17/01/2017 BBC News at Six


17/01/2017

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 17/01/2017. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

Britain will leave the EU single market -

:00:00.:00:07.

Theresa may sets out her core demands for Brexit negotiations.

:00:08.:00:13.

She wants British laws to be judged in British courts, and new ways

:00:14.:00:16.

Brexit must mean control over the number of people who come

:00:17.:00:21.

to Britain from Europe, and that is what we

:00:22.:00:23.

The Prime Minister also had a message for other EU leaders -

:00:24.:00:30.

While I am sure a positive agreement can be reached, I am equally clear

:00:31.:00:35.

that no deal for Britain is better than a bad deal for Britain.

:00:36.:00:41.

Parliament will have a vote on the final deal, but already

:00:42.:00:44.

If all her optimism of a deal with the European Union didn't work, we

:00:45.:00:50.

would move into a low tax, corporate taxation,

:00:51.:00:52.

I'm not prepared for Scotland to be taken down a path that I firmly

:00:53.:01:03.

We'll be hearing the first reactions from across the EU.

:01:04.:01:09.

The Supreme Court gives this Libyan the right to sue a former foreign

:01:10.:01:15.

A jump in the cost of living - inflation hits a two-and-a-half-year

:01:16.:01:21.

Vinnie Jones will captain the six Nations squad with Sam Warburton

:01:22.:01:44.

told to fight for his place in the side.

:01:45.:01:55.

Good evening and welcome to the BBC News at Six.

:01:56.:01:59.

Britain will be leaving the EU single market.

:02:00.:02:05.

That was the clear-cut message from Theresa May as she set

:02:06.:02:08.

out her red lines for the Brexit negotiations that are

:02:09.:02:10.

Britain must be able to control the number of people

:02:11.:02:15.

British courts must have the final say in interpreting British laws.

:02:16.:02:21.

And Parliament will get the chance to vote on whatever

:02:22.:02:24.

The Prime Minister is aiming for what she called "a global Britain"

:02:25.:02:30.

that has the best possible trade deal with the EU while opening up

:02:31.:02:33.

There was a warning too for her EU counterparts -

:02:34.:02:38.

she will walk away if EU negotiators try to punish Britain.

:02:39.:02:42.

Here's our political editor, Laura Kuennsberg.

:02:43.:02:47.

On a day when Theresa May set out her vision for Briain's future.

:02:48.:02:55.

Good morning. What's the plan? On her way.

:02:56.:03:05.

Have you got a plan? On our way out, not just out of the European

:03:06.:03:09.

Union... Are we going to get a detailed plan? Theresa May gathered

:03:10.:03:14.

ministers and ambassadors too. To confirm finally, we will leave

:03:15.:03:18.

behind the way the country has made its living for decades.

:03:19.:03:24.

APPLAUSE As a priority, we will pursue a bold

:03:25.:03:29.

and ambitious free trade agreement with the European Union. This

:03:30.:03:33.

agreement should allow for the freest possible trade in goods and

:03:34.:03:38.

services between Britain and the EU's member states. It will give

:03:39.:03:42.

British companies the maximum freedom to trade with and operate

:03:43.:03:47.

within European markets, and let European businesses do the same in

:03:48.:03:52.

Britain. But I want to be clear - what I am proposing cannot mean

:03:53.:03:59.

membership of the single market. Privately, ministers had talked of

:04:00.:04:03.

preserving some parts of the special club, the market of hundreds of

:04:04.:04:07.

millions where our businesses can buy and sell without barriers.

:04:08.:04:12.

Remain as had pushed her, but she believes it can't be done, because

:04:13.:04:15.

the rules of the single market come with unlimited EU immigration. The

:04:16.:04:20.

message from the public, before and during the referendum campaign, was

:04:21.:04:25.

clear - Brexit must mean control of the number of people who come to

:04:26.:04:29.

