13/11/2017 BBC News at Six


13/11/2017

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Tonight at Six.

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The government has guaranteed that

Parliament will be given a vote

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on the final Brexit deal.

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In what's being seen

as a concession, MPs will be given

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a chance to debate the bill.

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There will be new legislation for

MPs to debate.

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We'll have legislation that

puts it into effect,

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in other words the House will be

able to go through it line by line

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and agree it line by line.

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These questions have been

pressing for months.

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This last-minute attempt

to climb down brings them

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into very sharp focus.

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If MPs vote against the deal

the Government says we'll

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still leave the EU,

but without an agreement.

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Also tonight.

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The moment an earthquake struck

the Iran-Iraq border.

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More than 350 people dead

and thousands injured.

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The British citizen jailed in Iran.

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For the first time Boris Johnson

admits making a mistake over how

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he's handled the case.

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A warning from climate

change scientists.

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Global warming emissions are set

to rise again this year

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after a three-year lull.

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"Waste not, want not."

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If only that were true,

every year we throw away

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10 million tonnes of food.

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Coming up in Sportsday on BBC News.

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Could moments like this be a thing

of the past for Italy?

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The four-time winners stand

on the verge of missing out

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on next year's World Cup.

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Good evening and welcome

to the BBC News at Six.

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Ever since the Brexit vote MPs

on all sides of the Commons have

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been demanding a greater say

in how it's achieved.

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Today the Government appears to have

offered a major concession.

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The Brexit Secretary David Davis

says a vote on the final

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deal will be guaranteed

by a new piece of legislation.

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Labour has called it "a climb-down".

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But the offer came with a warning.

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If MPs do vote against the deal,

whatever it is, Britain

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will still leave the EU,

but without an agreement.

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Our political editor

Laura Kuenssberg is in

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Westminster this evening.

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A mess in the making. Tory rebels

and Labour were on course to beat

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the government. But avoid defeat,

MPs will have more of a say. A vote

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on the actual Brexit deal, as we are

about to leave.

I can now confirm

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that once we've reached an agreement

will bring forward a specific piece

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of legislation to implement that

agreement. Parliament will be given

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time to debate, scrutinised and vote

on the final agreement we strike

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with the European Union. This

agreement will only hold if

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Parliament approves that.

Giving in

to some Tory and Labour demands that

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Parliament to have a proper

decision, if and when a deal is

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done.

It's a recognition by the

government that it is about to lose

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a series of votes on the withdrawal

bill. These questions have been

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pressing for months, this

last-minute attempt to climb down

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rings them into very sharp focus and

we are entitled to clear and souls.

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Stop Brexit!

In other words what

took you so long to admit that

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Parliament would need a make or

break Brexit moment?

Stop Brexit!

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There has been fierce resistance all

along to the laws already going

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through the Commons. This new idea

takes the wind out of the rebels'

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sales. But if there is no deal in no

time will there be no vote?

If we

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run out of time, the time has to be

extended under Article 50 so that

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all parties are able to deal with

it.

Can he confirmed that in the

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event of no agreement, no deal, this

place will have no say and we will

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leave on that date because it's on

the face of the bill, without any

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say from this supposedly sovereign

Parliament which voted to take back

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control?

While Parliamentary

involvement is essential, this isn't

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and never should have been construed

an opportunity to reverse Brexit, to

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return the UK to the EU, or go

behind the wishes of the British

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people as expressed in the

referendum.

It matters not so much

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here but in the real world. European

business bigwigs in number ten

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today, to make it plain to the Prime

Minister. Jobs, millions of families

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livelihoods, depend on her getting

Brexit right.

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Laura, just to be clear, vote or no

vote, Britain will still leave the

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EU, is that right?

This concession

to try to buy off Tory rebels is not

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about that most fundamental of

questions, whether we actually go

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ahead and leave the EU, or whether

there is an attempt by the back door

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to make us stay in. That's not what

this climb-down is really about. But

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this is about or not the shape of

the Brexit deal, that will change

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our country for decades to come, is

subject to a separate act of

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Parliament. A separate set of new

laws that MPs and Lords will have to

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vote on, separate pieces of

legislation that actually line by

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line our elected representatives

will have the chance to say yes or

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no to the deal. On that fundamental

basic question, this doesn't change

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whether or not we're going to leave

the European Union. But what it is

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about is about trying to placate

rebels in the Tory party and Labour

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and other parties and opponents who

have said time and again that the

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government hasn't given people

enough of a chance to have their

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say. They haven't wanted Parliament

to have a real role in scrutinising

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the deal as and when it eventually

comes. There are big unanswered

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question is here. Will it be enough

to calm down MPs who have been

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really grumpy about how the

government is proceeding? I think

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that is an open question tonight.

