18/01/2017 Breakfast


18/01/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louis Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:00.:00:14.

Countries are queuing up for trade deals with Britain when it leaves

:00:15.:00:17.

the EU, says the Foreign Secretary, after Teresa May's confirmation that

:00:18.:00:20.

Boris Johnson answers critics, saying the UK will not be hauling

:00:21.:00:25.

One top trade negotiator tells me Britain needs a reality check

:00:26.:00:30.

on what it wants from Europe, and what it will be able to get.

:00:31.:00:43.

Good morning, it is Wednesday 18 January.

:00:44.:00:45.

Also this morning: Thousands of British holidaymakers are to be

:00:46.:00:47.

flown out of The Gambia, as the Foreign Office warns

:00:48.:00:50.

of the growing risk of unrest in the country.

:00:51.:00:55.

WikiLeaks whistle-blower Chelsea Manning has her prison

:00:56.:00:56.

sentence cut by more than 30 years, in one of Barack Obama's last acts

:00:57.:01:00.

In sport: non-League Lincoln City shock Ipswich Town

:01:01.:01:11.

with an injury-time winner, to reach the fourth round of the FA

:01:12.:01:14.

Good morning from Tennessee on Breakfast's Road trip across

:01:15.:01:30.

America. Today we are asking what President Trump can do for

:01:31.:01:31.

infrastructure and agriculture. Also this morning: Natalie Portman

:01:32.:01:33.

on playing Jackie Kennedy in her new film, and preparing

:01:34.:01:35.

for the Oscars hype. Good morning. For some of us it is a

:01:36.:01:44.

cold and Forest the start. Patchy fog but in the south and south-east

:01:45.:01:49.

in particular there will be some sunshine -- frosty start. For the

:01:50.:01:53.

rest of the UK, fairly cloudy with some light rain or drizzle but some

:01:54.:01:56.

sunshine. I will tell you where in 15 minutes.

:01:57.:01:57.

First, our main story: The Foreign Secretary has said

:01:58.:02:00.

countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with Britain

:02:01.:02:03.

Boris Johnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly

:02:04.:02:07.

after the Article 50 negotiations are concluded,

:02:08.:02:09.

and said the UK would not be hauling up the drawbridge,

:02:10.:02:12.

despite the new migration controls promised by Theresa May.

:02:13.:02:15.

Our political correspondent Tom Bateman has more.

:02:16.:02:23.

Theresa May's Brexit speech brought the most clarity yet on her approach

:02:24.:02:26.

She told ministers and European diplomats she wanted ambitious trade

:02:27.:02:35.

deals with the rest of the EU, but she confirmed Britain

:02:36.:02:37.

would leave the union's formal free-trade area.

:02:38.:02:39.

What I am proposing can't mean membership of the single market.

:02:40.:02:49.

The UK would have control of immigration policy,

:02:50.:02:53.

And, in an unexpected move, the Prime Minister revealed

:02:54.:03:00.

she would be prepared to walk away from the talks if the deal

:03:01.:03:04.

The Foreign Secretary, Boris Johnson, writes

:03:05.:03:13.

are queueing up to do trade deals with Britain.

:03:14.:03:18.

Today, attention turns to the response from the rest

:03:19.:03:20.

The head of the European Commission, Jean-Claude Juncker,

:03:21.:03:24.

Some in the European Parliament believe Mrs May's demands

:03:25.:03:27.

Yhe illusion that you can go out of the single market,

:03:28.:03:34.

that you can go out off the customs union, and that you can cherry-pick,

:03:35.:03:38.

and you can have still a number of advantages.

:03:39.:03:41.

The Prime Minister will face MPs later, with some opponents

:03:42.:03:43.

saying her plan risks an economic catastrophe.

:03:44.:03:45.

She has called for unity over Brexit.

:03:46.:03:47.

So far, at least, that seems some way off.

:03:48.:03:50.

Let's get the latest now from our political correspondent

:03:51.:03:52.

Iain, the Prime Minister faces MPs for the first time

:03:53.:03:56.

Theresa May will be facing MPs for the first time. It is Prime

:03:57.:04:15.

Minister's Questions at lunchtime, and she is likely to be challenged

:04:16.:04:19.

on the content of that speech. Labour's challenge will be first of

:04:20.:04:23.

all that she should have given that speech to MPs rather than those

:04:24.:04:27.

invited audience of ambassadors. They will call for more

:04:28.:04:30.

Parliamentary scrutiny, and thirdly they will say that they do not

:04:31.:04:33.

welcome her warning that she will make written into some kind of low

:04:34.:04:38.

tax, low regulation economy if she doesn't get her way. But some of the

:04:39.:04:42.

backbenchers, some of the MPs in Jeremy Corbyn's party, are not too

:04:43.:04:48.

pleased with the fact that they think he should be taking a stronger

:04:49.:04:52.

line on the argument that Britain should stay inside the single market

:04:53.:04:55.

and effectively the Labour leadership was giving an alibi to

:04:56.:05:00.

Theresa May for a bad Brexit. Liberal Democrats will call for a

:05:01.:05:03.

second referendum when she has negotiated the deal and the SNP

:05:04.:05:07.

warned that there could be another Scottish referendum because they are

:05:08.:05:12.

not at all pleased at the suggestion Britain is coming out the single

:05:13.:05:14.

market. Just after 7:00am this

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morning, we will hear from Shadow Brexit Secretary,

:05:15.:05:16.

Keir Starmer, and get his thoughts Thousands of British holidaymakers

:05:17.:05:19.

are being flown home from The Gambia, because of

:05:20.:05:24.

a worsening political crisis there. The Foreign Office is advising

:05:25.:05:26.

people to avoid all but essential travel to the country,

:05:27.:05:29.

after its President refused to step down and declared

:05:30.:05:32.

a state of emergency. It is a country on the move. Under a

:05:33.:05:47.

state of emergency, Gambians are fleeing their capital. And amongst

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all this are thousands of British tourists, who have been told to get

:05:53.:05:58.

out. Thomas Cook has a team heading to the country to help. Four extra

:05:59.:06:02.

flights are expected to leave today. The tension has built because this

:06:03.:06:09.

man has refused to leave office. President Yahya Jammeh went on

:06:10.:06:13.

television to warn about foreign interference in this country. This

:06:14.:06:19.

may lead to a state of public emergency. He had conceded last

:06:20.:06:27.

month's election after ruling for more than 20 years. The Opposition

:06:28.:06:31.

Leader was due to take power tomorrow, at the President

:06:32.:06:34.

challenged the result and has resisted pressure from neighbouring

:06:35.:06:38.

countries to stand down. Now the threat of violence is growing. That

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is why the Foreign Office updated its travel advice last night,

:06:43.:06:47.

warning against all but essential travel, saying the potential for

:06:48.:06:50.

military intervention and civil disturbance is high, and could

:06:51.:06:55.

result in international airport being closed at short notice. This

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is why tourists come. It calls itself the smiling coast of Africa.

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But it is a worrying time for holidaymakers waiting to leave, and

:07:05.:07:06.

for Gambians who can't. President Obama has cut

:07:07.:07:11.

the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who was jailed for 35 years

:07:12.:07:14.

for leaking intelligence secrets. The former military analyst,

:07:15.:07:16.

who was born Bradley Manning but had hormone therapy in prison,

:07:17.:07:19.

will be released in May. Our correspondent in Washington

:07:20.:07:22.

is Rajini Vaidyanathan. Chelsea Manning was responsible

:07:23.:07:28.

for one of the largest leaks of government secrets

:07:29.:07:32.

in American history. Born Bradley Manning,

:07:33.:07:35.

it was while serving in Iraq that the low-ranking Private hacked

:07:36.:07:38.

government databases, handing more than 700,000

:07:39.:07:42.

classified documents to Julian Assange's

:07:43.:07:45.

WikiLeaks organisation. Manning's supporters have campaigned

:07:46.:08:01.

for years for her release. They maintain she is a whistleblower, not

:08:02.:08:05.

a traitor. The reduction of Chelsea Manning's sentence means she has

:08:06.:08:10.

only served three out of 35 year term she was handed in 2013.

:08:11.:08:16.

Shortly after the trial, Bradley announced she would be known

:08:17.:08:21.

She was being held at a male prison, and tried to take her life

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I'd say 12 to 16 months, her mental condition deteriorated

:08:30.:08:37.

significantly and she became depressed.

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There was a risk to her well-being, if not her life, she had remained in

:08:40.:08:45.

this prison. Julian Assange thanked those

:08:46.:08:46.

who campaigned for Chelsea's release,

:08:47.:08:51.

and Edward Snowden, who also leaked government secrets,

:08:52.:08:53.

tweeted his thanks But the Republican Speaker,

:08:54.:08:54.

Paul Ryan, said the decision to cut short

:08:55.:09:01.

Chelsea Manning's sentence was outrageous, and sent a message

:09:02.:09:05.

that those who compromise national security won't be held accountable

:09:06.:09:08.

for their crimes. One of President Obama's final acts

:09:09.:09:10.

in office will please, as much

:09:11.:09:13.

as it will anger. An infertile couple have given birth

:09:14.:09:14.

to a baby which was conceived with the genetic material

:09:15.:09:17.

of three people. It is the first time

:09:18.:09:19.

the controversial procedure has been used to overcome infertility,

:09:20.:09:22.

rather than protect a child Another child was created

:09:23.:09:25.

using a slightly different method The Supreme Court is ruling today

:09:26.:09:28.

on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use

:09:29.:09:56.

of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies

:09:57.:09:59.

in buggies on board. The case was triggered

:10:00.:10:01.

when wheelchair user Doug Paulley attempted to board a bus

:10:02.:10:04.

but was unable to when a woman First says it is the most reasonable

:10:05.:10:12.

decision, but Mr Pauli insists it is discriminant.

:10:13.:10:12.

It is a big issue for disabled people.

:10:13.:10:23.

It is amazing that so few cases make it to the Supreme Court

:10:24.:10:26.

and it is the first time that it's ever had a case about rights

:10:27.:10:30.

of access to goods and services for disabled people.

:10:31.:10:33.

Yeah, I never thought about five years ago when I tried to catch that

:10:34.:10:36.

bus that we would still be talking about it now.

:10:37.:10:39.

The first freight train to travel directly to the UK from China is due

:10:40.:10:43.

It's taken over a fortnight to get here, but that's around half

:10:44.:10:48.

the time a journey by sea would take.

:10:49.:10:50.

The train, which has 34 wagons, travelled through Russia,

:10:51.:10:52.

Kazakhstan, Poland and many other countries to get here,

:10:53.:10:55.

The train began its journey at a giant container depot in China. 34

:10:56.:11:01.

carriages were loaded with goods such as clothes, bags and other

:11:02.:11:04.

household items. China has been operating trains to 14 European

:11:05.:11:07.

capitals from this depot for many years. Now London has been added to

:11:08.:11:10.

the list. It was a different rail gauges along the way, the containers

:11:11.:11:14.

have to be offloaded and reloaded several times, but China sees this

:11:15.:11:21.

as a new version of the silk Route. The journey goes through a tunnel to

:11:22.:11:26.

the UK. In all, the train carrying ?4 million worth of goods pass

:11:27.:11:28.

through eight countries on its journey of more than 7500 miles. The

:11:29.:11:35.

UK is China's seventh biggest trading market, so the boost to

:11:36.:11:39.

Chinese enterprise is clear, but it is also hoped the train will make

:11:40.:11:45.

the journey back to China laden with British goods. What is the longest

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train journey you have ever been on? I think it was three days and three

:11:50.:11:59.

nights, it was with Bill Turnbull. I like the way you drank your tea when

:12:00.:12:06.

you said that. We ended up in Vladivostok, as you do. It was the

:12:07.:12:15.

work! Thank you for that, Louise. I went to London once. I don't think I

:12:16.:12:21.

have done anything quite as significant as that. That is the new

:12:22.:12:27.

bonding thing we do with presenters, put them on the trans- Siberian

:12:28.:12:29.

railway and see how they get along. What is happening in the wide world

:12:30.:12:41.

of sport? Well, there was drama in the FA Cup. Did you stay out late? I

:12:42.:12:45.

did, foolishly. There will be two non-League sides

:12:46.:12:51.

in the fourth round of the FA Cup. Sutton United beat AFC Wimbledon

:12:52.:12:55.

whilst Lincoln City shocked Ipswich Town, with Nathan Arnold

:12:56.:12:57.

scoring a 91st-minute winner to stun Andy Murray is due on court

:12:58.:13:00.

at around 9:30am this morning, for his second-round match

:13:01.:13:05.

at the Australian Open. Dan Evans faces the seventh

:13:06.:13:07.

seed, Marin Cilic. Wales have a new captain

:13:08.:13:12.

for the Six Nations. Alun Wyn Jones takes over

:13:13.:13:14.

from Sam Warburton in a squad that And Marco Fu had luck on his side

:13:15.:13:18.

when he knocked world number three Judd Trump out of

:13:19.:13:23.

the Masters snooker. Lots of the papers have fantastic

:13:24.:13:37.

teachers from last night's football. We will show you those in the

:13:38.:13:42.

second. As good as Lincoln were, Ipswich were appalling. Looking at a

:13:43.:13:47.

business stories, one story which dominates all the front pages, in

:13:48.:13:51.

the Daily Mail, the steel of the new Iron Lady. That is after Theresa

:13:52.:14:04.

May's Brexit speech, in a cartoon version of the pantsuit. The Daily

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Express, Deal or no Deal, lots of them using that kind of headline.

:14:10.:14:14.

And the front page of the Sun, Brexodus. The Times, give us a fair

:14:15.:14:24.

deal or you will be crushed. Another picture of Theresa May, crash test

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Dumb-May, is their headline. I have dealt inside and I love this picture

:14:36.:14:39.

in the Financial Times this morning. All of these televisions on sale,

:14:40.:14:46.

but Theresa May departing from Europe. I will be talking about how

:14:47.:14:52.

easy it might be to come up with some of those deals. Some are

:14:53.:14:56.

fiendishly complicated and take many years to negotiate. I will be

:14:57.:15:00.

talking to an international trade lawyer about how that will work in

:15:01.:15:09.

practice. And a potential strike by referees. If you could just hold

:15:10.:15:13.

that side for me, that would be brilliant. An incredible story from

:15:14.:15:18.

a Manchester -based referee who has only just turned 18 this month but

:15:19.:15:24.

tell the story of how he has been punched, headbutted, spat at several

:15:25.:15:27.

times since becoming a referee three years ago and has launched a

:15:28.:15:32.

Facebook campaign and been contacted by 675 other officials who say that

:15:33.:15:36.

the treatment of referees and officials across the country can be

:15:37.:15:40.

appalling and very distressing. The Football Association are looking

:15:41.:15:43.

into the possibility of giving referee is the same type of

:15:44.:15:46.

protection as spectators at a football match, which they don't

:15:47.:15:50.

currently have. I think we all have a story, don't we, of seeing

:15:51.:15:53.

appalling abuse of referees, situations where perhaps some are

:15:54.:15:57.

quite young, who is having a go at this and just wants to try and make

:15:58.:16:02.

an effort and help in the game, is treated badly. And it is horrible to

:16:03.:16:06.

see. It is normally parents losing their rag, isn't it? I have seen

:16:07.:16:08.

that happen, and it is horrible. I want to quickly look at this,

:16:09.:16:17.

Boris Johnson writing in the Telegraph, if you want this point of

:16:18.:16:21.

view. Lots of them going through point by point. Can you help me?

:16:22.:16:28.

Thank you so much! This is how complicated these things are, pages

:16:29.:16:33.

of coverage. For example, another example from the Times, going

:16:34.:16:37.

through lots of different issues along with a bit of analysis, so

:16:38.:16:41.

much analysis if you want to see more. But it's not all about Brexit

:16:42.:16:46.

today, this is from the inside pages, an x-ray of a dog who

:16:47.:16:52.

swallowed an entire knife, the dog is called Macy. They operated on the

:16:53.:16:58.

dog for hours. The good news is the dog swallowed the knife handle

:16:59.:17:02.

first, if it happened the other way it would have been game over. They

:17:03.:17:07.

operated, took their time and Macy is fine and doing very well. It's

:17:08.:17:11.

horrible, you can see how big the knife is, half the length of the

:17:12.:17:15.

dog's body but everything is OK, don't panic. A quick one, it is all

:17:16.:17:21.

about forgiveness, how to make things not awkward. Here we have

:17:22.:17:24.

cost training with Chelsea yesterday. Training with this

:17:25.:17:31.

teammates instead on this own, which he had done after asking for a move

:17:32.:17:37.

to China, he's back in the fold and has to play until the end of the

:17:38.:17:41.

season and get along very nicely. When is the last time you cried,

:17:42.:17:45.

Dan? Apparently meant crime or at work than women. When I snapped my

:17:46.:17:52.

Achilles tendon. -- apparently men cry more. They work harder than

:17:53.:18:00.

women so are more likely to cry and 25% admit blubbing after speaking to

:18:01.:18:07.

their manager. 18% of women. Also when Bouncer died on neighbours. --

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Neighbours. Here's Carol with a look

:18:12.:18:13.

at this morning's weather. There was the promise of some

:18:14.:18:21.

sunshine? Yes, for some, but for many it will be another cloudy day

:18:22.:18:26.

and that is the note we start on. Cloudy, some mist around, a

:18:27.:18:28.

beautiful Weather Watchers picture from yesterday sent in by many will

:18:29.:18:32.

be looking at that scenario this morning. But for some clear skies, a

:18:33.:18:37.

touch of frost and patchy fog. Once again we have a weather front draped

:18:38.:18:42.

across us, a cold front, behind it the cold air is coming in so parts

:18:43.:18:50.

of East Anglia and southern England will have the frost and also clear

:18:51.:18:54.

skies. In the south-west, a bit more cloud, helping the temperature

:18:55.:18:57.

through the night, but some parts fell to almost -6 last night, cold

:18:58.:19:01.

and frosty with shallow mist and fog patches, which should lift readily

:19:02.:19:04.

through the morning. North of that into the Midlands and northern

:19:05.:19:08.

England, back into the cloud, like rain and drizzle, especially in

:19:09.:19:11.

parts of northern England and north Midlands. Then in Scotland, a lot of

:19:12.:19:18.

cloud around but some clearer skies in the north-east, Sony PHN. Rain in

:19:19.:19:22.

Shetland today, which will be fairly persistent, and a lot of cloud in

:19:23.:19:27.

Northern Ireland but not a particularly cold start. The light

:19:28.:19:33.

rain and drizzle associated with the weather front will tend to fizzle

:19:34.:19:37.

inland through the course of the day and it will be coasts more likely to

:19:38.:19:42.

see it in the north and west. The wind that bit stronger but nothing

:19:43.:19:46.

much to write home about, and we have the rain affecting Shetland

:19:47.:19:49.

primarily. The sunshine will be the brightest if you liked down in the

:19:50.:19:53.

south, but the shelter of the Welsh hills and the north-east of England

:19:54.:19:59.

and the Grampians could mean we see brightness and indeed sunshine.

:20:00.:20:03.

Through the evening and overnight, once again under clear skies we see

:20:04.:20:07.

frost forming. Not quite as cold a night as tonight. And we're also

:20:08.:20:11.

looking at the risk of patchy mist and fog forming as well.

:20:12.:20:15.

Temperatures under the cloud once again still holding up, but as we

:20:16.:20:19.

push further south, it will be cold enough for that touch of frost,

:20:20.:20:23.

particularly in rural areas. So we start tomorrow as we finished the

:20:24.:20:28.

night with some drizzle, light rain around Winwood coasts, particularly

:20:29.:20:31.

in the west. Again tomorrow there will be a lot of cloud around. Some

:20:32.:20:37.

breaks around the Moray Firth for example and in southern England and

:20:38.:20:43.

parts of Wales, Northern Ireland also potentially getting some breaks

:20:44.:20:49.

tomorrow. Temperatures getting down because they are high for this stage

:20:50.:20:54.

in January. If you want to see what tomorrow is like, more of the same,

:20:55.:21:00.

cloud around, some spots of rain and drizzle but for most of the UK, dry

:21:01.:21:04.

with some sunshine, particularly across the Northeast. This looks

:21:05.:21:08.

like it will carry on until the early part of next week.