Britain from Europe, and that is what we will deliver. Our customs

:04:30.:04:33.

arrangements, how we trade over borders, will change too, but no

:04:34.:04:38.

final decision on how. Her clear hope, though, is that the UK will

:04:39.:04:45.

not pay billions to the EU every year. There may be some specific

:04:46.:04:49.

programmes in which we might want to participate. If so, and this will be

:04:50.:04:53.

for us to decide, it is appropriate that we will make a contribution,

:04:54.:04:58.

but the principle is clear: The days of Britain making vast contributions

:04:59.:05:03.

to the EU every year will end. 27 other countries will decide if her

:05:04.:05:08.

plans are an ambitious wish list or a fantasy, yet most dramatically, if

:05:09.:05:13.

after two years of talks negotiations stall, she and her team

:05:14.:05:18.

are willing to walk away. Written wants to remain a good friend and

:05:19.:05:23.

neighbour to Europe, yet I know there are some voices calling for a

:05:24.:05:27.

punitive deal that punishes Britain and discourages other countries from

:05:28.:05:31.

taking the same path. Britain would not, indeed, we could not, accept

:05:32.:05:38.

such an approach. While I am confident that this scenario need

:05:39.:05:42.

never rise, while I am sure a positive agreement can be reached, I

:05:43.:05:46.

am equally clear that no deal for Britain is better than a bad deal

:05:47.:05:54.

for Britain. Thank you. But remember, the Prime Minister never

:05:55.:05:57.

wanted to leave. During the referendum campaign, you said

:05:58.:06:01.

plainly that you believed if we left the EU and single market, the

:06:02.:06:05.

country, its families and citizens, would be worse off. Now, I doubt you

:06:06.:06:12.

have changed your mind, or, as Prime Minister, you have made a decision

:06:13.:06:17.

that you believe will leave the country and its citizens poorer -

:06:18.:06:22.

which is a? All the economic indicators have been more positive

:06:23.:06:24.

than people predicted. It is only earlier this week that the IMF

:06:25.:06:31.

confirmed we were the fastest growing economy last year. And what

:06:32.:06:35.

I am talking about today is the country is coming together and

:06:36.:06:38.

looking for that brighter future as a global Britain. Did the Brexit

:06:39.:06:43.

backers in the Cabinet get the upper hand? It was an excellent speech,

:06:44.:06:49.

optimistic, confident, and it set out our responsibilities in a global

:06:50.:06:53.

context. This wasn't an inward looking, purely European speech. It

:06:54.:07:00.

is negotiate bulk -- negotiable, good for the UK and for the rest of

:07:01.:07:05.

the EU as well. Why should they allow us to have our cake and eat

:07:06.:07:09.

it? As the Prime Minister said, it will be good for both sides. Do you

:07:10.:07:13.

think what she set out is achievable? We shall have to see.

:07:14.:07:21.

Not exactly nodding along, either, the other parties across the UK. The

:07:22.:07:25.

political consequences of Theresa May's choices are unclear. I think

:07:26.:07:29.

we have to have a deal that ensures we have access to the market, that

:07:30.:07:35.

we have British jobs depended on that market, that is what we will be

:07:36.:07:39.

pushing for. If it is specifically this form of single market, I don't

:07:40.:07:43.

know. She seems to want to have her cake and eat it. Choices emerging

:07:44.:07:47.

here. Do we want to be taken down a path that we didn't vote for and

:07:48.:07:51.

which is against our interests, audibly want to take control of our

:07:52.:07:56.

own future? And I think that is a choice Scotland has the right to

:07:57.:08:01.

make. To wave the white flag across the Straits of Dover, as Theresa May

:08:02.:08:05.

has done, is damaging to Britain's future and is a theft of democracy.

:08:06.:08:12.

In Brussels, the message will had been received and at last clear.

:08:13.:08:18.

Parliament was told today they will get a vote on the final deal, but

:08:19.:08:23.

his is plain that the Prime Minister believes the country has delivered a

:08:24.:08:27.

clear verdict, and she has made her mind up, drawn her big conclusions.

:08:28.:08:32.

Her dilemma is now are persuading a continent that what she wants is

:08:33.:08:35.

possible, and those who voted to stay in the EU that it's even

:08:36.:08:40.

desirable, but this is really only the start of a long process. Much

:08:41.:08:46.

will change. Concern and criticism won't fade away. The scale of what

:08:47.:08:51.

we decided, how it will change our country and all our lives is still

:08:52.:08:57.

fully to emerge. Laura Kuenssberg, BBC News, Westminster.

:08:58.:09:01.

For decades now, Britain has traded within the EU's single market.

:09:02.:09:04.

As we've been hearing, those days are numbered.

:09:05.:09:06.

So what is the European single market and what could

:09:07.:09:08.

Here's our diplomatic correspondent, James Landale.

