14/11/2017 BBC News at One


14/11/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 14/11/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

The battles over Brexit laws begin

as MPs prepare to scrutinise the key

0:00:040:00:09

piece of legislation that

will the way for the UK's departure.

0:00:090:00:12

They will begin pouring over

the detail of the EU withdrawal

0:00:120:00:16

bill this afternoon -

nearly 500 amendments

0:00:160:00:18

have been put forward.

0:00:180:00:25

With the potential for a rebellion

against the Government.

0:00:250:00:28

Deeply loyal backbenchers,

many ex-ministers, people of real

0:00:280:00:30

standing and credibility,

are so cross about this

0:00:300:00:32

that they may well vote

against their party's whip.

0:00:320:00:36

We'll be live in Westminster.

0:00:360:00:39

Also this lunchtime:

0:00:390:00:42

Theresa May makes her strongest

attack to date on Russia -

0:00:420:00:46

accusing it of using technology

and fake news to sow

0:00:460:00:49

discord in the West.

0:00:490:00:53

The earthquake in Iran -

the death toll rises to 530 -

0:00:530:00:56

more than 8,000 are injured.

0:00:560:00:57

Rescuers have given up hope

of finding more survivors.

0:00:570:01:00

Another rise in food

prices last month,

0:01:000:01:03

but inflation remains at 3% -

a five-year high.

0:01:030:01:05

What a moment for Sir Mo.

0:01:050:01:08

Britain's most decorated

athlete receives his

0:01:080:01:09

knighthood from the Queen.

0:01:090:01:12

Where does this rank in terms

of your achievements?

0:01:120:01:15

It's definitely way up there, close

to my Olympic medals, for sure.

0:01:150:01:19

And heatbreak and disbelief in Italy

- for the first time in 60 years,

0:01:190:01:23

the former champions won't be

going to the World Cup.

0:01:230:01:27

And coming up in the

sport on BBC News...

0:01:270:01:30

A blow for Wales.

0:01:300:01:31

Centre Jonathan Davies

will miss the autumn

0:01:310:01:33

internationals and the Six Nations

with a foot injury.

0:01:330:01:44

Good afternoon and welcome

to the BBC News at One.

0:01:580:02:01

MPs will begin their line by line

scrutiny of the central piece

0:02:010:02:04

of Brexit legislation

in the next few hours.

0:02:040:02:07

Hundreds of amendments have

been tabled by Labour

0:02:070:02:10

and Conservative rebels.

0:02:100:02:13

The EU Withdrawal Bill aims to bring

all existing EU law into UK law.

0:02:130:02:17

Yesterday, the Government announced

that Parliament would be given

0:02:170:02:23

a vote on the final deal

agreed with Brussels,

0:02:230:02:25

although MPs were told

0:02:250:02:26

that if they voted against the deal

the UK would still leave the Union.

0:02:260:02:30

Here's our Political

Correspondent Alex Forsyth.

0:02:300:02:36

Pages and pages long. This is the

bill that will bring all EU law into

0:02:360:02:40

UK law, ready for the day of

departure, so there is no legal

0:02:400:02:44

black hole when we leave. But

several MPs are worried about some

0:02:440:02:48

of the detail in this bill.

Secretary David Davis. Yesterday,

0:02:480:02:54

the Government gave in and try to

offer an olive branch to those

0:02:540:02:57

concerned, promising a new act of

Parliament on the Brexit a deal.

0:02:570:03:01

Parliament will be given time to

debate, scrutinise and vote on the

0:03:010:03:10

final agreement we strike with the

European Union.

This future act

0:03:100:03:12

would put the withdrawal agreement

between the UK and the EU into law

0:03:120:03:15

once it was negotiated, including

things like Citizen's rights, the

0:03:150:03:18

financial settlement, and details of

any transition period. The

0:03:180:03:20

Government says MPs will be able to

examine and vote on the deal when

0:03:200:03:26

both sides to reach agreement.

They

have said they want to achieve a

0:03:260:03:30

withdrawal agreement deal by October

next year. That would give plenty of

0:03:300:03:34

time for Parliament to vote on and

discuss this legislation and make

0:03:340:03:37

sure that Parliament has the final

say on both the withdrawal agreement

0:03:370:03:41

itself and of the implementation

period.

So, according to ministers,

0:03:410:03:45

MPs will have a crucial say.

Do you

think this is a meaningless vote

0:03:450:03:52

being offered?

Not all agree with

the Government. Their critics say

0:03:520:03:55

take the deal or a week without one

isn't a choice at all.

Not only does

0:03:550:03:59

it not give MPs the final say

because they are being offered a

0:03:590:04:03

false choice, but it could come very

late on the 23rd hour, which

0:04:030:04:07

wouldn't give us time to do anything

to stop it or ask the Government to

0:04:070:04:10

think again so it is completely

meaningless.