:21:09.:21:10.

But we will keep listening! How many ways can I say it's going to be

:21:11.:21:21.

cloudy? Lots! She will be telling us it will be cloudy through the

:21:22.:21:23.

morning! During the US election campaign

:21:24.:21:23.

Donald Trump pledged to make America great again, but as he prepares

:21:24.:21:26.

to take office can he deliver We're taking a road trip

:21:27.:21:29.

through the heart of America on Route 45 to find out how

:21:30.:21:33.

Americans are feeling about Obama's legacy in the week that

:21:34.:21:36.

Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th President

:21:37.:21:39.

of the United States. Today, Breakfast's Jon Kay

:21:40.:21:41.

is heading south towards Tennessee. If you want to understand Donald

:21:42.:21:57.

Trump's election win, this is a good place to come. Next to Route 45, the

:21:58.:22:09.

Ohio River meets the Mississippi. It's an Central artery the US

:22:10.:22:15.

economy, carrying 18 million tons of cargo every year -- it's an

:22:16.:22:19.

essential artery. But things aren't what they used to be. The locks

:22:20.:22:25.

which boats pass through here have seen better days. Nearly 100 years

:22:26.:22:31.

old, they regularly break down, causing long and costly delays.

:22:32.:22:37.

Around 52 hours at one time. It could be waiting out for 52 hours

:22:38.:22:44.

before coming through? Yes, sir. Mark, the lock keeper, says it's a

:22:45.:22:49.

struggle to keep trade moving. The concrete is starting to break up and

:22:50.:22:53.

crumble, every time it gets hit by a boat and it lands on it it puts

:22:54.:22:57.

pressure on it and more cracks and the stress on it, we patch it

:22:58.:23:01.

together and try and keep it going, but it's not going to last for ever.

:23:02.:23:07.

Donald Trump has pledged $1 trillion to rebuild America's rivers, roads

:23:08.:23:12.

and railways. A promise that swung him plenty of support round here.

:23:13.:23:17.

But he hasn't said where the money will come from -- that's won him. We

:23:18.:23:22.

head back on Route 45 to see the kind of project the new president

:23:23.:23:27.

wants to encourage. A huge dam and lock system to replace the failing

:23:28.:23:32.

one downriver. It's nearly 20 years behind schedule and $2 billion over

:23:33.:23:39.

budget. Many here believe Donald Trump's life in business will mean

:23:40.:23:42.

he can deliver. I think he can Iffley Road wants to

:23:43.:23:47.

put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people, for

:23:48.:23:52.

sure, why not busy -- if he really. If you have -- why not? If you have

:23:53.:23:59.

good listening skills he can accomplish anything. Had he got

:24:00.:24:04.

those skills? I hope so. From's critics say his pledges are

:24:05.:24:08.

unrealistic and unaffordable -- Trump's critics. But in an area

:24:09.:24:12.

where jobs can be scarce, they're prepared to give him a try. We drive

:24:13.:24:20.

on into America's rural South. There are 2 million farms in this country.

:24:21.:24:26.

Will a property developer president understand this business?

:24:27.:24:34.

At the university of Tennessee, students are learning how to weigh

:24:35.:24:41.

and vaccinate cattle. Stick it in, press it forward, pull it out. Some

:24:42.:24:47.

are more willing to go forward and some are wanting to hold back.

:24:48.:24:54.

Sounds like politicians! I guess oh! Donald Trump won nearly 80% of the

:24:55.:24:59.

vote in the Martin area. -- I guess so. They like his confidence and in

:25:00.:25:06.

turn they have confidence in him. He might have a few mess ups on the way

:25:07.:25:11.

but eventually he'll figure it all out. We're always going to need

:25:12.:25:15.

agriculture, that's what feeds us, so we're going to need it to keep

:25:16.:25:20.

going. But is farming compatible with Trump's plans for building?

:25:21.:25:24.

What about the land, the environment. Donald Trump is a man

:25:25.:25:28.

you associate with skyscrapers and New York City, not with farming and

:25:29.:25:33.

places like this. Do you think he understands you and what you want to

:25:34.:25:37.

do? He's going to help small people out I think. I'd don't think he's

:25:38.:25:42.

going to be the big city man when he gets in office -- I don't think.

:25:43.:25:46.

What about farming, does he understand farming? Not as well as

:25:47.:25:53.

some agriculture people. Whether its agriculture or infrastructure, in

:25:54.:25:56.

these communities away from Washington, many feel Trump will be

:25:57.:25:59.

a president who finally speaks for them. Someone not just following the

:26:00.:26:04.

political heard. Jon Kay, BBC News, Tennessee.

:26:05.:26:09.

It is good to hear from real Americans. Projects like that as

:26:10.:26:13.

well many years overdue. Jon will be continuing his road trip

:26:14.:26:16.

tomorrow when he travels You're watching

:26:17.:26:19.

Breakfast from BBC News. Striking

:26:20.:26:21.

new trade deals will be at the heart of Britain's

:26:22.:26:24.

success post-Brexit. We'll be hearing from one

:26:25.:26:26.

of the biggest trade lawyers in the business about how

:26:27.:26:29.

to strike a deal with the EU. Time now to get the news,

:26:30.:26:32.

travel and weather where you are. Plenty more on our website

:26:33.:29:56.

at the usual address. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:29:57.:30:00.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. We will bring you all the latest

:30:01.:30:09.

news and sport in a moment. But also on Breakfast this morning:

:30:10.:30:17.

Could clean eating be the latest We will be looking at the scientific

:30:18.:30:20.

evidence behind some A row over whether wheelchair-users

:30:21.:30:24.

or baby buggies should get priority on buses reaches the UK's

:30:25.:30:30.

highest court today. We will analyse the

:30:31.:30:33.

implications after 8:00am. And Natalie Portman talks to us

:30:34.:30:34.

about Oscars, pregnancy, and portraying one of the most

:30:35.:30:37.

iconic First Ladies in history. But now, a summary of this

:30:38.:30:40.

morning's main news: The Foreign Secretary has said

:30:41.:30:46.

countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with Britain

:30:47.:30:49.

when it leaves the European Union. Boris Johnson also suggests that

:30:50.:30:52.

agreements could be achieved quickly after the Article 50

:30:53.:30:55.

negotiations are concluded, and said the UK would not be

:30:56.:30:57.

hauling up the drawbridge, despite the new migration controls

:30:58.:31:00.

promised by Theresa May. Well, many of the world's

:31:01.:31:09.

movers and shakers are at the World Economic Forum

:31:10.:31:11.

in Switzerland at the moment. So is Davos buzzing with talk

:31:12.:31:14.

of Theresa May's Brexit plan? Our business correspondent

:31:15.:31:17.

Tanya Beckett is there, Good morning to you. Is it buzzing

:31:18.:31:32.

with Brexit? It is. For a long time I think many financial firms based

:31:33.:31:36.

in the city of London, or at least to have large footholds in the city

:31:37.:31:40.

of London, have been thinking that they need to keep a foothold within

:31:41.:31:44.

the single market. And now they seem to be very open about saying we have

:31:45.:31:48.

been thinking about this for a long time and after what Theresa May has

:31:49.:31:51.

said we need to crystallise those plans. That is part of what is being

:31:52.:31:55.

said. Also the acceptance that if you are talking about leaving the

:31:56.:31:58.

single market and the customs union, to negotiate your way back in, to

:31:59.:32:02.

have some sort of trade deal, is going to take time. Question is

:32:03.:32:06.

therefore about what is going to happen in that void. And also within

:32:07.:32:13.

Davos, they are not just focused on the UK's plans, but what it might

:32:14.:32:18.

mean. It is one part of a jigsaw puzzle within the EU whereby we have

:32:19.:32:21.

seen similar stories developing in France, Germany, with AfD, and also

:32:22.:32:29.

Italy where there is even talk about the prospect of Italians being asked

:32:30.:32:32.

whether they want to stay within the euro. That would cause, if they were

:32:33.:32:37.

to leave, significant dislocation. The overriding theme, is

:32:38.:32:41.

globalisation of the thing? Davos says yes, but recognises, and

:32:42.:32:46.

especially with the president toeing the line, it recognises that there

:32:47.:32:50.

are adjustments that need to be made to capitalism. The pressing

:32:51.:32:54.

question, therefore, is what are those adjustments?

:32:55.:32:55.

Just after 7:00am we will be talking to Keir Starmer,

:32:56.:32:58.

President Obama has cut the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who was jailed

:32:59.:33:12.

for 35 years the leaking intelligence secrets. Manning's

:33:13.:33:17.

supporters have campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she is

:33:18.:33:20.

a whistleblower and not a traitor. The former military analyst who was

:33:21.:33:24.

born Bradley Manning but had hormone therapy in prison will be released

:33:25.:33:26.

in May. Thomas Cook is preparing to bring

:33:27.:33:26.

thousands of British holidaymakers home from The Gambia,

:33:27.:33:29.

because of a worsening The Foreign Office is advising

:33:30.:33:31.

people to avoid all but essential travel to the country,

:33:32.:33:35.

after its President refused to step down, and declared

:33:36.:33:38.

a state of emergency. Thomas Cook said it was implementing

:33:39.:33:40.

contingency plans to bring home all its UK customers,

:33:41.:33:43.

on additional flights over We expect to speak to Simon Calder

:33:44.:33:45.

about that in a minute or two. A baby has been born to a previously

:33:46.:34:00.

infertile couple in Ukraine using a new type

:34:01.:34:03.

of three-person IVF. Doctors in Kiev are reported to have

:34:04.:34:05.

used a method called pronuclear It is not the first baby born

:34:06.:34:08.

with DNA from three parents, Another child was created

:34:09.:34:13.

using a slightly different method The Supreme Court is ruling today

:34:14.:34:16.

on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use

:34:17.:34:20.

of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies

:34:21.:34:23.

in buggies on board. The case was triggered

:34:24.:34:25.

when wheelchair user Doug Paulley attempted to board a bus,

:34:26.:34:28.

but was unable to when a woman First Group says its current

:34:29.:34:31.

policy of requesting, not requiring other passengers

:34:32.:34:34.

to move is the most feasible solution, but Mr Paulley insists

:34:35.:34:37.

it is discriminatory. So few cases make it

:34:38.:34:51.

to the Supreme Court, and it's the first time that it's

:34:52.:34:56.

ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services

:34:57.:35:00.

for disabled people. Yeah, I never thought

:35:01.:35:02.

about five years ago, when I tried to catch that

:35:03.:35:04.

bus, that we'd still be The Duke of Cambridge

:35:05.:35:07.

and Prince Harry honoured the achievements of wounded

:35:08.:35:11.

servicemen and women at a special The event, held at the Royal

:35:12.:35:13.

Geographical Society, celebrated excellence

:35:14.:35:16.

through awarding prizes to individuals who have excelled

:35:17.:35:18.

in their Endeavour Fund sporting Talking about sporting challenges,

:35:19.:35:30.

Lincoln City were up against it last night but they are through to the

:35:31.:35:34.

fourth round of the FA Cup. And haven't there been some wonderful

:35:35.:35:38.

tributes over the last few days to the late Graham Taylor? I think that

:35:39.:35:41.

result last night is possibly one of the most fitting. It was his first

:35:42.:35:46.

club, 40 years ago. It makes me feel very grown up.

:35:47.:35:48.

The non-League side beat Ipswich Town of the Championship,

:35:49.:35:52.

1-0, in their FA Cup third-round replay, the first time they have got

:35:53.:35:55.

this far since Graham Taylor managed them in 1976.

:35:56.:35:58.

The drama was left until the 91st minute, when Nathan Arnold scored

:35:59.:36:01.

a well-deserved winner for Lincoln, who will be at home to Brighton

:36:02.:36:04.

I think we fully, really, deserved that over the two legs. And you

:36:05.:36:17.

know, I was really pleased to get the goal, obviously. And my Mrs

:36:18.:36:23.

actually had a dream that we were 1-0, and I scored.

:36:24.:36:25.

And another non-League side, Sutton United, also made it through.

:36:26.:36:28.

They beat League One's AFC Wimbledon 3-1 in their replay.

:36:29.:36:30.

That earned Sutton a lucrative televised tie at home

:36:31.:36:33.

I thought our supporters, as well, were magnificent. They stuck with us

:36:34.:36:43.

and what a reward for them. And really, you know, this team, it's

:36:44.:36:48.

just a fantastic group of players, a great spirit amongst them. And you

:36:49.:36:50.

know, they deserve all the credit. Sam Allardyce won his first match

:36:51.:36:51.

as Crystal Palace manager. They were a goal down at home

:36:52.:36:54.

to one of his old sides, Bolton, but Christian Benteke scored

:36:55.:36:58.

twice to earn Palace a home tie There were also wins

:36:59.:37:01.

for Blackpool Burnley and Bristol Manchester City midfielder

:37:02.:37:04.

Yaya Toure has turned down ?430,000 It is the second time a club

:37:05.:37:10.

in the Chinese Super League has His contract at Manchester City runs

:37:11.:37:15.

out at the end of the season, but it is believed he wants to stay

:37:16.:37:20.

in the Premier League. Scotland Women head coach

:37:21.:37:41.

Anna Signeul will step down after this summer's

:37:42.:37:43.

Euro 2017 finals. Signeul has managed the side

:37:44.:37:45.

since 2005, and has led them Her next role will be head coach

:37:46.:37:48.

of the Finnish national side. Number one seed Angelique Kerber

:37:49.:37:58.

and 2003 finalist Venus Williams are safely through to the third

:37:59.:38:00.

round of the Australian Open. Andy Murray and Dan Evans play

:38:01.:38:03.

in the next few hours. Evans faces the number seven seed,

:38:04.:38:06.

Marin Cilic, and Murray takes He is the son of a former

:38:07.:38:09.

professional boxer, and ranked 152nd in the world, but he is one

:38:10.:38:14.

of the most promising young players I have never hit with him. But I

:38:15.:38:29.

have seen him play, and he goes for it. You know, he really rips the

:38:30.:38:35.

ball. He is a clean ball striker. And I guess I will get a better idea

:38:36.:38:40.

of how good he is when I play against him, but he is obviously one

:38:41.:38:44.

of the better up-and-coming youngsters, and he has obviously got

:38:45.:38:50.

a bright, bright future. So yes, I will need to be ready, because he

:38:51.:38:54.

does take a lot of chances out there, and he goes for it.

:38:55.:38:55.

Murray is in Roger Federer's side of the draw, so they could meet

:38:56.:38:59.

And Federer is in action this morning, against American qualifier

:39:00.:39:03.

The four-time champion went two sets up, but has struggled in the third,

:39:04.:39:07.

and has had to fight back from 4-1 down.

:39:08.:39:09.

Alun Wyn Jones will take over the Wales captaincy

:39:10.:39:12.

from Sam Warburton for the Six Nations.

:39:13.:39:13.

Jones has led the team five times before, and captained the Lions

:39:14.:39:17.

in the final Test against Australia in 2013.

:39:18.:39:19.

Wales Interim head coach Rob Howley has included seven uncapped players

:39:20.:39:22.

Neil Robertson beat Ali Carter to set up a quarter-final

:39:23.:39:34.

against defending champion, Ronnie O'Sullivan,

:39:35.:39:36.

in the Masters Snooker at Alexandra Palace.

:39:37.:39:38.

And Marco Fu benefited from a bit of luck as he knocked out world

:39:39.:39:41.

The pair were tied at 5-5 all when the red Fu was trying

:39:42.:39:46.

to sink bounced out of the pocket, off the opposite cushion,

:39:47.:39:49.

That set him up for a century break, and gave him a 6-5 victory.

:39:50.:39:54.

British Athletics say they are puzzled by David Weir's

:39:55.:39:59.

The six-time Paralympic champion said, "I have been let down again.

:40:00.:40:03.

Today is the day I officially retire from GB.

:40:04.:40:06.

He had already planned to retire after the London Marathon in April.

:40:07.:40:17.

He had, of course, already announced plans to retire so the news he is

:40:18.:40:28.

retiring is not new news. But something has happened to make him

:40:29.:40:31.

very unhappy and disappointed, in order to make those remarks

:40:32.:40:37.

yesterday. I am sure we will find out in due course.

:40:38.:40:41.

Thousands of holidaymakers are to be flown back to Britain

:40:42.:40:44.

from The Gambia, because of the political crisis there.

:40:45.:40:50.

The Foreign Office advised against all but essential travel

:40:51.:40:53.

to the West African country, after the outgoing president

:40:54.:40:55.

He has refused to accept defeat in last month's election

:40:56.:40:59.

Let's talk now to The Independent's travel editor Simon Calder,

:41:00.:41:03.

who's in our Carlisle newsroom this morning.

:41:04.:41:05.

Talk about the practicalities. How are they going to get people back,

:41:06.:41:10.

how do they even tell people? Right, well let's start with the 985

:41:11.:41:13.

package holidaymakers who Thomas Cook have in The Gambia at the

:41:14.:41:17.

moment. They are by far the biggest operator to the country and that

:41:18.:41:20.

operation actually gets under way in the next few minutes just before

:41:21.:41:24.

7am, the normal, a scheduled flight from Manchester to the capital of

:41:25.:41:27.

The Gambia is going out. It will be empty of passengers. They were all

:41:28.:41:31.

told last night, sorry, your holiday is not going ahead but there will be

:41:32.:41:35.

a special team going out to the country to help to bring everybody

:41:36.:41:40.

else back. In addition to that, there is a flight going out from

:41:41.:41:43.

Gatwick this morning, and two other aircraft who are being sent down

:41:44.:41:48.

from the Canary Islands. And the idea is, Thomas Cook tells me, that

:41:49.:41:53.

if everything on the ground works, they should be able to bring back

:41:54.:41:58.

those package holidaymakers. Now, unfortunately that still leaves

:41:59.:42:01.

several thousand other people. They are people travelling with other

:42:02.:42:05.

package tour operators, who perhaps won't be able to bring people back,

:42:06.:42:10.

and also maybe 2500 people who are there independently, having bought

:42:11.:42:15.

flight only tickets. They don't have quite the same duty of care, but I

:42:16.:42:21.

do understand that Thomas Cook and possibly other airlines are going to

:42:22.:42:28.

be trying to get flights back in the last couple of days. So what do they

:42:29.:42:33.

do? Do they turn up to the airport, what do they do? Don't go to the

:42:34.:42:38.

airport, it is going to be chaotic enough, thank you very much. So I

:42:39.:42:42.

absolutely agree. There you are, thousands of miles from home where a

:42:43.:42:47.

state of emergency has been declared and the Foreign Office says get out.

:42:48.:42:51.

It is natural to think we had better get to the airport, but stay put.

:42:52.:42:56.

The holiday companies will be addressing everybody's concerns as

:42:57.:43:03.

best they can. It is a very fluid situation. As far as I can tell

:43:04.:43:06.

there is no immediate danger. This is a precautionary move by the

:43:07.:43:10.

Foreign Office and as soon as the Foreign Office says we advise

:43:11.:43:12.

against all but essential travel than basically people have to get

:43:13.:43:16.

out. It is a matter of staying put and then waiting to be told the

:43:17.:43:20.

buses are on their way. You will be taken to the airport. And there are

:43:21.:43:25.

tens of thousands of people booked to travel to the Gambia for the rest

:43:26.:43:29.

of the winter. At the moment, of course, several 100 people were told

:43:30.:43:33.

last night your holiday is not going ahead. They will get full refunds.