:09:09.:09:16.

The single market is the beating heart of the European Union, it

:09:17.:09:22.

binds the European community together. The members believe that

:09:23.:09:33.

if they get rid of barriers to trade and have goods, services and workers

:09:34.:09:36.

move freely across their borders, then their economies will grow. To

:09:37.:09:39.

make this happen, they agreed, trading rules. A widget made in

:09:40.:09:45.

Greece same as one made in Spain. They set up the European Court of

:09:46.:09:48.

Justice to make sure everybody follows the rules. Supporters say

:09:49.:09:54.

the single market helped British companies flourish, like this

:09:55.:09:56.

engineering firm in Bristol. It makes it easier for them to export

:09:57.:10:02.

their goods and employ people from across the EU. I think there's an

:10:03.:10:05.

obvious risk morass outside of the single market. We trade increasingly

:10:06.:10:12.

with Europe. I think any change in the customs regime is probably going

:10:13.:10:18.

to make us uncompetitive. But opponents say the single market

:10:19.:10:24.

imposes unnecessary red tape on British firms, like this nappy

:10:25.:10:26.

manufacturer in Northampton. It gives too much power to EU judges,

:10:27.:10:31.

and allows into many migrant workers. The owner of this firm says

:10:32.:10:36.

the opportunities outside are greater. I think morally we can't

:10:37.:10:40.

remain part of the single market because we want to go out and do our

:10:41.:10:42.

trade deals with countries outside the EU, and that's very exciting for

:10:43.:10:50.

countries such as ours. So, to help make that happen, Theresa May wants

:10:51.:10:55.

Britain to have instead the greatest possible access to the single

:10:56.:11:00.

market. Particularly the British cars, lorries and financial

:11:01.:11:03.

services, and to get that by negotiating a new free trade deal

:11:04.:11:07.

with the EU. If she can, and if they are willing. And what about the

:11:08.:11:13.

so-called customs union, the deal under which EU countries impose the

:11:14.:11:18.

same tariffs on goods and services imported from outside the EU?

:11:19.:11:22.

Theresa May said she didn't want that UK to be bound by this any more

:11:23.:11:26.

and instead wanted Britain to be able to set its own tariffs and

:11:27.:11:30.

negotiate its own trade deals with the rest of the world. But, she said

:11:31.:11:34.

she would accept some kind of new customs arrangement with the EU but

:11:35.:11:38.

didn't spell out what that might be. So, this is what the Prime Minister

:11:39.:11:43.

wants. Now, all she has to do is get the EU members to agree, and that's

:11:44.:11:47.

far from certain. I have skated over the surface of what are some

:11:48.:11:52.

important issues, so you can read more detail on the BBC website, that

:11:53.:11:55.

will take you through all the options and what that might be.

:11:56.:11:56.

George. It didn't take long

:11:57.:12:00.

for EU leaders to react. The president of the EU Council

:12:01.:12:03.

called the speech realistic, but the European Parliament's

:12:04.:12:05.

negotiator called The pound strengthened

:12:06.:12:06.

after the Prime Minister's speech. More on that from our

:12:07.:12:09.

Business Editor Simon Jack, who is at the World Economic

:12:10.:12:12.

Forum in Switzerland. But first, let's talk to our Europe

:12:13.:12:14.

Correspondent Damian Grammaticas, Damian, I suppose people are still

:12:15.:12:25.

die jesting the speech, but any themes emerging? -- digesting. There

:12:26.:12:37.

is a feeling that there is a little more clarity, but the European

:12:38.:12:39.

Parliament's chief negotiator said that in his view Theresa May was

:12:40.:12:44.

selling an illusion, because this idea that you could read the single

:12:45.:12:49.

market, leave the customs union and then still enjoy privileged access,

:12:50.:12:54.

he said that was an illusion. Also, another senior MEP said to me that

:12:55.:12:58.

