22/02/2018 BBC News at One


22/02/2018

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Theresa May holds crucial talks

with ministers to agree

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a united approach to Brexit.

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Senior ministers are at Chequers

this afternoon as the Prime Minister

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tries to get Cabinet

consensus on Brexit.

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We'll have the very latest

from our correspondent at Chequers.

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Also this lunchtime: The number

of EU citizens leaving the UK

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is at its highest for a decade.

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President Trump suggests giving

guns to some teachers

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as he meets survivors

of the Florida school shooting.

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Scientists say anti-depressants

do work, and more of

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us should be on them.

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And up, up and away

at the Winter Olympics -

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it's gold for America in the men's

skiing half pipe.

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And coming up in the

sport on BBC News...

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Team GB's men are out of the curling

at the Winter Olympics.

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The silver medallists from four

years ago lost 9-5 to Switzerland

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in their play-off match.

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Hello, welcome to the news out on.

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There's a crucial meeting this

afternoon of the government's

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inner cabinet on Brexit.

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The Prime Minister is holding talks

with senior ministers at Chequers,

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in an attempt to secure a common

approach on Britain's negotiating

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position with the European Union.

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The meeting begins in an hour,

but with significant

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differences to be resolved,

it could go on until

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late into the evening.

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Here's our political

correspondent, Chris Mason.

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The official country residence of

British prime ministers since 1921.

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Checkers in the Buckinghamshire

countryside, hosting a meeting of

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the Government's most senior figures

involved in making Brexit happen.

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The chance for them to work out what

they see our long-term relationship

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with the EU looking like.

Questions

to the Secretary of State for

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International Trade.

Back at

Westminster, Brexit dominates

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everything. Liam Fox faced questions

this morning, as did the Prime

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Minister's de facto deputy, who

tried to talk things down.

This is

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one of a number of meetings of

Cabinet ministers to talk through

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how we approach the forthcoming

negotiations. Obviously everybody

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brings their particular departmental

interests to the table but if you

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look at what happened back before

the December European summit there

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was a lot of speculation the Cabinet

would not reach agreement. We all

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agreed the position the Prime

Minister took to Brussels and got a

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successful outcome and we are

determined to get the best possible

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deal.

But there are continuing rows

about precisely how long the

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transition period immediately after

Brexit next year should be. And

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crucially there are differences of

instinct around the Cabinet table

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about what the UK's long-term

relationship with the EU after

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Brexit should look like and those

differences won't melt away easily.

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The Prime Minister has got to keep

Brexiteer backbenchers onside.

The

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Brexit Cabinet all fought the last

election on a manifesto of leaving

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the European Union and that's

basically what they are talking

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about, the structure as to how we do

that. The Prime Minister enunciated

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yesterday the main principles about

taking back control of our laws and

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money, leaving the single market and

customs union.

Labour has faced

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criticism is itself about a lack of

clarity about what it wants but is

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now saying...

We have been evolving

and deepening our policy over the

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last few months. The key issue is to

say to the Government you got to

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have the transition period of these

two years, but also for the

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long-term look at the potential of a

customs union.

The cameras won't get

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much closer to checkers than this

today. Spectacular views, yes, but

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don't expect spectacular political

theatre. The process of negotiating

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Brexit and home -- at home and

abroad is a slow and grinding on.

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Our Political Correspondent Alex

Forsyth is at Chequers.

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How important is this meeting?

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It is pretty crucial because, as

Chris was outlining, the whole point

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of it is to try to get some

agreement among Theresa May's top

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team about what the long-term

relationship between the UK and the

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EU will be. The tricky aspect of

that is trade. The Prime Minister

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has been clear it's her view of the

UK will be leaving the single market

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and customs union. The question is

what kind of trading relationship

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replaces that and crucially how

closely aligned the UK will state of

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the EU with its

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rules and regulations, and what it

is prepared to trade off in terms of

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the UK's own sovereignty in order to

gain access to the markets. The

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difficulty is there are

significantly different views about

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that, not just between parties but

between the ministers who will be

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meeting here today. Some of course

whom campaigned for Brexit, some of

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whom wanted the UK to stay in the

European Union. This meeting this

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afternoon could be tricky, could be

very long, and they will have to try

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to agree some sort of compromise. We

may get detail later about what that

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looks like but we are also expecting

a speech from the Prime Minister

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next week outlining what the UK

hopes to achieve. When they get

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through the negotiations here, once

they agree what they want, they have

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to agree it with Brussels too.