:43:34.:43:36.

Other people in the next few days should get full refunds, and tour

:43:37.:43:41.

operators will be offering the chance to switch to alternative

:43:42.:43:48.

destinations. Thank you very much. Sorry about that, just punched you

:43:49.:43:53.

in the arm that! You are watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:43:54.:44:02.

The main stories this morning: The Foreign Secretary,

:44:03.:44:05.

Boris Johnson, claims countries are queuing up to sign free trade

:44:06.:44:08.

deals with Britain when it leaves the European Union.

:44:09.:44:11.

Thousands of British holidaymakers will be flown home from The Gambia

:44:12.:44:14.

because of the country's worsening political crisis.

:44:15.:44:16.

The Foreign Office now advises against all but essential travel

:44:17.:44:18.

Only a straight punch! It's not like we haven't got enough sofa!

:44:19.:44:31.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:44:32.:44:35.

For many parts, not everywhere, but it will remain cloudy for most of

:44:36.:44:42.

the UK today. Some patchy mist and shallow fog as well but also clear

:44:43.:44:46.

skies and where we have those we have frost as well. In Gravesend,

:44:47.:44:50.

the temperature at the moment is quite low. London, -4. But

:44:51.:44:58.

Manchester, not quite as cold, six. In Edinburgh, even milder, nine. If

:44:59.:45:02.

you've got the cloud cover it isn't as cold to start. Today we have a

:45:03.:45:06.

weather front which is across the central swathe of the UK and where

:45:07.:45:10.

we have that is where the thickest cloud is producing some light rain

:45:11.:45:14.

and drizzle. That will fizzle as we go through the day so it will be the

:45:15.:45:19.

coasts that see it more than anywhere else. A lot of cloud in the

:45:20.:45:27.

south-west and Wales, then we come under clear skies as we go over to

:45:28.:45:31.

Kent and East Anglia and this is where we have the low temperatures.

:45:32.:45:34.

You may have to scrape your car this morning and watch out for shallow

:45:35.:45:38.

fog patches as well. North of that through the Midlands and northern

:45:39.:45:42.

England, a lot of cloud and where we have the front we have the light

:45:43.:45:45.

rain and drizzle and some hill fog. Clear skies in north-east Scotland

:45:46.:45:49.

but for much of Scotland, a cloudy start but temperatures not

:45:50.:45:51.

particularly low at this stage in the morning and the same for

:45:52.:45:55.

Northern Ireland, a cloudy start but not particularly cold. Across the

:45:56.:45:58.

Irish Sea into Wales, again we're under the influence of the weather

:45:59.:46:01.

front so a fair bit of cloud and light rain and drizzle. Through the

:46:02.:46:05.

day where we have the weather front the rain in it will fizzle, we'll

:46:06.:46:09.

still see Sandra is all and rain along the coasts and hills but the

:46:10.:46:12.

brighter skies will be the south-east to the south-west.

:46:13.:46:16.

Despite the sunshine and light breeze it will be a pleasant day but

:46:17.:46:21.

it will feel cold. Further north, high temperatures but you're under

:46:22.:46:24.

the cloud. Persistent rain will continue through the day, across

:46:25.:46:28.

Shetland, we will have that through the night as well. Rain and drizzle

:46:29.:46:32.

along the coasts and hills but where we have clear skies, a cold night,

:46:33.:46:37.

not as cold as the night just gone but still cold enough for a touch of

:46:38.:46:42.

frost and again patchy mist and fog. Move away from that, temperatures

:46:43.:46:45.

generally holding their own but under clear skies in the north-east

:46:46.:46:49.

of Scotland, Aberdeenshire and Murray, again it will be cold.

:46:50.:46:53.

Tomorrow morning we start off with some sunshine, some sunshine in the

:46:54.:46:57.

south as well and tomorrow we could see some breaks in parts of Wales,

:46:58.:47:01.

northern England and also parts of Northern Ireland. A brighter day for

:47:02.:47:04.

more of us but the emphasis is still on a fairly cloudy day and

:47:05.:47:08.

temperatures just coming down a touch in the north, similar as we

:47:09.:47:10.

come further south. As we've been discussing,

:47:11.:47:14.

the Prime Minister has said the UK will seek a new trade agreement

:47:15.:47:19.

with the EU after leaving Ben's been talking to a top trade

:47:20.:47:22.

negotiator about what trade What's he been saying? It's been

:47:23.:47:34.

dish and the conjugated to try to negotiate all these trade deals. If

:47:35.:47:38.

you think back to the 1970s, that was the last time we negotiated

:47:39.:47:45.

trade ourselves -- it's fiendishly, located. Yesterday we heard from

:47:46.:47:53.

Theresa May about this. -- fiendishly complicated. I've been

:47:54.:47:57.

speaking to a top international trade lawyer and she's been looking

:47:58.:48:01.

at how the process might work and she says we need to stop

:48:02.:48:05.

prioritising which industries we think are most important in the UK

:48:06.:48:10.

and what they may get. Crucially she says the process will take a long

:48:11.:48:15.

time. We begin that process, the divorce proceedings begin when we

:48:16.:48:18.

trigger are to go 50 perhaps at the end of March, we have two years from

:48:19.:48:23.

then to do those deals -- Article 50. She said she doesn't think we

:48:24.:48:25.

will be ready in time. It's important to remember

:48:26.:48:30.

international trade agreements are about deals. So you get something so

:48:31.:48:35.

that you can take something. The only problem is that this is

:48:36.:48:39.

obviously a very technical thing with lots of legal details and

:48:40.:48:43.

discussion, which has a political context and an economic content and

:48:44.:48:49.

the legal technical underpinning. The agreement for example between

:48:50.:48:55.

the EU and South Korea is, kind of, 2000 or more pages and it's not even

:48:56.:49:01.

a very sophisticated one. If we're not part of the European Union, not

:49:02.:49:05.

subject to agreeing it with 27 member states, if it's one-on-one

:49:06.:49:09.

negotiating with another country, does that make it easier and more

:49:10.:49:16.

simple? The key interest for the UK is services and services is the most

:49:17.:49:25.

difficult bit with negotiations, services is about nontariff

:49:26.:49:30.

barriers, what we call nontariff barriers, the hidden insidious

:49:31.:49:35.

barriers that mean you may tell me I can come to your country freely,

:49:36.:49:38.

actually you have a license provision or a condition somewhere,

:49:39.:49:44.

safety provisions or whatever it is, that make it impossible for me to

:49:45.:49:48.

actually have open access to your market. These are incredibly

:49:49.:49:54.

complex. Where will trade negotiators come from? Have we got

:49:55.:49:58.

enough in this country to do the job? The question is the other way

:49:59.:50:02.

round, how many people do we have, therefore what can we realistically

:50:03.:50:07.

do and what are we going to prioritise? I think in government

:50:08.:50:10.

you don't have limitless resources, but we don't, we are where we are.

:50:11.:50:15.

Is it a case it's a mismatch between what we want and what we'll probably

:50:16.:50:25.

get. I think we're going to have to compromise between three things,

:50:26.:50:28.

what we want, what we have to get to that and also what the others are

:50:29.:50:33.

willing to give to us. Yes, at some point I think there will be a

:50:34.:50:36.

reality check. Assuming we trigger Article 50 at the end of March, we

:50:37.:50:40.

then have two years to negotiate. How hopeful argue that deals will be

:50:41.:50:44.

in place at the end of those two years? The likelihood that at the

:50:45.:50:48.

end of two years the UK will have a fully fledged sophisticated

:50:49.:50:51.

agreement with the European Union, and also agreements, or the

:50:52.:50:55.

beginning of agreements, with various countries, is very low.

:50:56.:51:00.

Maria Gonzales speaking about the complex tee of the deals. It's worth

:51:01.:51:06.

bearing in mind the trade deal Canada has just signed with Canada

:51:07.:51:11.

took seven years to negotiate and it's not yet done -- complexity. It

:51:12.:51:15.

does mean we can start looking elsewhere, it could be good for

:51:16.:51:19.

trade deals with the likes of India, China and the US. Clearly a lot of

:51:20.:51:23.

work to do and a lot of negotiation starting to take place. We can only

:51:24.:51:28.

begin that negotiation when we trigger Article 50, so those two

:51:29.:51:33.

years will be crucial in shaping the relationship we have with Europe.

:51:34.:51:37.

That's seven years to get the trade deal between Canada and the EU! It's

:51:38.:51:43.

all about negotiation, it will take a long time, and do we have the

:51:44.:51:47.

right people to do it? If not then are we getting the skills we need to

:51:48.:51:51.

do that negotiation? So many questions. Thank you, Ben.

:51:52.:51:53.

Jackie Kennedy is best remembered for her style and elegance,

:51:54.:51:56.

as well as for the events in Dallas on the 22nd of November 1963,

:51:57.:52:00.

but a new film examines what life was like for the wife of JFK before

:52:01.:52:04.

Natalie Portman, who plays the former First Lady,

:52:05.:52:07.

has been speaking to Tom Brook about the role,

:52:08.:52:12.

and about her thoughts on President-elect Donald Trump.

:52:13.:52:21.

You're getting masses of praise for this role. Did you know a lot about

:52:22.:52:28.

Jackie Kennedy before you began working on the film?

:52:29.:52:32.

I really didn't know anything beyond the popular conception, sort of,

:52:33.:52:39.

this 2-dimensional icon. Preparing for the role was really what let me

:52:40.:52:41.

now about her. I said I'll change my mind, we will

:52:42.:52:46.

have a procession and I'll walk to the cathedral with the casket. The

:52:47.:52:52.

really interesting aspect I noticed when I began watching while she had

:52:53.:52:56.

a little girl voice. Why did she do that and was that difficult for you

:52:57.:53:01.

to get right? She did have this very breathy voice, especially when she

:53:02.:53:06.

was doing public interviews like the White House tour in particular.

:53:07.:53:10.

There's audio tapes that she did with a friend of hers and JFK pass

:53:11.:53:18.

who was doing an oral history of the White House after the assassination.

:53:19.:53:23.

And with him her voice was deeper, she spoke faster. You see that she

:53:24.:53:29.

was sort of cultivating this very classic image of femininity and

:53:30.:53:34.

coyness that she was projecting to the public.

:53:35.:53:39.

This article will bring you a great deal of attention. In that case, any

:53:40.:53:46.

advice? Yes. Don't marry the president.

:53:47.:53:50.

I think it's very much a portrait of grief and the way that it's not

:53:51.:53:56.

exactly an arc or anything, it's this very fragmented experience of

:53:57.:54:04.

incredible sorrow and then an intrusive memory and then anger and

:54:05.:54:08.

a bit of dark humour and all of those, sort of, different sides of

:54:09.:54:12.

the grieving process. You know, she is one of the most

:54:13.:54:17.

popular first ladies. Why does she have such a hold on people? I think

:54:18.:54:25.

she really had an exquisite understanding of public image and I

:54:26.:54:28.

think one of the most shocking things in the movie is when you see

:54:29.:54:34.

at the end the plaque on the door, they were only there for... JFK was

:54:35.:54:39.

only president for a little over two years. And to see the kind of import

:54:40.:54:45.

that they've meant to the American people shows how strong the story

:54:46.:54:50.

she told was. While the Kennedys were in the White House, her husband

:54:51.:54:55.

was having to content with some quite severe racial tensions in the

:54:56.:54:58.

country, like the Birmingham church bombing. How will racial tensions or

:54:59.:55:04.

civil rights there under President Trump do you think? I have no idea.

:55:05.:55:11.

It's not new unfortunately for this country and it's something that we

:55:12.:55:15.

seriously need to find a positive way forward. Are you not a fan

:55:16.:55:22.

particularly? Of? Trump? I did not vote for Trump. I do not know him

:55:23.:55:30.

personally. And I really pray for the best for our country, and not

:55:31.:55:36.

just pray, but, you know, I'm energised to do whatever I can to

:55:37.:55:41.

make my own community and my own country... And, and the world, I

:55:42.:55:49.

think, country, patriotism, nationalism, it's not our way to go.

:55:50.:55:54.

I'm guessing you won't allow me to write any of that? No. Because I

:55:55.:55:58.

never said that. Plenty more from Natalie Portman

:55:59.:56:00.

later in the programme. Time now to get the news,

:56:01.:56:08.

travel and weather where you are. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:56:09.:59:32.

with Louis Minchin and Dan Walker. Countries are queuing up for trade

:59:33.:00:07.

deals with Britain when it leaves the EU, says the Foreign Secretary,

:00:08.:00:11.

after Teresa May's confirmation that Boris Johnson says the UK will not

:00:12.:00:13.

be hauling up the drawbridge. One top trade negotiator tells me

:00:14.:00:22.

Britain needs a reality check on what it wants from Europe,

:00:23.:00:25.

and what it will be able to get. Good morning, it is

:00:26.:00:43.

Wednesday 18 January. Also this morning: Thousands

:00:44.:00:47.

of British holidaymakers are to be flown out of The Gambia

:00:48.:00:50.

in the next 48 hours, as the Foreign Office warns

:00:51.:00:54.

of the growing risk of unrest WikiLeaks whistle-blower

:00:55.:00:57.

Chelsea Manning has her prison sentence cut by more than 30 years,

:00:58.:01:02.

in one of Barack Obama's last acts In sport: Non-League Lincoln City

:01:03.:01:06.

shock Ipswich Town with an injury-time winner,

:01:07.:01:11.

to reach the fourth round of the FA Good morning from Tennessee,

:01:12.:01:14.

on Breakfast's Road Trip across Today we are asking

:01:15.:01:22.

what the new president, Donald Trump can do for

:01:23.:01:37.

infrastructure and for agriculture. And we examine the scientific

:01:38.:01:41.

evidence behind some of the healthy-eating claims

:01:42.:01:43.

grabbing the attention of millions Good morning. For many of us another

:01:44.:01:52.

cloudy day with some light rain and drizzle here and there but they will

:01:53.:01:56.

be some sunshine, the best of which will be across East Anglia and

:01:57.:01:59.

southern counties of England where it is clear but frosty start, and we

:02:00.:02:03.

will see the lion's share of the sunshine during the day. More

:02:04.:02:08.

details and 15 minutes. -- in 15 minutes.

:02:09.:02:11.

First, our main story: The Foreign Secretary has said

:02:12.:02:14.

countries are queuing up to sign free trade deals with Britain

:02:15.:02:17.

Boris Johnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly

:02:18.:02:22.

after the Article 50 negotiations are concluded,

:02:23.:02:24.

and said the UK would not be hauling up the drawbridge,

:02:25.:02:27.

despite the new migration controls promised by Theresa May.

:02:28.:02:29.

We will speak to our Europe correspondent Gavin Lee,

:02:30.:02:32.

But first let's talk to our political correspondent

:02:33.:02:35.

Iain Watson, who joins us from Westminster.

:02:36.:02:38.

So the day after the key speech, what are people waking up to this

:02:39.:02:46.

morning? What will be the talk in Westminster today? I think Theresa

:02:47.:02:49.

May will be pleased by the reaction in the newspapers, the Daily

:02:50.:02:54.

comparing her to Mrs Thatcher. Many of her own MPs will be delighted by

:02:55.:02:58.

the tone she has struck, even those who are very much against her coming

:02:59.:03:02.

out of the single market, and there are some in the Conservative Party,

:03:03.:03:06.

they will be pleased with the tone she has adopted. That will not be

:03:07.:03:10.

universally welcomed. Labour say they are not too chuffed by this

:03:11.:03:18.

idea, that she has perhaps antagonise European allies by saying

:03:19.:03:22.

that no deal is better than a bad deal. The Liberal Democrats will be

:03:23.:03:28.

repeating their call for a second referendum when the deal is finally

:03:29.:03:32.

done, not just a vote of MPs in Parliament, and they warned there

:03:33.:03:37.

could be another Scottish referendum, the SNP. Theresa May

:03:38.:03:42.

wants to come out and will face MPs herself at Prime Minister's

:03:43.:03:46.

Questions this lunchtime, and we will be able to gauge the reaction

:03:47.:03:47.

of a better them. Gavin Lee is our

:03:48.:03:49.

Europe correspondent. People reacting there as well. What

:03:50.:04:01.

is most striking? I think it has taken a bit of time on the side of

:04:02.:04:05.

the channel to digests. It was something of a surprise. A few days

:04:06.:04:12.

ago I was talking to Juncker, and whether Britain will want to leave

:04:13.:04:17.

the single market, and the President was briefed only a short while

:04:18.:04:21.

before the speech was made and we will have some of the biggest

:04:22.:04:26.

reaction, first of all from Jean-Claude Juncker, he avoided any

:04:27.:04:29.

questions yesterday. We will also hear from Angela Merkel, I expect.

:04:30.:04:34.

She is meeting with the new Italian prime minister. Some of the European

:04:35.:04:38.

papers, the Spanish and French papers talk about a hard Brexit, and

:04:39.:04:42.

the contradiction that you can have a situation where Britain isn't in

:04:43.:04:46.

or out but at the same time has aspects or an association agreement

:04:47.:04:50.

when it comes to the customs union. So picking up on that as well but in

:04:51.:04:55.

brief what this allows is all of a sudden the negotiators on the EU

:04:56.:05:00.

side will start to formalise the explicit points that Theresa May has

:05:01.:05:02.

made out. Just after 8:30am we will be

:05:03.:05:03.

speaking to Brexit Secretary, Thomas Cook is preparing to bring

:05:04.:05:06.

thousands of British holidaymakers home from The Gambia,

:05:07.:05:14.

because of a worsening The Foreign Office is advising

:05:15.:05:16.

people to avoid all but essential travel to the country,

:05:17.:05:20.

after its President refused to step down, and declared

:05:21.:05:23.

a state of emergency. Thomas Cook said it was implementing

:05:24.:05:25.

contingency plans to bring home all its UK customers on additional

:05:26.:05:28.

flights over the next 48 hours. Under a state of emergency,

:05:29.:05:32.

Gambians are fleeing their capital, and amongst all this are thousands

:05:33.:05:40.

of British tourists, Thomas Cook has a team heading

:05:41.:05:43.

to the country to help. Four extra flights are

:05:44.:05:49.

expected to leave today. It is bringing 985 package holiday

:05:50.:06:10.

customers home. That also means cancelled trips, a surprise for some

:06:11.:06:13.

passengers at Manchester Airport first thing this morning. I am just

:06:14.:06:20.

disappointed. I understand there are problems with the President saying

:06:21.:06:23.

he isn't going to stand down, and obviously I have family out there

:06:24.:06:26.

and friends out there saying it is all right, there is no problem.

:06:27.:06:29.

The tension has built because this man has refused to leave office.

:06:30.:06:32.

President Yahya Jammeh went on television to warn about foreign

:06:33.:06:35.

If it is allowed to continue, may lead to a state of public emergency.

:06:36.:06:46.

He had conceded last month's election, after ruling for more

:06:47.:06:48.

Opposition leader Adama Barrow was due to take power tomorrow.

:06:49.:06:58.

But the President challenged the result, and has resisted

:06:59.:07:01.

pressure from neighbouring countries to stand down.

:07:02.:07:03.

Now, the threat of violence is growing.

:07:04.:07:12.

It calls itself the smiling coast of Africa.

:07:13.:07:16.

But it is a worrying time for holidaymakers waiting to leave,

:07:17.:07:19.

President Obama has cut the sentence of Chelsea Manning,

:07:20.:07:23.

who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets.

:07:24.:07:25.

Manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release,

:07:26.:07:28.

maintaining she is a whistle-blower and not a traitor.

:07:29.:07:30.

The former military analyst, who was born Bradley Manning but had

:07:31.:07:33.

hormone therapy in prison, will be released in May.

:07:34.:07:42.

