12/05/2017 BBC News at One


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12/05/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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The Labour leader uses a foreign policy speech to say the war

:00:00.:00:00.

on terror has failed and it's a time for fresh thinking.

:00:00.:00:10.

He says he accepts military action is sometimes necessary

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The philosophy, bomb first, talk later approach

:00:15.:00:19.

To persist with it, as the Conservative government has

:00:20.:00:23.

made clear it's determined to do, is a recipe for increasing not

:00:24.:00:27.

We'll have the latest from the campaign trail.

:00:28.:00:32.

President Trump talks about his sacking of the head of the FBI.

:00:33.:00:38.

He criticises James Comey as a showman and a grandstander.

:00:39.:00:42.

A coroner rules that 14-year-old Nasar Ahmed died as a result

:00:43.:00:47.

of an allergic reaction to his school lunch.

:00:48.:00:50.

His mother says he could have been saved.

:00:51.:00:53.

If they gave him an Epi-pen injection, that time,

:00:54.:00:56.

within five minutes, before the ambulance came,

:00:57.:01:00.

Britons are now more likely to be a victim of cybercrime

:01:01.:01:07.

We follow the specialist training now being given to police.

:01:08.:01:17.

And it's the first Eurovision Song Contest since the EU

:01:18.:01:19.

Will Brexit scupper Britain's chances?

:01:20.:01:26.

Chelsea can complete their charge to the Premier

:01:27.:01:31.

A win at West Brom would guarantee them top spot

:01:32.:01:34.

Good afternoon and welcome to the BBC News at One.

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Jeremy Corbyn has said the war on terror has not worked.

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In a speech outlining his foreign policy, the Labour leader said this

:02:04.:02:06.

was the fourth general election in a row during which

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Britain had been at war, and fresh thinking was needed.

:02:10.:02:13.

Mr Corbyn insisted he was not a pacifist, but warned

:02:14.:02:16.

against a bomb first, talk later approach.

:02:17.:02:19.

He said Donald Trump was making the world more dangerous,

:02:20.:02:22.

and he accused Theresa May of pandering to and holding

:02:23.:02:26.

Our political correspondent Eleanor Garnier reports.

:02:27.:02:34.

This is the Labour leader positioning himself as a potential

:02:35.:02:42.

world leader. Not a pacifist, he says, instead pledging a robust,

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independent foreign policy. I would do everything to protect the

:02:47.:02:50.

security and safety of our people and our country. That is our first

:02:51.:02:57.

duty. Jeremy Corbyn is a long-standing critic of military

:02:58.:03:00.

intervention Broads, the former chairman of the stop the War

:03:01.:03:04.

coalition, a veteran anti-war campaigner. And on nuclear weapons,

:03:05.:03:08.

he's sticking to his tune. I'm often asked if as prime ministers, I would

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order the use of nuclear weapons. It is an extraordinary question. Would

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you order the indiscriminate killing of millions of people? Labour is

:03:20.:03:26.

committed to actively pursue disarmament under the nuclear

:03:27.:03:30.

Non-Proliferation Treaty. And we're committed to no first use of nuclear

:03:31.:03:37.

weapons. Taking direct aim at Theresa May, the Labour leader said

:03:38.:03:43.

there should be no more handholding with Mr Trump. There is a sharp

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distinction between a government which is to stand up for this

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country, willing to make sure this country is properly defended, and a

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Labour Party led by Jeremy Corbyn that would simply chuck away our

:03:57.:04:01.

ability to defend ourselves. I think that is crazy. Hundreds of thousands

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marched against the Iraq war in 2003. Mr Corbyn's allies believe

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many former members of Labour who have left the party in protest have

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comeback under his leadership. Jeremy Corbyn has put forward his

:04:19.:04:22.

position on foreign affairs proudly, in double his core support. But the

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campaigners, think this could be a liability. It is up to you to decide

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who you want to fly the flag for Britain.

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Our Assistant Political Editor Norman Smith is in Central London

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where Jeremy Corbyn just made that speech.

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How controversial was the speech? I think team Jeremy Corbyn have

:04:47.:04:57.

followed the military maxim that the best form of defence is attack,

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there is no point in trying to say that he has not opposed nuclear

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weapons and military intervention abroad, American foreign policy, he

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has always protested all his adult life against war from Iraq to Kosovo

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to the Falklands, he is a regular anti-American protest. He is now

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offering a different vision of Britain's roll on the world stage,

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different sort of Labour Party where the government would only act

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military intervention in very few circumstances and when authorised

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under international law. They would seek to work more to the United

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Nations. The hope is that voters will respect him for being honest

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about his views, it will resonate in the aftermath of the Iraq war,

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particularly with younger voters. The danger that it alienates more

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conditional Labour supporters, who do take pride in our military

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history and our place in the world. The Prime Minister is visiting

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Berwick-upon-Tweed and our Chief Political Correspondent Vicki

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Young is there. Are we likely to hear more on this

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theme from the Prime Minister? Yes, we are, she is due to arrive here

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any time now. This is the Berwick-upon-Tweed constituency, a

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large constituency taken from the Liberal Democrats last time around.

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Later in the day, the Prime Minister will go to traditional Labour areas,

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areas in the last 20 years that Tories would have never dared to

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dream they could win. They are buoyed up by the recent mayoral

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victory they had in Teesside, that make them think they can win people

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over. The message from the Prime Minister is very clear, appealing

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directly to Labour voters, some who have voted Labour for generations,

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she says she understands why they have done that but she wants them to

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give her a chance. She says it is because Jeremy Corbyn has deserted

:06:54.:07:00.

them. It is this idea of patriotic is that she is appealing to.

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Cheating is she can win over Labour voters to her side. -- she thinks

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she can win over Labour voters to her side.

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Well, how is Labour's message about defence being received in one

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Labour won Barrow-in-Furness at the last

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election by fewer than 800 votes and the Trident weapons system,

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in a town that builds submarines, is a fundamental issue.

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Our North West Political Editor Nina Warhurst reports.

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In Barrow town centre, a statue stands tall.

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To the welders, the gaffers, the men and women who made

:07:28.:07:30.

From an opposition party whose stance on nuclear deal

:07:31.:07:41.

It's not just the 8,000 Trident jobs at stake.

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You can talk about shops in the town, the hairdressers

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in the town, whatever industry or sector you're in in the town.

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The size of Barrow, it affects every part of the community.

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The Furnace Railway pub sits close to the terraced houses which have

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been homes to shipyard workers for generations.

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Where party loyalty is being questioned.

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I've always voted Labour, but I'm not going to vote Labour

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this time because Theresa May is doing a wonderful job.

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Are you surprised that you're voting Conservative?

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But on the big issues, it's Labour that Andy and Barry

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Free car parking for patients, obviously, and I think

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over a period of time, they'll bring in more people to work

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in the NHS which sadly, at the moment, they're lacking.

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So you trust Labour more when it comes to the NHS?

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It's in my blood, I guess, I'll always be a Labour man,

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It's a Labour town, it's a working man's town.

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And that's damn well how it should be.

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Now, the Labour Party can't blame Jeremy Corbyn

:08:46.:08:47.

for all of its problems in Barrow, because they predate his leadership.

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In 2015, their majority was cut from more than 5,000

:08:52.:08:55.

They know that a tiny swing would tip it.

:08:56.:09:01.

And they're concerned that this leader isn't connecting with voters.

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And this is where the Corbyn factor comes in.

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Can Barrow connect with a man described as Marmite,

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Terry has been a Labour Party member for more than 50 years.

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It's not their sort of person, we don't live in some suburb

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of London where it's, you go in a cafe and everybody

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agrees with you and something like that.

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And we get, we hear what he says but we don't believe it,

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Do you think that could lose the seat?

:09:36.:09:39.

Four weeks is a long time in politics.

:09:40.:09:51.

The Liberal Democrats have confirmed they would make the sale

:09:52.:09:54.

The party would allow licensed shops to sell the drug to over-18s.

:09:55.:10:01.

People would also be able to grow cannabis at home and smoke

:10:02.:10:04.

In his first television interview since sacking the head of the FBI,

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President Trump has set out his version of events.

:10:15.:10:18.

Calling James Comey a "showboat and a grandstander", the President

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said it was his decision alone to sack him.

:10:22.:10:25.

He also called for the FBI's investigation into his campaigns

:10:26.:10:32.

connection with Russia to be completed quickly.

:10:33.:10:33.

Laura Bicker reports from Washington.

:10:34.:10:35.

When did Donald Trump decide to sack the towering figure from the FBI?

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This presidential handshake not an act of friendship, it seems,

:10:45.:10:47.

but the beginning of the end for James Comey.

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He's a showboat, he's a grandstander.

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And it wasn't on the advice from the Deputy Attorney-General,

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You had made the decision before they came in the room?

:10:56.:11:11.

The White House had claimed that Mr Comey had little or no

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The rank and file of the FBI had lost confidence in their director.

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Not so, said the Acting FBI Director, who was sitting

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in for his sacked boss before the Senate intelligence committee.

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I can tell you that I hold Director Comey

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I have the highest respect for his considerable

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I can tell you also that Director Comey enjoyed broad

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support within the FBI, and still does.

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At the heart of this row is the alleged collusion between

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The President admits that Russia was on his mind

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Regardless of recommendation, I was going to fire Comey.

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Knowing there was no good time to do it.

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And in fact, when I decided to just do it, I said to myself,

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you know, this Russia thing, with Trump and Russia,

:12:06.:12:11.

is a made-up story, it's an excuse by the Democrats for having

:12:12.:12:14.

Donald Trump denies any collusion with Russia and insists that,

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despite sacking the head of the FBI, he wants any enquiry done

:12:20.:12:24.

Our correspondent Gary O'Donoghue is in Washington for us.

:12:25.:12:36.

It seems the president is insuring that this is a row that is just not

:12:37.:12:44.

going away. Yes, and this is self-inflicted harm. These are

:12:45.:12:48.

political own goals. They'd been all over the place on this one. All

:12:49.:12:55.

week. First of all we were told the sacking of James Comey was a

:12:56.:13:00.

decision effectively made by the Deputy Attorney General, endorsed by

:13:01.:13:03.

the President, that has now changed, the president said he would do it

:13:04.:13:07.

anyway. Secondly, we were told, nothing to do with Russia, the

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president said Russia was in his mind jarring that interview last

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mind. -- during that interview last night. And thirdly, we were told

:13:17.:13:19.

that effectively the president sacked him because he had no support

:13:20.:13:25.

in the PI. The FBI acting director yesterday saying he had broad

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support, deep and positive connection with his staff. This

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morning, the president says, by the way, guys, all those people at the

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podium making the case for me, they don't always know what is going on

:13:37.:13:40.

because they are very busy. They are telling us this morning, you do not

:13:41.:13:46.

always have to believe what you hear from the White House podium,

:13:47.:13:46.

extraordinary time. A coroner has ruled that

:13:47.:13:49.

a 14-year-old boy died as a result of an allergic reaction

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to his school lunch. She said that if an epi-pen had been

:13:53.:13:54.

used promptly and Nasar Ahmed had been given adrenaline,

:13:55.:13:57.

he might have survived. Nasar was in an exclusion room

:13:58.:13:59.

when he became unwell He loved maths and science

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and wanted to be a politician. He also suffered with severe

:14:03.:14:11.

asthma and food allergies. For the last two weeks,

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his family have heard in detail how he came to die after suffering

:14:16.:14:20.

an extreme allergic reaction to an ingredient in a curry he had

:14:21.:14:22.

for lunch while at school. Nasar had told staff

:14:23.:14:26.

he couldn't breathe. They fetched his personal

:14:27.:14:28.

medical box, but it emerged during the inquest his care plan

:14:29.:14:31.

didn't accurately indicate how The box contained an adrenaline

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injection pen, but there were no details as to when or how it should

:14:35.:14:40.

be used, and so even as his condition deteriorated,

:14:41.:14:44.

none of the staff administered it. Nasar died four days

:14:45.:14:47.

later in hospital. His family say the school let

:14:48.:15:01.

them and their son down. If they gave him EpiPen injection

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that time within five minutes, before the ambulance came,

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maybe they could have Bow School issued

:15:10.:15:14.

a statement today, saying... Part of the coroner's role

:15:15.:15:25.

is to help prevent future deaths, and so she has written

:15:26.:15:28.

to the school, outlining the concerns which were raised

:15:29.:15:30.

during the inquest, but she is also asking the Chief Medical Officer

:15:31.:15:33.

for England to consider making adrenaline injector pens much more

:15:34.:15:36.

widely available in public spaces, Following Nasar's death,

:15:37.:15:39.

she concluded, the reality is, giving an adrenaline shot

:15:40.:15:46.

is unlikely to cause harm and could Sarah Campbell, BBC News,

:15:47.:15:49.

Poplar Coroners Court. The EU's chief Brexit negotiator

:15:50.:15:56.

Michel Barnier is visiting the border between Northern Ireland

:15:57.:15:59.

and the Republic this lunchtime. He's been discussing

:16:00.:16:03.

the importance of the border Our correspondent Chris Buckler

:16:04.:16:06.

is in Monaghan, where Michel Barnier Days when customs checkpoints

:16:07.:16:10.

like this old hut marked the roads between Northern Ireland

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and the Republic are long gone. And while everyone repeatedly says

:16:17.:16:21.

they don't want them to return, the EU's chief negotiator has made

:16:22.:16:25.

clear that there will have to be But Michel Barnier is visiting

:16:26.:16:28.

the Irish border today to show that the European Union is aware

:16:29.:16:36.

of the many concerns held by those A lot of employees working

:16:37.:16:41.

in the factories in this food park from Northern Ireland,

:16:42.:16:45.

and similarly, we have some people from the County Monaghan area

:16:46.:16:49.

working in Northern Ireland, so they have to look

:16:50.:16:51.

and see what impact this This business in County

:16:52.:16:54.

Monaghan is just miles The UK is one of its most important

:16:55.:17:03.

markets, and they know that, packaged up with all the Brexit

:17:04.:17:10.

negotiations, are months of uncertainty about how it

:17:11.:17:14.

could affect their trade. If there is a hard border,

:17:15.:17:17.

we envisage obviously potential extra costs for ourselves,

:17:18.:17:21.

for getting our products to the UK marketplace,

:17:22.:17:25.

and delays at the border, A hard border wouldn't mean a return

:17:26.:17:27.

to watch towers and barbed wire. This kind of security

:17:28.:17:33.

is no longer needed. And shared by the EU, the UK

:17:34.:17:38.

and Ireland is a determination to avoid anything that

:17:39.:17:41.

could threaten peace I think there is a really common

:17:42.:17:43.

desire, whatever other issues there are in relation to Brexit,

:17:44.:17:49.

to make Northern Ireland a special case and make sure that we do

:17:50.:17:51.

everything we possibly can to protect the Good Friday

:17:52.:17:54.

Agreement, the peace process, and to protect that strong

:17:55.:17:56.

relationship between the Republic Towns along the Irish border may

:17:57.:17:59.

well feel caught in the middle, Whatever deal is finally agreed

:18:00.:18:10.

between the UK and the EU could have a real impact

:18:11.:18:16.

on their daily lives. He is expected here at this business

:18:17.:18:29.

within the next hour or so and many factories here rely on produce from

:18:30.:18:31.

both Northern Ireland and the Republic. The visit has been

:18:32.:18:35.

organised by the Irish Government and technically they're on the EU

:18:36.:18:40.

side of that negotiation over Brexit but they share many concerns, many

:18:41.:18:43.

interests and of course a land border with the UK and that will

:18:44.:18:47.

play in what they say to Mr Barnier today. Thank you.

:18:48.:18:51.

The Labour leader uses a foreign policy speech to say the war

:18:52.:18:59.

on terror has failed and it's time for fresh thinking.

:19:00.:19:01.

He accepts military action is sometimes necessary.

:19:02.:19:05.

Coming up, car credit is now

:19:06.:19:06.

Coming up in sport at half past: Ahead of the weekend's

:19:07.:19:13.

Spanish Grand Prix Lewis Hamilton goes quickest in first practice.

:19:14.:19:16.

His Mercedes Valtteri Bottas teammate was second

:19:17.:19:17.

We are now more likely to be a victim of cybercrime in this

:19:18.:19:33.

It's one of the fastest growing areas of criminal activity.

:19:34.:19:42.

So, police forces are now offering detectives specialist training

:19:43.:19:47.

The BBC's technology correspondent Rory Cellan-Jones has been given

:19:48.:19:50.

In a hotel room a man, who may be part of an international crime gang,

:19:51.:19:57.

His hacker's lair has all the tools of his trade

:19:58.:20:02.

This is not a traditional forensic operation where

:20:03.:20:07.

you are looking for fingerprints, blood spatters, DNA...

:20:08.:20:09.

These police officers are being trained to catch cyber

:20:10.:20:13.

criminals and the hacker in the hotel is today's exercise

:20:14.:20:16.

They're being given the skills to tackle the fastest

:20:17.:20:20.

Some estimates say up to half of all offences

:20:21.:20:25.

Well, the hacker in room 523 has popped out for

:20:26.:20:32.

a while and the trainee cyber police officers with a search warrant

:20:33.:20:35.

Let's see what evidence they can find.

:20:36.:20:39.

They're certainly taking it very seriously.

:20:40.:20:44.

Internet enabled, it's not that smartTV so you should be

:20:45.:20:52.

The first priority is to make sure all the computers stay powered up,

:20:53.:21:06.

connected to the internet and don't lock up after a certain time,

:21:07.:21:09.

that way they can get access to the data much more easily.

:21:10.:21:12.

What did you discover on the router when you first...

:21:13.:21:14.

Examining the router they've realised there is another device

:21:15.:21:20.

Hidden under a tray, a tablet with more evidence.

:21:21.:21:25.

The techniques they're learning should make hunting the hackers much

:21:26.:21:29.

Back in the day on a scene like this, for example,

:21:30.:21:35.

the officers were just simply turning up and literally pulled

:21:36.:21:38.

the electric supply out of the back of the computer,

:21:39.:21:40.

bag, tag it and then send it away for forensic investigation

:21:41.:21:43.

which could take months before they got any meaningful information

:21:44.:21:45.

It's a case of learning skills, practical skills,

:21:46.:22:00.

that we can utilise, no different to finding a gun

:22:01.:22:02.

at the scene that we can make safe for the public and then attribute

:22:03.:22:05.

to a criminal, we are doing exactly the same with IT

:22:06.:22:08.

It's the future of the policing, although people don't

:22:09.:22:11.

see it as the norm now, I think certainly it will be.

:22:12.:22:14.

These detectives are among thousands going through this type of training

:22:15.:22:19.

...with the cyber crime wave that's getting bigger by the day.

:22:20.:22:27.

A British firm has just received one of the largest ever investments

:22:28.:22:33.

Police have voiced concern about the number of weapons

:22:34.:22:35.

being seized in schools in England and Wales.

:22:36.:22:38.

Kitchen knives, air rifles and an imitation firearm were among

:22:39.:22:40.

some of the 2,500 items confiscated in the last two years.

:22:41.:22:43.

Cases involved children as young as five.

:22:44.:22:45.

Our education correspondent Gillian Hargreaves reports.

:22:46.:22:49.

Some schools have taken to using metal arches to make sure

:22:50.:22:53.

no weapons are brought on to the premises.

:22:54.:22:57.

But figures obtained by the Press Association show

:22:58.:23:01.

the number of seizures over a two-year period

:23:02.:23:03.

2,579 weapons were seized - among them were samurai swords, axes and

:23:04.:23:12.

47 children found with weapons were below the age of ten,

:23:13.:23:18.

and one five-year-old was caught with a knife.

:23:19.:23:21.

Sometimes the younger children are used to carry for older

:23:22.:23:26.

children, so they are learning from their siblings,

:23:27.:23:28.

they are learning from their peer groups.

:23:29.:23:32.

So these cases are very worrying,

:23:33.:23:36.

because if you don't catch those young children now,

:23:37.:23:39.

they will go on to continue to be more serious offenders.

:23:40.:23:43.

Barry Mizen lost his son Jimmy eight years ago.

:23:44.:23:45.

He was 16 when he was stabbed to death.

:23:46.:23:47.

His father now visits schools, warning children about the

:23:48.:23:49.

We are not there to lecture young people, we are there to say this

:23:50.:24:01.

is what happened to us and this was the unintended consequence

:24:02.:24:04.

And hopefully, that will have an impact on some people.

:24:05.:24:07.

We get listened to so well, the young people are

:24:08.:24:10.

Young people are scared when they go out of their front door.

:24:11.:24:14.

Although the statistics reveal around 500 knives

:24:15.:24:17.

were seized by teachers, violent crime in schools is very rare.

:24:18.:24:22.

I know that as a headteacher for 15 years, we would,

:24:23.:24:25.

if we had a tip-off about a child bringing something inappropriate in,

:24:26.:24:30.

which might be a pair of scissors, frankly, that they were going to use

:24:31.:24:33.

with the wrong reason, then we would follow it up.

:24:34.:24:36.

If necessary, we would exclude that child, involve the parents.

:24:37.:24:38.

I think there is greater awareness, and I think today's report adds

:24:39.:24:41.

The Department for Education said teachers' powers had been increased,

:24:42.:24:45.

so they can take action if they suspect a pupil has brought

:24:46.:24:47.

The value of finance deals used to buy new cars has

:24:48.:24:55.

soared to a new record, alarming those who have

:24:56.:25:02.

warned the growing trend could spell trouble.

:25:03.:25:04.

Britain has been on a car-buying boom as a result of these deals,

:25:05.:25:07.

but the Bank of England has raised concerns about the level

:25:08.:25:10.

Our personal finance correspondent Simon Gompertz reports.

:25:11.:25:13.

Picking up the dream vehicle, and in eight out of ten

:25:14.:25:16.

cases it's on credit, dealers and lenders have made it

:25:17.:25:20.

easy for people who used to drive an old banger to get new car

:25:21.:25:23.

Sometimes the finance can help you and it's really good deal.

:25:24.:25:33.

You pay a deposit of thousands of pounds then a monthly payment,

:25:34.:25:38.

typically between 100 and 200, covering interest and the amount

:25:39.:25:41.

After three years you give back the keys and sign up

:25:42.:25:45.

Many don't realise they never actually own the car

:25:46.:25:48.

but the financial watchdog, the FCA, said last month.

:25:49.:25:52.

We are concerned there may be a lack of transparency,

:25:53.:25:54.

potential conflicts of interest and irresponsible lending.

:25:55.:26:00.

There are two worries about this, one is that people are signing up

:26:01.:26:04.

for deals which they can't afford, the other is that the finance

:26:05.:26:07.

companies are stoking up a debt bubble which will burst

:26:08.:26:09.

if they can't get rid of the cars at a decent price in the secondhand

:26:10.:26:13.

At the end of the day, lenders only have a sustainable

:26:14.:26:20.

business model if they can confidently expect to get

:26:21.:26:22.

But no one's putting the brakes on car credit at the moment.

:26:23.:26:32.

The concern will grow if records keep being overtaken.

:26:33.:26:38.

Can Chelsea clinch the Premier League title tonight

:26:39.:26:40.

Victory at The Hawthornes would give Chelsea an unassailable 10-point

:26:41.:26:47.

For Chelsea the celebrations have already started. Glory is within

:26:48.:27:02.

their grasp. Tonight they can secure the trophy with two games to spare,

:27:03.:27:07.

a remarkable achievement for a team who finished 10th last season and

:27:08.:27:10.

for a manager working in English football for the first time. Yeah, I

:27:11.:27:16.

think that we are doing a really good job. But I want this job to

:27:17.:27:24.

become great and then fantastic because we have two big opportunity

:27:25.:27:28.

in this season to finish this season the right way. Early in the campaign

:27:29.:27:33.

Chelsea were in trouble. But after losing at Arsenal Conte changed

:27:34.:27:41.

tactics and the results followed. Spearheaded by Kante. They've not

:27:42.:27:45.

looked back. He is only 12 months into a three-year contract but he

:27:46.:27:51.

reportedly earns far less than most of the rival monger he has

:27:52.:27:54.

outperformed and that, allied to his success and the fact his family

:27:55.:27:59.

remain in Italy, has cast doubt over his future. Chelsea will be

:28:00.:28:02.

desperate to keep him. Any player wants to look at a manager and say I

:28:03.:28:06.

am prepared to go over that white line and do everything I have been

:28:07.:28:10.

coached to do, without question. Believing in what the manager is

:28:11.:28:14.

saying, my own ability, and also what my teammates are going to do

:28:15.:28:19.

and to create that environment takes special people. Three points at West

:28:20.:28:23.

Brom would finish the job. If not, Chelsea can do it when they host

:28:24.:28:28.

Watford or Sunderland. Conte stands to become only the fourth manager to

:28:29.:28:32.

win the Premier League in his first season in England. Following that up

:28:33.:28:36.

by lifting the FA Cup to seal a domestic double would be extra

:28:37.:28:37.

special. For some people, it's

:28:38.:28:42.

one of the television highlights of the year -

:28:43.:28:45.

the final of the Eurovision Song Contest is tomorrow night

:28:46.:28:47.

in Kiev, with Lucie Jones The 26-year-old says she's keeping

:28:48.:28:49.

politics firmly out of her mind, even though this is the first

:28:50.:28:57.

Eurovision since the EU referendum. Our Moscow correspondent

:28:58.:28:59.

Steve Rosenberg weighs It's big, it's brash

:29:00.:29:01.

and at times quite bizarre. Eurovision, the song contest that

:29:02.:29:13.

gave us Abba and now...apes. After a week of rehearsals

:29:14.:29:18.

and qualifiers in Kiev, The UK's entry is Never Give Up

:29:19.:29:22.

On You, sung by Lucy Jones. Yeah, I'm nervous, but if I wasn't,

:29:23.:29:30.

I think I'd probably worry If I wasn't nervous to sing in front

:29:31.:29:32.

of 200 million people, It's easy to forget that there

:29:33.:29:37.

is a serious side to this annual The idea behind the Eurovision Song

:29:38.:29:44.

Contest is a noble one, to use music to break down borders

:29:45.:29:49.

and bring different countries and cultures

:29:50.:29:53.

and communities together. The problem this year, though,

:29:54.:29:58.

is that politics is centre stage. Russia's entrant was not

:29:59.:30:02.

allowed into Ukraine, the first time a Eurovision host

:30:03.:30:08.

nation has barred a singer. Ukraine said the artist

:30:09.:30:12.

had violated its border laws by visiting Crimea,

:30:13.:30:21.

the Ukrainian peninsula She was back there this week,

:30:22.:30:23.

stoking the controversy. Theresa May thinks that

:30:24.:30:26.

will spoil our Eurovision party. In current circumstances, I'm not

:30:27.:30:29.

sure how many votes we will get. But even before Brexit,

:30:30.:30:34.

the UK was struggling in Eurovision. The songs were bad,

:30:35.:30:40.

the performances were bad. I mean, nobody votes for us

:30:41.:30:44.

when the songs are bad And we had some bad

:30:45.:30:50.

ones, I tell you. So maybe, just maybe, with a good

:30:51.:30:55.

song and a great performance, Let's catch up with the weather.

:30:56.:31:11.

Thank you very much. Afternoon. I will start with a sunny

:31:12.:31:16.

note because there is a lot of cloud today but the best is across

:31:17.:31:20.

Scotland, this weather watcher picture proves that.

:31:21.:31:25.

You can see from the satellite and radar showing the rain. A lot of

:31:26.:31:30.

cloud out there. A band of rain moving northwards this morning,

:31:31.:31:33.

didn't amount to very much. There's been a lot of cloud further south

:31:34.:31:37.

too. Through the afternoon we will see rain returning in to the West

:31:38.:31:41.

Country and towards Wales. There will be some sunshine breaking

:31:42.:31:43.

through that cloud as it continues to thin and break in the next couple

:31:44.:31:49.

of hours. The M4 corridor northwards likely to see hefty showers

:31:50.:31:52.

developing, some heavy with hail and thunder mixed in. Watch out if you

:31:53.:31:55.

catch one. Warm and humid you will notice. There is that rain

:31:56.:31:59.

continuing to push to southern Scotland. For much of Northern

:32:00.:32:03.

Ireland and Scotland should and good deal of sunshine, especially western

:32:04.:32:05.

Scotland where it will feel quite warm. That's in comparison to the

:32:06.:32:09.

east coast that will be chilly and grey and breezy. Through the

:32:10.:32:13.

overnight period it looks like the rain will move northwards into

:32:14.:32:15.

south-west Scotland. Northern Ireland may see a fair amount of

:32:16.:32:18.

rain during the overnight period. Further south and east could see a

:32:19.:32:22.

few heavy showers, otherwise lengthy dryer interludes and it's going to

:32:23.:32:26.

be a mild night. Double figures for most. Saturday, a few early showers

:32:27.:32:30.

across the south-east. Another fairly cloudy day, particularly the

:32:31.:32:33.

northern half of the country where we start off with some rain and then

:32:34.:32:36.

see showers. Some of these will be heavy across western Scotland

:32:37.:32:43.

through the afternoon. A good chance of plenty of dry spells across

:32:44.:32:47.

central and eastern England. Chilly across the north-east of Scotland.

:32:48.:32:50.

Saturday, this weather front sweeps through. It takes a band of rain

:32:51.:32:55.

northwards. It could be heavy but short-lived. This low pressure will

:32:56.:32:59.

bring windy weather on Monday. That weather front as it moves through

:33:00.:33:02.

Saturday will introduce fresher air, we will lose that humidity. We will

:33:03.:33:05.

continue to see a day of sunshine and showers, mainly across northern

:33:06.:33:08.

and western areas. The south-east probably staying dry and warm again

:33:09.:33:12.

with plenty of sunshine. Into the early part of next week that low

:33:13.:33:16.

pressure will bring wet and windy conditions to the north and the west

:33:17.:33:21.

of the UK. Further south and east a better chance of seeing the

:33:22.:33:25.

sunshine. It will also feel warm. We could see 25.

:33:26.:33:32.

Thank you. That's it for now. Time to

:33:33.:33:33.