The Government had

0:04:100:04:14

helped by putting the

0:04:140:04:24

final Brexiteers into law, promising

a vote, it would appease MPs with

0:04:300:04:33

concerns.

It doesn't seem to have

worked. In fact, now there is

0:04:330:04:35

opposition to Theresa May's plan to

set the final Brexit date into law,

0:04:350:04:38

with some of her own MPs threatening

to vote against her. A lot of

0:04:380:04:40

people, more than I would have

imagined, who are deeply loyal

0:04:400:04:43

backbenchers, many ex-ministers and

people of real credibility, are so

0:04:430:04:45

cross about this that they may well

vote against their party's whip.

So

0:04:450:04:51

Parliament is set to become

something of a Brexit battle ground.

0:04:510:04:55

This is just the start of complex

laws that must be passed. Each one a

0:04:550:05:00

test of the Government's authority.

0:05:000:05:02

Let's speak to our Assistant

Political Editor Norman Smith.

0:05:020:05:08

Who is in Westminster. This will be

a long and drawn-out process.

0:05:080:05:12

Theresa May has promised a final

vote on any deal, but it doesn't

0:05:120:05:16

look as if there will be enough to

win over her critics. Just before we

0:05:160:05:21

came on air, a Brexit supporting MP

came up to me and said, "Let the

0:05:210:05:26

hand to hand fighting begin." And it

seems to be like that. We seem to be

0:05:260:05:31

heading for a parliamentary extra

mashed because if Theresa May offers

0:05:310:05:34

another vote to confirm the deal,

her critics view it has a gun to the

0:05:340:05:42

head because if they do not accept

the deal we will leave anyway, but

0:05:420:05:47

without any deal, which is their

nightmare scenario. But huge

0:05:470:05:52

pressure is now coming on Mrs May's

Tory critics, who are being told, if

0:05:520:05:57

you help to defeat Mrs May over this

bill, you will be doing Jeremy

0:05:570:06:02

Corbyn's work. You may even pave the

way for a Jeremy Corbyn Government

0:06:020:06:06

because they defeat over Brexit

would be tantamount almost to a vote

0:06:060:06:10

of no-confidence in the Government.

At the same time, ministers know

0:06:100:06:15

there are about half a dozen, maybe

more, Labour MPs, who are willing to

0:06:150:06:21

support the Prime Minister over this

bill. So difficult days ahead. Knife

0:06:210:06:26

edge votes, late night debates. But

privately, quietly, the Brexiteers

0:06:260:06:33

believe Mrs May can get through this

without significant defeat. Norman

0:06:330:06:39

Smith in Westminster. Thank you.

0:06:390:06:42

Theresa May has made her strongest

attack yet on Russia,

0:06:420:06:44

accusing it of using technology

to undermine the

0:06:440:06:46

international order.

0:06:460:06:47

Speaking at the Lord Mayor's banquet

in London last night,

0:06:470:06:52

the prime minister said state-run

Russian organisations

0:06:520:06:54

were planting stories,

meddling in elections and using fake

0:06:540:06:56

news to undermine societies.

0:06:560:06:57

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

0:06:570:07:05

media organisations to plant fake

stories and Photoshopped

0:07:050:07:07

images in an attempt

to sow discord in the West

0:07:070:07:09

and undermine our institutions.

0:07:090:07:11

So I have a very simple

message for Russia.

0:07:110:07:14

We know what you are doing

and you will not succeed.

0:07:140:07:23

The Prime Minister speaking last

night.

0:07:230:07:25

Our correspondent Steve

Rosenberg is in Moscow.

0:07:250:07:31

And the response from Moscow? Well,

they heard what she was saying, but

0:07:310:07:34

they didn't like it. One Russian

senator dismissed these today as

0:07:340:07:38

groundless allegations. Another said

that Theresa May had made a fool of

0:07:380:07:41

herself, so the message from Moscow

is clear. We don't care what you

0:07:410:07:46

think, we are doing it. Part of the

reason the Russians do not care

0:07:460:07:50

about being criticised by the

British Government is that Moscow

0:07:500:07:52

views Theresa May as a weak leader.

This is a country which invented the

0:07:520:07:56

phrase I related to describe

Margaret Thatcher in the 1970s, but

0:07:560:08:01

Putin's Russia does not see Theresa

May as a iron lady. It views as a

0:08:010:08:08

weak Prime Minister and it is that

weakness which dilutes the strong

0:08:080:08:11

message was trying to get across in

that speech. But there's another

0:08:110:08:15

reason the Russians don't care about

being criticised. As bizarre as it

0:08:150:08:18

may sound, I think they see a

benefit in being criticised by

0:08:180:08:23

countries psych Chas -- such as

Britain because there will be an

0:08:230:08:33

image created of Russia as a

besieged fortress to rally the

0:08:330:08:36

people around the current President

Vladimir Putin, which would get him

0:08:360:08:41

re-elected in the coming vote.