I'd say 12 to 16 months, her mental condition deteriorated

:07:43.:07:52.

She tried to commit suicide twice, and was punished for it by the

:07:53.:08:01.

prison authorities. There was a risk to her well-being,

:08:02.:08:01.

if not her life, she had remained A baby has been born to a previously

:08:02.:08:05.

infertile couple in Ukraine using a new type

:08:06.:08:09.

of three-person IVF. Doctors in Kiev are reported to have

:08:10.:08:11.

used a method called pronuclear It is not the first baby born

:08:12.:08:15.

with DNA from three parents, Another child was created

:08:16.:08:19.

using a slightly different method The Supreme Court is ruling today

:08:20.:08:24.

on whether disabled travellers are legally entitled to priority use

:08:25.:08:27.

of wheelchair spaces on buses, even when there are babies

:08:28.:08:30.

in buggies on board. The case was triggered

:08:31.:08:33.

when wheelchair user Doug Paulley attempted to board a bus,

:08:34.:08:35.

but was unable to when a woman First Group says its current

:08:36.:08:39.

policy of requesting, not requiring other passengers

:08:40.:08:42.

to move is the most feasible solution, but Mr Paulley insists

:08:43.:08:45.

it is discriminatory. So few cases make it

:08:46.:08:54.

to the Supreme Court, and it's the first time that it's

:08:55.:08:57.

ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services

:08:58.:09:01.

for disabled people. Yeah, I never thought that,

:09:02.:09:09.

back five years ago, when I tried to catch that bus,

:09:10.:09:12.

that we'd still be talking In the last few minutes,

:09:13.:09:15.

we have had some breaking news What can you tell us? This has just

:09:16.:09:33.

come through to us. News from the regulator Ofcom that it will find

:09:34.:09:38.

the telecoms giant EE ?2.7 million because they overcharge customers.

:09:39.:09:42.

They call it a fundamental billing mistake. This is to do with

:09:43.:09:47.

customers who are using customer service and numbers while roaming in

:09:48.:09:54.

the EU. They have been overcharged to the tune of ?250,000. They

:09:55.:09:58.

suggest nearly 40,000 customers were affected. So they are imposing the

:09:59.:10:04.

spine, ?2.7 million for overcharging those customers. Let's speak to

:10:05.:10:06.

Ofcom. Lindsey Fussell from

:10:07.:10:07.

Ofcom joins us now. Good morning to you. So they have

:10:08.:10:16.

just announced a fine for EE. I have touched on some of the details of

:10:17.:10:20.

what they did, but why did they get it so wrong? Good morning. We all

:10:21.:10:24.

rely on big companies to get the most basic thing right for us, and

:10:25.:10:28.

that is the charge us the right amount of our phone bills. Our

:10:29.:10:32.

investigation found that EE had broken out billing rules not just

:10:33.:10:37.

once but on two occasions. That is clearly completely unacceptable and

:10:38.:10:41.

we have levied this fine of ?2.7 million today. It is not just a

:10:42.:10:45.

small mistake. Customers were charged 1.20 pounds a minute instead

:10:46.:10:51.

of 19p a minute. How did they get it so wrong? Absolutely, well, we

:10:52.:10:57.

uncovered a catalogue of errors at EE. Firstly, as you say, they

:10:58.:11:03.

charged customers who are travelling abroad, who are trying to call the

:11:04.:11:07.

helpline number, presumably because they needed some support, they

:11:08.:11:10.

charge those customers as if they were making a call to the United

:11:11.:11:14.

States of America, which is clearly a much more expensive phone call.

:11:15.:11:18.

And when the calls to that line were made free later, they continued to

:11:19.:11:21.

charge some customers to make those calls. That is why, as well as the

:11:22.:11:27.

fine today, we have required EE to trace every one of those customers

:11:28.:11:32.

and make sure they get their money back. You have said in a report that

:11:33.:11:36.

you are happy that the majority of customers have now been refunded.

:11:37.:11:39.

Let's talk about the fine, ?2.7 million. The proceeds of that will

:11:40.:11:43.

go to the Treasury but many people watching this will think you find a

:11:44.:11:47.

big telecoms firm, I will end up paying because my bill will go up.

:11:48.:11:52.

We think this is a significant fine and that fines are a good deterrent

:11:53.:11:56.

for companies. We know that they don't like to be on the receiving

:11:57.:12:00.

end of finds like this. But I think what really matters to consumers is

:12:01.:12:05.

that companies get the services they provide and have bills right first

:12:06.:12:10.

time. We hope this sends a clear message not just to EE but across

:12:11.:12:14.

the industry that we won't hesitate to step in and levy large fines if

:12:15.:12:19.

they get that wrong for customers. You have said it is clearly a large

:12:20.:12:24.

fine. ?2.7 million, would you like it to be more? I know you have

:12:25.:12:30.

limits on how large the fines you are allowed to levy, but would you

:12:31.:12:34.

like to send a message that you will not tolerate this sort of behaviour?

:12:35.:12:39.

We obviously have to look at the facts of each case and each

:12:40.:12:42.

investigation and decide on the appropriate level of fine. We are

:12:43.:12:46.

satisfied that ?2.7 million is the right deterrent. But as I say, we

:12:47.:12:50.

won't hesitate to step in and issue further fines if we see that

:12:51.:12:53.

companies are failing to give their customers the most basic standards

:12:54.:12:58.

of customer service. Good to talk to you, thank you very much. Just to

:12:59.:13:02.

recap what you can see on the screen, EE charged ?2.7 million for

:13:03.:13:08.

overcharging customers who phoned a customer service helpline, they were

:13:09.:13:12.

find much more than they should have been, ?1.2 a minute instead of 19p.

:13:13.:13:20.

Ofcom, the regulator, are happy that most of those have now been

:13:21.:13:24.

refunded. At ?2.7 million fine imposed on the telecoms giant EE.

:13:25.:13:30.

No deal for Britain is better than a bad deal, according

:13:31.:13:33.

to Theresa May, but her hard line hasn't been welcomed

:13:34.:13:35.

In a minute we will be talking to Shadow Brexit Secretary Keir Starmer

:13:36.:13:45.

about the Prime Minister's proposals, but first let's hear

:13:46.:13:47.

what our own Breakfast Brexit panel thought about Theresa May's big plan

:13:48.:13:50.

I thought the Prime Minister's speech today was very good. Quite

:13:51.:14:01.

rightly, she has made it plain to the EU that, should they try to

:14:02.:14:05.

punish us for leaving, we have other means by which we can achieve

:14:06.:14:10.

Brexit. I said I wanted clarity, and we do have clarity. But the single

:14:11.:14:15.

market, we are completely out of it. Whether it is good or bad is going

:14:16.:14:20.

to come down to detail negotiations, at there is no doubt about it, we

:14:21.:14:23.

are going to lose our biggest trading partner without tariffs, but

:14:24.:14:29.

so is the European Union. To be honest, I feel positive, and it was

:14:30.:14:34.

expected we would look after British people living in the European Union,

:14:35.:14:39.

as we do in the UK. So I feel safe, and all I need to do now is Cook

:14:40.:14:44.

great food and enjoy Britain. I'm extremely disappointed by the

:14:45.:14:48.

speech, and I knew I would be. There was not a single mention from

:14:49.:14:51.

Theresa May about the issues with racism, with homophobia, with

:14:52.:14:55.

attacks against disabled people, because they are all on the rise at

:14:56.:14:58.

the moment, after Brexit. Let's speak now to

:14:59.:14:59.

Shadow Brexit Secretary, Thank you very much for your time.

:15:00.:15:10.

Can I ask you to clear up what Labour's position is on what we

:15:11.:15:14.

heard yesterday, we were hearing noises that you were happy with some

:15:15.:15:18.

of what you heard from Theresa May and the former Shadow Chancellor

:15:19.:15:21.

Chris Leslie was saying there's a danger you might be giving Theresa

:15:22.:15:26.

May an alibi for a Brexit deal by not arguing for single market

:15:27.:15:30.

membership. What is your view on that? It's important just to stand

:15:31.:15:35.

back and assess what we're trying to achieve here. The Labour Party's

:15:36.:15:39.

been clear from the start that of course we accept the result of the

:15:40.:15:43.

referendum but nobody voted to be poorer and everyone wants our

:15:44.:15:46.

businesses to succeed in their dealings with the EU, whether

:15:47.:15:49.

they're trading in goods or services. What I was highly critical

:15:50.:15:54.

of yesterday was Theresa May's bargain basement tax haven threat,

:15:55.:16:02.

no deal and out of any meaningful relationship with the EU. That would

:16:03.:16:06.

make people poorer, there's no mandate for it and it's totally

:16:07.:16:10.

inconsistent with what she's saying about the protection of workers'

:16:11.:16:13.

rights and a fairer Britain. So we're very critical of that. What

:16:14.:16:18.

she did say, though, which was important, is she intends to have as

:16:19.:16:22.

one of her objective tariff free access to the single market and what

:16:23.:16:26.

she calls frictionless access to the single market. That's really

:16:27.:16:29.

important for business. I've been all over the country talking to

:16:30.:16:33.

hundreds of businesses, trade unions and working people and they know how

:16:34.:16:39.

important those things are, tariff free and red tape free access and

:16:40.:16:43.

what I said yesterday is it's delivering on that that really

:16:44.:16:47.

matters. Today we need to think about how we ensure the government

:16:48.:16:52.

brings a plan, brings those objectives to the House of Commons

:16:53.:16:56.

so they can be properly discussed and also how we frame or amend any

:16:57.:17:01.

Article 50 legislation to make sure those important objectives are

:17:02.:17:04.

achieved and also that we criticise heavily the bargain basement

:17:05.:17:09.

fallback threat that Theresa May made, and she shouldn't have made.

:17:10.:17:13.

Do you not think there is a point, which I number of people have been

:17:14.:17:17.

making, about a united front in terms of opposition from some of the

:17:18.:17:21.

major parties so the British public have a choice, it's not just MPs

:17:22.:17:25.

that get to vote on this, people can see there's clear lines of

:17:26.:17:30.

demarcation? We've been clear that the continued success of businesses,

:17:31.:17:34.

whether it's manufacturing, whether it's selling goods or services, is

:17:35.:17:42.

absolutely critical to the outcome and we've been saying that for

:17:43.:17:46.

months. We've pushed for a plan, we pushed for those objectives to be in

:17:47.:17:50.

the plan. We've got both now. But now we need to push to make sure

:17:51.:17:54.

they're delivered. We only had a plan or objectives yesterday because

:17:55.:17:57.

we'd been pushing for them. Now we've had a concession that tariff

:17:58.:18:00.

free access to the single market will be an objective, that something

:18:01.:18:03.

again we've been pushing for four months. It's important people

:18:04.:18:07.

appreciate what we have been doing, what we've achieved so far, and what

:18:08.:18:11.

we now need to do is make sure that is delivered in a way that, as I

:18:12.:18:20.

say, so that people are not poorer and businesses can continue to trade

:18:21.:18:23.

successfully. We've been talking this morning about trade deals and

:18:24.:18:26.

Canada's most recent book seven years to negotiate, and Miriam

:18:27.:18:29.

Goddard is knows all about international trade and she says

:18:30.:18:33.

it's highly unlikely a fully fledged trade deal can be sorted out in two

:18:34.:18:38.

years. Is there a danger these negotiations could take many years

:18:39.:18:42.

and paralyse the UK economy? I don't think there's any realistic prospect

:18:43.:18:46.

of a fully fledged trade deal, a comprehensive trade deal being

:18:47.:18:51.

finished within the two-year period. Not least because the deal has to be

:18:52.:18:55.

agreed by about October or November of next year. And what's important

:18:56.:19:01.

is we get it right. Again, the Labour Party has been clear saying

:19:02.:19:05.

transitional arrangements, implementation phase is really

:19:06.:19:08.

important and recognising that we need time to get this right. What is

:19:09.:19:13.

needed is a trade agreement, but make sure our businesses can succeed

:19:14.:19:17.

in the future in the way they succeed now. That is a prize that we

:19:18.:19:22.

have to fight for. Keir Starmer, appreciate your time this morning,

:19:23.:19:23.

thank you very much. We'll be speaking to

:19:24.:19:24.

Brexit Secretary David Davis just Here's Carol with a look

:19:25.:19:27.

at this morning's weather. Some frost, Sunrise, lots going on,

:19:28.:19:34.

good morning. Good morning, a wee bit of

:19:35.:19:42.

everything this morning, a cloudy day for most. Some patchy mist and

:19:43.:19:49.

shallow fog as well as sunshine. Coded in the south under clear

:19:50.:19:53.

skies. We're importing this cold easterly from the near continent --

:19:54.:19:59.

cold in. That's reflected nicely in these temperatures.

:20:00.:20:03.

Edinburgh has just dropped a degree at eight degrees. Compare to do the

:20:04.:20:15.

rest of the country, much milder. A 14 degrees difference there. You can

:20:16.:20:20.

see the weather front draped across Lincolnshire, the north Midlands,

:20:21.:20:23.

Wales, producing a lot of cloud and like patchy rain and drizzle. South

:20:24.:20:28.

of that, we've also got a fair bit of cloud across south-west England.

:20:29.:20:32.

But drift over to Dorset, heading to the Isle of Wight, Hampshire and

:20:33.:20:37.

into Kent, Essex, East Anglia, this is where it's particularly cold

:20:38.:20:41.

where there's frost and also shallow mist and fog. That will lift through

:20:42.:20:44.

the morning. North of that through the rest of the Midlands and

:20:45.:20:48.

northern England, much of Scotland, a cloudy start with hill fog and

:20:49.:20:52.

where we have the front we have like rain and drizzle. North-west pollen

:20:53.:20:56.

has a cold start where we have clear skies but through the day we have

:20:57.:21:01.

outbreaks of rain in Shetland National Press cloud and. Northern

:21:02.:21:04.

Ireland starts on a cloudy relatively mild -- north-west

:21:05.:21:06.

Scotland. In Wales, we start on a cloudy note

:21:07.:21:15.

with drizzle in east Wales. Rue the day where we have the weather front,

:21:16.:21:19.

it is fairly weak, the rain -- through the day. There will still be

:21:20.:21:24.

a lot of cloud around and in the Moray Firth towards Aberdeenshire we

:21:25.:21:28.

see some breaks and we see them from the word go in parts of southern

:21:29.:21:31.

England to the south-west and East Anglia. Temperatures are still

:21:32.:21:35.

highest in the north and lowest in the sunshine in the south. As we

:21:36.:21:39.

head on through the evening and overnight, under clear skies once

:21:40.:21:42.

again there will be some frost. Not as cold a night as the one just

:21:43.:21:46.

gone. We'll see shallow mist and fog patches forming but away from that a

:21:47.:21:50.

lot of cloud and still dampness around the coasts, so as a result

:21:51.:21:54.

not particularly cold, except where we have clear skies in Scotland, and

:21:55.:21:59.

cold as we go further south. Tomorrow, more of the same, still a

:22:00.:22:04.

cloudy picture. Some breaks in the north-east and the south but

:22:05.:22:07.

tomorrow we're likely to see more breaks in Northern Ireland, parts of

:22:08.:22:10.

Wales and northern England and temperatures where they've been high

:22:11.:22:12.

coming down a touch. During the US election campaign

:22:13.:22:13.

Donald Trump pledged to make America great again, but as he prepares

:22:14.:22:19.

to take office can he deliver In the week that Donald Trump

:22:20.:22:22.

will be sworn in as the 45th we're taking a road trip

:22:23.:22:30.

through the heart of America on Route 45 to find out how

:22:31.:22:34.

Americans are feeling about Obama's legacy and today,

:22:35.:22:39.

Breakfast's Jon Kay is heading If you want to understand

:22:40.:22:41.

Donald Trump's election win, Next to Route 45, the Ohio River

:22:42.:22:47.

meets the Mississippi. It's an essential artery for the US

:22:48.:22:58.

economy, carrying 18 million tons But things aren't

:22:59.:23:06.

what they used to be. The locks which boats pass

:23:07.:23:14.

through here have seen better days. Nearly 100 years old,

:23:15.:23:21.

they regularly break down, A boat could be waiting out for 52

:23:22.:23:23.

hours before coming through? Mark, the lock keeper,

:23:24.:23:34.

says it's a struggle The concrete is starting

:23:35.:23:37.

to break up and crumble. Every time it gets hit by a boat

:23:38.:23:40.

and it lands on it it puts pressure on it and causes more

:23:41.:23:50.

cracks and stress on it, and keep it going, but it's not

:23:51.:23:53.

going to last for ever. Donald Trump has pledged $1 trillion

:23:54.:23:58.

to rebuild America's rivers, A promise that's won him plenty

:23:59.:24:01.

of support round here. But he hasn't said where

:24:02.:24:10.

the money will come from. We head back on Route 45

:24:11.:24:13.

to see the kind of project the new president

:24:14.:24:16.

wants to encourage. A huge dam and lock system to

:24:17.:24:25.

replace the failing one downriver. It's nearly 20 years behind schedule

:24:26.:24:28.

and $2 billion over budget. Many here believe Donald Trump's

:24:29.:24:31.

life in business will mean I think he if he really wants

:24:32.:24:33.

to put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people,

:24:34.:24:41.

for sure, why not? One person can't do it

:24:42.:24:44.

but if you take a group of people and you've got good conversation

:24:45.:24:47.

communication skills, good listening skills, you can

:24:48.:24:49.

pretty much accomplish anything. Has he got those skills?

:24:50.:24:50.

I hope so. Trump's critics say his pledges

:24:51.:24:53.

are unrealistic and unaffordable. But in an area where jobs can be

:24:54.:24:56.

scarce, they're prepared We drive on into

:24:57.:24:59.

America's rural South. There are 2 million

:25:00.:25:05.

farms in this country. Will a property developer president

:25:06.:25:15.

understand this business? At the University of Tennessee,

:25:16.:25:21.

students are learning how to weigh Stick it in, press it

:25:22.:25:30.

forward, pull it out. Some are gonna be more willing to go

:25:31.:25:36.

forward and some are wanting Donald Trump won nearly 80%

:25:37.:25:39.

of the vote in the Martin area. They like his confidence and in turn

:25:40.:25:52.

they have confidence in him. He might have a few mess-ups

:25:53.:25:56.

on the way but eventually he'll We're always going to need

:25:57.:26:00.

agriculture, that's what feeds us. So we're going to need

:26:01.:26:05.

it to keep going. But is farming compatible

:26:06.:26:08.

with Trump's plans for building? What about the land,

:26:09.:26:12.

the environment? Donald Trump is a man you associate

:26:13.:26:17.

with skyscrapers and New York City, not with farming

:26:18.:26:20.

and places like this. Do you think he understands

:26:21.:26:22.

you and what you want to do? I think he's going to help

:26:23.:26:26.

small town people out. I'd don't think he's

:26:27.:26:28.

going to be the big city man What about farming, does

:26:29.:26:31.

he understand farming? Not as well as some

:26:32.:26:35.

agriculture people. Whether it's agriculture

:26:36.:26:40.

or infrastructure, in these communities away from Washington,

:26:41.:26:47.

many feel Trump will be a president Someone not just following

:26:48.:26:53.

the political herd. Jon will be continuing his road trip

:26:54.:26:56.

tomorrow when he travels deeper Then he continues his route all week

:26:57.:27:13.

before Donald Trump's inauguration on Friday.

:27:14.:27:14.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:27:15.:30:36.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:30:37.:30:38.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:30:39.:30:46.

The Foreign Secretary has said countries are queuing up to sign

:30:47.:30:49.

free trade deals with Britain when it leaves the European Union.

:30:50.:30:52.

Boris Johnson also suggests that agreements could be achieved quickly

:30:53.:30:55.

after the Article 50 negotiations are concluded,

:30:56.:30:57.

and said the UK would not be hauling up the drawbridge,

:30:58.:31:00.

despite the new migration controls promised by Theresa May.