Theresa May was overselling the benefits of what could be achieved

:12:59.:13:02.

with trade deals with distant countries, and underestimating the

:13:03.:13:08.

difficulties that there will be for British companies, British

:13:09.:13:10.

businesses, giving trade with the EU. He said they may find it very

:13:11.:13:14.

difficult in the future if there are things like customs checks, Mike

:13:15.:13:18.

tariffs coming in. Also, the idea that the UK could walk away was

:13:19.:13:27.

dismissed, saying the UK would suffer most. One negotiator said he

:13:28.:13:34.

is not seeking to punish the UK in the negotiations. Simon, let's come

:13:35.:13:38.

to you. I guess you couldn't be in a better place to gauge business

:13:39.:13:43.

sentiment. What is the reaction so far? Businesses have been calling

:13:44.:13:48.

out for some clarity. We got some today - no ifs, no buts, no single

:13:49.:13:53.

market. Pretty clear, but most leaders I've spoken to here had come

:13:54.:13:57.

to this conclusion themselves, thinking that continued membership

:13:58.:14:00.

of the single market was incompatible with the political

:14:01.:14:03.

imperative of bringing immigration down. What really got years

:14:04.:14:07.

twitching here was the tone of Theresa May's speech here today. She

:14:08.:14:11.

didn't pull any punches, said she would fight for a good deal, was

:14:12.:14:15.

prepared to retaliate if necessary, and that she thought no deal was

:14:16.:14:19.

better than a bad deal. What that means, if she does walk away, walks

:14:20.:14:24.

into these general international trading standards, that means

:14:25.:14:28.

tariffs could come in. Businesses here are very worried about that,

:14:29.:14:33.

and they hope it is a negotiating posture. It is a nuclear option that

:14:34.:14:36.

they don't want to press the button on. They beget clarity? Sum. Are we

:14:37.:14:42.

going to get a better idea of where we finally end up? I'm afraid not.

:14:43.:14:48.

Thank you, both. So, is Theresa May's vision

:14:49.:14:52.

of Britain's future what voters had in mind when they went to the polls

:14:53.:14:54.

in the EU Referendum? Our Midlands correspondent,

:14:55.:14:57.

Sima Kotecha, has been talking to people in Birmingham,

:14:58.:14:59.

which voted narrowly It's the 50-50 city,

:15:00.:15:01.

where half the population voted to leave the EU,

:15:02.:15:08.

and the other half voted to remain. Today in her speech,

:15:09.:15:13.

the Prime Minister said people who had voted for Brexit had done

:15:14.:15:17.

so with their eyes open. The country seems like it's

:15:18.:15:21.

slipping, slipping. We lost everything,

:15:22.:15:31.

everything to the European. Everything was going up and it just

:15:32.:15:32.

seemed to be slipping away. She confirmed the UK

:15:33.:15:49.

was heading for a hard Brexit, but not everybody's clear

:15:50.:15:52.

about what that means. Unless it's laid out

:15:53.:15:54.

in layman's terms, we don't She may as well just

:15:55.:15:56.

speak Chinese to us. You've got 16 sausage

:15:57.:15:59.

rolls there for a pound. At the market, locals were digesting

:16:00.:16:01.

the headline announcement. She's just said that the UK will be

:16:02.:16:03.

leaving the single market - I think things are all

:16:04.:16:06.

right the way it is. Personally, they are rocking

:16:07.:16:12.

the boat quite a lot. Diversity is a good thing,

:16:13.:16:14.

because you bring all kinds And the jobs that some people

:16:15.:16:17.

in England don't want to do, other people are happy to come

:16:18.:16:21.

and do it to keep the country going. The leave campaign won by a whisker

:16:22.:16:30.

here, fewer than 4,000 votes made the difference,

:16:31.:16:33.

but no matter which way people voted, the question many

:16:34.:16:36.

want the answer to is, We need still even more information,

:16:37.:16:38.

and I don't think we will fully understand until we have made that

:16:39.:16:47.

complete break away. Then, we will understand

:16:48.:16:49.

what it means. You know, at the moment,

:16:50.:16:53.

it's just pie in the sky, isn't it? The Prime Minister says she wants

:16:54.:16:57.

a smooth and orderly Brexit, In her speech today,

:16:58.:17:04.

the Prime Minister made a point of saying she wanted the four

:17:05.:17:18.

nations of the UK to have their say Let's hear now from our

:17:19.:17:21.

correspondents in Cardiff and Belfast, but first our Scotland

:17:22.:17:25.

editor, Sarah Smith. Nicola Sturgeon, the First Minister

:17:26.:17:31.

of Scotland, responded to Theresa May's speech today by saying she

:17:32.:17:35.

think it is has increased the chances there will be a seconding

:17:36.:17:38.

referendum on Scottish independence. She said it's clear that the UK is

:17:39.:17:43.

heading for a hard Brexit, which they she thinks will be economically

:17:44.:17:47.

catastrophic and will not allow Scotland to be stem rollered down a

:17:48.:17:51.

path it didn't vote for. At the end of last year, the First Minister put

:17:52.:17:56.

together a paper outlining you how she thinks Scotland could stay in

:17:57.:17:59.

the single market if the UK leaves. That could only happen if the Prime

:18:00.:18:03.