0:08:410:08:43

The death toll from Sunday's

powerful earthquake in Iran has

0:08:430:08:46

risen to 530, with more

than 8,000 injured.

0:08:460:08:48

Officials have called off

the rescue operation,

0:08:480:08:50

saying it's unlikely that more

survivors will be found.

0:08:500:08:53

The Iranian President Hassan Rouhani

has visited the affected area.

0:08:530:08:55

Richard Lister reports.

0:08:550:08:58

The earthquake shook

much of the Middle East,

0:08:580:09:01

but this is where it

did most damage.

0:09:010:09:04

Hundreds of people in Sarpol-e Zahab

lost their lives, tens

0:09:040:09:07

of thousands lost their homes.

0:09:070:09:10

Many of these buildings

were built by the

0:09:100:09:13

Government as cheap

housing after the war

0:09:130:09:16

with Iraq in the 1980s.

0:09:160:09:20

The question some

here are asking is why

0:09:200:09:22

did so many collapse in an area long

prone to earthquakes?

0:09:220:09:26

Visiting the town today,

Iran's president

0:09:260:09:29

pledged that anyone who'd failed

to follow proper building standards

0:09:290:09:32

would be held accountable but, for

now, he's focusing on the survivors.

0:09:320:09:39

TRANSLATION:

We'll provide tents

for those who need them,

0:09:390:09:43

and give loans and grants

to all those whose houses

0:09:430:09:45

were damaged and are unsafe.

0:09:450:09:46

We will give money

to everyone who needs

0:09:460:09:48

temporary accommodation.

0:09:480:09:51

An estimated 70,000 people

need emergency shelter.

0:09:510:09:55

Helicopters are bringing them

supplies, while many

0:09:550:09:57

roads are still blocked

by landslides.

0:09:570:10:00

The challenge is to keep these

survivors healthy as the

0:10:000:10:03

winter temperatures

continue to fall.

0:10:030:10:09

This is another challenge for

the authorities - the town's only

0:10:090:10:12

hospital was so badly

damaged it's unusable.

0:10:120:10:16

More than 1,000 of the injured

are being treated at

0:10:160:10:18

hospitals around the region.

0:10:180:10:23

They are far from

home and many won't

0:10:230:10:25

have houses to return to.

0:10:250:10:30

Across the border in Iraq,

hundreds were injured,

0:10:300:10:32

but only a handful were killed.

0:10:320:10:34

Aid agencies there

say they are ready to

0:10:340:10:36

assist Iran if needed.

0:10:360:10:39

In case of any need

from our Iranian...

0:10:390:10:42

Brothers, we will definitely

provide, across the border, the

0:10:420:10:47

support they ask for.

0:10:470:10:50

Sarpol-e Zahab had to be

rebuilt after the war with

0:10:500:10:52

Iraq.

0:10:520:10:54

Now it will have to be

rebuilt all over again.

0:10:540:10:56

Richard Lister, BBC News.

0:10:560:11:00

Inflation remained unchanged

last month at 3% -

0:11:000:11:04

a five-year high -

despite a rise in food prices.

0:11:040:11:08

Earlier this month, the Bank

of England raised interest rates

0:11:080:11:12

for the first time in a decade

to try to deal with the threat

0:11:120:11:15

of higher inflation.

0:11:150:11:16

Our Economics Correspondent

Andy Verity reports.

0:11:160:11:21

Upward pressure on prices. This

Bristol-based manufacturer makes

0:11:210:11:25

high-pressure safety valves used in

everything from refrigeration to

0:11:250:11:29

transport. The raw materials it uses

that once passed through Bristol's

0:11:290:11:33

nearby docks have to be bought in

foreign currencies, from the Euro to

0:11:330:11:37

the dollar. Because of the weaker

pound, you need more to buy the same

0:11:370:11:42

amount of copper to make the valves.

We have seen a 37% increase in raw

0:11:420:11:47

material prices since January of

last year. That is a really

0:11:470:11:53

substantial issue for us. That is

about, two thirds of that, is

0:11:530:11:59

weakness of the pound and one third

of that is caused by commodity price

0:11:590:12:05

changes, increases.

The company

can't risk passing on those higher

0:12:050:12:09

costs to its customers, saw its

profits being squeezed.

0:12:090:12:20

Meanwhile the workers face higher

prices on the supermarket shelves.

0:12:200:12:23

Cost of living goes up,

cost of things in shops, food etc.

0:12:230:12:30

We do seem to stay

at a certain level.

0:12:300:12:35

Your paying with the same

money than in the

0:12:350:12:37

past.