Alex,

thank you.

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The EU appears to have rejected

a key British proposal

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for the future relationship

after Brexit, according

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to documents published

by the European Commission.

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Our reporter Adam Fleming has

been looking at them.

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Adam, what has the EU been saying?

A

couple of weeks ago EU officials

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have a private meeting to discuss

this proposal put forward by the

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British government, that you have

some areas where the UK keeps EU

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rules and regulations, other areas

of the economy where they have the

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same goal but get there using

different rules and regulations, and

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areas where things are totally

different between the two. A

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document published last night shows

the European Commission's Brexit

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negotiators said that concept would

be incompatible with the EU ground

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rules for Brexit which are all about

protecting the integrity of the

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single market, the internal market

as they call it here in Brussels.

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This morning a senior EU diplomat

said it looks like the UK was trying

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to pick bits of the single market it

liked and reject bits it didn't like

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which to them is not an acceptable

course of action. This meeting at

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Chequers today is all about the UK

agreeing an opening position for the

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next phase of Brexit talks which is

all about trade and the future

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relationship. If we have learned

anything about the process,

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anything about the process, all of

these meetings here with Michel

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Barnier and David Davies are about

finding a compromise between the

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British and Brussels position which

they are happy with in Brussels and

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end up being happy with in Britain.

Adam, thank you.

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The number of European Union

nationals leaving the UK

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is at its highest level

for a decade.

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New figures show that 130,000

EU nationals emigrated

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in the year to last September.

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Our home affairs correspondent

Danny Shaw is here.

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Danny, how significant

are these statistics?

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These figures from the office for

National Statistics appear to

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indicate to me is certainly that

Brexit is having an impact on

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whether EU nationals want to live in

the UK. If you look at the

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referendum June 2016, since then

every quarter these figures are

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published there's been a drop in the

number of EU nationals coming to

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live here and there's been a rise in

the number of EU citizens leaving

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Britain. The latest numbers we have

got, 130,000 people leaving, that's

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the highest since 2008, and 220,000

arriving, the lowest for almost four

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years. At the same time we are

seeing a rise in the number of

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people from outside Europe coming to

Britain, the highest number since

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September 2011. What does this do

for the controversial target to cut

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net migration, the difference

between overall numbers coming and

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leaving to less than 100,000? They

are still way off that target at 240

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4000.

Danny, thank you very much

indeed.

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The UK economy expanded by less

than previously thought in the final

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three months of last year,

official figures reveal.

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Gross domestic product -

or GDP - grew by 0.4%

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in the October-to-December period,

down from the initial

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estimate of 0.5%.

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The Office for National Statistics

said the downgrade was due to slower

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growth in production industries.

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Donald Trump has suggested that

giving guns to some teachers

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would stop massacres like last

week's high school shooting

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in Florida, in which 17 pupils

and staff were killed.

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The president said teachers

with firearms training could have

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concealed weapons in the classroom.

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His comments came as he met

survivors of the Florida massacre

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and other shootings.

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Barbara Plett-Usher

reports from Florida.

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The people demand a hearing.

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In Florida telling their lawmakers

loud and clear, they don't want this

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mass shooting to drop off

the political agenda

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like all the others have.

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At the White House, President Trump

was listening, to victims

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of the Parkland school attack,

but also those that came before it.

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Andrew Pollack's 18-year-old

daughter Meadow was

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killed last week.

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It doesn't make sense, fix it,

should have been one school shooting

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and we should have fixed it.

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And I'm kissed.

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Because my daughter I'm

not going to see again.

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She's not here, she's not here.