Minister and the UK Government agrees with it. She says she doesn't

:18:04.:18:07.

think Theresa May is giving the proposals serious consideration and

:18:08.:18:13.

that is why she said she thinks the prospects spect of another vote for

:18:14.:18:17.

independence, she think's a prospect which is being abouting more likely.

:18:18.:18:22.

-- becoming more likely. Most exposed to the fallout from Brexit

:18:23.:18:26.

because it shares a land border with the Irish Republic. Theresa May was

:18:27.:18:29.

quick today to say there would be no return to the borders of the past.

:18:30.:18:34.

She said the common travel area would be retained. But there were

:18:35.:18:38.

few details as to how this would happen. Here's the question - if the

:18:39.:18:43.

UK wants to control immigration from the EU, how can it do that with an

:18:44.:18:49.

open border, with the Irish Republic? Here's another question -

:18:50.:18:54.

say the UK steps outside the customs union, what will that do to the

:18:55.:18:59.

border? Will that border become effectively a hard border? Is Wales

:19:00.:19:08.

voted to leave the EU despite that I think inevitable concerns today,

:19:09.:19:12.

economically, about what the impact could be, particularly in areas like

:19:13.:19:15.

manufacturing and farming, strong in Wales. Dependant on exports to the

:19:16.:19:23.

EU. At the National Assembly the First Minister has a problem, he

:19:24.:19:27.

campaigned to remain. Since Brexit he has called for full and

:19:28.:19:32.

unvettered access, as he calls it, to the single market. He said things

:19:33.:19:36.

appears to be going in the wrong direction for him. Political

:19:37.:19:42.

leverage is also a problem. If he complains too much, ministers at

:19:43.:19:44.

Westminster can turn round to him and say - they are delivering what

:19:45.:19:47.

the people of Wales want, which was Brexit. George. All right, Nick,

:19:48.:19:52.

Gavin, Sarah, thank you all. Let's speak to our political

:19:53.:19:56.

editor, Laura Kuenssberg, Laura, Theresa May has been

:19:57.:20:02.

criticised an awful lot for not saying enough about her Brexit

:20:03.:20:05.

plans, do you think she answered those critics today? Well, being

:20:06.:20:13.

clear is a prize in any argument. The eurosceptics are cock-a-hoop

:20:14.:20:17.

tonight. One senior Tory figure on the argument joked he could have

:20:18.:20:20.

written the speech himself. The remainers who have been pushing to

:20:21.:20:24.

hajj on to parts of the single market membership have been muted.

:20:25.:20:28.

Theresa May killed off some of the charges of delay, of dither, of her

:20:29.:20:32.

not being able to make up her mind. This clarity from today does give us

:20:33.:20:36.

a sense she has taken the initiative. It gives her a bit of

:20:37.:20:40.

breathing space in political terms. Let's be quite clear about it, one

:20:41.:20:46.

day this is one day, 24-hours in what will be a long, complicated

:20:47.:20:51.

fraught and dif process. There are people here, here inpm still, more

:20:52.:20:55.

importantly on the other side of the negotiating table, those 27

:20:56.:20:59.

countries, who believe what she is asking for is a delusion. If, as

:21:00.:21:04.

time comes to pass, they are proven to be right and Number Ten is proven

:21:05.:21:10.

to be wrong, it will be very politically and maybe economically

:21:11.:21:13.

painful finding out that they were right and Theresa May called it

:21:14.:21:15.

wrong. Lawyer thank you.

:21:16.:21:20.

The former Foreign Secretary, Jack Straw, can now be sued

:21:21.:21:25.

by a Libyan man who claims that British agents helped

:21:26.:21:27.

the United States to kidnap and secretly remove him and his wife

:21:28.:21:30.

Today, the Supreme Court cleared the way for Abdel Hakim Belhaj

:21:31.:21:38.

to take legal action over the alleged British involvement.

:21:39.:21:40.