What happens if there isn't actually

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a deal with the other 27? If there

isn't a deal then there can't be an

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act of Parliament on the deal said

the other alternative and therefore

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we crash out after all. But the

government hopes is this has taken

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some of the steam out of those who

were bruising for a fight in

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Parliament this week. It has

certainly turned down the tone of

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some of the opposition. The

government is kidding themselves

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that they think the fight is over

how we leave have disappeared.

Thank

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you.

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More than 400 people have been

killed in a powerful earthquake that

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struck the northern border

of Iran and Iraq.

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Another 4,000 were injured

and the casualty figure is expected

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to rise on both sides of the border.

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A major rescue operation is under

way but it is being hampered

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by landslides and power cuts.

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The epicentre of the quake,

which measured 7.3, was just under

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20 miles south of Halabja.

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One of the worst hit

areas was Sarpol-e Zahab,

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as James Robbins reports.

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The moment the Earth

starts shaking violently.

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A man runs for his life

from the control room of this

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dam, as massive boulders

are hurled around outside.

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The dam wall was not breached

but elsewhere devastation.

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In Iran, the border town

of Sarpol-e Zahab was hit hardest.

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As entire walls collapsed,

many families did manage

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to flee their homes,

but others were crushed or buried.

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At a local hospital, there were many

stories of narrow escape.

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TRANSLATION:

I fell

from the balcony down.

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The earthquake was very strong.

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TRANSLATION:

The earthquake

shattered the window which fell

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on me and it wounded my hand

and my face.

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Rescue has been made more difficult

by the mountainous terrain.

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Iranian authorities are pouring

resources in but landslides

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and power cuts are slowing both

rescue efforts and the task

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of establishing the full

extent of casualties.

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This quake was 7.3 in magnitude,

and happened in a known danger zone.

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The surface of the Earth is made up

of tectonic plates, and in this case

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the Arabian plate has been moving

roughly northwards

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against the Eurasian plate

at a rate of two centimetres,

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just under an inch a year.

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Forces build up and eventually

are very suddenly released

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with devastating effect.

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The destruction in Iran is greater

than in neighbouring Iraq,

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where a major rescue operation

is also underway.

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The BBC's correspondent is there.

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This area is one of the hardest hit

in Iraq by Sunday's earthquake.

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We are told seven people were inside

this home when it collapsed.

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Two of them were killed

and others were injured.

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Several other buildings suffered

similar damage to this one,

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but fortunately they seem to be

the exception rather than the rule,

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and most of the other homes

in the region managed to withstand

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the impact of the earthquake.

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For the survivors,

night-time is the toughest.

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In rapidly falling temperatures,

families are huddled around fires.

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Even where buildings are intact,

fear of after-shocks will keep

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people outdoors.

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James Robbins, BBC News.

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The Foreign Secretary,

Boris Johnson, has admitted

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for the first time that he made

a mistake in his handling

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of the case of Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe, the British

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citizen who is being

held in prison in Iran.

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Following renewed criticism

from Labour, he also confirmed

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that he would be meeting

Ms Zaghari-Ratcliffe's husband

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in London this week.

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Our special correspondent, Lucy

Manning, has been speaking to him.

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SINGS.

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A mother singing with her daughter,

just a week before her arrest

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Nazanin Zaghari-Ratcliffe has now

been separated from three-year-old

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Gabriella for a year and a half.

With her health deteriorating in and

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Iranians prison and the words of

politicians here appearing to harm

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her case, her husband has this

message to the Foreign Secretary.

I

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want you to solve this mess. It's

not a mess that entirely the Foreign

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Secretary's making but it is a mess

that his name has been touched it

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and is getting deeper and more

complicated because of that.

He will

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take his requests to a meeting with

the Foreign Secretary this week.

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When you go to Iran at like to be on

that plane, I'd like to be standing

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next to you for the symbolism that

has. The second thing is that

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Nazanin is given diplomatic

protection.

Mr Johnson and Michael

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Gove less than clear in backing the

family 's account that Mrs

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Zaghari-Ratcliffe was visiting

relatives when she was arrested.

