gareth Southgate

:16:58.:17:03.

says his side need to "lose They face World Champions Germany

:17:04.:17:10.

in a friendly this evening, while Scotland face

:17:11.:17:13.

Canada in Edinburgh. It's a year since three bombers

:17:14.:17:25.

killed 32 people and injured hundreds more in attacks at Brussels

:17:26.:17:29.

airport and on the subway. Today the King of Belgium

:17:30.:17:33.

has been leading events to remember the victims -

:17:34.:17:36.

with a minute's silence held at the city's airport to mark

:17:37.:17:38.

the moment when two of the suicide attackers blew themselves up

:17:39.:17:41.

in the departures hall. About friends, family,

:17:42.:17:44.

and those they never knew. And to consider the what ifs

:17:45.:18:00.

and maybes of a year ago. Chance decisions that

:18:01.:18:03.

determined life or death. That morning, two suicide bombs

:18:04.:18:10.

shattered the terminal. Through the dust and the panic,

:18:11.:18:14.

a camera captured one After eight operations,

:18:15.:18:17.

he's starting to walk again. You know, sometimes I have a good

:18:18.:18:26.

cry, sometimes I just have a moment to myself where,

:18:27.:18:28.

you know, I find energy in that place, I find

:18:29.:18:33.

the strength to continue, you know, building myself

:18:34.:18:36.

back up to being even In this corner there

:18:37.:18:38.

was Sebastien Bellin, This is the journalist who caught

:18:39.:18:47.

that moment of terror. Personally for me it is

:18:48.:18:53.

very, very difficult. And we must remember those

:18:54.:18:56.

who lost their lives here. How important do you think your

:18:57.:19:03.

photographs are in showing people what actually happened,

:19:04.:19:06.

what people went through? Yes, I think that we should show

:19:07.:19:10.

to our viewers and readers In the city centre the Belgian

:19:11.:19:13.

Royal Family joined survivors of the underground train blown up

:19:14.:19:31.

an hour later. The shock wave knocked

:19:32.:19:33.

a nation out of step. Security has been tightened

:19:34.:19:35.

here in the last year, the Army But more generally, some feel

:19:36.:19:41.

the security services They face big challenges monitoring

:19:42.:19:46.

extremists plotting alone. And Sebastien thinks

:19:47.:19:59.

they are failing. I'm a victim, I know the pain

:20:00.:20:01.

and suffering my family went I know the pain and

:20:02.:20:04.

suffering I went through. I want this to be preventable

:20:05.:20:07.

as much as possible. People are still healing

:20:08.:20:09.

and they will not forget why. Plans are under way for two

:20:10.:20:14.

new prisons to be built at Full Sutton near York

:20:15.:20:28.

and Port Talbot in South Wales. The Justice Secretary Liz Truss also

:20:29.:20:30.

confirmed that jails at Rochester, Kent and Hindley

:20:31.:20:32.

in Greater Manchester The proposals are part of a ?1.3bn

:20:33.:20:34.

government pledge to create 10,000 The Scottish Parliament

:20:35.:20:38.

will vote today on a call by the First Minister,

:20:39.:20:42.

Nicola Sturgeon, for a second The motion, which is

:20:43.:20:45.

likely to be passed after a second day of debate,

:20:46.:20:51.

will give the Scottish government a mandate to open negotiations

:20:52.:20:53.

with Westminster on Our Scotland Editor Sarah

:20:54.:20:55.

Smith is in Holyrood. The Scottish Parliament is expected

:20:56.:21:06.

to back the call later today for a second referendum? That is right,

:21:07.:21:10.

the debate is set to get underway in about an hour, the second day of the

:21:11.:21:16.

vote. Of course there were strong positions put out yesterday here in

:21:17.:21:19.

the Scottish Parliament and I think we can expect more of the same today

:21:20.:21:23.

from the First Minister Nicola Sturgeon set out her stall, she

:21:24.:21:26.

wants the Scottish Parliament to support her in thinking the

:21:27.:21:31.

authority to hold a second referendum from Westminster. The

:21:32.:21:36.

timing is crucial, would like it to be between the autumn of next year

:21:37.:21:40.

and the spring of 2019 although she indicated this is negotiable. But

:21:41.:21:45.

the Prime Minister has said no, not now, she said now is not the time.