Jack Straw, who was responsible for MI6 at the time,

:21:41.:21:43.

Our home affairs correspondent, Tom Symonds, reports.

:21:44.:21:49.

Libya, 2011, Colonel Gaddafi's been toppled, and it's chaos.

:21:50.:21:57.

Among the files strewn across the offices of his security

:21:58.:22:01.

service, a document comes to light suggesting Britain played a part

:22:02.:22:04.

in the abduction and torture of a Libyan dissident.

:22:05.:22:09.

He's Abdul Hakim Belhaj, once regarded as a terror suspect.

:22:10.:22:14.

Now, he's been told by Britain's highest court he can sue

:22:15.:22:17.

MI6 and the Government, which tried to halt the case.

:22:18.:22:20.

The Supreme Court unanimously dismisses the Government's appeals.

:22:21.:22:24.

Normally, the English courts can't consider cases involving

:22:25.:22:26.

what foreign governments have done abroad, but in this judgment,

:22:27.:22:31.

the Supreme Court has concluded that that doesn't prevent the courts

:22:32.:22:34.

here from considering British involvement in what's happened.

:22:35.:22:41.

In this jail, Mr Belhaj says he was tortured after he and his

:22:42.:22:44.

pregnant wife were intercepted by US agents and flown to Libya.

:22:45.:22:58.

There have been no criminal charges but, speaking in Istanbul today,

:22:59.:23:01.

TRANSLATION: They've got to admit that this act,

:23:02.:23:04.

committed by individuals in the British Government,

:23:05.:23:07.

is a criminal act encroaching on our freedom and rights

:23:08.:23:10.

and rendering us to a regime they know is they know

:23:11.:23:12.

My wife was pregnant then and she was kept

:23:13.:23:16.

If they apologise, we will drop our demands.

:23:17.:23:27.

The crucial evidence could be the document found in Libya

:23:28.:23:29.

in which an MI6 officer appears to write to a Gaddafi

:23:30.:23:32.

the safe arrival of Mr Belhaj, using his alternative name,

:23:33.:23:41.

but also describing him as, "air cargo."

:23:42.:23:47.

The letter says the intelligence that led to his capture was British.

:23:48.:23:50.

Labour's Jack Straw, Foreign Secretary at the time

:23:51.:23:52.

is one of those accused, but said today he acted

:23:53.:23:54.

within the law and was never complicit with what might

:23:55.:23:57.

Britain's alleged connection with so-called rendition,

:23:58.:23:59.

official flights to secret prison torture destinations has never been

:24:00.:24:01.

Tom Symonds, BBC News, the Supreme Court.

:24:02.:24:06.

A brief look at some of the day's other news stories.

:24:07.:24:09.

An inquest has heard how concerns over security

:24:10.:24:12.

at a Tunisian holiday resort, where 30 Britons were killed

:24:13.:24:14.

by an Islamist gunman in June 2015, were raised six months before

:24:15.:24:19.

A report in January 2015, for the UK Government,

:24:20.:24:22.

suggested there was a low standard of protection at some hotel

:24:23.:24:25.

The killings were the deadliest on Britons since the

:24:26.:24:30.

The man suspected of carrying out the New Year's Eve attack

:24:31.:24:37.

on a nightclub in Istanbul has been arrested.

:24:38.:24:41.

The Uzbek national was trained in Afghanistan, according

:24:42.:24:44.

to the city's governor, and is believed to have illegally

:24:45.:24:46.

39 people died in the attack on the Reina club,

:24:47.:24:50.

A public inquiry has heard that a police marksman,

:24:51.:24:58.

who shot and killed an unarmed man, was acting on "out of date"

:24:59.:25:00.

Anthony Grainger was shot once in the chest during

:25:01.:25:04.

a Greater Manchester Police operation in Cheshire in 2012.

:25:05.:25:07.

The inquiry into his death heard that police

:25:08.:25:09.

believed he was preparing for an armed robbery.

:25:10.:25:15.

A teenager has been arrested after the body of a 16-year-old girl

:25:16.:25:18.

The girl has been named locally as Leonne Weeks,

:25:19.:25:25.

An 18-year-old, from Dinnington, is being questioned

:25:26.:25:27.

Rising air fares and food prices have helped push up UK

:25:28.:25:34.

inflation to its highest rate in nearly two-and-a-half years.

:25:35.:25:36.