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When you look at what Nazanin

Zaghari-Ratcliffe was doing, she was

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simply teaching people journalism,

as I understand it.

What was she

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doing when she went to Iran?

I do

know.

The Foreign Secretary said her

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imprisonment cast a shadow over UK

Iranians relations but he recognised

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the family's distress.

The words I

used were open to being

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misinterpreted and I apologise. I

apologise to Mrs Zaghari-Ratcliffe

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and her family if I've inadvertently

cause them any further anguish.

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Labour said he needed to admit it

got it wrong.

It's not good enough.

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If it is a matter of pride that the

Foreign Secretary is refusing to

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admit that he's made a mistake, I

feel bound to say to him that his

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pride matters not one ounce compared

to Nazanin's freedom.

Ministers are

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considering if diplomatic protection

can be given to Mrs

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Zaghari-Ratcliffe which would turn

it from a consumer issue into a more

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serious dispute. It's not clear if

this would help her. Mrs

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Zaghari-Ratcliffe's employers were

insistent her job was

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administrative.

We don't work in a

run and we have no relations with

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Iran. On top of that she was really

on holiday. She's not spy material

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at.

Young Gabriella cried when her

visit to her mum in weekend was cut

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short. -- visit to Hamon imprisoned

this weekend was cut short.

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A man has been found guilty

of carrying out an acid attack

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in a packed London club which left

16 people seriously injured.

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This is the moment

when Arthur Collins,

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the ex-boyfriend of reality TV star

Ferne McCann, threw the substance

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at the Mangle nightclub

in East London in April.

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The 25-year-old was convicted

at Wood Green Crown Court

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of 14 charges, including

grievous bodily harm.

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The chair of Parliament's spending

watching has called for a police

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investigation after BBC Panorama

uncovered evidence of fraud

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in the student loan system.

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Panorama has uncovered scams

that could be costing

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the taxpayer millions of pounds.

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Richard Watson reports.

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Imran Shaikh is an education agent

who we were told was up to his neck

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in fraud.

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He offered to get Panorama's

undercover students

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thousands of pounds of student loan

money we were not entitled to.

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The fee for faking attendance and

supplying assignments, £1500 paid

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out of our student loan money every

year we are on the course.

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From the evidence you have

shown me, there is

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clear fraud going on and it needs

to be referred to the police.

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He arranged for us to get

on an HND diploma course

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at Grafton College in central

London.

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But our cover story was that our

student left school at

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16 and did not have the

right qualifications.

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Another agent called Raza,

who works for him, had an idea.

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A fraudulent certificate

was made out in our

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undercover student's name.

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It was apparently supplied by

an awarding body based on the floor

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above Grafton College.

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For the National Union

of Students, crooked

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agents are damaging UK education.

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I am totally and

utterly disappointed

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and disgusted that these people,

these fraudsters, are actually

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exploiting students at the detriment

of them wanting a degree to be able

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to progress in society.

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The government needs to do more

in regulating these types of

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institutions.

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Grafton College and the awarding

body both say they are

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unaware of any

fraudulent activities.

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The College says that although Raza

and Imran are on its

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premises from time to time, they

are not authorised to act as agents.

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Neither of the agents

responded to our allegations.

0:15:100:15:13

Richard Watson, BBC News.

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And you can see more of Richard's

investigation on tonight's Panorama

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at 7.30pm on BBC One.

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The time is a quarter past six.

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Our top story this evening...

0:15:320:15:34

The government has guaranteed that

parliament will be given a vote

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on the final Brexit deal.

0:15:360:15:38

And still to come...

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Exploring identity at school -

the Church of England says kids

0:15:400:15:42

should be able to wear

what they want without jugdement.

0:15:420:15:47

Coming up in Sportsday

on BBC News...

0:15:470:15:51

"I knew I was going to die" -

the miraculous story of one surfer

0:15:510:15:55

who is returning to the water,

having survived two

0:15:550:15:57

days stranded at sea.

0:15:570:16:02

Global carbon dioxide emissions

are projected to rise

0:16:050:16:07

for the first time in four years.

0:16:070:16:11

Scientists at a United Nations

climate conference in Germany say

0:16:110:16:15

the main cause of the expected

growth has been greater use of coal

0:16:150:16:17

in China as its economy expands.

0:16:170:16:20

Researchers say cuts are needed

to avoid dangerous global

0:16:200:16:23

warming later this century,

as our science editor,

0:16:230:16:24

David Shukman, explains.