0:12:370:12:39

Spending more.

0:12:390:12:41

3% inflation might

not seem too high,

0:12:410:12:42

but then you see what is driving

it, food and clothing.

0:12:420:12:45

And low income households

spend more of their money

0:12:450:12:47

on those items, so they are hit

harder in this new bout of

0:12:470:12:50

inflation.

0:12:500:12:51

The overall rate of inflation

was 3.0%, slightly less

0:12:510:12:53

than expected, but food and soft

drinks rose by 4.1%, the fastest

0:12:530:12:56

rise for four years.

0:12:560:13:00

However, there are some

signs that inflationary

0:13:000:13:05

pressure is easing with the raw

materials at more than 8% in

0:13:050:13:08

September, but less

than 5% in October.

0:13:080:13:11

The reason why inflation rose

is principally down to the drop

0:13:110:13:14

in the value after the EU referendum

and we do not expect the pound to

0:13:140:13:18

fall dramatically

further, not to the same

0:13:180:13:28

extent and what that

means is that what

0:13:280:13:35

probably close to the peak inflation

as a result of that fall

0:13:350:13:39

in the value of the pound.

0:13:390:13:45

Head teachers representing more

than 5,000 schools across England

0:13:450:13:47

have sent a joint letter

to the Chancellor,

0:13:470:13:49

Philip Hammond, warning

of inadequate funding.

0:13:490:13:51

They say they are increasingly

having to ask parents for donations.

0:13:510:13:56

The government has already promised

to move £1.3 billion

0:13:560:13:58

of education funding into schools.

0:13:580:14:00

But head teachers say they need

another £1.7 billion

0:14:000:14:02

of new money.

0:14:020:14:06

Evidence from a 'so-called' loyalist

0:14:060:14:07

supergrass will be used

against a man accused of murdering

0:14:070:14:10

two Catholic workmen 23 years ago.

0:14:100:14:11

Gary Convie and Eamon Fox were shot

dead as they sat eating lunch

0:14:110:14:14

in a car at a building site

in Belfast city centre in May 1994.

0:14:140:14:18

Chris Buckler reports.

0:14:180:14:19

Gary Haggerty was a leader within

the Ulster volunteer Force, a

0:14:190:14:24

notorious loyalist paramilitary

group, responsible for hundreds of

0:14:240:14:27

murders during years when conflict

and killings were only too common in

0:14:270:14:30

Northern Ireland. Haggerty was

responsible for some of them.

0:14:300:14:35

Earlier this year, he pleaded guilty

to more than 200 crimes, among them

0:14:350:14:41

shootings and kidnappings,

conspiracy to murder and directing

0:14:410:14:44

terrorism. He was given five life

sentences for the five murders he

0:14:440:14:49

admitted. But those jail terms will

be significantly reduced because

0:14:490:14:53

Haggerty has agreed to give evidence

against a former friend, James

0:14:530:14:57

Smith.

The reported suspect will be

prosecuted for the following

0:14:570:15:03

offences. The murder of Gary Convie,

the murder of Eamon Fox.

Gary Convie

0:15:030:15:11

and Eamon Fox were shot dead simply

because of their religion. They were

0:15:110:15:17

Catholic workmen, murdered in 1994

by the UVF, as they had lunch in

0:15:170:15:21

their car. The case will be what is

known as a supergrass trial a case

0:15:210:15:28

where the word of an offender is key

to the prosecution. There were a

0:15:280:15:32

series of them here in Belfast in

the 1980s. However, the system

0:15:320:15:36

collapsed because of concerns about

the credibility of the evidence

0:15:360:15:40

given by the so-called supergrasses.

The law was changed a decade ago to

0:15:400:15:46

begin safeguards for these kind of

offenders. The evidence is not

0:15:460:16:00

sufficient to prosecute killings by

more than a dozen other people.

0:16:000:16:06

Our top story this lunchtime...

0:16:060:16:11

Battles over Brexit wars begin as

MPs prepare to scrutinise the key

0:16:110:16:15

piece of legislation that will pave

the way for the UK's departure.

0:16:150:16:18

Coming up...

0:16:180:16:19

Remembering Paddington

creator Michael Bond -

0:16:190:16:21

the author who delighted generations

of children

0:16:210:16:24

Coming up in sport...

0:16:240:16:25

Not bothered by the

Aussies - Joe Root

0:16:250:16:27

says "bring it on" as he is singled

out by Australia ahead of the first

0:16:270:16:31

Ashes Test.

0:16:310:16:32

Arise, Sir Mo.

0:16:430:16:45

This morning the Olympic champion

went to Buckingham Palace

0:16:450:16:47

and received his knighthood

from the Queen.

0:16:470:16:50

He came to the UK from Somalia

as a young boy, and went

0:16:500:16:53

on to become Britain's

most decorated athlete.

0:16:530:16:56

This summer Sir Mo called time

on his track career to concentrate

0:16:560:16:59

on running marathons.

0:16:590:17:01

He's described the knighthood

as a dream come true.

0:17:010:17:06

Our sports correspondent

Richard Conway reports.

0:17:060:17:08

He is Britain's most

successful track athlete,

0:17:080:17:12

and after a career that has brought

four Olympic golds and six

0:17:120:17:15

World Championship medals,

today it was time to add

0:17:150:17:19

yet another title...

0:17:190:17:20

Sir Mohammed Farah,

for services to athletics.

0:17:200:17:23

With the Queen on hand to confer

Sir Mo's knighthood.

0:17:230:17:30

It is recognition for a career that

has scaled the heights.

0:17:300:17:33

Sir Mo is only the second athlete

in modern Olympic history to win

0:17:330:17:38

both the five and 10,000 metre

titles at successive Games.

0:17:380:17:42

This is definitely way up there.

0:17:420:17:44

Close to my Olympics

medals, for sure.

0:17:440:17:48

To, you know, to come

here to Britain at the age of eight,

0:17:480:17:51

not speaking a word of English,

and to achieve what I have

0:17:510:17:54

achieved over the years,

and to be knighted, it's just,

0:17:540:17:57

you know, there's no

word really to describe.

0:17:570:17:59

Well, a moment like this

in a sports star's career,

0:17:590:18:01

with a visit to the Palace

and a shiny medal normally indicates

0:18:010:18:04

the end of their career.

0:18:040:18:06

Not so in this case.

0:18:060:18:07

Sir Mo has plans for his future,

albeit with a slightly

0:18:070:18:10

different focus.

0:18:100:18:16

She asked if I was retiring and I

said no, I am going into the roads.

0:18:160:18:21

She said that as far too long. I

said it is. She was like, you have

0:18:210:18:26

been going for too long as well.

Something like that. She asked what

0:18:260:18:30

I would like to do when I stopped

running and I said I would like to

0:18:300:18:34

help the next generation of kids get

involved.

0:18:340:18:37

A switch to the roads

and marathons now awaits,

0:18:370:18:39

with the prospect he may compete

for Britain at the Tokyo

0:18:390:18:42

Olympics in 2020.

0:18:420:18:43

And having recently split

from his controversial

0:18:430:18:45

coach Alberto Salazar,

who remains under investigation

0:18:450:18:46

by US authorities, Sir Mo is also

returning to live in London.

0:18:460:18:50

It is a city that in 2012 bore

witness to his ascent

0:18:500:18:53

to the peak of world athletics,

and that now celebrates

0:18:530:18:55

a momentous career.

0:18:550:18:58

Richard Conway, BBC News,

Buckingham Palace.

0:18:580:19:02

There's been a big rise

in the number of people who've had

0:19:020:19:05

bailiffs knocking at their door

in England and Wales,

0:19:050:19:07

according to a charity.

0:19:070:19:09

The Money Advice Trust says bailiffs

were brought in by local authorities

0:19:090:19:11

to collect debts more

than two million times in a year -

0:19:110:19:14

that's a rise of 14% over two years.

0:19:140:19:19

The charity says it's

deeply worrying.

0:19:190:19:21

Our personal finance correspondent

Simon Gompertz reports.

0:19:210:19:26

It is upsetting,

sometimes frightening.

0:19:260:19:28

Bailiffs have the power to seize

certain possessions if you let

0:19:280:19:31

them into your home,

or if they find a way in.

0:19:310:19:35

You're on my property.

0:19:350:19:37

I'm not trespassing,

I was sent here by the courts.

0:19:370:19:39

Daniel Bostock in Nottinghamshire

filmed bailiffs trying

0:19:390:19:41

to enforce parking fines

he thought were unfair.

0:19:410:19:45

Have a nice day, chaps.

0:19:450:19:47

I thought, I'm not paying this.

0:19:490:19:51

I've got principles,

I've not caused a hazard,

0:19:510:19:53

I've not interrupted anybody's

rights of access, I've not

0:19:530:19:55

interrupted the flow of commerce,

I've not caused a hazard.

0:19:550:20:00

They usually make two visits,

face-to-face visits, the bailiffs.

0:20:000:20:04

And who are the top users?

0:20:040:20:06

Not banks or credit card companies,

but councils - up 10%.

0:20:060:20:11

Getting bailiffs to enforce council

tax debts, that's the biggest one.

0:20:110:20:14

Up 27% giving bailiffs

parking fines to deal with,

0:20:140:20:18

and bailiffs retrieving overpaid

housing benefit, that is up 20%.

0:20:180:20:23

You can imagine a knock

on the door from the bailiff,

0:20:230:20:26

especially if you have small

children, is distressing.

0:20:260:20:28

We hear about sleepless nights.

0:20:280:20:29

And it's adding to the cost

of debts, because the bailiffs' fees

0:20:290:20:32

are simply added on.

0:20:320:20:34

We think councils should be

trying more progressive

0:20:340:20:36

ways of collecting debt,

as other sectors are doing.

0:20:360:20:43

It's an easy option for councils

to send bailiffs to your door.

0:20:430:20:46

The fees are £75 for the initial

letter, that is added to your debt,

0:20:460:20:50

then £235 for the visit and £110

for selling your possessions.

0:20:500:20:59

But councils say elderly

care has to be paid for,

0:20:590:21:03

as well as services for vulnerable

children and things

0:21:030:21:05

like collecting rubbish.

0:21:050:21:07

They have a duty, they say,

to raise the money they can.

0:21:070:21:10

Simon Gompertz, BBC News.

0:21:100:21:11

Motorists should be forced

to have their eyes tested

0:21:150:21:18

every ten years, according

to the Association of Optometrists.

0:21:180:21:20

They say too many people who've

been told their eyesight

0:21:200:21:23

isn't good enough are still driving.

0:21:230:21:26

Their campaign is being backed

by the family of Natalie Wade,

0:21:260:21:28

who was killed by a partially

sighted driver.

0:21:280:21:31

Ali Fortescue reports.

0:21:310:21:33

If she walked into a room,

as the saying goes, she lit it up.

0:21:330:21:38

She enjoyed every moment

and was so looking forward

0:21:380:21:40

to getting married.

0:21:400:21:44

28-year-old Natalie Wade died

on her way to buy a wedding dress.

0:21:440:21:47

She was hit by a 78-year-old

driver with poor eyesight.

0:21:470:21:50

There's always an empty chair,

and Christmas, birthdays,

0:21:500:21:53

the day she would have been married,

they are still very painful.

0:21:530:22:00

The driver who killed Natalie

was blind in one eye and partially

0:22:000:22:02

sighted in the other,

but he died before being tried

0:22:020:22:05

for dangerous driving.

0:22:050:22:07

But Natalie is just one of 70 people

who are killed or seriously injured

0:22:070:22:10

in similar incidents involving bad

eyesight last year.

0:22:100:22:14

The legal standard for eyesight

involves being able to read a number

0:22:140:22:17

plate from 20 metres,

but that's something that's

0:22:170:22:19

only tested when you

first take your test.

0:22:190:22:22

At the moment, everyone needs

to fill out a form like this every

0:22:220:22:25

ten years to renew their driving

license and that involves answering

0:22:250:22:28

a question about their eyesight

and if you're over the age of 70,

0:22:280:22:31

you have to fill out

a slightly more comprehensive

0:22:310:22:33

form every three years,

but it's still a question of just

0:22:330:22:36

putting a tick in a box,

there's no requirement to take

0:22:360:22:38

an actual eye test.

0:22:380:22:40

The mechanism of self reporting

isn't always reliable.

0:22:400:22:44

We know that vision can change

gradually over time,

0:22:440:22:48

so drivers might not be aware

of a deterioration to their vision.

0:22:480:22:54

The Association of Optometrists

don't have a legal requirement to do

0:22:540:22:56

anything if they're concerned

about a patient's driving -

0:22:560:22:59

it's down to the driver.

0:22:590:23:01

More than one in three

of their optometrists surveyed have

0:23:010:23:04

seen a driver in the last month

who continues to drive

0:23:040:23:06

despite being told their vision

is below the legal standard.

0:23:060:23:09

Nine in ten of them

believe the current sight

0:23:090:23:12

tests are insufficient

0:23:120:23:13

and they want to see a change

in the law.

0:23:130:23:16

What we're calling for is vision

screening to be carried out

0:23:160:23:17

The Department for Transport say

that all drivers are required by law

0:23:210:23:24

to make sure their eyesight is good

enough to drive.

0:23:240:23:27

They also say that if a driver

experiences any changes

0:23:270:23:29

to their eyesight or has a condition

that could affect their driving

0:23:290:23:32

they must notify the DVLA

and speak to an optician.

0:23:320:23:34

Ali Fortescue, BBC News.

0:23:340:23:36

It's time to dig out any old £10

notes, because from March first next

0:23:360:23:39

year they will cease

to be legal tender.

0:23:390:23:41

The decision follows

the introduction of the plastic

0:23:410:23:43

replacement in September.

0:23:430:23:45

The paper notes can still be spent

ahead of the cut-off date,

0:23:450:23:48

but after that must be exchanged

at a bank.

0:23:480:23:52

Now have a look at this.

0:23:520:23:53

It's the largest diamond of its kind

ever to be sold publicly,

0:23:530:23:56

and it goes under the hammer

in Geneva tonight.

0:23:560:23:59

It was found in Angola last year.

0:23:590:24:01

It has taken ten months to cut it.

0:24:010:24:04

It's 163 carats, and has no flaws.

0:24:040:24:07

And, not surprisingly,

it's expected to fetch

0:24:070:24:10

an awful lot of money -

around £22 million.

0:24:100:24:16

Italy is in a state of shock.

0:24:160:24:18

For the first time in 60

years their national team will not

0:24:180:24:21

be at football's World Cup finals.

0:24:210:24:23

Last night they lost

a play-off to Sweden,

0:24:230:24:25

who beat them 1-0 over two legs.

0:24:250:24:29

Our sports correspondent Olly Foster

reports on joy for Sweden

0:24:290:24:31

but heartbreak for Italy.

0:24:310:24:37

Despair and disbelief -

generations of Italian players have

0:24:370:24:39

taken it for granted.

0:24:390:24:40

Every four years they

go to the World Cup.

0:24:400:24:43

Next summer will be strange.

0:24:430:24:45

Spaghetti without the bolognese.

0:24:450:24:48

The headlines in Italy today

described the team's demise as

0:24:480:24:50

an apocalypse, a disaster.

0:24:500:24:53

A national shame,

the fans last night

0:24:530:24:55

had already come to that conclusion.

0:24:550:24:58

TRANSLATION:

What can I say?

0:24:580:25:00

We were pathetic, we were terrible.

0:25:000:25:04

Italy not qualifying

for the World Cup is

0:25:040:25:06

an embarrassment, an embarrassment.

0:25:060:25:09

TRANSLATION:

They really played

so badly, I've come miles to

0:25:090:25:12

see this match and they

lost against Sweden.

0:25:120:25:21

Thanks a bunch!

They finished second behind Spain in

0:25:210:25:28

their qualifying group.

0:25:280:25:29

Italy had these two play-off matches

against Sweden to make it to

0:25:290:25:32

Russia, even after their one-nil

defeat in Stockholm last week in the

0:25:320:25:35

first week they were favourites

to progress in Milan.

0:25:350:25:37

It was a desperate call this

night for the Italians.

0:25:370:25:39

-- a desperate, goalless night.

Their manager, John Pierre

0:25:390:25:44

adventurer, has two years left on

his contract and is not expected to

0:25:440:25:47

see at the week.

0:25:470:25:50

TRANSLATION:

I have to apologise

for this result, certainly

0:25:500:25:52

not because of the commitment,

the will of the players,

0:25:520:25:54

but because of the

0:25:540:25:55

result, that is the main

thing, I know it.

0:25:550:25:58

Only Brazil have won the World Cup

more times than Italy, the Azurri

0:25:580:26:01

lifted their fourth trophy in 2006,

a member of that team, Buffon,

0:26:010:26:04

won his 175th cap last night.

0:26:040:26:11

It was his last.

0:26:110:26:12

He described his 20 years of service

as a beautiful journey.

0:26:120:26:16

Sweden's journey continues

to their first World Cup

0:26:160:26:18

since the year Italy last won it.

0:26:180:26:22

An historic night for them

when they crashed what was

0:26:220:26:24

supposed to be an Italian party.

0:26:240:26:31

Olly Foster, BBC News.

0:26:310:26:35

A memorial service has been held

at St Paul's Cathedral this

0:26:350:26:38

morning for Michael Bond,

the man who created Paddington Bear.

0:26:380:26:40

Hugh Bonneville - who stars

in the Paddington films -

0:26:400:26:43

was among the hundreds of guests

at the service.

0:26:430:26:46

Michael Bond, who wrote more

than 200 books, died in June.

0:26:460:26:48

Our arts correspondent

David Sillito is at St Paul's.

0:26:480:26:56

Michael Bond first started writing

when he was in the Army in the

0:26:560:26:59

1940s. 13 years after that, one

evening, looking for inspiration, he

0:26:590:27:04

looked to a shelf and saw a forlorn

little bear he had bought one

0:27:040:27:11

Christmas Eve. 60 years after that

evening, St Paul's Cathedral has

0:27:110:27:14

celebrated the life of the creator

of Paddington Bear.

0:27:140:27:20

Dear friends, we are gathered here

in this Cathedral church to give

0:27:200:27:24

thanks to God for the life and work

of Michael Bond. So let us give

0:27:240:27:32

thanks for a bear called Paddington,

who fitted our world is perfectly,

0:27:320:27:37

because he was different.

Generations have grown up with

0:27:370:27:43

Michael Bond's characters, and today

some of his most devoted readers

0:27:430:27:46

were here for the memorial service.

Amongst the reading is one, of

0:27:460:27:51

course, from... A bear called

Paddington, read by his

0:27:510:27:58

granddaughter, Robin.

Paddington

removed his hat and laid it

0:27:580:28:03

carefully on the table.

Michael himself was a gentle, kind,

0:28:030:28:07

polite, friendly man. Not allowed,

not boisterous, not like most of us.

0:28:070:28:14

He was a really decent soul, a

lovable man in the way that

0:28:140:28:20

Paddington is a lovable, polite bear

and raises his hat.

0:28:200:28:23

It is more than a memorial, it is a

celebration of bodies. The values of

0:28:230:28:29

a friendly, polite young bear from

darkest Peru. -- it is a celebration

0:28:290:28:34

of values.

Would you excuse a moment?

And from

0:28:340:28:42

Paddington's latest on-screen

adventures, a reading of tributes by

0:28:420:28:45

another admirer of the little bear,

Hugh Bonneville.

0:28:450:28:49

I love Paddington Bear as much today

as I did as a child in the 70s.

0:28:490:28:54

We can all identify with him, we

have been a stranger in a strange

0:28:540:28:58

place trying to fit in, in a new

school, a new town, a new country.

0:28:580:29:04

Over and above that, his spirit of

adventure, his optimism, resetting

0:29:040:29:09

the doughty positive when things go

wrong, and they always do, I think

0:29:090:29:14

there is a great characteristic for

us to latch onto.

0:29:140:29:18

A memorial and a celebration of both

the writer and a polite and

0:29:180:29:26

thoroughly decent little bear from

darkest Peru.

0:29:260:29:31

Among the tributes today, one caught

my eye. It was from a woman who was

0:29:310:29:35

a student in France and when she

first arrived there, she said, not

0:29:350:29:39

knowing anyone, I found myself

sitting on the pavement with my

0:29:390:29:42

suitcase, feeling very sorry for

myself. But then thought, Paddington

0:29:420:29:47

managed it, so shall I.

Sophie. David, thank you.

0:29:470:29:51

Time for a look at the weather.

0:29:510:29:53

Here's Phil Avery.

0:29:530:29:53

Here's Phil Avery.

0:29:530:29:56

I know what it is like not to have

many fronts, as a weather forecaster

0:29:560:30:01

of many years standing.

Aaah, all together now! Generally

0:30:010:30:06

speaking there is a lot of cloud

across the British Isles, much of

0:30:060:30:11

its height, some other just about

thinking of two bridges the odd bit

0:30:110:30:14

abuse of rain. You get the odd sense

that there will be break this to the

0:30:140:30:19

eastern side of the Pennines, parts

of Scotland doing well. The only

0:30:190:30:22

other thing you need to note is the

afternoon is not cold, double-figure

0:30:220:30:26

temperatures rule the roost. Not a

great deal changes over the evening

0:30:260:30:31

and into the night. You might pick

up more rain than through the day

0:30:310:30:35

that it will not ever amount to very

much at all, not a cold night

0:30:350:30:39

either, eight to about 11, 12 of 13.

My real concern about the night is

0:30:390:30:45

there could be some holes in that

cloud, and as a consequence in dense

0:30:450:30:50

fog patches. The word patches is the

really relevant one. Just because

0:30:500:30:54

you step out first thing, if you are

travelling a distance you might move

0:30:540:30:58

into one of those areas that will

see them. My sense could be part of

0:30:580:31:04

East Anglia, Lincolnshire, Southern

Wales, some spots in the Midlands

0:31:040:31:08

and perhaps into Northern Ireland,

gaps appearing here overnight, parts

0:31:080:31:12

of central and southern Scotland. By

that in mind, because after much

0:31:120:31:16

rather dull start, I am hopeful that

the day, once it gets going, could

0:31:160:31:20

brighten up quite nicely in one or

two spots and with the breeze coming

0:31:200:31:25

somewhere out of the south-west for

the most part, it will not be a cold

0:31:250:31:29

day again.

Single figure temperatures across

0:31:290:31:41

the north, South, 12 or 13 degrees

or so is not too buyer for the time

0:31:420:31:45

of year. For that we have to thank

the fact that we are sandwiched in a

0:31:450:31:48

wedge of relatively mild as, with

the breeze coming in from the

0:31:480:31:51

south-west, such as it is. Not 1

million miles away towards the

0:31:510:31:53

north-west of us, cold air, becoming

a bit of a player as we move into

0:31:530:31:57

Wednesday into Thursday. The feature

that introduces that colder air to

0:31:570:32:00

many of us is this cold fronts. The

morning works to Scotland and the

0:32:000:32:06

morning, it will feel fresh and the

skies will brighten, but the

0:32:060:32:10

temperatures will dip away. Not

freezing by any means, but fresher,

0:32:100:32:18

which introduces us to Friday, where

all parts of the British Isles have

0:32:180:32:23

a much fresher regime. Windy across

0:32:230:32:26