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She's in North Lauderdale

at whatever it is,

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King David Cemetery,

that's where I go to see my kid now.

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It doesn't make sense

to her schoolmate Samuel Zeif

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either, especially the gunman's

access to a semiautomatic rifle.

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I don't understand.

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I turned 18 the day after,

woke up to the news that my best

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friend was gone and I don't

understand why I could still go

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in a store and buy a weapon of war.

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The president has responded to calls

for tougher gun laws with promises

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of strong background checks,

but also more guns.

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It's called concealed

carry, where a teacher

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would have a concealed gun on them.

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They'd go for special training.

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They would be there and you would no

longer have a gun-free zone.

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There is some support for that

argument, but students who survived

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the attack flooded Florida's state

legislature, demanding a ban

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on assault rifles.

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Lawmakers may make it harder

for a teenager to buy one,

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but not more than that.

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ALL:

Never again!

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Still, that's movement

in an unmoving debate.

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The students aim to harness that

momentum and turn it

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into a national campaign.

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This feels like something new.

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The students seem to

have captured a moment.

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They're giving a face and a voice

to widespread anger and frustration

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about mass shootings.

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But whether their movement has

the power to bring real

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change will be the story

of the coming months.

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Barbara Plett-Usher, BBC News,

Tallahassee, Florida.

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Our Correspondent Gary O'Donghue

is in Maryland where

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later today the head

of the National Rifle Association

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is making his first speech

since the Florida school shooting.

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Gary, what's he likely to say?

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That is interesting because the NRA

has a pattern of these things, when

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the shootings happened. It goes very

quiet in the immediate aftermath of

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that and that's exactly what's

happened this time. This will be the

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first public comments by the head of

the NRA since the Parkland shooting

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and there's a lot of things for him

to address. There is pressure for

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example for a ban on assault rifles,

something they won't support at all.

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There is pressure to raise the age

at which you can buy such guns,

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that's one of the suggestions in the

Florida house at the moment. Then

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there's the question of what you do

about people with mental health

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problems and their access to guns.

He will be talking among friends,

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this is a right-wing conference so

he will I think get a lot of support

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here. But bear in mind his

organisation is extraordinarily

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powerful. It spends a lot of money

lobbying and politically giving

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money to congressmen for their runs

and they know that. In terms of the

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president himself, he is saying this

morning it does have to be the time

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when teachers get guns in ordered to

stop what he calls sickos shooting

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in schools.

Thank you.

0:14:080:14:11

The United Nations Security Council

will today consider a resolution

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calling for a ceasefire in Syria.

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It comes as government

forces in the country

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continue their intense bombardment

of the rebel enclave

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of Eastern Ghouta,

on the outskirts of Damascus.

0:14:190:14:21

The UN have described

the enclave as "hell on earth",

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and in the last few days hundreds

of civilians, including many

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children, have been killed there.

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This report from Paul Adams does

include some distressing images.

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A massacre, hell on earth, a

monstrous campaign of annihilation.

0:14:380:14:44

The world is running out of ways to

describe what's happening in eastern

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Ghouta, but the bombs are still

falling and the toll is dreadful.

0:14:490:14:55

And medical facilities are not being

spread. This Children's Hospital now

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wrapped.

TRANSLATION:

The clinical care and

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surgery unit is out, the incubator

unit is out, the paediatric section

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is out. All of the departments of

hospital are out of service, the

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destruction is total.

Elsewhere

medical staff tried desperately to

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keep up with hundreds of casualties.

The siege of eastern Ghouta began

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five years ago. The situation was

intolerable long before this

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terrible week.

TRANSLATION:

These are hopeless

0:15:300:15:37

cases, there's nothing we can do to

save them. These victims have

0:15:370:15:41

suffered head and brain injuries.

This one has stopped breathing. I'm

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worried about this boy too, both

need intensive care but we cannot

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operate because the bombing is

relentless.

Where are the Arabs?

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Where are the Muslims? Do we have to

appeal to Israel instead to help?

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Shame on you, this is just a little

boy who wants freedom. Why are you

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doing this? I don't know what to do.

Can any of this be stopped through

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diplomacy? The UN wants a ceasefire

and there's a meeting at the UN

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Security Council this afternoon, but

in Geneva its envoy for Syria

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doesn't sound optimistic.

Comment on whether you think there

0:16:310:16:34

will be a deal today on a ceasefire

resolution?

I hope it will, but it

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is uphill, it is very urgent.

If

there isn't one, what happens?

We

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will have to push for it to take

place as soon as possible because

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there is no alternative to a

ceasefire and humanitarian access.

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Russia says the real blame lies with

terrorists firing out of Ghouta into

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the capital. Jihadi fighters

including some connected with

0:17:000:17:03

Al-Qaeda have been active in the

area since the siege began. This for

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President Assad is about securing

Damascus, there's no immediate sign

0:17:070:17:12

of him stopping. Britain is halfway

towards its target of resettling the

0:17:120:17:22

most vulnerable refugees from the

Syrian civil war. The Home Secretary

0:17:220:17:26

says 10,000 refugees have already

come here and she's looking to see

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what to do after the scheme ends in

two years' time. Daniel Sandford

0:17:290:17:33

reports.

0:17:330:17:36

Far from the horrors

of the war in Syria,

0:17:360:17:39

we found Khaled Kara Hasan playing

football in his garden in Coventry

0:17:390:17:41

with his sons, Mahmood and Zid.

0:17:410:17:43

His family are some of the 10,000

people now given refuge in Britain

0:17:430:17:46

under the vulnerable person

resettlement scheme.

0:17:460:17:47

Khaled, who was a pharmacy

assistant in Syria, now works

0:17:470:17:50

part-time in Waitrose.

0:17:500:17:52

He told me he fled Homs in 2012

after Syrian government forces

0:17:520:17:56

bombed first his neighbourhood

and then a second area,

0:17:560:17:58

where he'd taken refuge.

0:17:580:18:01

I decided with my family

to leave Syria, Turkey,

0:18:010:18:07

because I like my family.

0:18:070:18:10

To protect them.

0:18:100:18:12

I remember my brothers,

I remember my friend, my neighbours.

0:18:120:18:19

Here it's more safe, more safe,

but in Syria it's like,

0:18:230:18:29

you know in Syria it's

like fighting, but it's

0:18:290:18:33

still my country.

0:18:330:18:36

You miss it a bit, yeah?

0:18:360:18:37

Yeah.

0:18:370:18:39

But the old Syria is gone.

0:18:390:18:40

This mobile phone footage sent

by a friend shows what their flat

0:18:400:18:43

in Homs looks like today.

0:18:430:18:46

The scheme to resettle refugees

from Syria is overseen

0:18:460:18:52

by the Home Secretary,

Amber Rudd, who was in a camp

0:18:520:18:55

in Lebanon this week.

0:18:550:18:56

The UK has promised to give homes

to 20,000 of the most vulnerable

0:18:560:18:59

by the end of 2020 and is now

halfway to that target.

0:18:590:19:05

I think that the British public can

be very proud of that,

0:19:050:19:08

proud of the fact they've been able

to reach that commitment,

0:19:080:19:10

that these families are being

resettled in the community

0:19:100:19:13

and are being looked after.

0:19:130:19:15

But campaigners say Britain

could still be doing much more.

0:19:150:19:19

There are more than 5 million

Syrian refugees living

0:19:190:19:22

in neighbouring countries,

some in terrible conditions.

0:19:220:19:26

Like this woman, who has

three children under ten

0:19:260:19:28

and whose husband is missing.

0:19:280:19:31

A couple of years ago she had

the chance to go to Germany.

0:19:310:19:37

I was afraid at the time,

as my children were still young,

0:19:370:19:40

so I declined the offer,

she told the BBC.

0:19:400:19:43

With a return to Syria

still impossible, it's a decision

0:19:430:19:45

she now bitterly regrets.

0:19:450:19:48

Daniel Sandford, BBC News.

0:19:480:19:55

Our top story this lunchtime.

0:19:550:19:58

Theresa May is holding crucial

talks with her ministers

0:19:580:20:01

at Chequers this afternoon,

to agree a united approach

0:20:010:20:03

for the Brexit negotiations.

0:20:030:20:06

And still to come.

0:20:060:20:08

More disappointment for Team GB

in the Winter Olympics -

0:20:080:20:10

men's curling is the latest to be

knocked out, with the skipper

0:20:100:20:16

Coming up in sport...

0:20:160:20:17

Mercedes reveal their new car

for the Formula One season.

0:20:170:20:19

Lewis Hamilton says he'll quickly

get used to the new halo

0:20:190:20:22

designed to protect drivers.

0:20:220:20:28

New research shows

antidepressants are effective -

0:20:330:20:36

and that many more people

could benefit from taking them.

0:20:360:20:39

The study, in the medical journal

the Lancet, found 21 common

0:20:390:20:43

antidepressants were more effective

than placebos at reducing symptoms

0:20:430:20:47

of acute depression.

0:20:470:20:48

Here's our health correspondent,

James Gallagher.

0:20:480:20:53

How did the chicken cross the road?

0:20:530:20:55

Comedian Christian Talbot makes

a career out of making people laugh.

0:20:550:20:59

..to feel safe.

0:20:590:21:02

But off the stage he takes

antidepressants in order to get

0:21:020:21:04

from one day to the next.

0:21:040:21:08

It did feel literally

like a weight off my shoulders.

0:21:080:21:11

I was less anxious.

0:21:110:21:13

And I sort of felt just more even,

you know, not happy, but even.

0:21:130:21:19

Antidepressants are some of our most

commonly-used drugs.

0:21:190:21:23

64 million prescriptions were handed

out in England in 2016 and, yet,

0:21:230:21:27

they are the source of huge debate.

0:21:270:21:31

So many people take antidepressants

that it seems remarkable

0:21:310:21:34

there could be serious questions

about whether they work,

0:21:340:21:37

but some trials have hinted

they have no affect,

0:21:370:21:40

and for the fiercest critics,

antidepressants are snake oil.

0:21:400:21:46

But scientists think

they have finally answered

0:21:460:21:47

the question in a huge study.

0:21:470:21:50

They analysed more than 500 clinical

trials, including previously

0:21:500:21:52

unpublished data held

by drug companies.

0:21:520:21:57

We found that all the most commonly

prescribed antidepressants work

0:21:570:22:02

for major depression and for people

with moderate to severe depression

0:22:020:22:08

and also we found that some of them

are more effective than others,

0:22:080:22:12

or better tolerated than others.

0:22:120:22:16

The study assessed whether these

drugs are effective

0:22:160:22:18

in the short term.

0:22:180:22:21

More work is underway to see how

long any benefits last.

0:22:210:22:23

However, there are still

patients that don't respond

0:22:230:22:26

to any form of treatment.

0:22:260:22:29

The patient can be reassured that

if they need antidepressants

0:22:290:22:31

and they take antidepressants

they are doing the right

0:22:310:22:35

thing, but we can move

on to the new most important

0:22:350:22:38

questions, which is what we do

with patients who don't respond

0:22:380:22:40

to all available antidepressants.

0:22:400:22:42

The study included 21 drugs,

yet some to patients do not

0:22:420:22:45

respond to any of them.

0:22:450:22:46

How can we help them?

0:22:460:22:47

Another concern is too few people

with depression get treatment.

0:22:470:22:50

Researchers estimate at least

one million more people

0:22:500:22:52

in the UK would benefit

from therapies including

0:22:520:22:55

antidepressants.

0:22:550:22:56

James Gallagher, BBC News.

0:22:560:23:01

University lecturers across the UK

are beginning a series of strikes.

0:23:010:23:04

The action will affect

around a million students.

0:23:040:23:11

Members of the University

and College Union are walking out

0:23:110:23:13

in protest at planned changes

to their pension scheme,

0:23:130:23:15

which they say will leave them

worse off in retirement.

0:23:150:23:18

Our correspondent Tomos Morgan has

this report from Cardiff -

0:23:180:23:20

where hundreds of university staff

are taking action.

0:23:200:23:25

Know ifs, no buts, no pension cuts.

Picket lines, protests, the scene at

0:23:250:23:32

universities across the country.

Staff walking out in a dispute over

0:23:320:23:36

pensions. Institutions say there's a

£6.1 billion deficit in the current

0:23:360:23:42

scheme, which is unsustainable. They

say changes must be made. But after

0:23:420:23:45

35 meetings over the past year, the

University and College Union says

0:23:450:23:50

the strikes were inevitable is the

proposed new scheme would be far

0:23:500:23:56

less generous.

We are saying changes

to the scheme should be fair. We are

0:23:560:24:01

in the scheme which the staff and

employers are committed to. They

0:24:010:24:05

employers have now junked that

approach and are going for something

0:24:050:24:07

where the staff are being shoved

aside.

With lectures being affected

0:24:070:24:11

by the strikes there a danger that

student degrees will be impacted.

0:24:110:24:15

There are suggestions exams may have

to be modified marking relaxed. The

0:24:150:24:21

thousands of students that have come

out today to protest across the

0:24:210:24:25

country are doing so alongside their

lecturers. Their frustration is

0:24:250:24:29

aimed at their institutions. They

are seen as consumers in the eyes of

0:24:290:24:33

regulators and the courts and if

this deadlock continues students

0:24:330:24:36

believe they deserve some

compensation from universities for

0:24:360:24:39

the loss of teaching time. Students

across the country have begun

0:24:390:24:44

petitions, calling for universities

to recognise that they are not

0:24:440:24:48

receiving a service paid for by

their tuition fees. The petition

0:24:480:24:52

here in Cardiff has already had

almost 5000 the glitches.

It's an

0:24:520:24:58

opportunity to focus on financial

compensation, we believe that

0:24:580:25:02

academic compensation is more

beneficial. We don't believe in the

0:25:020:25:05

long-running financial compensation

will benefit students and changes to

0:25:050:25:11

exam feedback or deadlines benefits

is more.

The union says senior

0:25:110:25:15

lecturers could be £10,000 a year

worse off under the proposed new

0:25:150:25:20

scheme. Universities UK, the body

that represents institutions, says

0:25:200:25:25

that they are making every effort to

minimise the impact of industrial

0:25:250:25:28

action on students, adding that

changes proposed will make the

0:25:280:25:32

pension scheme secure and

sustainable, safeguarding the future

0:25:320:25:37

of universities. Currently, 14 days

of protests are planned. But unless

0:25:370:25:43

a deal can be reached soon, unions

say more strike action stretching

0:25:430:25:48

into the summer exam period is

inevitable. Tomos Morgan, BBC News,

0:25:480:25:52

Cardiff.

0:25:520:25:54

Britain's biggest energy supplier,

Centrica, says it's cutting 4000

0:25:540:25:56

jobs over the next couple of years.

0:25:560:25:58

It follows a big drop in profits,

down by 17 % last year.

0:25:580:26:01

The group - which owns British Gas -

has blamed its performance

0:26:010:26:04

in North America as well in the UK.

0:26:040:26:06

Our business correspondent

Emma Simpson reports.

0:26:060:26:14

It's been a disappointing year for

Britain's biggest energy supplier.

0:26:150:26:19

Today, the hard numbers will stop

Centrica's group profits down 17%

0:26:190:26:26

come at a £1.25 billion. It also

lost 1.4 million British Gas

0:26:260:26:32

customer accounts and more

cost-cutting is on the way, with

0:26:320:26:37

4000 jobs to go. And those cuts, the

boss told me, are partly down to the

0:26:370:26:42

government's looming price cap on

bills.

It's about competition and

0:26:420:26:47

what customers are wanting, but

there's a third reason. There is a

0:26:470:26:51

link between our cost efficiency

programme and preparing for price

0:26:510:26:56

cap in the UK. We've got to be

competitive and this measure means

0:26:560:26:59

that we've got to drive more

efficiency.

The posts will go over

0:26:590:27:07

the next three years, mainly in its

UK residential business.

It's only a

0:27:070:27:10

couple of years ago that I was

talking to the Chief Executive

0:27:100:27:17

around 5500 job losses and that

being the necessary action required,

0:27:170:27:22

and now here we are again with a

further 4000 job cuts being

0:27:220:27:28

announced. It's very, very

concerning.

The government says

0:27:280:27:32

Britain's energy market isn't

working. Customers are being

0:27:320:27:35

overcharged. That's why it wants to

cap the most expensive energy bills.

0:27:350:27:40

A move which could put another

squeeze on Centrica's profits, so

0:27:400:27:45

our price rises on the cards?

I

can't make any guarantees others and

0:27:450:27:50

we watch the input costs closely and

we are trying to make our energy as

0:27:500:27:56

competitive as possible.

From

government intervention to

0:27:560:27:59

increasing competition, the whole

industry is in the midst of change,

0:27:590:28:04

but will it come at a price, and for

whom? Emma Simpson, BBC News.

0:28:040:28:11

In the Winter Olympics,

British skier Dave Ryding finished

0:28:110:28:13

ninth in the men's slalom.

0:28:130:28:15

The GB men's curling team failed

to reach the semifinals,

0:28:150:28:17

after Switzerland beat them

in their tie-break match.

0:28:170:28:21

In the men's skiing half pipe,

some spectacular aerial acrobatics -

0:28:210:28:24

as you'll see in David Ornstein's

report from Pyeongchang.

0:28:240:28:28

COMMENTATOR:

From Great Britain

and Northern Ireland,

0:28:280:28:29

Dave "The Rocket" Ryding.

0:28:290:28:32

At the gateway to Olympic glory.

0:28:320:28:35

From a dry ski slope in Lancashire

to the real stuff in South Korea,

0:28:350:28:40

Dave Ryding has followed

an unconventional path,

0:28:400:28:42

but now finds himself battling

against the world's best.

0:28:420:28:47

The Rocket starts to get

acceleration on the flat.

0:28:470:28:49

Ryding's final run here propelled

him to a ninth place finish -

0:28:490:28:52

Britain's best Olympic Alpine skiing

result in 30 years.

0:28:520:29:00

That's a superb performance

by Dave Ryding, but it won't quite

0:29:000:29:04

be enough to get him on the podium,

and Britain's wait for another medal

0:29:040:29:08

at these Games goes on.

0:29:080:29:11

I'm 31, but still life

in the old dog yet, and it

0:29:110:29:14

motivates me for another four years

and I know I can

0:29:140:29:17

improve on that still.

0:29:170:29:20

Curling has become one

of the country's main sources

0:29:200:29:22

of Olympic success -

the men taking silver

0:29:220:29:25

in Sochi four years ago.

0:29:250:29:27

This, however, is a new team

and they leave empty-handed,

0:29:270:29:30

after an agonising defeat by

Switzerland.

0:29:300:29:33

Leading 5-4 with just two ends to go

and a semifinals place at stake,

0:29:330:29:38

the Brits capitulated to lose 9-5.

0:29:380:29:43

We had a good game today,

but it wasn't to be, sadly.

0:29:430:29:46

A couple of things didn't go our way

and a couple of half shots

0:29:460:29:50

and that's all it takes

against a team as good as them.

0:29:500:29:53

Meanwhile there was confirmation

today that the Russian mixed doubles

0:29:530:29:56

pair of Alexander Krushelnitskiy

and his wife Anastasia Bryzgalova

0:29:560:30:00

have been stripped of their curling

bronze medal after Krushelnitskiy

0:30:000:30:05

was found guilty of doping.

0:30:050:30:07

In the women's ice hockey

there was incredible drama

0:30:070:30:09

as the United States and Canada went

to a sudden-death shoot out.

0:30:090:30:13

COMMENTATOR:

Saved,

the USA win gold.

0:30:130:30:17

Having claimed each of the last four

titles, Canada were left devastated

0:30:170:30:21

as the USA celebrated

a famous victory.

0:30:210:30:26

There was more American joy

in the men's ski half pipe.

0:30:260:30:29

Defending champion David Wise making

the spectacular look simple,

0:30:290:30:34

to triumphant again

with a near-perfect final run.

0:30:340:30:38

COMMENTATOR:

Oh, that's it!

0:30:380:30:39

David Ornstein, BBC

News, Pyeongchang.

0:30:390:30:46

Time for a look at the weather.

0:30:460:30:48

Here's Stav.

0:30:480:30:49

We are in for some Winter Olympics

temperatures?

0:30:530:30:57

Indeed we are, the story is

unfolding. Good afternoon. I'll

0:30:570:31:01

start with the European map and the

temperature contrast, you can see

0:31:010:31:04

the blues pouring out from Siberia

into western Russia, spreading

0:31:040:31:10

across the continent and reaching

our shores, particularly into next

0:31:100:31:13

week you really will notice the

bitterly cold conditions. It's going

0:31:130:31:17

to feel extremely bitter,

particularly if you add on the wind.

0:31:170:31:20

Widespread morning frosts. There's

the chance of some snow in some

0:31:200:31:24

areas, but uncertainty in that

detail. Keep tuned to the forecast

0:31:240:31:28

the weather snow will fall. Here and

now, we have high pressure in

0:31:280:31:31

control. Its finance settled. A lot

of dry weather around through the

0:31:310:31:36

afternoon. The best of the sunshine

across eastern side of England,

0:31:360:31:40

eastern Scotland and some glimmers

elsewhere, but there will be a tough

0:31:400:31:43

cloud and disappointingly chilly

where you have the cloud. Not too

0:31:430:31:46

bad in the sunshine. 5-7dC. As we

had through this evening and

0:31:460:31:52

overnight, the skies clear quite

widely. It looks like temperatures

0:31:520:31:54

will plummet. It will be a dry one

for where the skies are clear,

0:31:540:32:00

particularly in England and the fund

into parts of Scotland it will be a

0:32:000:32:03

really cold one, much colder than

last night, with a hard frost down

0:32:030:32:06

to maybe minus five Celsius in a few

places. One thing is for sure, it

0:32:060:32:11

will be a cold start tomorrow

morning. You'll be scraping the car

0:32:110:32:13

if you are heading out early. Like

today, because high

0:32:130:32:22

pressure is in control, it will be

largely financed right, variable

0:32:300:32:33

amounts of cloud and good spells of

sunshine, the best of it in

0:32:330:32:36

Scotland, parts of England and why,

a bit of cloud rolling in off the

0:32:360:32:39

North Sea for north-east England.

Temperatures 4-7. That's the trend

0:32:390:32:41

as we head into the weekend. The

temperatures continue to fall away

0:32:410:32:44

as we pick up the south-easterly

wind bringing the cold air, which is

0:32:440:32:47

already across the near continent.

Again, high pressure in control for

0:32:470:32:49

Saturday. A lot of fine and dry

weather. Wrap up well and head out,

0:32:490:32:52

it should be quite nice, good sunny

spells around. A bit more of a

0:32:520:32:56

breeze. It will start to knock the

temperatures down further. Ranging

0:32:560:33:00

from 4-7dC. A similar picture on

Sunday, with a lot of dry weather

0:33:000:33:04

around. Temperatures continue to

fall, particularly after Sunday. At

0:33:040:33:07

the start of next week we're looking

at highs a couple of degrees above

0:33:070:33:11

freezing. Add on the wind and it

will feel colder. There should be

0:33:110:33:15

quite a bit of sunshine around as

well but there is some snow in the

0:33:150:33:18

forecast, so keep tuned to the

weather forecast for the next few

0:33:180:33:22

days.

0:33:220:33:25

That's all from the BBC News at One.

0:33:250:33:26

That's all from the BBC News at One.

0:33:260:33:27

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