0:16:240:16:30

For more than a week now the people

of Delhi had been suffering in air

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that has become toxic, smog created

by countless engines burning fossil

0:16:350:16:41

fuels including coal. Coal is one of

the biggest sources of pollution

0:16:410:16:45

worldwide. Power stations like this

one in Poland belch out gases

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including carbon dioxide and despite

promises to clean up, emissions are

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actually increasing. For countries

in the path of devastating Harry

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Kane is like the ones that struck

the Caribbean earlier this year,

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this is depressing -- devastating

hurricane aims. It seems that little

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is being done to stop global

warming.

This is very worrying for

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us, I would hate to say that it

sounds a death but it translate into

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that given we have had such an

active hurricane season this season.

0:17:180:17:24

This new research finds that more

and more, Burke said is being

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released from power stations,

factories and different forms of

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transport -- more and more carbon

dioxide. This shows how emissions of

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carbon dioxide have risen over three

decades. In the last few years they

0:17:380:17:42

have been levelling off which was

seen as a positive sign but this

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year there has suddenly been an

increase of 2% so what is happening

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and who is to blame around the

world? In America, emissions of

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carbon dioxide have fallen slightly

and that is despite President Trump

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wanting to leave the Paris

agreement. In Europe they are on

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course to be down as well but in

China they are up as the economy

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picks up and more coal is burned.

Climate scientists say it is vital

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that less coal is used if we are to

have any chance of heading off the

0:18:120:18:16

worst of global warming will stop

President Trump is promoting the

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coal industry and he wants America

to help other countries to use it.

0:18:200:18:25

There are countries that have said

that coal is going to be part of our

0:18:250:18:28

energy mix for the foreseeable

future, many in Asia and some in

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Africa as well, and they have been

clear that because coal is going to

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be part of their energy mix in the

future, they want support for clean

0:18:360:18:41

coal technology.

There is now a

battle over a few will that many

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economies rely on. There are plans

to make coal cleaner, to use it

0:18:450:18:51

without releasing carbon dioxide,

but this is not much of a reality so

0:18:510:18:54

far and in the meantime there are

warnings that emissions need to fall

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rapidly, not rise, as they are now.

0:18:590:19:03

MPs in Westminster have

been debating a budget

0:19:030:19:05

for Northern Ireland,

after ten months without a devolved

0:19:050:19:07

executive at Stormont.

0:19:070:19:09

The power sharing government

collapsed in January,

0:19:090:19:12

and since then the DUP and Sinn Fein

have failed to agree a deal

0:19:120:19:15

to restore devolution.

0:19:150:19:16

Our Ireland correspondent Chris

Buckler is at Stormont tonight.

0:19:160:19:25

After all this time, presumably

Northern Ireland need a budget and

0:19:250:19:29

quickly?

Absolutely, public services

here are starting to run out of cash

0:19:290:19:33

and that includes departments like

health and education so without a

0:19:330:19:37

power-sharing executive here,

Westminster has had no choice but to

0:19:370:19:40

step in and legislate for a budget.

Theresa May has been clear that she

0:19:400:19:45

believes this is a one-off decision

and not the introduction of what is

0:19:450:19:49

known as direct rule is where London

would take over the running of the

0:19:490:19:53

apartments here in Belfast and she

believed the DUP and Sinn Fein can

0:19:530:20:02

come to an agreement that would see

them return to government in the

0:20:020:20:05

building behind me but frankly that

is not looking likely. The DUP have

0:20:050:20:08

said they believed direct rule could

return sometime in a matter of weeks

0:20:080:20:10

and Sinn Fein are insisting that the

current talks to overcome the

0:20:100:20:13

difficulties are now over and they

want the British and Irish

0:20:130:20:16

governments to come to some kind of

partnership agreement to fill the

0:20:160:20:20

void. In the meantime, Northern

Ireland is stuck in a kind of limbo,

0:20:200:20:24

halfway between devolution and

direct rule. The one thing the two

0:20:240:20:28

parties agree on is that

power-sharing is not likely to

0:20:280:20:32

return any time soon.

Thank you.

0:20:320:20:36

Bob Geldof has returned his freedom

of the city of Dublin in protest

0:20:360:20:40

against the Burmese leader Aung San

Suu Kyi who was given the same

0:20:400:20:44

honour. He described the treatment

of the Rohingya Muslim minority

0:20:440:20:49

community as mass ethnic cleansing

and he said his home city had

0:20:490:20:55

honoured Aung San Suu Kyi but now

she had shamed Dublin.

0:20:550:20:58

The Church of England

is telling its schools that

0:20:590:21:01

children should be free

to explore their identity and that

0:21:010:21:03

both boys and girls should be

free to wear a tutu,

0:21:030:21:07

tiara or tool belt without judgment.

0:21:070:21:11

The updated guidelines aim

to prevent children being bullied

0:21:110:21:15

because of their sexual orientation

or gender identity.

0:21:150:21:17

Here's our religious affairs

correspondent Martin Bashir.

0:21:170:21:23

Dressing up is not just a favourite

activity for the reception class

0:21:230:21:27

at this London church primary

school, it's also part

0:21:270:21:30

of the curriculum designed

to encourage individuality

0:21:300:21:33

and discourage bullying.

0:21:330:21:39

The Church of England has

updated its advice for its 4700

0:21:390:21:44

schools to protect children who may

be considering transition

0:21:440:21:46

from one gender to another.

0:21:460:21:50

Being an individual is very

important and respecting everybody's

0:21:500:21:52

right to be an individual is very

important to us.

0:21:520:21:56

So if children aren't themselves

then they cannot be free

0:21:560:21:58

to learn, and that's key.

0:21:580:22:03

The new guidelines say children

should be allowed to try many cloaks

0:22:030:22:07

of identity without being labelled

and that a child may choose

0:22:070:22:10

the tutu, princess's tiara,

or a fireman's helmet

0:22:100:22:13

without expectation or comment.

0:22:130:22:18

Today's guidance is designed

to prevent bullying in schools

0:22:180:22:23

like this, but on the issue of human

sexuality, there is deep division

0:22:230:22:26

within the Church of England

and some evangelical Christians see

0:22:260:22:30

today's announcement as an attempt

to erode the authority

0:22:300:22:32

of the Bible and embrace

an ever-changing culture.

0:22:320:22:38

What people expect the Church

of England to do is to set forth

0:22:380:22:43

the framework for living as set out

in the Bible.

0:22:430:22:46

That way all made wonderfully

in the image of God,

0:22:460:22:49

male and female, and the Church

of England today seems

0:22:490:22:52

to have failed in its duty

to say that to the nation.

0:22:520:22:56

But the Archbishop of Canterbury,

who expressed his support

0:22:560:23:00

for the new guidance in writing

and on social media,

0:23:000:23:03

rejects this criticism,

saying no child should be diminished

0:23:030:23:08

by being reduced to

a stereotype or a problem.

0:23:080:23:11

Martin Bashir, BBC

News, central London.

0:23:110:23:14

This may not be what you want to see

as you sit down to a meal.

0:23:200:23:25

But we throw away around 10 million

tonnes of food each year,

0:23:250:23:28

and according to experts much

of it is good enough to eat.

0:23:280:23:31

There is waste throughout

the food supply chain,

0:23:310:23:33

but it's thought that the biggest

problem lies with consumers

0:23:330:23:35

and campaigners are urging us

to be much more careful

0:23:350:23:38

about what we throw away,

as Jeremy Cooke explains.

0:23:380:23:41

OK, it is past its sell by date.

0:23:410:23:44

But this is, or was, food.

0:23:440:23:46

What's this?

0:23:460:23:48

Sushi.

0:23:480:23:50

Grown, produced,

processed, and discarded.

0:23:500:23:55

A super-sized serving

of stinking waste.

0:23:550:23:59

It's amazing how much food is thrown

out and it's amazing how long it's

0:23:590:24:03

taken the message to get through.

0:24:030:24:04

If you don't have to

eat it, don't buy it.

0:24:040:24:09

The striking thing here

is the tonnes of food waste

0:24:090:24:11

that we all throw away all the time.

0:24:110:24:15

This stuff has come from bars

and restaurants and businesses

0:24:150:24:18

and there are mountains of it piling

up here every day.

0:24:180:24:21

Across the country,

we throw away 10 million

0:24:210:24:23

tonnes of food every year.

0:24:230:24:26

That's £17 billion worth in the bin.

0:24:260:24:29

And we're told 60%

of that is avoidable -

0:24:290:24:32

food that could have and should

have been eaten.

0:24:320:24:38

There is waste through

the entire supply chain.

0:24:380:24:41

From in the field,

in the manufacturing,

0:24:410:24:45

in the restaurant, in the retail,

in the supermarket, distribution,

0:24:450:24:47

and in the kitchen at home.

0:24:470:24:50

Overproduction is a fact

of the modern food industry.

0:24:500:24:54

Most of the surplus - good,

nutritious stuff - goes to waste.

0:24:540:24:56

But here there's another way.

0:24:560:25:00

All this, if it wasn't

for Fareshare, would end

0:25:000:25:04

up going in the bin.

0:25:040:25:05

At the Fareshare charity,

they take the surplus and use

0:25:050:25:07

it to feed the hungry.

0:25:070:25:10

The thing that really drives us nuts

is it is going to waste

0:25:100:25:14

while there are people going hungry.

0:25:140:25:16

We feed at the moment half

a million people a week,

0:25:160:25:18

half a million people a week,

with this food.

0:25:180:25:22

We do that to 7000 front line

charity and community groups.

0:25:220:25:26

Which is good news here

at the Melton Learning Hub,

0:25:260:25:30

where disadvantaged kids get

good, fresh food.

0:25:300:25:35

For our kids it means

they get hot meal.

0:25:350:25:37

They definitely get

a hot meal every day.

0:25:370:25:40

Lots of different circumstances

the young people come to us

0:25:400:25:43

in and it is a brilliant way

of using food that would,

0:25:430:25:46

as you say, go to waste.

0:25:460:25:47

But Luke and his mates know

that this is the exception.

0:25:470:25:50

Most surplus food is

simply thrown away.

0:25:500:25:54

This stuff, if it was like left

on the shelf, it would get put

0:25:540:25:58

into storage and get put

in landfills and that

0:25:580:26:00

and that's not good.

0:26:000:26:01

Tackling the issue will mean dumping

less food and doing more

0:26:010:26:04

with whatever goes in the bin.

0:26:040:26:07

Here it is used to make valuable

fertiliser to generate

0:26:070:26:10

gas and electricity.

0:26:100:26:13

But most of our discarded food

still goes to the incinerator

0:26:130:26:16

or to landfill - perhaps

the definition of waste

0:26:160:26:18

in a hungry world.

0:26:180:26:19

Jeremy Cooke, BBC News.

0:26:190:26:22

We'll have more on waste

tomorrow, looking at

0:26:260:26:28

the ways we can reduce it.

0:26:280:26:30

Time for a look at the weather.

0:26:300:26:32

Here's Phil Avery.

0:26:320:26:37

A beautiful picture but I guess it

means it is pretty nippy.

0:26:370:26:40

It was this morning, the milder air

from the Atlantic brought this in

0:26:430:26:48

parts of Scotland and at the same

time further south the cold air gave

0:26:480:26:52

a glorious start. But there is

something of a transition already in

0:26:520:26:57

hand as the mild air that was always

around has pushed to the north of

0:26:570:27:02

Britain ranked stoop weather fronts

that have changed the wind

0:27:020:27:05

direction. Sunday was all about the

northerly, but no longer the -5 of

0:27:050:27:14

last night, plus five or more for

many parts about from maybe Scotland

0:27:140:27:19

which has the best of the sunshine

to start the day. Some rain in the

0:27:190:27:27

Western Isles, but the south and

Central Belt, we picked up the cloud

0:27:270:27:31

and it thickens up in the North of

England, East Anglia and across the

0:27:310:27:35

Midlands and Wales. Only in the

southern counties might see a bit of

0:27:350:27:40

brightness to start the day. The

theory is that we will drag that

0:27:400:27:45

cloud further south, all the while

with the breeze from the west, it

0:27:450:27:50

might break up coming over the hills

of Wales and the Pennines but no

0:27:500:27:55

doubt the best sunshine is in

Scotland. Relatively mild compared

0:27:550:27:59

to today. But it comes at a price,

fog on Wednesday morning could be

0:27:590:28:08

dense in patches in the South of

England and Wales. The best of the

0:28:080:28:13

sunshine further north. As the day

gets going, some of the cloud and

0:28:130:28:18

fog will lift, some brightness in

parts of England and Wales and in

0:28:180:28:22

Scotland you have that weather front

coming back at you in the West but

0:28:220:28:27

Italy but it is relatively mild --

particularly.

0:28:270:28:30

That's all from the BBC News at Six

so it's goodbye from me

0:28:320:28:35

and on BBC One we now join the BBC's

news teams where you are.

0:28:350:28:36