The fall in the pound since the Brexit vote is, in part,

:25:37.:25:39.

Our economics correspondent, Andy Verity, is here with the details.

:25:40.:25:44.

You have been looking at the detail of this? That is right. Part of the

:25:45.:25:52.

reason that prices are going up is because of higher oil prices. They

:25:53.:25:56.

bounced back on the ward markets. It's also, as you mentioned, because

:25:57.:26:00.

of the weaker pound. And the weaker pound of course means if you are

:26:01.:26:03.

going to buy imported goods you need more pounds to buy the same number

:26:04.:26:08.

of dollars or euros to buy those imported goods. You have seen that

:26:09.:26:12.

inflationary effect of the weaker pound up the chain. It strengthened

:26:13.:26:18.

today. It has weakened 16%. Producer prices have risen by 16% over the

:26:19.:26:22.

past year. Now, they are passing on some of that effect. Those producer

:26:23.:26:30.

prices the prices for raw materials. It.7% is what they are charging at

:26:31.:26:33.

the factory gate. They are only putting some of that into the shops,

:26:34.:26:38.

retailers are shielding us from that. Retail prices have gone up by

:26:39.:26:43.

1.6%. Competition may play a role there. The retailers are thinking -

:26:44.:26:47.

if we raise our prices to cover the cost, business might go elsewhere.

:26:48.:26:51.

Competition is shielding us from the effect of the weaker pound for now.

:26:52.:26:54.

When you are being looking at petrol prices up by a tenth over the last

:26:55.:26:58.

year, they can only do that for so long. We should expect more

:26:59.:27:02.

incompetent inflation, perhaps up to 3%, over the next year. All right,

:27:03.:27:08.

Andy, thank you very much. -- inflation.

:27:09.:27:10.

Time for a look at the weather, here's Nick Miller.

:27:11.:27:15.

The winter weather is being turned on it is heads. The highest

:27:16.:27:21.

temperatures have been in Scotland. Despite the sunshine in south-east

:27:22.:27:25.

England this is where the lowest temperatures have been. Blue sky Bob

:27:26.:27:30.

was living up to his name in Kent. The sunshine in the south-east, the

:27:31.:27:35.

low trps. It felt cold under this area of cloud through Wales and

:27:36.:27:40.

Midland and into north-west England where they had outbreaks of rain on

:27:41.:27:45.

and off during the day. There will be hill fog to be found tonight,

:27:46.:27:49.

too. Cloud in Scotland and Northern Ireland, but mainly dry. Where you

:27:50.:27:52.

have cloud, temperatures will hold up. Where you are under clear skies,

:27:53.:27:56.

east anning Lee why and south-east England the frost will set in. Hard

:27:57.:28:02.

frost in rural spots. Minus 6 possible going into tomorrow

:28:03.:28:05.

morning. Scraping the ice off the car. After the frosty start more

:28:06.:28:09.

sunshine to come during the day tomorrow. Elsewhere, most of us will

:28:10.:28:13.

stay cloudy. Where you have the cloud in England and Wales damp and

:28:14.:28:18.

drizzly in places. Dry weather despite the cloud in Scotland and

:28:19.:28:21.

Northern Ireland. Rain into Shetland later. Sunshine in the Channel

:28:22.:28:25.

Islands. It won't feel particularly warm, nor will it despite the

:28:26.:28:28.

sunshine in the far south-east. A cold feeling day in the cloud across

:28:29.:28:32.

south-east Wales into the Midlands. Temperatures a little bit higher the

:28:33.:28:36.

further north we come. Could see brighter breaks in north-east

:28:37.:28:39.

England across eastern parts of Scotland, patchy rain heading into

:28:40.:28:42.

Shetland. Yes, in Scotland double figure temperatures again for some

:28:43.:28:46.

of us. Looks like a bit more cloud tomorrow evening and night across

:28:47.:28:49.

southernmost parts of the UK. That frost not as hard or widespread.

:28:50.:28:53.

With high pressure in control, a lot of fine, settled but cloudy weather

:28:54.:28:57.

to come going into the ebbed would, too.

:28:58.:29:16.

Theresa May's long-awaited speech on Brexit.

:29:17.:29:18.

She confirmed Britain would leave the single market and said

:29:19.:29:21.

she wanted a stronger Britain, in charge of its own laws

:29:22.:29:24.

Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS