14/03/2018 BBC News at Six


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14/03/2018

The latest national and international news stories from the BBC News team, followed by weather.


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An extraordinary scientist

who inspired millions -

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tributes pour in from all over

the world for Professor Stephen

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Hawking who has died

at the age of 76.

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I'm very proud that I have

been able to contribute

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to our understanding

of the universe.

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Diagnosed with motor neurone

disease in his 20s -

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he defied the odds and pushed

the boundaries with his theories

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that scientists say unlocked

a universe of possibilities.

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He had a real impact on my life

and I think it is the passing

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of a great scientist.

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He will be truly sorely missed.

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We'll be looking back at the life

of one of the world's most eminent

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and famous scientists.

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Also on the programme tonight.

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The Salisbury nerve agent attack -

Britain expels 23 Russian diplomats

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and cuts off all high-level contact

after Moscow refuses

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to give answers.

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They have treated the use

of a military grade nerve agent

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in Europe with sarcasm,

contempt and defiance.

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And learning the language -

almost 800,000 people live

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here but don't speak English,

will the government's

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integration plan work?

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And coming up in

Sportsday on BBC News.

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Chelsea face a test

of their credentials

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if they are to make it three English

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Champions League quarterfinalists.

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Good evening and welcome

to the BBC News at Six.

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One of the greatest

scientists of modern times,

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Professor Stephen Hawking,

has died at the age of 76.

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He was diagnosed with a rare form

of motor neurone disease

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when he was 22 and told he had only

a few years to live.

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But he defied all expectations

and went on to become one

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of the most famous physicists

in the world thanks to his studies

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on black holes and relativity.

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Nasa said his theories have unlocked

a universe of possibilities

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that they and the world

are still exploring.

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The tributes that have poured

in from far and wide speak volumes

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about his influence and his reach,

as well as his ability to bridge

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the gap between academia

and popular culture.

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Our science editor David Shukman

looks back at his life.

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There is nothing like the Eureka

moment of discovering something no

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one knew before.

Stephen Hawking had

a gift for inspiration, a powerful

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spirit overcoming an ailing body to

allow a mind to roam the cosmos.

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Earning him a place as the most

famous scientist in the world.

It

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has been a glorious time to be alive

and researching and doing

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theoretical physics.

Who else could

draw crowds like this? The man who

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gazed at the stars became one

himself. His story poignant and

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uplifting, his career involved

concept is so

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concept is so alien and complicated

for most it was a struggle to keep

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up but he explored the strangest of

features of the universe, black

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holes, drawing together the science

of the largest things in space with

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the science of the small, part of a

quest to come up with a theory for

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the universe.

He made these

incredibly original insights that

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set up the modern theory of black

holes. And made great contributions

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to cosmology, and so he was a huge

figure.

I was devastated, really

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upset. I met him a couple of times

but he had an impact on my life. It

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is the passing of a great scientist

who will be truly missed.

As a

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student his intelligence stood out

that at that moment he was given a

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warning that motor neurone disease

would cut his life short.

When I was

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diagnosed, I was told it would kill

me in two, three years.

Somehow he

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kept going. In a high-tech

wheelchair and a synthesised voice.

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Communicating first by touch, then

by twitching a single muscle in his

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cheek, a daunting burden for anyone.

His children saw him as an example.

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People who live in extreme

circumstances seem to find something

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inspirational in his example of

perseverance and his ability to rise

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above the suffering and still want

to communicate at a higher level.

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Life was not straightforward, his

first marriage ending in divorce, as

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did a second to one of his nurses.

Claims that he had been physically

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abused, the case dropped because of

lack of evidence. His book sold at

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least 10 million copies and everyone

wanted to meet him from the Pope in

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the Vatican, to the Queen. To

President Obama, who awarded him a

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medal of honour. His fame reached

beyond the world of science.

Your

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theory of a doughnut shaped universe

is intriguing. Even appearing in The

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Simpsons.

I did not say that. In an

episode of Star Trek he had the

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chance to tease Isaac Newton.

Not

the apple story again!

Astounding to

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think the Lord created this in seven

days.

Incorrect.

It took 13.8

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million years. More recently he was

happy to play along for Comic

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Relief. He saw himself as an

ambassador for science and in this

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interview told me of his hopes for

the Large Hadron Collider.

He had a

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sense of adventure. I am very

excited. I have been

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wheelchair-bound almost four decades

and the chance to float free in zero

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G will be wonderful.

Even braving a

zero gravity flight. No surprise his

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death prompted tributes. Tim

Berners-Lee two ET...

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Berners-Lee two ET... Nasa said...

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If you reverse time and the universe

is getting smaller.

Eddie Redmayne

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played him in the film The Theory of

Everything and today said, we have

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lost a truly beautiful mind. A

scientist who delved into the realm

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of black holes offered an incredibly

engaging story that achieved

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something remarkable, it touched a

global audience.

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Professor Stephen Hawking,

who's died at the age of 76.

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David joins me now.

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He was an extraordinary man on so

many levels. He had an incredible

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ability to bridge the gap between

academia and popular culture.

There

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are scientists brilliant at

explaining what they do but he took

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it to a superior level. He said

about his own famous book that a lot

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of people did not finish it, might

not have understood it that might

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have come away with a central point

which was the universe is governed

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by rational laws, and that is what

mattered to him. On the sidelines

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occasionally there was grumbling

from other scientists about the cult

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of celebrity, but because he had it,

he acted as a bridge between science

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and the wider world, which meant he

could connect with millions, who

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otherwise would not have given a

second thought to science and that

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makes him unique.

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Britain is expelling 23 Russian

diplomats after Moscow refused

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to explain how a military grade

nerve agent was used

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on a former spy in Salisbury.

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It's the biggest such expulsion

for more than 30 years.

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The Prime Minister told Parliament

that the "undeclared intelligence

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officers" have just one

week to leave.

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The UK has also cut off

all high-level contacts with Russia

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and announced that government

ministers and the Royal family

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will not attend the World Cup.

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Here's our political

editor, Laura Kuenssberg.

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It was right to offer Russia the

opportunity to provide an

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explanation but their response

demonstrated complete disdain for

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the gravity of these events.

The

midnight deadline came and went

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leaving a morning with no new

answers. Theresa May went prepared

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to Prime Minister's Questions, ready

to announce the biggest diplomatic

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action against Russia since the Cold

War.

They have treated the use of a

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military grade nerve agent in Europe

with sarcasm, contempt and defiance.

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There is no alternative conclusion

other than the Russia State was

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culpable for the attempted murder of

Sergei Skripal and his daughter and

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this represents an unlawful use of

force by the Russian state against

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the UK.

The UK will retaliate.

United Kingdom will expel 23 Russian

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diplomats, who have been identified

as undeclared intelligence officers.

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They have one week to leave. This

was not just an act of attempted

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murder, nor just an act against the

UK, it is an affront to the

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prohibition on the use of chemical

weapons and an affront to the

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rules-based system on which we and

our international partners depend.

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23 diplomats suspected of being

spies have seven days to leave, all

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high-level contact between the UK

and Russia is suspended and no

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minister or member of the Royal

family will go to the World Cup.

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Some Russian state assets could be

frozen, with possible laws to crack

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down on hostile states. In a tense

Commons, Jeremy Corbyn was not quite

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ready to accept the culpability of

the Russian state.

Our response must

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be decisive and proportionate and

based on clear evidence.

But listen

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to rising anger as Jeremy Corbyn

turned some of his fire on the

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Tories.

It is as we have expressed

before a matter of huge regret our

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country's diplomatic capacity has

been stripped back with cuts of 25%

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in the past five years.

It is

tradition for the two main parties

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to stick together on foreign policy.

Not these two. This is not a

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question of our diplomacy, of what

diplomatic support we have around

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the world, this is a question of the

culpability of the Russian state.

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Fever rose.

There is continued

disregard for the rule of law and

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human rights must be met with

condemnation.

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condemnation.

Look, Tories cheering

Labour backbenchers. Jeremy Corbyn's

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team, arms folded.

The Russian

government has behaved with

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arrogance, within humanity and with

contempt.

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contempt.

But does this bother the

Russian strongman? Vladimir Putin

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approaching a election, campaigning

in Crimea, unapologetic. A

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spokeswoman claiming on TV...

Britain does not understand

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diplomacy or the law and is full of

liars, fully fledged liars.

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This is not just a straightforward

foreign policy clash but a fight

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with a country that ignores the

norm. Number 10 knows this may only

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be the start. There are no easy

options for the government, nothing

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politically tempting to do next.

There was rank are on display in the

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Commons, anger and concern. The

government has taken what they

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believe his decisive action into

events that happened a few days ago,

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but they are aware they could be

retaliation from the Russian side

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and know only too well to take

bigger action, while Britain would

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need the support and backing of

other international friends around

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the world to do so. A meeting is

scheduled at the UN tonight that

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might give a first taste of whether

or not there could be support for

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more significant action for Britain

and partners around the world to

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take against Russia, but this is a

real moment of decision for Theresa

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May, her first significant foreign

policy test as Prime Minister.

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The Prime Minister has announced

a series of sanctions against Russia

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and Russian state assets.

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Our diplomatic correspondent,

James Robbins, has been assessing

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the scale of today's announcement.

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Here at the Russian Embassy in

London, to get an idea of the scale

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of the expulsion you have to crunch

numbers. 23 diplomats are being

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kicked out, which might not see many

but there are only 58 accredited

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diplomats from Russia in the UK, so

that is 40% sent home. Compared with

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what would seem a bigger expulsion

at the height of the Cold War and

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you can see proportionally this one

is bigger. In 1971, around 100

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diplomats were kicked out, a huge

number, but compared

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number, but compared to the 550

Soviet diplomats in London it was

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small in proportion to today's

action. Interesting that Theresa May

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made clear in her view the 23 being

sent home all of them spies. In the

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City of London it is harder to see

the impact of Theresa May's

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announcements. The Prime Minister

announced a freeze on Russian state

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assets where it is believed they

threaten British life or property.

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The anti-corruption organisation

transparency international estimates

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a fifth of all properties bought in

Britain with criminal money are

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owned by Russians, so expect to see

more use of existing legal measures

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to bring back down. It really is the

expulsions on an unprecedented scale

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from the Russian Embassy that is the

big story today. The Prime Minister

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was clear, saying, we will degrade

Russian intelligence capability in

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the UK for years to come. Whatever

the effect of today's action, the

0:15:030:15:10

Prime Minister was bowled in claims

and said if the Russians seek to

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rebuild their intelligence

capability, we will prevent them

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from doing so.

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Britons travelling to Russia

are being warned that they could

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now face 'anti British

sentiment or harassment'.

0:15:240:15:26

The Foreign Office says Britons

should remain vigilant and avoid

0:15:260:15:29

commenting publicly

on political developments.

0:15:290:15:31

Our Moscow correspondent,

Steve Rosenberg, joins us now.

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What has been the reaction to this

in Russia?

Anger and Moscow has been

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dismissive of what Theresa May said

in the House of Commons. I have just

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come from an interview with the

official spokesperson of the Russian

0:15:490:15:52

Foreign Ministry and she told me

this about Theresa May: she said it

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was a political show, bad theatre,

nonsense, she said it was a shocking

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piece of international provocation,

and of Theresa May, the spokesperson

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of the foreign Ministry said that

the British Prime Minister was

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destroying international law. She

even went as far as to say this was

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the end of Theresa May's career,

because she was involved in a dirty

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story. Moscow will definitely

respond shortly, she said, probably

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not today. And as you mentioned, the

Foreign Office has updated its

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travel advice, its advice to people

travelling to Russia, saying that

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because of heightened political

tensions people should be very

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careful and be aware of the

possibility of anti-British

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sentiment and harassment.

Steve Rosenberg in Moscow, thank

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you. The time is just after 6:15pm.

0:16:410:16:46

Our top story this evening.

0:16:460:16:48

Tributes pour in from all over

the world for Professor Stephen

0:16:480:16:50

Hawking, who has died

at the age of 76.

0:16:500:16:53

Scientists say his theories will

inspire countless generations to

0:16:560:16:59

come.

0:16:590:17:00

Stephen Hawking was really unique

in the sense that he wanted to do

0:17:000:17:03

things differently and he wanted

to contribute things in a different

0:17:030:17:05

sense and I was really

inspired by that.

0:17:050:17:07

We've been talking to some

of the young people

0:17:070:17:15

at the science fair in Birmingham

about the great man

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and his influence.

0:17:180:17:19

Coming up on Sportsday on BBC News:

0:17:190:17:23

Altior underlines his billing

as the best horse in National Hunt

0:17:230:17:25

racing with a commanding

Champion Chase win but there

0:17:250:17:27

was a potentially serious injury

for jockey Ruby Walsh.

0:17:270:17:33

Almost 800,000 people

who live here in the UK

0:17:330:17:36

speak little or no English.

0:17:360:17:38

Now the government is planning

to spend £50 million

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to try to change that

and to encourage social integration.

0:17:410:17:47

Five councils in England have been

selected for special help -

0:17:470:17:50

Bradford, Blackburn,

Peterborough, Walsall

0:17:500:17:51

and Waltham Forest in London.

0:17:510:17:53

Judith Mortiz sent this

report from Bradford.

0:17:530:17:55

What about this one?

0:17:550:17:56

What sound does that give?

0:17:560:18:03

Oh.

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One sound at a time these women

are learning English.

0:18:050:18:10

Whilst their children

are at school they're

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studying too, wanting

to improve their language

0:18:120:18:14

for lots of reasons.

0:18:140:18:15

It would be easier for me

and my husband to establish our own

0:18:150:18:18

business.

0:18:180:18:19

I've got four children.

0:18:190:18:20

Need to help the children.

0:18:200:18:21

You want to help your children?

0:18:210:18:23

Yeah.

0:18:230:18:24

To do homework.

0:18:240:18:25

To do their homework.

0:18:250:18:26

I'm really clever and I'm good

at my work and I can do anything.

0:18:260:18:29

I'm creative.

0:18:290:18:31

But I can't be my 100% if I don't

have my skill of English.

0:18:310:18:34

Empowering marginalised women and

boosting language skills are amongst

0:18:340:18:36

new government plans

to tackle segregation.

0:18:360:18:39

Bradford is one of five areas

which have been selected.

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We've got florists, we've got

artists, we've got tailors, we've

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got women with a plethora of

experiences that they come with but

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unfortunately they can't engage

in the local society because of the

0:18:550:18:58

lack of the language.

0:18:580:18:59

Now, if the language

is there, just open one

0:18:590:19:01

barrier, we'll open a whole field

0:19:010:19:02

full of opportunities for these

women.

0:19:020:19:04

Bradford was at its lowest ebb

in 2001 when race riots erupted

0:19:040:19:07

and segregated communities were

shown to be leading parallel lives.

0:19:070:19:11

17 years on, tackling segregation

here is still a work in progress.

0:19:110:19:19

But what Bradford has

achieved has now earned

0:19:200:19:23

it extra funding and

a

0:19:230:19:23

chance to show other

areas how to improve.

0:19:230:19:25

Two years ago, a report warned that

segregation and social

0:19:250:19:28

exclusion were at worrying

levels in Britain.

0:19:280:19:30

Its author has long been calling

on the government to take action.

0:19:300:19:34

Some of these communities that

we're worried about,

0:19:340:19:36

these very isolated

communities, have abject

0:19:360:19:38

poverty and that will take

money.

0:19:380:19:41

I'm not sure that 50 million over

two years will be enough.

0:19:410:19:46

The government says its plans are

designed to get more people to mix

0:19:460:19:49

together, live together

and play together.

0:19:490:19:50

Judith Moritz, BBC News, Bradford.

0:19:500:19:56

Toys R Us is closing

all 100 of its UK stores

0:19:560:19:59

in the next six weeks -

after administrators

0:19:590:20:01

failed to find a buyer.

0:20:010:20:02

3000 jobs will be lost as a result.

0:20:020:20:06

Some 25 stores have either already

closed in recent days or are due

0:20:060:20:12

to be closed tomorrow.

0:20:120:20:13

Students walked out of classrooms

across the United States this

0:20:130:20:18

afternoon to remember the victims

of the Florida school shooting

0:20:180:20:20

and to demand tighter

gun safety laws.

0:20:200:20:23

Pupils left their classes for 17

minutes - one minute for each

0:20:230:20:25

person who was killed

at the Marjory Stoneman Douglas

0:20:250:20:28

High School in Parkland

exactly a month ago.

0:20:280:20:32

West Mercia Police say they're

currently dealing with 46 young

0:20:320:20:36

people in Telford in Shropshire

who are victims of child

0:20:360:20:38

sexual exploitation,

or are at risk of being abused.

0:20:380:20:43

It comes after an investigation

by the Sunday Mirror suggested that

0:20:430:20:48

up to 1000 girls could have been

sexually assaulted in the town

0:20:480:20:50

over the last 40 years.

0:20:500:20:52

Sima Kotecha reports.

0:20:520:20:53

Night-time in Telford.

0:20:530:20:57

Recent reports say up to 1000 girls

could have been sexually

0:20:570:20:59

abused in the town over

the last four decades.

0:20:590:21:03

The police here say

at the moment they're dealing

0:21:030:21:05

with less than 50 cases.

0:21:050:21:08

We know that we currently

are working jointly with the local

0:21:080:21:12

authority with 46 young people

between the age of 13 and 19.

0:21:120:21:17

And they are people we have

identified as being at risk,

0:21:170:21:20

not necessarily being offended

against, but we're working

0:21:200:21:22

with them to prevent them

from becoming victims.

0:21:220:21:25

In 2013 seven men including these

two brothers, Adil and Mubarak Ali,

0:21:250:21:29

were jailed after police launched

an investigation into child

0:21:290:21:32

prostitution in the town.

0:21:320:21:34

Some believe white, vulnerable girls

are still being targeted

0:21:340:21:37

by mainly Asian gangs.

0:21:370:21:41

However this local social worker,

who doesn't want to be identified,

0:21:410:21:43

says not every victim is the same.

0:21:430:21:46

We have females, we have

males that we support.

0:21:460:21:50

We have young people

from all different backgrounds.

0:21:500:21:57

It is not around targeting just

young girls through working-class.

0:21:570:22:02

Politicians across the region are

calling for an independent inquiry.

0:22:020:22:05

Police here say they welcome

any scrutiny into what

0:22:050:22:07

they're doing and why.

0:22:070:22:10

However, there are some

deep concerns that

0:22:100:22:11

they're not doing enough.

0:22:110:22:14

I think we've all been shocked

by the horrific case that

0:22:140:22:18

we have seen in Telford...

0:22:180:22:21

Today, the Prime Minister

said the most vulnerable

0:22:210:22:24

in Telford have been preyed

on by ruthless criminals.

0:22:240:22:27

The authorities here don't deny

there's a problem with child

0:22:270:22:31

sexual exploitation.

0:22:310:22:32

They say it's happening

all over the country.

0:22:320:22:39

However, the scale of the problem

is what is being contested.

0:22:390:22:41

Seema Kotecha, BBC News, Telford.

0:22:410:22:42

The comedian Jim Bowen -

best know as the presenter

0:22:420:22:47

of the darts-based game show

Bullseye - has died

0:22:470:22:49

at the age of 80.

0:22:490:22:56

One. Can't do it. I'm sorry, boys.

Look at what you could have won.

0:22:560:23:06

Jim Bowen was inspired

to try stand-up comedy

0:23:060:23:07

after seeing Ken Dodd perform.

0:23:070:23:09

Bullseye ran for 14

years on ITV until 1995.

0:23:090:23:11

"Look up at the stars

and not down at your feet.

0:23:110:23:13

Try to make sense of what you see

and wonder about what makes

0:23:130:23:17

the universe exist.

0:23:170:23:18

Be curious."

0:23:180:23:20

Those were the words of Professor

Stephen Hawking - who died today.

0:23:200:23:22

It was advice that he gave

to his three children.

0:23:220:23:27

Our correspondent Jon Kay has been

to the science fair in Birmingham

0:23:270:23:30

today to talk to school children

about Professor Hawking

0:23:300:23:32

and his influence.

0:23:320:23:33

Stephen Hawking would

have loved this.

0:23:330:23:35

20,000 young British scientists

experimenting together.

0:23:350:23:41

Do it again!

0:23:410:23:42

Do it again!

0:23:420:23:46

He told young people

to be curious and

0:23:460:23:48

today, as they studied trajectories

and force, many were thinking

0:23:480:23:54

of their scientific superhero.

0:23:540:23:56

How would you describe him?

0:23:560:23:58

Genius, pioneer,

brilliant, inspirational,

0:23:580:24:00

motivationally engaging, phenomenal.

0:24:000:24:03

I read A Brief History Of Time.

0:24:030:24:06

I thought it was very interesting.

0:24:060:24:08

Did you read all of it?

0:24:080:24:10

I did actually read all of it.

0:24:100:24:13

And it got me into black holes

and I went on to a series of

0:24:130:24:16

lectures about them so, yeah,

it fuelled a lot for me.

0:24:160:24:19

On display at the Big Bang

Fair, inventions from

0:24:190:24:21

the scientists of tomorrow.

0:24:210:24:23

These A level physicists

from North Wales

0:24:230:24:25

regard Professor Hawking

as a modern-day genius.

0:24:250:24:28

He's the intellectual follower

of Einstein and Newton.

0:24:280:24:36

These amazing, amazing figures

that we read about in

0:24:360:24:38

physics books, he was

getting to that level.

0:24:380:24:40

He was incredible.

0:24:400:24:41

His legacy will live on.

0:24:410:24:43

Forever.

0:24:430:24:46

Inside an inflatable

black hole, teenagers

0:24:460:24:50

studied Hawking's space and time

theories while taking selfies.

0:24:500:24:55

It's a lot in one

lifetime for anyone.

0:24:550:24:57

I think he's encouraged

science as a field as well.

0:24:570:25:00

I think more people

are more invested in

0:25:000:25:01

science nowadays because of him.

0:25:010:25:08

It would navigate you to the nearest

exit.

0:25:080:25:11

At 15 he has invented an app

which could help people

0:25:110:25:14

escape a tower block fire

using virtual reality.

0:25:140:25:15

He admires Hawking's

personal courage.

0:25:150:25:18

He was only one man who did such

great things and I was really

0:25:180:25:21

inspired by that, because usually

you see people follow the same paths

0:25:210:25:24

and try and do the same things.

0:25:240:25:26

But Stephen Hawking

was really unique in

0:25:260:25:29

the sense that he wanted to do

things differently and he wanted to

0:25:290:25:32

contribute things

in a different sense.

0:25:320:25:33

I was really inspired by that.

0:25:330:25:35

Perhaps the next Stephen Hawking

was in this room today.

0:25:350:25:37

Jon Kay, BBC News, Birmingham.

0:25:370:25:40

Time for a look at the weather.

0:25:400:25:43

Of course, the weather is all

physics, just to remind you, we have

0:25:460:25:50

one type of dynamic engine, the one

pumping in from the Atlantic, so it

0:25:500:25:54

has been mild since the weekend in

the UK, but we are going to see the

0:25:540:25:59

Danan exchange into the weekend with

the easterly wind returning, do you

0:25:590:26:03

remember that one? Bitterly cold

weather and the prospect of some

0:26:030:26:05

snow. But right now the influence is

coming in off the Atlantic, this

0:26:050:26:10

huge area of low pressure dominating

much of Western Europe, bringing in

0:26:100:26:14

rain with it, strong winds, gales

blowing in the western extremities

0:26:140:26:18

at the moment continuing to pick up

further east. The good news is about

0:26:180:26:21

strong winds overnight is

temperatures should remain above

0:26:210:26:24

freezing and arrest the following

temperature along with the cloud and

0:26:240:26:28

rain creeping eastwards. It tends to

pivot and stick around over Northern

0:26:280:26:33

Ireland, so here is the main concern

for some flooding. A different

0:26:330:26:35

complexion for the weather tomorrow

with the weather system across many

0:26:350:26:39

areas, three or four hours for most

of us as it moves northwards, the

0:26:390:26:46

strong winds easing in the

south-west, as the sun returns some

0:26:460:26:48

sharp showers in the afternoon and

by that stage the rain will clear

0:26:480:26:51

from Northern Ireland and it is

still relatively mild, only single

0:26:510:26:53

figure temperatures in Scotland.

Roll the clock forward 24 hours and

0:26:530:26:58

into tomorrow evening and overnight

we started pick up more snow in the

0:26:580:27:03

showers as we establish more of a

south-easterly wind as opposed to

0:27:030:27:06

the southerly right now, so the

increasing risk we will see some

0:27:060:27:09

snow over the hills of Scotland

during Friday initially but possibly

0:27:090:27:12

at lower levels late in the day, the

start of the blast from the east.

0:27:120:27:16

Again, further south there will be

showers but we are still relatively

0:27:160:27:20

mild. Through Friday night and into

Saturday

0:27:200:27:27

Saturday we will to see the weather

front sinking southwards again,

0:27:270:27:29

bringing a risk of some snow into

the eastern side of the country. And

0:27:290:27:32

then, perhaps, later in the weekend

a significant risk of snow in the

0:27:320:27:35

south with this blast from the east

again it is open to question. We

0:27:350:27:38

will keep you

0:27:380:27:44

That's it from us.

0:27:440:27:46

In a moment the news where you are,

but first we'll leave

0:27:460:27:49

you with the words and images

of Professor Stephen Hawking -

0:27:490:27:52

one of the greatest scientists

of modern times.

0:27:520:27:55

theoretical physics is one of the

few fields in which being disabled

0:27:550:27:59

is no handicap. It's all in your

mind.

0:27:590:28:12

I hope my example will give

encouragement and hope to others in

0:28:190:28:23

similar situations.

0:28:230:28:32

I hope my example will show

disability can be no barrier. One

0:28:370:28:44

can achieve anything if one is

determined enough.

0:28:440:28:50

Never give up.

0:28:560:29:14