:21:46.:21:50.

That is not -- that is a sentiment that has been echoed by the Scottish

:21:51.:21:54.

Conservatives in error, Scottish Labour and the Scottish Liberal

:21:55.:21:57.

Democrats are also opposed to the move. They believe the Scottish

:21:58.:22:03.

people do not want a second independence referendum, not at this

:22:04.:22:07.

time. Now at 5:30pm members of the Scottish Parliament will vote, we

:22:08.:22:10.

expect Nicola Sturgeon to have a majority backed by the Greens but

:22:11.:22:16.

this will be significant, Downing Street say not now, the Scottish

:22:17.:22:19.

Government will see this as a mandate for the second referendum.

:22:20.:22:22.

New figures show that the number of women working into their seventies

:22:23.:22:25.

has doubled over the last four years.

:22:26.:22:26.

More than 11% of women are still part of the workforce

:22:27.:22:29.

Many are working longer to try to maintain their standard of living.

:22:30.:22:33.

Here's our Personal Finance Correspondent, Simon Gompertz.

:22:34.:22:38.

How do you measure your working life and where is the cut-off point

:22:39.:22:39.

Anne, who runs a fabric store in Bristol's St Nicholas market,

:22:40.:22:50.

is one of a growing band of women in their 70s working on.

:22:51.:22:53.

She has little beyond the state pension to fall back on.

:22:54.:22:55.

Well, we have absolutely no pensions, little

:22:56.:22:57.

We always invested money into the business.

:22:58.:23:00.

It would certainly be a struggle and life would have to change,

:23:01.:23:04.

The proportion of women who don't stop working

:23:05.:23:17.

until they are beyond 70 has grown from one in 20 four years ago

:23:18.:23:20.

It has doubled and it is catching up with men.

:23:21.:23:24.

The government is encouraging people to work on, encouraging employers

:23:25.:23:26.

But if at least some are doing it because they're

:23:27.:23:30.

desperate for the money, then there is still a question,

:23:31.:23:32.

what happens when you really do have to stop?

:23:33.:23:34.

It is a concern because women tend to have much less than men in a way

:23:35.:23:38.

Particularly for women, if they haven't saved enough

:23:39.:23:46.

and in some cases they need to keep working later because they simply

:23:47.:23:49.

Women have smaller pension pots than men typically,

:23:50.:23:52.

and will continue to do so for some time to come.

:23:53.:23:55.

I've been selling jewellery for 30 odd years.

:23:56.:23:57.

Like many women, Elaine, who is 74, doesn't even get

:23:58.:23:59.

She loves her shop, but she too needs the extra money.

:24:00.:24:03.

I probably wouldn't be able to go to the hairdressers as often,

:24:04.:24:06.

I've probably wouldn't be able to go out for a meal as often

:24:07.:24:09.

And you know, these are things that are important to me.

:24:10.:24:12.

They talk about the rich pensioners, don't they, but a lot

:24:13.:24:15.

A lot of pensioners, you know, are just hanging on.

:24:16.:24:23.

It's got the nicest sound you'll ever hear.

:24:24.:24:27.

The pressure means the number of women like Elaine who are working

:24:28.:24:30.

into their early 70s has risen to around 150,000.

:24:31.:24:34.

Simon Gompertz, BBC News, in Bristol.

:24:35.:24:38.

The Northern Ireland Assembly is gathering today for a special

:24:39.:24:41.

sitting to allow politicians to reflect on the life

:24:42.:24:43.

Last night, thousands of people gathered at a candlelit vigil

:24:44.:24:48.

in west Belfast for the former Deputy First Minister who died

:24:49.:24:50.

Our Ireland Correspondent Chris Page is in Londonderry.

:24:51.:25:04.

Irish flags are flying at half-mast in the Bogside area of Derry where

:25:05.:25:11.

Mark McGuinness lived. The mood across Northern Ireland is of

:25:12.:25:14.

contemplation. Both were people who suffered greatly as a result of IRA

:25:15.:25:17.

violence and for those who regard Martin McGuinness mainly as a

:25:18.:25:18.

peacemaker. This shows how much

:25:19.:25:20.

Martin McGuinness was In west Belfast hundreds

:25:21.:25:22.

attended a vigil to remember The life of the former IRA

:25:23.:25:26.

commander was a complex story He ended up as the joint head

:25:27.:25:32.

of Northern Ireland's The Stormont assembly has

:25:33.:25:39.

held a special meeting to reflect on the man

:25:40.:25:44.

who was Deputy First Martin McGuinness was

:25:45.:25:45.

a political visionary. He played a key and enormous part

:25:46.:25:48.

in delivering fundamental change in this society and in transforming

:25:49.:25:52.

the relationships on this island But the memories of the IRA campaign

:25:53.:25:56.

are still strong and personal. The Democratic Unionist Party leader

:25:57.:26:04.

Arlene Foster survived the bombing Things have fundamentally

:26:05.:26:07.

changed since I was growing up in the 70s and 80s,

:26:08.:26:15.

and changed immeasurably And Martin McGuinness did play

:26:16.:26:18.

a role, which I will always condemn, But I also have to acknowledge

:26:19.:26:25.

the role which he played over this last decade and more in government

:26:26.:26:34.

in Northern Ireland. The coalition between her party

:26:35.:26:36.

and Sinn Fein collapsed in January. Negotiations are going

:26:37.:26:39.

on to try to restore A clergyman who was a mediator

:26:40.:26:42.

in the peace process says Martin McGuinness passionately

:26:43.:26:47.

wanted power-sharing to work. Reaching out, that

:26:48.:26:51.

was his great phrase. I want to keep reaching

:26:52.:26:53.

out and getting people As we now, we've got

:26:54.:26:55.

the structures, but what we now Mr McGuinness's death has come

:26:56.:27:03.

as Northern Ireland is facing But in his home city people

:27:04.:27:08.

are still considering the legacy of the leader who moved

:27:09.:27:14.

from the shadow of the gun As preparations are being made for

:27:15.:27:30.

the funeral service here tomorrow there has been News from a town not

:27:31.:27:35.

far away from Derry showing that the relative peace here remains uneasy.

:27:36.:27:39.

The police say some officers are lucky to be alive after a bomb

:27:40.:27:42.

exploded in Strabane last night, they believed it was a clear attempt

:27:43.:27:46.

to murder members of a police patrol. It is likely the attack was

:27:47.:27:49.

carried out by dissident republicans opposed to the peace process.

:27:50.:27:54.

Now, we've all got used to seeing free-range eggs and free-range

:27:55.:27:56.

meat in the supermarket but what about free-range milk?

:27:57.:27:59.

That's milk from cows who spend more time out in the fields,

:28:00.:28:02.

feeding on grass and if it takes off, it's hoped that it could keep

:28:03.:28:05.

One leading supermarket has already begun stocking free-range

:28:06.:28:08.

milk and they're hoping others will follow.

:28:09.:28:10.

Our Business Correspondent Emma Simpson reports.

:28:11.:28:14.

The cows hitting the field after winter indoors.

:28:15.:28:22.

But it's been increasingly hard for small dairy farms like this

:28:23.:28:30.

In actual fact, personally, I don't think I've ever been

:28:31.:28:39.

We were just lucky free range came along and gave us a new outlook.

:28:40.:28:44.

We've seen friends, neighbours, go out of business, we've seen

:28:45.:28:53.

In just ten years the number of dairy farmers has reduced, many

:28:54.:28:58.

But farmers are delivering more milk per cow, the average

:28:59.:29:02.

So fewer farms with bigger herds and some are kept in all year round.

:29:03.:29:10.

And Jenny is keen that shoppers know about it.

:29:11.:29:18.

You've got skimmed, semi-skimmed, whole, filtered,

:29:19.:29:22.

It's cheaper than organic, but 15p more than your average litre.

:29:23.:29:31.

Can I interest you in a milk taste test?

:29:32.:29:38.

We would probably try it and see how we get on.

:29:39.:29:46.

But long-term, I'm not sure, it depends on the cost of it.

:29:47.:29:51.

Asda said the milk sold better than they thought and they're now

:29:52.:29:54.

After a few rough years for this industry, here they are trying

:29:55.:30:05.

And hoping free range will earn them a fairer price.

:30:06.:30:12.

Emma Simpson, BBC News, Gloucestershire.

:30:13.:30:17.

Former Liverpool captain, coach and caretaker manager

:30:18.:30:19.

Ronnie Moran has died at the age of 83.

:30:20.:30:22.

He made 379 appearances between 1952 and 1968,

:30:23.:30:27.

and then became part of Bill Shankly's famous

:30:28.:30:29.

He had two spells as caretaker manager in his 49 years

:30:30.:30:35.

I hope there is no more snow. It is the date for woolly coats and

:30:36.:30:56.

for most of us a day for the waterproofs. This has been a typical

:30:57.:31:01.

scene across the UK, wet, miserable and cold. But by the weekend there

:31:02.:31:06.

is quite a transformation, it is going to feel like spring at last

:31:07.:31:11.

with some lovely sunshine for most. That is courtesy of high-pressure.

:31:12.:31:17.

At the moment we have no pressure and hence we have rain and a bit of

:31:18.:31:24.

snow across the far north of England and southern Scotland this morning.

:31:25.:31:30.

Some of those showers mean business, pushing up into the East of England,

:31:31.:31:38.

more persistent rain still across the north of England. Most of the

:31:39.:31:43.

snow turning back to rain. The northern half of Scotland enjoying

:31:44.:31:47.

some sunshine but not warm at around 34 degrees. And the wet weather is

:31:48.:31:51.

lodged across the far north of England with again some slow over

:31:52.:31:56.

the higher ground. More rain coming in to the south-east again. Where

:31:57.:32:03.

the skies are clear across parts of Wales and the South West of England,

:32:04.:32:09.

there should be some frost around. And up in the northern glens of

:32:10.:32:14.

Scotland as low as minus eight. Everything begins to head west, the

:32:15.:32:20.

band of rain pushing into Wales and the South West England and

:32:21.:32:24.

brightening up in the north and East. Not exactly warm but heading

:32:25.:32:28.

in the right direction. Still single figures for many, perhaps double

:32:29.:32:33.

figures further south but you have to factor in the cloud and blustery

:32:34.:32:39.

wind. That is still with us on Friday, further north things are

:32:40.:32:43.

settling down. Some rain across the far Northern Isles. But in between

:32:44.:32:48.

that wedge of sunshine as high pressure begins to build. And high

:32:49.:32:52.

pressure will be the dominant force as we head into the weekend. Around

:32:53.:33:00.

the periphery of that is still a notable breeze and for example

:33:01.:33:03.

across some Southern counties not feeling all that warm out in the

:33:04.:33:08.

breeze. But for the vast majority this weekend is looking good. Dry,

:33:09.:33:14.

plenty of sunshine, pinning warm. But still cold enough at night for

:33:15.:33:20.

some frost. But we will put up with that with some sunshine in store.

:33:21.:33:22.

A reminder of our main story this lunchtime.

:33:23.:33:28.

The biggest fine ever handed to a British water company guide Thames

:33:29.:33:33.

Water ordered to pay ?20

:33:34.:33:34.