:31:01.:31:02.

Earlier the Shadow Brexit Secretary, Keir Starmer, set out

:31:03.:31:05.

What I was highly critical of yesterday was Theresa May's sort of

:31:06.:31:24.

bargain basement, tax haven threat. No deal, and out of any meaningful

:31:25.:31:32.

relationship with the EU. That would make people poorer, there is no

:31:33.:31:35.

mandate for it, and it is totally inconsistent.

:31:36.:31:37.

The Telecoms giant EE has been fined ?2.7 million

:31:38.:31:39.

More than 30,000 thousand customers have been affected,

:31:40.:31:42.

The regulator explained why they had taken action.

:31:43.:31:56.

They charged customers who are travelling abroad,

:31:57.:31:58.

who are trying to call the helpline number,

:31:59.:32:00.

presumably because they needed some support, they charged those

:32:01.:32:02.

customers as if they were making a call to the United States

:32:03.:32:06.

of America, which is clearly a much more

:32:07.:32:08.

And then secondly, when the calls to that helpline were made free,

:32:09.:32:13.

some months later, they continued to charge some

:32:14.:32:15.

President Obama has cut the sentence of Chelsea Manning,

:32:16.:32:19.

who was jailed for 35 years for leaking intelligence secrets.

:32:20.:32:22.

Manning's supporters have campaigned for years for her release,

:32:23.:32:24.

maintaining she is a whistle-blower and not a traitor.

:32:25.:32:27.

The former military analyst, who was born Bradley Manning but had

:32:28.:32:29.

hormone therapy in prison, will be released in May.

:32:30.:32:37.

Thomas Cook is preparing to bring thousands of British holidaymakers

:32:38.:32:39.

home from The Gambia, because of a worsening

:32:40.:32:41.

The Foreign Office is advising people to avoid all but essential

:32:42.:32:45.

travel to the country after its President refused to step

:32:46.:32:48.

down, and declared a state of emergency.

:32:49.:32:50.

Thomas Cook said it was implementing contingency plans to bring home

:32:51.:32:53.

all its UK customers on additional flights over the next 48 hours.

:32:54.:32:59.

A baby has been born to a previously infertile couple in Ukraine

:33:00.:33:02.

using a new type of three-person IVF.

:33:03.:33:04.

Doctors in Kiev are reported to have used a method called pronuclear

:33:05.:33:08.

It is not the first baby born with DNA from three parents,

:33:09.:33:13.

Another child was created using a slightly different method

:33:14.:33:18.

The Supreme Court is ruling today on whether disabled travellers

:33:19.:33:23.

are legally entitled to priority use of wheelchair spaces on buses,

:33:24.:33:26.

even when there are babies in buggies on board.

:33:27.:33:29.

The case was triggered when wheelchair user Doug Paulley

:33:30.:33:31.

attempted to board a bus, but was unable to when a woman

:33:32.:33:35.

First Group says its current policy of requesting,

:33:36.:33:38.

not requiring other passengers to move is the most feasible

:33:39.:33:41.

solution, but Mr Paulley insists it is discriminatory.

:33:42.:34:02.

The Duke of Cambridge and Prince Harry honoured

:34:03.:34:04.

the achievements of wounded servicemen and women at a special

:34:05.:34:06.

The event, held at the Royal Geographical Society,

:34:07.:34:09.

celebrated excellence through awarding prizes

:34:10.:34:11.

to individuals who have excelled in their Endeavour Fund sporting

:34:12.:34:13.

Coming up on the programme, Carol will have a full weather

:34:14.:34:17.

Sally is here with all the day's sport. Really nice to be back from

:34:18.:34:30.

our holiday, and some sporting drama last night.

:34:31.:34:32.

The non-League side beat Ipswich Town of the Championship,

:34:33.:34:36.

1-0, in their FA Cup third-round replay, the first time they have got

:34:37.:34:40.

this far since Graham Taylor managed them in 1976.

:34:41.:34:43.

The drama was left until the 91st minute, when Nathan Arnold scored

:34:44.:34:46.

a well-deserved winner for Lincoln, who will be at home to Brighton

:34:47.:34:49.

People obviously talk about the finances but for me it is not about

:34:50.:35:05.

the money, it is the moment. It is about nights like this and smiles on

:35:06.:35:08.

people's faces. That is what football is about, so that to me has

:35:09.:35:10.

been a great part of this journey. And another non-League side,

:35:11.:35:12.

Sutton United, also made it through. They beat League One's AFC Wimbledon

:35:13.:35:15.

3-1 in their replay. That earned Sutton a lucrative

:35:16.:35:18.

televised tie at home I thought our supporters,

:35:19.:35:20.

as well, were magnificent. They stuck with us,

:35:21.:35:25.

and what a reward for them. And really, you know, this team,

:35:26.:35:28.

it's just a fantastic group of players, a great

:35:29.:35:31.

spirit amongst them. And, you know, they

:35:32.:35:33.

deserve all the credit. Sam Allardyce won his first match

:35:34.:35:41.

as Crystal Palace manager. They were a goal down at home

:35:42.:35:44.

to one of his old sides, Bolton, but Christian Benteke scored

:35:45.:35:48.

twice to earn Palace a home tie There were also wins

:35:49.:35:51.

for Blackpool Burnley and Bristol Manchester City midfielder

:35:52.:35:54.

Yaya Toure has turned down ?430,000 It is the second time a club

:35:55.:36:00.

in the Chinese Super League has His contract at Manchester City runs

:36:01.:36:06.

out at the end of the season, but it is believed he wants to stay

:36:07.:36:11.

in the Premier League. Number one seed Angelique Kerber

:36:12.:36:18.

and 2003 finalist Venus Williams are safely through to the third

:36:19.:36:20.

round of the Australian Open. Andy Murray and Dan Evans play

:36:21.:36:23.

in the next few hours. Evans faces the number seven seed,

:36:24.:36:26.

Marin Cilic, and Murray takes He is the son of a former

:36:27.:36:29.

professional boxer, and ranked 152nd in the world, but he is one

:36:30.:36:34.

of the most promising young players I have never hit with him,

:36:35.:36:37.

but I have seen him play, He is a clean ball-striker,

:36:38.:36:41.

and I guess I will get a better idea of how good he is when

:36:42.:36:49.

I play against him. But he is obviously one

:36:50.:36:51.

of the better up-and-coming youngsters, and he has obviously got

:36:52.:36:54.

a bright, bright future. So yeah, I'll need to be ready,

:36:55.:36:57.

because he does take a lot of chances out there,

:36:58.:37:00.

and he goes for it. Murray is in Roger Federer's side

:37:01.:37:08.

of the draw, so they could meet And Federer is in action this

:37:09.:37:12.

morning, against American qualifier The four-time champion went two sets

:37:13.:37:15.

up, but has struggled in the third, and has had to fight

:37:16.:37:20.

back from 4-1 down. Alun Wyn Jones will take

:37:21.:37:22.

over the Wales captaincy from Sam Warburton

:37:23.:37:25.

for the Six Nations. Jones has led the team five times

:37:26.:37:27.

before, and captained the Lions in the final Test

:37:28.:37:30.

against Australia in 2013. Wales Interim head coach Rob Howley

:37:31.:37:32.

has included seven uncapped players It has just been announced that

:37:33.:37:35.

Europe's captain will be able to choose four players for next

:37:36.:37:47.

year's Ryder Cup in France. Thomas Bjorn will get to pick one

:37:48.:37:50.

more player than Darren Clarke It is part of a revamp

:37:51.:37:53.

of the qualifying system, after Europe lost heavily

:37:54.:37:57.

to the United States in Hazeltine. Before I go, the day's Daily

:37:58.:38:16.

Express. We spoke to Alex Thomson back in November. He is taking part

:38:17.:38:24.

in the Vendee Globe round the world yacht race and it is due to end this

:38:25.:38:28.

time tomorrow. He is in second place. In a yacht race you can be

:38:29.:38:34.

quite far behind, is the close? He was making great progress but has

:38:35.:38:38.

fortunately stall at the moment, a lot of drama in the last few months.

:38:39.:38:42.

One thing I have to mention is he hasn't washed since November. So we

:38:43.:38:46.

would like to speak to him. I'm not sure we would! There could be some

:38:47.:38:51.

wet wipe action going on. Best of luck to him in the next 24 hours. He

:38:52.:38:58.

is sleep deprived, hasn't slept for more than 45 minutes in a row at one

:38:59.:39:02.

time, feeling quite queasy, hasn't walked in a straight line in all

:39:03.:39:06.

that time. I can't imagine. Good luck to him.

:39:07.:39:07.

In the last few years clean eating has become a big deal in the food

:39:08.:39:11.

world, and the hashtag of choice for trendy food bloggers.

:39:12.:39:14.

But, as the movement has grown, so too has the list of options that

:39:15.:39:18.

clean eaters should and shouldn't be eating, and the claims and promises

:39:19.:39:21.

Giles Yeo has been investigating the science behind the diets,

:39:22.:39:26.

and speaking to some of the famous faces behind the movement.

:39:27.:39:36.

I'm going to argue that a significant proportion of those,

:39:37.:39:46.

even though there are intelligent beings and should understand that

:39:47.:39:49.

this is actually a brand is putting it out, think that you are actually

:39:50.:39:55.

living like this. But I do. That is the point, that is why it is a

:39:56.:39:59.

snapshot rather than 24 a day documentary. It was that is what I

:40:00.:40:05.

eat, that is my Breakfast. I made it a little prettier because I am

:40:06.:40:09.

showing a picture of it. I think it is there for inspiration. I don't

:40:10.:40:13.

think it is their to share my day to day, like, my dog appeared Lebed, I

:40:14.:40:17.

missed the train, I'm going to miss an important meeting -- my dog peed

:40:18.:40:25.

on the bed. As a scientist working with obesity, a narrow our

:40:26.:40:28.

relationship with food can be complex. Is there a danger of social

:40:29.:40:33.

media driving this sort of eating? -- I know our relationship. I think

:40:34.:40:40.

there can be and it is up to us to be as responsible as we can be, to

:40:41.:40:45.

do everything to allow people not to take it out of context. To me that

:40:46.:40:49.

doesn't stop at food. That is the whole of social media.

:40:50.:40:53.

We have some examples of the food here.

:40:54.:40:55.

Good morning. I don't think there is a definition, particularly, but

:40:56.:41:06.

clean eating. What does it mean? It doesn't mean these two, no dairy,

:41:07.:41:18.

cubs... -- carbs. I think it is the three second role. It used to be

:41:19.:41:22.

entirely about weight loss. Whatever, Atkins, south-west, low

:41:23.:41:27.

GI. This is different, and I think from the investigation we have done

:41:28.:41:31.

what we have found out is, although there are a number of different

:41:32.:41:34.

kinds of clean eating, clean eating on the whole uses food as medicine.

:41:35.:41:39.

They believe that food can make you better. Not just healthy, but

:41:40.:41:43.

actually healthier, actually cure diseases. That is what clean eating

:41:44.:41:49.

is. Let's take a look at these plates here. Clean eating would

:41:50.:41:53.

involve what we have on the left or right of your screen here, the fruit

:41:54.:41:57.

and veg, rather than the hefty carbohydrates, cornflakes,

:41:58.:42:00.

diskettes, things like that and dairy products as well. Just

:42:01.:42:04.

promoting generally a more healthy lifestyle, there is nothing

:42:05.:42:08.

inherently wrong with that, is that, in terms of what you put in your

:42:09.:42:12.

body? No, absolutely not. Although you put it out and say it vegetables

:42:13.:42:17.

are clean and broadly speaking they are, depending on which of the

:42:18.:42:21.

strains of clean you are looking at, there are subtleties. You are

:42:22.:42:26.

absolutely right, there is nothing wrong with promoting a healthy diet.

:42:27.:42:31.

A study of obesity and the biology of food and TAC, which is what I do.

:42:32.:42:36.

But I realised, and I think we have all realised, that you can't fix the

:42:37.:42:41.

obesity problem just by understanding biology. We also need

:42:42.:42:45.

to fix our food environment. In this I agree with the food gurus I have

:42:46.:42:50.

met, where we have a broken food environment that we need to fix

:42:51.:42:53.

before we can fix the obesity epidemic. That is a big driving

:42:54.:42:58.

force behind white I wanted to look at this to begin with. You have

:42:59.:43:02.

looked at people involved in these ideas and there are some people who

:43:03.:43:06.

take it quite far. What can be the effect of that? So when things go

:43:07.:43:13.

beyond dietary advice, which I think if we are sensible it is going to be

:43:14.:43:17.

fine. The problem with thinking that you can use certain things for

:43:18.:43:21.

medicine, and I actually went and interview the guy who thought that

:43:22.:43:26.

using the alkaline diet, one of the diet so looked at, you could cure

:43:27.:43:32.

cancer. And the problem is, if you think along those lines of actually

:43:33.:43:37.

trying to cure cancer, instead of using medicine, by using some

:43:38.:43:41.

unproven thing to try and do it, people end up dying. I think that is

:43:42.:43:46.

the tragedy that actually comes when you take it to the extreme. That is

:43:47.:43:51.

the difference, as you say, between healthy eating for the sake of

:43:52.:43:55.

healthy eating and those people who take it a step further and think if

:43:56.:43:59.

I balance my body's pH, or apply this to every aspect of my life, I

:44:00.:44:04.

can cure an illness or save myself from something. That's right. As I

:44:05.:44:09.

said, do I think I eat too much meat? I do eat too much meat. I am a

:44:10.:44:13.

carnivore. Do people think that eating more vegetables is a good

:44:14.:44:17.

thing? Of course, that is uncontroversial. But why all means

:44:18.:44:21.

say that you are selling a vegetarian cookbook or trying to

:44:22.:44:25.

promote healthy eating. The main issue is when you try and wrap it up

:44:26.:44:29.

into some pseudoscientific babble to try and explain something. The big

:44:30.:44:33.

problem behind that is, when something goes wrong or something

:44:34.:44:37.

changes and you need to tweak it, it is not raced on truth, not based on

:44:38.:44:42.

evidence. It is difficult to try and work out what went wrong, what went

:44:43.:44:45.

right, and how you can make it better. There are lots of people who

:44:46.:44:51.

leave out certain food groups. People may have very serious

:44:52.:44:54.

problems with gluten. What do you think about that? Do you need to go

:44:55.:44:58.

down the route were you see your GP? What do you think people should be

:44:59.:45:02.

doing? You mentioned gluten. 1% of people are coeliac, they have to

:45:03.:45:08.

give up gluten. About 4% of people have an intolerance to gluten. 25%

:45:09.:45:15.

of us by gluten-free products. I just saw something in Forbes

:45:16.:45:20.

magazine saying that since 2009, triple the number of Americans have

:45:21.:45:23.

gone gluten-free completely, whether or not they have two or not. I think

:45:24.:45:28.

you should get yourself tested out if you think you have a problem with

:45:29.:45:31.

gluten, before giving it up. Because it may have nothing to do with

:45:32.:45:35.

gluten at all. IT something completely different. Yes,

:45:36.:45:40.

absolutely. What would you have for Breakfast on here? My wife is

:45:41.:45:45.

watching, I can't answer the question! Strawbridge, avocado? --

:45:46.:45:55.

strawberry. And those chocolate biscuits looked magnificent.

:45:56.:45:56.

Clean Eating: The Dirty Truth is on BBC Two tomorrow

:45:57.:45:59.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:46:00.:46:07.

This morning for some it is a mild but cloudy start, for others, patchy

:46:08.:46:14.

mist, clear skies and some frost. The reason is we are pulling in cold

:46:15.:46:19.

continental air across East Anglia and southern counties of England,

:46:20.:46:24.

but for the rest of the UK, we have south westerlies, a milder

:46:25.:46:29.

direction. That is doing the following to the temperatures:

:46:30.:46:34.

There's quite a difference in the temperatures up and down the land.

:46:35.:46:40.

We've also got this weather front draped across Lincolnshire, parts of

:46:41.:46:44.

the Midlands into Wales, producing quite a lot of cloud, light rain and

:46:45.:46:51.

drizzle and that will fizzle out through the day, eventually becoming

:46:52.:46:55.

confined to coasts. The sunshine continuing in East Anglia and

:46:56.:46:59.

southern counties. The shallow mist and fog patches lifting and we see

:47:00.:47:02.

further breaks developing in parts of north-east Scotland but for most

:47:03.:47:06.

it will remain fairly cloudy. Through the day we see bits and

:47:07.:47:09.

pieces of cloud in south-west England but there will be quite a

:47:10.:47:13.

bit of sunshine, as they will be in Hampshire heading into Kent and East

:47:14.:47:17.

Anglia but through the day more cloud rolling into Norfolk and we

:47:18.:47:21.

see more of that into the north Midlands and. Still fairly cloudy in

:47:22.:47:25.

northern England, some hill fog, the same in Scotland but around the

:47:26.:47:28.

Moray Firth, heading to Aberdeenshire, we could see sunshine

:47:29.:47:33.

but some persistent outbreaks across Shetland. For Northern Ireland this

:47:34.:47:37.

afternoon, not much change in the temperature from now to the maximum

:47:38.:47:41.

is later. Still fairly cloudy, any bright breaks will be at a premium.

:47:42.:47:48.

-- maximums. In Wales, a cloudy afternoon. Through the evening and

:47:49.:47:53.

overnight, the temperature will drop in the clearer sky areas, not as bad

:47:54.:48:01.

as the other evening but still damp along the coasts and where we have

:48:02.:48:05.

breaks in north-east Scotland, that will be an area prone to being

:48:06.:48:09.

colder. For tomorrow, while we start with sunshine in the north-east, we

:48:10.:48:15.

will see sunshine in the south. Tomorrow, although it will be

:48:16.:48:19.

another cloudy day, we're more likely to see more breaks in that

:48:20.:48:23.

cloud. Parts of Northern Ireland, Wales and northern England will see

:48:24.:48:28.

some too. The cloud thicken of fear and therefore the odd spot of rain

:48:29.:48:32.

but you'll be lucky if you catch one. Temperatures starting to come

:48:33.:48:38.

down, double figures in the north and west and going into single

:48:39.:48:42.

figures like we should be seeing at this stage in mid-January.

:48:43.:48:45.

Thank you, Carol. Bolellli to see you this morning. -- lovely to see

:48:46.:48:49.

you. As we've been discussing,

:48:50.:48:50.

the Prime Minister has said the UK will seek a new trade agreement

:48:51.:48:53.

with the EU after leaving Ben's been talking to a top trade

:48:54.:48:56.

negotiator about what trade We really need to know what it

:48:57.:49:11.

actually involves. Ben, you've been speaking to someone who hopefully

:49:12.:49:15.

knows the answer, a top trade negotiator? It's been visually

:49:16.:49:21.

complicated, trying to strike trade deals with all the countries around

:49:22.:49:25.

the world -- fiendishly. If we leave the single market and we have to

:49:26.:49:30.

strike trade deals... Theresa May has talked about the freest kind of

:49:31.:49:35.

trade with Europe, it sounds simple but it's all about the nitty-gritty

:49:36.:49:41.

of the deals we strike. Once we trigger Article 50, that's expected

:49:42.:49:45.

at the end of March, we then have two years for these negotiations so

:49:46.:49:50.

do we have enough trade negotiators with the experience to sit around

:49:51.:49:53.

the negotiating table and represent Britain and get what we need out of

:49:54.:49:59.

it? I been speaking to a top trade negotiator and she's been telling me

:50:00.:50:02.

how this process works and what's involved. You might recognise her,

:50:03.:50:07.

she's the wife of Nick Clegg, the former Deputy Prime Minister and the

:50:08.:50:11.

leader of the Liberal Democrats. This is what she told me.

:50:12.:50:13.

It's important to remember international trade agreements

:50:14.:50:14.

So you get something so that you can take something.

:50:15.:50:18.

The only problem is that this is obviously very technical

:50:19.:50:21.

with lots of legal details and discussion, which has

:50:22.:50:23.

a political context and an economic content

:50:24.:50:25.

The agreement for example between the EU and South Korea is,

:50:26.:50:33.

kind of, 2,000 or more pages and it's actually not even

:50:34.:50:37.

If we're not part of the European Union, not subject

:50:38.:50:43.

to agreeing it with 28 member states, if it's one-on-one

:50:44.:50:46.

negotiating with another country, does that make it easier

:50:47.:50:49.

The key area of interest for the UK is services and services is the most

:50:50.:50:55.

With goods it's just looking at tariffs.

:50:56.:51:01.

It's a figure up and down and you just trade the figures

:51:02.:51:04.

Services is about nontariff barriers, what we call nontariff

:51:05.:51:12.

barriers, the hidden insidious barriers that mean you may tell me

:51:13.:51:15.

I can come to your country freely, actually you have put in a license

:51:16.:51:21.

provision or a condition somewhere, safety provisions or whatever it is,

:51:22.:51:24.

that make it impossible for me to actually have open access

:51:25.:51:27.

Where will trade negotiators come from?

:51:28.:51:32.

Have we got enough in this country to do the job?

:51:33.:51:37.

Therefore what can we realistically do and what are we going

:51:38.:51:45.

I think in government you think you have limited resources,

:51:46.:51:50.

Is it a case it's a mismatch between what we want

:51:51.:51:56.

I think we're going to have to compromise between three things,

:51:57.:52:01.

what we want, what we have to get to that and also what the others

:52:02.:52:05.

And yes, at some point I think there will be a reality check.

:52:06.:52:12.

So assuming we trigger Article 50 at the end of March,

:52:13.:52:15.

How hopeful are you that deals will be in place at the end

:52:16.:52:21.

The likelihood that at the end of two years the UK

:52:22.:52:26.

will have a fully-fledged sophisticated agreement

:52:27.:52:30.

with the European Union, and also agreements,

:52:31.:52:33.

or the beginning of agreements, with various countries,

:52:34.:52:35.

So it's interesting, Miriam Gonzalez, telling me about how this

:52:36.:52:50.

process works. It's worth bearing in mind the free trade deal Canada has

:52:51.:52:54.

just done with Europe took seven years to negotiate, lots of pages

:52:55.:52:57.

and complicated bits to work through. The big question, do we

:52:58.:53:01.

have the right people and enough of them and do they have the right

:53:02.:53:05.

experience to make sure we're well represented dealing with the EU? --,

:53:06.:53:11.

compensated. We will be speaking to the Brexit secretary David Davis

:53:12.:53:16.

later so we will try and get some of those questions. -- complicated.

:53:17.:53:18.

Jackie Kennedy is best remembered for her style and elegance,

:53:19.:53:21.

as well as for the events in Dallas on the 22nd of November 1963,

:53:22.:53:25.

but a new film examines what life was like for the wife of JFK before

:53:26.:53:29.

Natalie Portman, who plays the former First Lady,

:53:30.:53:32.

has been speaking to Tom Brook about the role,

:53:33.:53:34.

and about her thoughts on President Elect Donald Trump.

:53:35.:53:40.

You're getting masses of praise for this role.

:53:41.:53:42.

Did you know a lot about Jackie Kennedy before you began

:53:43.:53:45.

I really didn't know anything beyond, sort of,

:53:46.:53:48.

the popular conception, this 2-dimensional icon.

:53:49.:53:56.

Preparing for the role was really what let me know about her more.

:53:57.:54:00.

We will have a procession and I'll walk to the cathedral

:54:01.:54:05.

The really interesting aspect I noticed when I began watching

:54:06.:54:09.

Why did she do that and was that difficult for you to get right?

:54:10.:54:15.

She did have this very, sort of, breathy voice,

:54:16.:54:17.

especially when she was doing public interviews, like the White House

:54:18.:54:21.

There's audio tapes that she did with a friend of hers and JFK's

:54:22.:54:29.

who was doing an oral history of the White House

:54:30.:54:34.

And with him her voice was deeper, she spoke faster.

:54:35.:54:41.

You see that she was sort of cultivating this very classic

:54:42.:54:44.

image of femininity and coyness that she was projecting

:54:45.:54:47.

This article will bring you a great deal of attention.

:54:48.:54:53.

In that case, any advice for me? Yes.

:54:54.:54:57.

I think it's very much a portrait of grief and the way that it's not

:54:58.:55:10.

exactly an arc or anything, it's this, sort of, very fragmented

:55:11.:55:12.

experience of incredible sorrow and then unintrusive memory and then

:55:13.:55:15.

anger and a bit of dark humour and all of those,

:55:16.:55:18.

sort of, different sides of the grieving process.

:55:19.:55:26.

You know, she is one of the most popular First Ladies.

:55:27.:55:30.

Why does she have such a hold on people?

:55:31.:55:32.

I think she really had this exquisite understanding of public

:55:33.:55:38.

image and I think one of the most shocking things in the movie

:55:39.:55:41.

is when you see at the end the plaque on the door,

:55:42.:55:45.

JFK was only president for a little over two years.

:55:46.:55:53.

And to see the kind of import that they've meant to the American people

:55:54.:55:57.

shows how strong the story she told was.

:55:58.:56:03.

While the Kennedys were in the White House,

:56:04.:56:05.

her husband was having to contend with some quite severe racial

:56:06.:56:12.

tensions in the country, like the Birmingham church bombing.

:56:13.:56:14.

How will racial tensions or civil rights fare under President Trump

:56:15.:56:17.

It's not new unfortunately for this country and it's something

:56:18.:56:25.

that we seriously need to find a positive ways forward.

:56:26.:56:30.

Of...? Trump?

:56:31.:56:34.

And I really pray for the best for our country, and not just pray,

:56:35.:56:48.

but, you know, I'm energised to do whatever I can

:56:49.:56:51.

to make my own community and my own country...

:56:52.:56:58.

And, and the world, I think, country, patriotism,

:56:59.:57:00.

I'm guessing you won't allow me to write any of that?

:57:01.:57:11.

She has had high praise for her portrayal of Jackie Kennedy.

:57:12.:57:25.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:57:26.:00:49.

but that cloud hanging around through the weekend.

:00:50.:00:51.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

:00:52.:01:00.

Countries are "queuing up" for trade deals with Britain when it leaves

:01:01.:01:05.

the EU says the Foreign Secretary after Teresa May's confirmation that

:01:06.:01:07.

Labour warn the UK could become a bargain basement tax haven,

:01:08.:01:11.

but speaking in India Boris Johnson praises the Prime

:01:12.:01:14.

One of the points I'm going to be making in India, we think we can do

:01:15.:01:26.

free trade deals which will be for the benefit of both our countries,

:01:27.:01:28.

both Britain and India as well. Good morning.

:01:29.:01:37.

It's Wednesday, 18th January. Thousands of British holiday-makers

:01:38.:01:40.

are to be flown out of the Gambia in the next 48 hours

:01:41.:01:54.

as the Foreign Office warns of the growing risk

:01:55.:01:57.

of unrest in the country. WikiLeaks whistleblower

:01:58.:01:59.

Chelsea Manning has her prison sentence cut by more than 30 years

:02:00.:02:01.

in one of Barack Obama's last acts Telecoms giant EE is fined

:02:02.:02:04.

?2.7 million by the regulator for what it calls a "catalogue

:02:05.:02:14.

of errors" and overcharging In sport, non-league Lincoln City

:02:15.:02:16.

shock Ipswich Town with an injury time winner to reach the fourth

:02:17.:02:21.

round of the FA Cup Good morning from Tennessee on

:02:22.:02:35.

Breakfast's road trip across America. We will be asking what the

:02:36.:02:39.

new president Donald Trump can do for Truck and for agriculture.

:02:40.:02:43.

Across East Anglia and southern counties, it is a cold and frosty

:02:44.:02:52.

start to the day. For the rest of the UK, it will be mostly cloudy

:02:53.:02:56.

with light rain and drizzle here and there and it will feel quite mild,

:02:57.:03:02.

but I'll have more details in 15 minutes.

:03:03.:03:02.

Thank you. The Foreign Secretary has said

:03:03.:03:06.

countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with Britain

:03:07.:03:11.

when it leaves the European Union. Speaking in India in the last hour,

:03:12.:03:14.

Boris Johnson echoed the Prime Minister's vision,

:03:15.:03:16.

saying Brexit would benefit the EU Well, I think that the Prime

:03:17.:03:19.

Minister set out a very powerful, a very positive vision yesterday

:03:20.:03:26.

for how we can do a deal, that will not just benefit our friends

:03:27.:03:29.

in the rest of the EU, but also drive growth in the rest

:03:30.:03:32.

of the world and one of the points I will be making here in India

:03:33.:03:36.

is that we think we can do free trade deals which will be

:03:37.:03:40.

for the benefit of both our countries, both Britain

:03:41.:03:42.

and India as well. Earlier the Shadow Brexit

:03:43.:03:45.

Secretary Keir Starmer warned the Prime Minister's approach

:03:46.:03:47.

could leave people poorer. What I was highly critical of

:03:48.:03:59.

yesterday was Theresa May's sort of bargain basement tax haven threat.

:04:00.:04:05.

No deal and out of any meaningful relationship with the EU. That is,

:04:06.:04:09.

that would make people poorer. There is no mandate for it and it is

:04:10.:04:12.

totally inconsistent. Our Political Correspondent Iain

:04:13.:04:14.

Watson is in Westminster. Good morning. It is nice to see

:04:15.:04:23.

sunlight behind you. Can Theresa May expect more of the same at Prime

:04:24.:04:26.

Minister's Questions today? It is the first time she will face MPs

:04:27.:04:30.

since giving that speech. A new dawn has broken as you suggested. Her own

:04:31.:04:34.

backbenchers will think so. She will get praise from them. They will be

:04:35.:04:43.

echoing what Boris Johnson was saying. So many of them, not all of

:04:44.:04:48.

them, I think will be supportive. Some have got concerns about leaving

:04:49.:04:52.

the single market, whether that would make Britain poorer, leaving a

:04:53.:04:55.

market of 500 million people. I think some of them will bite their

:04:56.:04:57.

tongues at Prime Minister's Questions, not so, the Labour Party,

:04:58.:05:01.

they'll criticise Theresa May for not making that speech to Parliament

:05:02.:05:05.

yesterday. As you heard from Keir Starmer, they will say she was wrong

:05:06.:05:11.

to threaten our EU partners, but Keir Starmer himself and Jeremy

:05:12.:05:14.

Corbyn, the Labour leadership will come under pressure from their own

:05:15.:05:17.

backbenchers who believe they should be taking a stronger line against

:05:18.:05:21.

Theresa May arguing more strongly to stay inside the single market and

:05:22.:05:24.

from the Liberal Democrats, well, they will say thank you very much,

:05:25.:05:27.

Theresa May for giving MPs a vote on the final deal, but that vote should

:05:28.:05:31.

be put to the British people too. In other words, they will be calling

:05:32.:05:36.

for a second referendum. Iain, thank you.

:05:37.:05:39.

We'll be talking to the Brexit Secretary David Davis

:05:40.:05:42.

Thousands of British holiday-makers are being flown home from The Gambia

:05:43.:05:49.

because of a worsening political crisis there.

:05:50.:05:51.

The Foreign Office is advising people to avoid all but essential

:05:52.:05:53.

travel to the country, after its president refused

:05:54.:05:55.

to step down and declared a state of emergency.

:05:56.:05:57.

Under a state of emergency, Gambians are fleeing their capital.

:05:58.:06:04.

And mongst all this are thousands of British tourists who have

:06:05.:06:08.

Thomas Cook has a team heading out there to help.

:06:09.:06:14.

Four extra flights are expected to leave today.

:06:15.:06:18.

The company said in a statement, "We will operate a programme

:06:19.:06:20.

of additional flights into Banjul Airport over

:06:21.:06:22.

It is bringing 985 package holiday customers home.

:06:23.:06:31.

A surprise for some passengers at Manchester Airport

:06:32.:06:35.

I'm just disappointed. I could be wrong.

:06:36.:06:40.

I understand, I knew there were problems

:06:41.:06:41.

He said he isn't going to stand down.

:06:42.:06:44.

But I've got family and friends over there and they say it's all right.

:06:45.:06:48.

This man is the problem - President Yahya Jammeh.

:06:49.:06:56.

Refusing to step down and warning about foreign

:06:57.:06:59.

He had conceded last month's election and was due to hand over,

:07:00.:07:05.

but then he challenged the result and is now resisting pressure to go.

:07:06.:07:13.

The threat of violence has been growing.

:07:14.:07:14.

It calls itself the smiling coast of Africa, but it's a worrying time

:07:15.:07:24.

for holiday-makers waiting to leave and for Gambians who can't.

:07:25.:07:36.

In the last hour, the regulator Ofcom has imposed a pretty hefty

:07:37.:07:39.

fine on telecoms giant EE for overcharging their customers.

:07:40.:07:41.

How much is it, Ben? ?2.7 million is the fine. This relates to EE

:07:42.:07:49.

overcharging customers for the use of a helpline number. This was a

:07:50.:07:54.

number that EE set-up, but they were supposed to be charged 19 pence a

:07:55.:07:58.

minute. Many people got their bills and realised they were charged ?1.20

:07:59.:08:03.

a minute to call that number. Ofcom says that cost customers about

:08:04.:08:09.

?250,000 more than it should have done. They have given them this fine

:08:10.:08:15.

and EE said they have contacted the customers and anyone who has been

:08:16.:08:19.

out of pocket, we've refunded, but this big fine will send a message to

:08:20.:08:22.

other companies that they need to get it right.

:08:23.:08:25.

Well, we think this is a significant fine and fines are a deterrent for

:08:26.:08:32.

companies. They don't like to be on the receiving end of fines like

:08:33.:08:35.

this, but I think what really matters to consumers is that,

:08:36.:08:38.

companies get the services they provide and our bills right first

:08:39.:08:42.

time and that's why we hope that this fine today sends a clear

:08:43.:08:45.

message, not just to EE, but right across the industry that we won't

:08:46.:08:51.

hesitate to help in and levy fines if they get that wrong for

:08:52.:08:53.

customers. EE has 20 days to pay the fine and

:08:54.:09:02.

as always, everyone wonders where the money goes? The money will go to

:09:03.:09:07.

the Treasury, but critics will say, we'll end up paying it through

:09:08.:09:13.

higher bills from EE. EE says it contacted everybody who needs to be

:09:14.:09:15.

contacted, but not great. President Obama has cut

:09:16.:09:20.

the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who was jailed for 35 years

:09:21.:09:22.

for leaking intelligence secrets. The former military analyst,

:09:23.:09:29.

who was born Bradley Manning but had hormone therapy in prison,

:09:30.:09:32.

will be released in May. Our correspondent in Washington

:09:33.:09:35.

is Rajini Vaidyanathan. Chelsea Manning was responsible

:09:36.:09:36.

for one of the largest leaks of government secrets

:09:37.:09:39.

in American history. Born Bradley Manning,

:09:40.:09:40.

it was while serving in Iraq that the low-ranking private hacked

:09:41.:09:45.

government databases, handing more than 700,000

:09:46.:09:48.

classified documents to Julian Assange's

:09:49.:09:50.

WikiLeaks organisation. Manning's supporters have campaigned

:09:51.:09:59.

for years for her release. They maintain she's

:10:00.:10:05.

a whistleblower, not a traitor. The reduction of Chelsea Manning's

:10:06.:10:08.

sentence means she has only served three years out of a 35-year term

:10:09.:10:11.

she was handed in 2013. After the trial it was announced

:10:12.:10:27.

that Bradley would be known as Chelsea and live as a woman. She has

:10:28.:10:31.

been held at a male prison and tried to take her life on two occasions. I

:10:32.:10:37.

would say 12 to 16 months her mental state and her condition has

:10:38.:10:40.

deteriorated. She became depressed and there was a risk to her

:10:41.:10:44.

well-being, if not her life if she remained in this prison. Jewel

:10:45.:10:49.

Assange thanked those who campaigned for Chelsea's release and Edward

:10:50.:10:53.

Snowden who also leaked Government secrets tweeted his thanks to

:10:54.:10:57.

President Obama. But the Republican speaker of the House, Paul Ryan said

:10:58.:11:02.

President Obama's decision to cut short Chelsea Manning's sentence was

:11:03.:11:07.

outrageous and sent a message that those who compromise national

:11:08.:11:09.

security won't be held accountable for their crimes. One of President

:11:10.:11:14.

Obama's final acts in office will please as much as it will anger.

:11:15.:11:23.

A baby has been born to a previously infertile couple

:11:24.:11:26.

in Ukraine using a new type of "three-person IVF".

:11:27.:11:30.

Doctors in Kiev are reported to have used a method called pro-nuclear

:11:31.:11:33.

It's not the first baby born with DNA from three parents, however.

:11:34.:11:37.

Another child was created using a slightly different method

:11:38.:11:40.

The first freight train to travel directly to the UK from China is due

:11:41.:11:49.

It has taken over a fortnight to get here, but that's around

:11:50.:11:54.

half the time a journey by sea would take.

:11:55.:11:56.

The train, which has 34 wagons, travelled through Russia,

:11:57.:12:02.

and many other countries to get here.

:12:03.:12:03.

The train began its journey at a giant container depot in China.

:12:04.:12:08.

34 carriages were loaded with goods, such as clothes, bags

:12:09.:12:10.

China has been operating trains to 14 European capitals from this

:12:11.:12:15.

Now, London has been added to the list.

:12:16.:12:20.

Because of different rail gauges along the way,

:12:21.:12:24.

the containers have to be offloaded and reloaded several times,

:12:25.:12:28.

but China sees this as a new version of the Silk Route.

:12:29.:12:38.

Then it was on to Germany and through the Channel Tunnel to the

:12:39.:12:41.

UK. In all, the train, carrying

:12:42.:12:45.

?4 million worth of goods, passes through eight countries

:12:46.:12:47.

on its journey of more The UK is China's seventh-biggest

:12:48.:12:49.

trading market, so the boost to Chinese enterprise is clear,

:12:50.:12:56.

but it's also hoped the train will make the journey back to China

:12:57.:12:59.

laden with British goods. It is an incredible journey that,

:13:00.:13:11.

isn't it? It is a beast. But much quicker than going via sea.

:13:12.:13:18.

The sub-prime court is ruling on whether wheelchair users should be

:13:19.:13:25.

allowed priority spaces on buses. Five years ago, wheelchair user

:13:26.:13:28.

Doug Paulley tried to get He couldn't because the space

:13:29.:13:30.

was taken up by a mum with a pushchair, and the driver

:13:31.:13:34.

refused to force her to move. What began as one man trying

:13:35.:13:43.

to catch a bus has turned into a nearly five-year legal

:13:44.:13:45.

battle, in a bid to clarify a grey area when it comes

:13:46.:13:48.

to wheelchair spaces on buses. Back in 2012, Doug was unable

:13:49.:13:51.

to catch a bus because the space for wheelchairs was taken by a mum

:13:52.:13:55.

with a pushchair. She refused to move,

:13:56.:13:57.

which meant Doug couldn't get on. His case centred around

:13:58.:14:00.

the bus company First Group and their policy of requesting,

:14:01.:14:03.

not requiring, someone to move out of the wheelchair space

:14:04.:14:07.

if a disabled person wants It's a big issue

:14:08.:14:09.

for disabled people. It's pointless having fully

:14:10.:14:14.

accessible bus services when in fact Today's final ruling

:14:15.:14:16.

at the Supreme Court could have wide implications that stretch further

:14:17.:14:23.

than public transport. It's amazing that so few cases make

:14:24.:14:27.

it to the Supreme Court and it is the first time that it's

:14:28.:14:30.

ever had a case about rights of access to goods and services

:14:31.:14:34.

for disabled people. Yeah, I never thought about five

:14:35.:14:36.

years ago when I tried to catch that bus that we would still be talking

:14:37.:14:39.

about it now. If found in Doug's favour,

:14:40.:14:43.

it would mean any company that provides a space for disabled people

:14:44.:14:47.

would need to make sure they are prioritised

:14:48.:14:50.

for disabled people. If not they could open

:14:51.:14:54.

themselves up to legal action. So many of you getting in touch. We

:14:55.:15:03.

will talk about it now. Good morning. Sarah, so many people

:15:04.:15:19.

getting in touch. From your Keith, relating to this case. First

:15:20.:16:17.

Group's policy states where a pushchair or buggy is occupying the

:16:18.:16:22.

space, a driver will ask that it is re-positioned and they make the

:16:23.:16:26.

point that a driver has no power to ask passengers to move and is

:16:27.:16:29.

relying on the goodwill of passengers. They say if a fellow

:16:30.:16:36.

passenger refuses to move, the wheelchair user needs to wait for

:16:37.:16:40.

the next bus. You could argue they are following policy? What are the

:16:41.:16:45.

bus company's policies. There are a range of different policies across

:16:46.:16:48.

the country. If you come back to basics and this is what this case

:16:49.:16:53.

was about, there is already a legal requirement and regulations to

:16:54.:16:56.

provide physical access to buses. So it is not just about the width of

:16:57.:17:01.

the doorways and ramps, it is about a designated wheelchair accessible

:17:02.:17:04.

space. That's what the regulations call it, so each bus has to have

:17:05.:17:09.

that space. If then in practise, there becomes a battle between the

:17:10.:17:15.

person for whom that space is designated the wheelchair user and

:17:16.:17:18.

everybody else who might want to use it, that includes passengers wanting

:17:19.:17:21.

to stand, people with luggage and people with children in buggies, it

:17:22.:17:26.

becomes a very practical battle over the use of that space. You come back

:17:27.:17:31.

to the law. The law says that should be a wheelchair designated space.

:17:32.:17:40.

If we do not have properly trained drivers who understand the needs of

:17:41.:17:46.

disabled people but also are prepared to have a conversation with

:17:47.:17:50.

people who may be in that space you are not wheelchair users and take

:17:51.:17:53.

whatever steps reasonably necessary to try to get them to move so the

:17:54.:17:57.

wheelchair user can occupy the space, that becomes a very

:17:58.:18:01.

problematic issue on a day-to-day basis for wheelchair users. There is

:18:02.:18:06.

no consistency and confidence that space will be usable. It is

:18:07.:18:12.

interesting. In some ways, if they were given the power to make people

:18:13.:18:16.

move, how do you enforce it? It seems so ridiculous to get to this

:18:17.:18:20.

point when someone just won't move when they are being asked.

:18:21.:18:24.

Absolutely. They are all the arguments which are being put before

:18:25.:18:31.

the Supreme Court. The first court case Doug Pooley one and was awarded

:18:32.:18:36.

compensation for her to feelings will do the Supreme Court overturned

:18:37.:18:40.

that. There are hopes that having been consistent in bringing this

:18:41.:18:44.

case to the Supreme Court, he will win. Having said that, you are

:18:45.:18:49.

absolutely right. What is really needed is a fresh look at the design

:18:50.:18:53.

of buses so there is more flexibility around the space

:18:54.:18:57.

available, so it is not just one limited space, the possibility to

:18:58.:19:01.

use other space. It is about properly trained drivers who are

:19:02.:19:05.

prepared to do whatever they need to encourage people to move and making

:19:06.:19:12.

sure that passengers, who are occupying space, are fully aware

:19:13.:19:14.

that space is the only space available to people in wheelchairs

:19:15.:19:20.

and they have no other options. Nicola has said wheelchairs should

:19:21.:19:24.

definitely get the priority. When my children were little we did not have

:19:25.:19:30.

a choice. Sarah says, what if your child is also disabled and uses a

:19:31.:19:35.

wheelchair that looks like a pushchair? We cannot get out of

:19:36.:19:40.

wheelchairs like babies and toddlers can be helped out of theirs. I have

:19:41.:19:44.

been told there are pushchairs and the driver asked someone politely to

:19:45.:19:49.

move and they get the same answer, my buddy or pushchair just not fold

:19:50.:19:55.

down. The viewers says, first come first serve -- served, so it is

:19:56.:20:05.

therefore everyone. It comes to something when others will not move

:20:06.:20:09.

for you. Actually we have had a pretty difficult day. Getting on a

:20:10.:20:13.

bus is a difficult issue you have to go through in your everyday life.

:20:14.:20:24.

Thank you for your time. Thank you. Thanks to you both. We'll keep you

:20:25.:20:28.

up to date on what has happened. Keep your coming in.

:20:29.:20:33.

Here's Carol with a look at this morning's weather.

:20:34.:20:44.

It is cold. We have a weather front draped across Lincolnshire, the

:20:45.:20:51.

Midlands were into wells producing cloud, light rain and drizzle. To

:20:52.:20:56.

the south of that, we have lower temperatures. To the north of that,

:20:57.:21:01.

temperatures are higher. In Kent it is minus seven. In oxygen, minus

:21:02.:21:08.

five. In Bournemouth, minus four. In Stornoway it is plus ten. As we go

:21:09.:21:13.

through the day, any missed Yunis in the south and south-east will lift.

:21:14.:21:23.

We have fog. -- Misti Nass. The cloud will break across North East

:21:24.:21:27.

Scotland. We will see some sunshine but it will be wet across Shetland

:21:28.:21:31.

for the in the afternoon sunshine across southern counties. Bits and

:21:32.:21:37.

pieces of cloud. A bit more cloud will encroach across Norfolk, coming

:21:38.:21:42.

in across the North Midlands by afternoon. You can see how the light

:21:43.:21:47.

rain fizzles and will become confined to the coast. Hill fog in

:21:48.:21:51.

the North of England. The rain continuing across Shetland. Around

:21:52.:21:54.

the Murray first we will see some sunshine. Across Northern Ireland

:21:55.:22:01.

any brighter breaks will be a premium. It would be cloudy and

:22:02.:22:07.

mild. The same across Wales. Inland it will remain fairly cloudy. By

:22:08.:22:11.

evening and overnight, under the clearer skies we will see return to

:22:12.:22:15.

mist and fog patches. Elsewhere there will be too much cloud around

:22:16.:22:19.

for that to happen and it will be milder and colder, as you would

:22:20.:22:24.

expect in the south. Into tomorrow more of the same. Another cloudy

:22:25.:22:29.

day. Brighter with sunshine in the south, brighter with sunshine across

:22:30.:22:32.

north-east Scotland for that we could see sunshine across Northern

:22:33.:22:36.

Ireland, parts of rain across England tomorrow. Similar to today.

:22:37.:22:40.

See you in half an hour. During the US election campaign

:22:41.:22:45.

Donald Trump pledged to make America great again,

:22:46.:22:47.

but as he prepares to take office can he deliver on that promise?

:22:48.:22:50.

In the week that Donald Trump will be sworn in as the 45th

:22:51.:22:53.

President of the United States We're taking a road trip through the heart

:22:54.:22:56.

of America on Route 45 to find out how Americans are feeling

:22:57.:22:59.

about Obama's legacy. Today, Breakfast's Jon Kay

:23:00.:23:02.

is heading south towards Tennessee. If you want to understand

:23:03.:23:12.

Donald Trump's election win, Next to Route 45, the Ohio River

:23:13.:23:14.

meets the Mississippi. It's an essential artery for the US

:23:15.:23:28.

economy, carrying 18 million tons But things aren't

:23:29.:23:30.

what they used to be. The locks which boats pass

:23:31.:23:41.

through here have seen better days. Nearly 100 years old,

:23:42.:23:46.

they regularly break down, A boat could be waiting out for 52

:23:47.:23:48.

hours before coming through? Mark, the lock keeper,

:23:49.:23:59.

says it's a struggle The concrete is starting

:24:00.:24:02.

to break up and crumble. Every time it gets hit by a boat

:24:03.:24:12.

as it lands on it it puts pressure on it and causes more cracks

:24:13.:24:15.

and stress on it, we patch it together and try and keep it going,

:24:16.:24:19.

but it's not going to last forever. Donald Trump has pledged $1 trillion

:24:20.:24:23.

to rebuild America's rivers, A promise that's won him plenty

:24:24.:24:27.

of support round here. But he hasn't said where

:24:28.:24:32.

the money will come from. We head back on Route

:24:33.:24:38.

45 to see the kind of project the new president

:24:39.:24:40.

wants to encourage. A huge dam and lock system to

:24:41.:24:44.

replace the failing one downriver. It's nearly 20 years behind schedule

:24:45.:24:50.

and $2 billion over budget. Many here believe Donald Trump's

:24:51.:24:56.

life in business will I think he if he really wants

:24:57.:24:58.

to put his mind with it and really wants to work with the people,

:24:59.:25:08.

for sure, why not? One person can't do it

:25:09.:25:11.

but if you take a group of people and you've got good conversation

:25:12.:25:14.

communication skills, good listening skills, you can

:25:15.:25:17.

pretty much accomplish anything. Trump's critics say his pledges

:25:18.:25:19.

are unrealistic and unaffordable. But in an area where jobs

:25:20.:25:26.

can be scarce, they're We drive on into

:25:27.:25:28.

America's rural South. There are 2 million

:25:29.:25:39.

farms in this country. Will a property developer president

:25:40.:25:42.

understand this business? At the University of Tennessee,

:25:43.:25:53.

students are learning how to weigh Stick it in, press it

:25:54.:25:55.

forward, pull it out. Some are gonna be more willing

:25:56.:26:06.

to go forward and some Donald Trump won nearly 80%

:26:07.:26:09.

of the vote in the Martin area. They like his confidence and in turn

:26:10.:26:18.

they have confidence in him. He might have a few mess-ups

:26:19.:26:26.

on the way but eventually We're always going to need

:26:27.:26:28.

agriculture, that's what feeds us. So we're going to need

:26:29.:26:35.

it to keep going. But is farming compatible

:26:36.:26:37.

with Trump's plans for building? What about the land,

:26:38.:26:40.

the environment? Donald Trump is a man

:26:41.:26:43.

you associate with skyscrapers and New York City, not with farming

:26:44.:26:46.

and places like this. Do you think he understands

:26:47.:26:48.

you and what you want to do? I think he's going to help small

:26:49.:26:54.

town people also out. I don't think he's going

:26:55.:27:01.

to be the big city man What about farming, does

:27:02.:27:04.

he understand farming? Not as well as some

:27:05.:27:08.

agriculture people. Whether it's agriculture

:27:09.:27:09.

or infrastructure, in these communities away from Washington,

:27:10.:27:12.

many feel Trump will be a president Someone not just following

:27:13.:27:16.

the political herd. Tomorrow, John is off to

:27:17.:27:31.

Mississippi. I'll be back just after nine

:27:32.:30:53.

o'clock, see you then. Hello this is Breakfast

:30:54.:31:05.

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker. The Foreign Secretary has said

:31:06.:31:07.

countries are "queuing up" to sign free trade deals with Britain

:31:08.:31:10.

when it leaves the European Union. Boris Johnson also suggests that

:31:11.:31:16.

agreements could be achieved quickly after the Article 50

:31:17.:31:18.

negotiations are concluded, and said the UK would not be

:31:19.:31:20.

"hauling up the drawbridge", despite the new migration controls

:31:21.:31:24.

promised by Theresa May. Thomas Cook is preparing to bring

:31:25.:31:29.

thousands of British holidaymakers home from The Gambia

:31:30.:31:32.

because of a worsening The Foreign Office is

:31:33.:31:34.

advising people to avoid all but essential travel

:31:35.:31:39.

to the country, after its President refused to step down and declared

:31:40.:31:43.

a state of emergency. Thomas Cook said it was implementing

:31:44.:31:48.

contingency plans to bring home all its UK customers on additional

:31:49.:31:51.

flights over the next 48 hours. The mobile phone operator EE has

:31:52.:31:55.

been fined ?2.7 million More than 30,000 customers

:31:56.:31:57.

have been affected - overcharged by a quarter

:31:58.:32:04.

of a million pounds. The regulator explained why

:32:05.:32:05.

they'd taken action. They charged customers

:32:06.:32:12.

who were travelling abroad, who were trying to call

:32:13.:32:16.

the helpline number, presumably

:32:17.:32:22.

because they needed some support. They charged those customers

:32:23.:32:26.

as if they were making a call to the United States of America,

:32:27.:32:28.

which is clearly a much more And then secondly, when the calls

:32:29.:32:31.

to that helpline were made free, some months later, they continued

:32:32.:32:40.

to charge some customers President Obama has cut

:32:41.:32:42.

the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who was jailed for 35 years

:32:43.:32:45.

for leaking intelligence secrets. Manning's supporters have

:32:46.:32:47.

campaigned for years for her release, maintaining she's

:32:48.:32:49.

a whistleblower and not a traitor. The former military analyst -

:32:50.:32:51.

who was born Bradley Manning but had hormone therapy in prison -

:32:52.:32:54.

will be released in May. I'd say 12 to 16 months,

:32:55.:32:57.

her mental state and her condition have deteriorated significantly,

:32:58.:33:00.

she became depressed. She tried to commit suicide twice,

:33:01.:33:04.

and was punished for it There was clearly a risk

:33:05.:33:06.

to her well-being, if not her life, if she had

:33:07.:33:16.

remained in this prison. A baby has been born

:33:17.:33:19.

to a previously infertile couple in Ukraine using a new type

:33:20.:33:21.

of "three-person IVF". Doctors in Kiev are reported

:33:22.:33:23.

to have used a method called pronuclear transfer

:33:24.:33:26.

in what is a world first. It is not the first baby born with

:33:27.:33:28.

DNA from three parents, however. Another child was created

:33:29.:33:31.

using a slightly different method The Duke of Cambridge

:33:32.:33:33.

and Prince Harry honoured the achievements of wounded

:33:34.:33:53.

servicemen and women at a special The event, held at the Royal

:33:54.:33:55.

Geographical Society, celebrated excellence

:33:56.:33:58.

through awarding prizes to individuals who have excelled

:33:59.:33:59.

in their Endeavour Fund sporting The message yesterday

:34:00.:34:02.

from Theresa May was "No deal for Britain is better

:34:03.:34:11.

than a bad deal". But is the Prime Minister in danger

:34:12.:34:13.

of alienating her fellow EU leaders, and could her hard line

:34:14.:34:16.

damage Britain's Brexit Secretary David Davis joins

:34:17.:34:18.

us now from our London Newsroom. Good morning. No deal is better than

:34:19.:34:24.

a bad deal, but how would you judge a bad deal? You are picking out one

:34:25.:34:32.

sentence from a 7000 word speech. What she was but in front of the

:34:33.:34:37.

country yesterday, with great clarity, by the way, was in the

:34:38.:34:40.

interests of both UK and the European Union, that seeks to

:34:41.:34:45.

preserve the best of what we have whilst giving us the freedom to

:34:46.:34:49.

trade globally. -- what she was putting in front. And a proposal for

:34:50.:34:53.

a deal which will get the whole country behind it, because that is

:34:54.:34:57.

in the interests of the whole country, that is the aim. We are not

:34:58.:35:02.

seeking a fight, we are seeking to get a good deal which serves

:35:03.:35:06.

everyone, that is the most important thing to have in the front of your

:35:07.:35:13.

mind. Not seeking a fight, but of course she uses that kind of

:35:14.:35:16.

language. I had to pick out something. I understand that. Boris

:35:17.:35:21.

Johnson says countries are queueing up to make trade deals with written.

:35:22.:35:28.

What countries? -- with Britain. I had lunch with the New Zealand

:35:29.:35:35.

people the other day, and also Australia. We are not at the back of

:35:36.:35:41.

the key with the Americans, as well. -- the back of the queue. There are

:35:42.:35:48.

a series of countries involved. Do you concede that any kind of deal

:35:49.:35:54.

with New Zealand or America takes time? Bear in mind, we can't

:35:55.:36:00.

actually sign off on such a deal for two years so we have a lot of time

:36:01.:36:04.

in hand in one sense. To talk about exactly what they want in the deal

:36:05.:36:09.

and what it would involve, so we will get to appoint very soon after

:36:10.:36:12.

leaving where we exactly what both sides want out of the deal and will

:36:13.:36:18.

be able to sign very quickly -- get to a point. I don't think time is a

:36:19.:36:24.

problem with those deals. Two years, you will be having conversations in

:36:25.:36:27.

these two years and then you can do the deal? Well, this is government,

:36:28.:36:33.

suddenly is putting it too strongly, but very soon after, after departing

:36:34.:36:41.

the European Union. Months? I will not get into predicting what day we

:36:42.:36:44.

will sign these things, and I think the important thing to bear in mind,

:36:45.:36:49.

there are big opportunities and they will become available very soon

:36:50.:36:53.

after we leave. You know this very well, the Canadian deal with the EU

:36:54.:36:58.

has taken seven years. That tells you quite a lot about negotiations

:36:59.:37:03.

with the EU, but you think we can get everything in order in a couple

:37:04.:37:08.

of years? I think we can agree in two, but we might need

:37:09.:37:11.

implementation elements after that, but are not talking long periods.

:37:12.:37:17.

Maybe a new customs arrangement or a new border arrangement, and the big

:37:18.:37:23.

difference between something like Canada which is a sort of

:37:24.:37:28.

state-of-the-art deal in many ways, when you are doing these deals, one

:37:29.:37:32.

of the big things you have to worry about is common standards so the car

:37:33.:37:36.

made in this country is considered safe and saleable and meets the

:37:37.:37:40.

standards in another country. The day after we leave the European

:37:41.:37:44.

Union, all of our standards will be identical, there is no negotiations

:37:45.:37:52.

to do for -- because they are identical, we have a interest in

:37:53.:37:56.

maintaining the trade we have a dog Europeans sell 290 billion to us. --

:37:57.:38:03.

maintain the trade we have. They want to preserve that. It is in

:38:04.:38:09.

their interests just as much as it is in ours with them, so there are

:38:10.:38:12.

incentives and a big technical advantage because we have already

:38:13.:38:17.

started on the same basis for stop can we talk about process. The prime

:38:18.:38:22.

ministers says Parliament will have a vote on the deal that she strikes.

:38:23.:38:24.

Dashti Prime Minister if the prime ministers says no, what

:38:25.:38:34.

will happen? Do you think people are focusing on, the single vote, but

:38:35.:38:37.

there will be a knot of votes on this along the way. It is not about

:38:38.:38:42.

turning up after two years of silence and then say, here we are,

:38:43.:38:46.

choose this. There will be the great repeal Bill, and a great deal of

:38:47.:38:51.

discussion of what we intend, and after that there will be major

:38:52.:38:56.

legislation which relates to the policies and are affected by the

:38:57.:39:00.

negotiation and the departure, and Parliament will have any number of

:39:01.:39:04.

occasions, so by the time we get to the end of this, it will be like the

:39:05.:39:10.

third reading, we have gone through these issues beforehand. It's a

:39:11.:39:13.

false comparison, really. Really hypothetical. And we will win that

:39:14.:39:19.

vote. Parliament will have lots of votes, on what pieces of

:39:20.:39:25.

legislation? First off, the great repeal Bill, this is very important,

:39:26.:39:28.

the aim of that is to take those bits of European law to continue

:39:29.:39:36.

with, to bring them into UK law, so Parliament can change that if they

:39:37.:39:39.

choose to. And then you will have other bills, I don't know which

:39:40.:39:43.

ones, because we have got to agree the details, but there will be bills

:39:44.:39:49.

which relate to the major changes which result from leaving. There

:39:50.:39:53.

will be a number of those. Thanks for joining us.

:39:54.:39:56.

Let's speak now to our Political Correspondent Iain

:39:57.:39:57.

David Davis talking about the 7000 words that Theresa May was speaking

:39:58.:40:06.

yesterday, what kind reception is she likely to get today in Prime

:40:07.:40:12.

Minister's Questions? She will get a positive response from any of her

:40:13.:40:18.

backbenchers, and also the media have given her a good write up, like

:40:19.:40:25.

the Daily Mail, they have called on her as the iron Lady. The kind of

:40:26.:40:34.

language from yesterday's speech has annoyed some of the politicians on

:40:35.:40:42.

the continent who might be crucial in effectively agreeing to that deal

:40:43.:40:47.

further down the line. When you asked him what happens if MPs don't

:40:48.:40:51.

back be fine deal, he said, of course they will. -- don't back the

:40:52.:40:55.

final deal. But he has said previously that Parliament should

:40:56.:41:01.

not be able to overturn the referendum, so the logic is, even if

:41:02.:41:04.

politicians vote against the deal, we still come out of the European

:41:05.:41:14.

Union. On her other threat to bring Britain into a low tax low

:41:15.:41:16.

regulation regime if she doesn't get her way, that will be the labour

:41:17.:41:20.

opposition. Quite simply when it comes to another vote on this issue,

:41:21.:41:25.

the Liberal Democrats will say, don't confine this to Parliament,

:41:26.:41:27.

give the British people another boat. In other words they will be

:41:28.:41:33.

calling for a second referendum -- another boat. There is a long road

:41:34.:41:36.

ahead. The Victoria Derbyshire programme

:41:37.:41:43.

is on BBC2 later this morning, let's find out what they've covering

:41:44.:41:47.

on today's show. It is the most treacherous time of

:41:48.:41:52.

the year to cross the Mediterranean in a dinghy, but many migrants have

:41:53.:41:57.

made this journey in the first part of this year. We join people who are

:41:58.:42:06.

trying to save them. Stay where you are, we will come to you. Also, real

:42:07.:42:11.

parents with buggies be forced to make way for disabled passengers on

:42:12.:42:18.

buses in the future? -- will parents will stop we have the latest from

:42:19.:42:25.

the caucus. -- we will have the latest on that court case.

:42:26.:42:28.

And coming up here on Breakfast this morning.

:42:29.:42:30.

We've been talking to the actor Natalie Portman

:42:31.:42:32.

about Oscars, pregnancy, and portraying one of the most

:42:33.:42:34.

It can be hard to speak to children about disturbing world events,

:42:35.:42:40.

but we'll hear how one woman's son inspired her to write a play

:42:41.:42:43.

about how young people respond to tragedy.

:42:44.:42:50.

You don't look like a civil servant. You don't look like a scientist.

:42:51.:42:55.

The actor Ben Chaplin will be here to tell us about his new role

:42:56.:42:58.

as a man embroiled in a dangerous affair, in the psychological

:42:59.:43:01.

That is a bit fruity. Yes, it is. Apple Tree Yard, that is the

:43:02.:43:19.

connection. You have seen it? Do we look forward to it? UCLA lot...

:43:20.:43:28.

And now to last night's football, it was a great moment for Lincoln city,

:43:29.:43:33.

especially after the death of Graham Taylor. That was his first job as a

:43:34.:43:40.

manager. Incredible to think it was for decades ago. -- for.

:43:41.:43:46.

The non-league side beat Ipswich Town of the Championship

:43:47.:43:58.

1-0, in their FA Cup third round replay.

:43:59.:44:00.

The first time they've got this far

:44:01.:44:01.

since Graham Taylor managed them in 1976.

:44:02.:44:03.

The drama was left until the 91st minute -

:44:04.:44:05.

when Nathan Arnold scored a well-deserved winner for Lincoln,

:44:06.:44:07.

who'll be at home to Brighton in the fourth round.

:44:08.:44:10.

And another non-league side, Sutton United, also made it through.

:44:11.:44:12.

They beat League One's AFC Wimbledon 3-1 in their replay.

:44:13.:44:15.

That earned Sutton a lucrative televised tie at home

:44:16.:44:17.

Sam Allardyce won his first match as Crystal Palace manager.

:44:18.:44:23.

They were a goal down at home to one of his old sides Bolton,

:44:24.:44:26.

but Christian Benteke scored twice to earn Palace a home tie

:44:27.:44:29.

There were also wins for Blackpool, Burnley and Bristol City.

:44:30.:44:33.

Number one seed Angelique Kerber and 2003 finallist Venus Williams

:44:34.:44:36.

are safely through to the third round of the Australian Open.

:44:37.:44:39.

Andy Murray plays Russia's Andrey Rublev shortly.

:44:40.:44:42.

He's the son of a former professional boxer and ranked

:44:43.:44:44.

152nd in the world - but he's one of the most promising

:44:45.:44:47.

I have never hit with him, but I have seen him play,

:44:48.:44:57.

He's a clean ball-striker, and I guess I will get

:44:58.:45:06.

a better idea of how good he is when I play against him.

:45:07.:45:10.

But he is obviously one of the better up-and-coming

:45:11.:45:13.

youngsters, and he has obviously got a bright, bright future.

:45:14.:45:18.

So, yeah, I'll need to be ready, because he does take a lot

:45:19.:45:24.

One Brit is on court at the moment, Dan Evans is playing 2014 US Open

:45:25.:45:27.

champion Marin Cilic, who is seeded seventh.

:45:28.:45:29.

Andy Murray looked like he was in a cupboard. Not perhaps in the

:45:30.:45:44.

Australian sunshine. Neil Robertson beat Ali Carter to

:45:45.:45:49.

set up a quarterfinal against Ronnie O'Sullivan in the Masters snooker.

:45:50.:45:52.

Marco Fu benefited from a bit of luck as he knocked out Judd Trump.

:45:53.:45:58.

They were tied at 5-5 when the red he was trying to sink bounced out of

:45:59.:46:03.

the pocket, of the opposite side, and back into the pocket. That set

:46:04.:46:07.

him up for a century break and gave him a 6-5 the jury.

:46:08.:46:11.

It's just been announced that Europe's captain will be able

:46:12.:46:14.

to choose four players for next year's Ryder Cup in France.

:46:15.:46:17.

Thomas Bjorn will get to pick one more player than Darren Clarke

:46:18.:46:20.

It's part of a revamp of the qualifying system

:46:21.:46:23.

after Europe lost heavily to the United States in Hazeltine.

:46:24.:46:29.

I should mention Alex Thompson, who is in the last 24 hours of the yacht

:46:30.:46:38.

race, 400 miles to go, they are heading back to France, he is 40

:46:39.:46:42.

miles behind the leader. That is nothing, they have been around the

:46:43.:46:46.

world. It is really close. He could make it at the end.

:46:47.:46:51.

Except he is not travelling as fast as he was, but we will know by this

:46:52.:46:55.

time tomorrow. He has not had a wash since

:46:56.:46:59.

November, magnificent. He does not wash his clothes, they

:47:00.:47:04.

fall off him. We both think of that as we talk to

:47:05.:47:06.

him! Beautiful!

:47:07.:47:12.

It will be sunny, frosty, all sorts of things.

:47:13.:47:19.

Our weather watchers have sent us some pictures, it is misty and murky

:47:20.:47:27.

in Staffordshire and Gwent, a lot of cloud, for geek in the shins. We

:47:28.:47:30.

have a weather front across Midlands, through Lincolnshire and

:47:31.:47:36.

Wales, producing a lot of cloud and dampness. To the south, clearer

:47:37.:47:41.

skies, Frost and sunshine. We are still pulling in the continental

:47:42.:47:46.

cold air. Look at the low pressure around the Mediterranean, very

:47:47.:47:51.

unsettled. It is snowing even at low levels in Majorca and Barcelona. We

:47:52.:47:56.

have no snow in our forecast for the foreseeable future, but we have a

:47:57.:48:01.

lot of cloud into the early part of next week. Where we have the clear

:48:02.:48:06.

sky in the south, it is cold and sunny. It is mild elsewhere, with a

:48:07.:48:12.

lot of cloud, except for the north-east of Scotland, where we

:48:13.:48:16.

have broken cloud. The afternoon sees a lot of sunshine for the South

:48:17.:48:22.

of England. If anything, more clout will roll into Norfolk and the North

:48:23.:48:25.

Midlands through the course of the day. As we push north across

:48:26.:48:31.

northern England and the bulk of Scotland, we hang on to the cloud

:48:32.:48:36.

and higher temperatures. It will be pleasant enough where we have the

:48:37.:48:41.

sunshine. If you are in Shetland, it will be wet for much of the day.

:48:42.:48:45.

Northern Ireland has a cloudy day ahead. Any bright breaks will be at

:48:46.:48:49.

a premium, and it is similar for Wales. Any drizzle confined to the

:48:50.:48:55.

coast. Through the evening and overnight, the temperatures will

:48:56.:48:59.

drop, and it is the same across north-east Scotland. It is low

:49:00.:49:04.

enough for a touch of frost, but a lot of cloud again. We are likely to

:49:05.:49:12.

see some drizzle around the coast. The temperatures stay up in the

:49:13.:49:17.

cloud. Under the clear sky, the sun will come out, it will be a pleasant

:49:18.:49:22.

day, and as we look towards the north-east of Scotland, that is how

:49:23.:49:25.

we start. For the rest of us, we start cloudy, but more brighter

:49:26.:49:30.

breaks than today across Northern Ireland, Wales and parts of northern

:49:31.:49:33.

England. The temperatures coming down a touch. For the rest of us,

:49:34.:49:41.

they stay roughly where they are today. On Friday, a fair bit of

:49:42.:49:48.

cloud around, the brightest breaks in the South, but temperatures will

:49:49.:49:50.

be roughly where they should be. So much to talk about, I know the

:49:51.:49:57.

feeling! She has a beautiful home and a good

:49:58.:50:00.

relationship with her husband and grown-up children,

:50:01.:50:06.

but the character at the centre of BBC One's new Sunday night drama

:50:07.:50:08.

puts that all at risk when she meets It's called Apple Tree Yard

:50:09.:50:12.

and is based on Louise Doughty's We'll speak to one of its stars

:50:13.:50:16.

and scriptwriter in a moment, Are you sure you weren't just

:50:17.:50:22.

hanging out here on the off chance It crops up in the news

:50:23.:50:33.

all the time, doesn't it? Anything about genes

:50:34.:50:47.

or genomes or DNA. Thanks to you I know

:50:48.:50:50.

they are not all the same thing. We just saw actor Ben Chaplin

:50:51.:50:54.

in that clip and he joins us now, Tell us a bit about your character.

:50:55.:51:39.

He is really boring and difficult to talk about, because you give away

:51:40.:51:43.

too much, so we should talk about the other characters, but he is a

:51:44.:51:46.

man of mystery, he works for Government. They have a chance

:51:47.:51:51.

encounter at the Houses of Parliament, where he works. It goes

:51:52.:51:59.

on from there. And under, you wrote it, it is very intense, why did you

:52:00.:52:02.

want to write this screenplay? It is a terrific book, it was a best

:52:03.:52:07.

seller, and much discussed by book groups. It is very gripping. But it

:52:08.:52:15.

feels like a gripping story that is also about something and has lots of

:52:16.:52:20.

light and shade, it has the love story, it has this erotic thriller,

:52:21.:52:23.

it has a court case, a crime, it is all good stuff. A bit of everything,

:52:24.:52:29.

a psychological thriller, a court drama. It is racy. Is that the best

:52:30.:52:36.

way to describe it? I think so, at this time of the morning. There has

:52:37.:52:43.

been much made of the fact that there is a mother, a middle-aged

:52:44.:52:46.

professional woman at the heart of this story, which is not as a family

:52:47.:52:49.

something we see a huge amount on television. It is great to have the

:52:50.:52:56.

story propelled by this woman who is sitting at the middle of her life,

:52:57.:53:01.

she is middle-aged, she is feeling slightly stuck in a rut, and she

:53:02.:53:06.

meets the handsome, mysterious stranger, who is not all he seems.

:53:07.:53:12.

She gets in boiled with me! Unit have known Emily Watson for many

:53:13.:53:17.

years, did that make the passionate stuff difficult, or did you do it

:53:18.:53:23.

professionally? I was worried about it. She was keen that I do it

:53:24.:53:29.

because we have put together a couple of times, so she is

:53:30.:53:31.

comfortable with me, got those white! -- god knows why! But it made

:53:32.:53:39.

it easier, we were able to talk things openly and planned them in

:53:40.:53:46.

the way that might seem inappropriate with someone you do

:53:47.:53:50.

not know. Did she phoned you up and say, come on? Literally, yes. I took

:53:51.:53:58.

her out for lunch, but that does not cover it! She is in a lawsuit with

:53:59.:54:01.

our agent at the moment! We have another clip which shows

:54:02.:54:03.

the chemistry and attraction So when did you change

:54:04.:54:06.

your mind, then? Something else going on with you,

:54:07.:54:17.

though, isn't there? It is hard to watch! He does not

:54:18.:54:50.

like watching himself. Not really. I love the fact you are

:54:51.:54:58.

uncomfortable! That is quite light! Will you watch it at home? I will

:54:59.:55:03.

watch it and thoroughly enjoyed it on my own! I can indulge myself

:55:04.:55:09.

fully! Just watching it when you know loads of other people are

:55:10.:55:12.

watching it at the same time on live television, it is embarrassing. Are

:55:13.:55:17.

you sure you all in the right job? You never see yourself on stage. Why

:55:18.:55:24.

does Emily's character do what she does's why does she abandon her

:55:25.:55:32.

perfect life? She feels she is in control of everything in her life,

:55:33.:55:37.

there are a lot of demands placed on her, and she meets this guy and

:55:38.:55:41.

there is chemistry, and she is at a time in her life where she feels

:55:42.:55:44.

this is not going to happen again. It is quite unusual. The story

:55:45.:55:50.

unfolds and something quite dramatic happens at the end of the first

:55:51.:55:56.

episode. She realises that what she thought was a very contained,

:55:57.:55:59.

specifically sexual contact that she has with this man is deepening into

:56:00.:56:05.

something else, and it becomes more emotional, and there is space in her

:56:06.:56:09.

life for that as well. That it has harsh consequences. Had you read the

:56:10.:56:18.

book before? Had you read Apple Tree Yard before you saw the screenplay?

:56:19.:56:22.

Know, though I had heard of it. I read the screenplay first. Emily

:56:23.:56:27.

called me and I was sent it and read it and then I called her back. I

:56:28.:56:33.

really loved it, it was a real page turner, four hours of television,

:56:34.:56:39.

which is unusual. That is the best way for me to read it. A book is

:56:40.:56:46.

inevitably more detailed about thoughts and so on, so you end up

:56:47.:56:50.

sometimes tortured by what is omitted, and you get confused about

:56:51.:56:56.

what is in the book and what is in the screenplay, so it is best as an

:56:57.:57:00.

actor to have read the screenplay first, because you can never put the

:57:01.:57:04.

genie back in the bottle. You cannot tell us too much, but is it a

:57:05.:57:07.

cautionary tale? That is interesting. I would like to think

:57:08.:57:13.

he does not go as far as that, but it is a metaphorical cautionary

:57:14.:57:21.

tale. I don't know. I hope at some point it is maybe, but then it spins

:57:22.:57:28.

back a bit. It makes you ask questions, why do we judge women so

:57:29.:57:31.

harshly? Particularly middle-aged women? Are they allowed to be

:57:32.:57:36.

sexually active or have sexual fantasies? All of that stuff. Maybe

:57:37.:57:42.

women are judged differently from men. I think the piece as a whole,

:57:43.:57:48.

certainly in the book, it is clear it is saying that, it raises that

:57:49.:57:54.

issue. Yes, but it is from a woman's perspective on the unreliable

:57:55.:57:58.

narrator problem. That is where it is fascinating, you never quite know

:57:59.:58:04.

what it is, it is difficult to categorise, and that is what makes

:58:05.:58:11.

it brilliant. I will enjoy it a lot more when it is not really early in

:58:12.:58:14.

the morning and I know it is on TV and people are watching! But fine on

:58:15.:58:19.

Sunday night! I will thoroughly enjoy it!

:58:20.:58:23.

Apple Tree Yard starts on BBC One this Sunday at 9pm.

:58:24.:58:27.

Jackie Kennedy is best remembered for her style and elegance,

:58:28.:58:30.

as well as for the events in Dallas on 22nd November 1963.

:58:31.:58:36.

But a new film examines what life was like for the wife of JFK before

:58:37.:58:39.

Natalie Portman, who plays the former First Lady,

:58:40.:58:43.

has been speaking to Tom Brook about the role,

:58:44.:58:45.

and about her thoughts on President-elect Donald Trump.

:58:46.:58:54.

You are getting masses of praise for this role, did you know a lot

:58:55.:58:58.

I really did not know anything beyond the popular conception,

:58:59.:59:05.

Preparing for the role was what taught me about her.

:59:06.:59:14.

I said I have changed my mind, we will have a procession

:59:15.:59:17.

and I will walk to the cathedral with the casket.

:59:18.:59:20.

The interesting aspect that I noticed is that she has

:59:21.:59:24.

She had this very breathy voice, especially when she was doing public

:59:25.:59:37.

interviews, like the White House Tour.

:59:38.:59:42.

There are audio tapes that she did with a friend of hers and JFK's,

:59:43.:59:48.

an oral history of the White House after the assassination,

:59:49.:59:53.

and with him her voice was deeper, she spoke faster, so you see

:59:54.:59:58.

that she was cultivating this very classic image of femininity

:59:59.:00:03.

and coyness that she was projecting to the public.

:00:04.:00:12.

This article will bring you a great deal of attention.

:00:13.:00:14.

Yes. Don't marry the President.

:00:15.:00:22.

In terms of doing the portrayal, what did you rely

:00:23.:00:24.

I watched the White House Tour over and over again,

:00:25.:00:30.

it was a two-hour special that she did after she restored

:00:31.:00:37.

the White House, she spent two years restoring it,

:00:38.:00:40.

and she brought all of the historical objects and furniture

:00:41.:00:44.

back, because they used to sell things in yard sales

:00:45.:00:47.

when a President would leave office, so she would find Lincoln's desk

:00:48.:00:53.

at some flea market in the middle of the country and she would go

:00:54.:00:57.

and find all of these pieces and put them back.

:00:58.:00:59.

The film covers the four days in the wake of the assassination

:01:00.:01:03.

Do you think in a way the film is partly a portrait of grief,

:01:04.:01:11.

in which she shows amazing strength and resolve?

:01:12.:01:13.

It is very much a portrait of grief and the way that it is not

:01:14.:01:21.

It's this fragmented experience of incredible sorrow and intrusive

:01:22.:01:33.

memory and anger and a bit of dark humour, and all of those different

:01:34.:01:37.

She is one of the most popular First Ladies,

:01:38.:01:42.

why did she have such a hold on people?

:01:43.:01:47.

She really had this exquisite understanding

:01:48.:01:49.

One of the most shocking things in the movie is when you see

:01:50.:01:59.

JFK was only President for a little over two years,

:02:00.:02:09.

and to see the import that they have meant to the American people shows

:02:10.:02:13.

While the Kennedys were in the White House,

:02:14.:02:21.

her husband was having to content with some quite severe racial

:02:22.:02:24.

tensions in the country, like the Birmingham church bombing.

:02:25.:02:28.

How will racial tensions or civil rights fare under Donald Trump?

:02:29.:02:31.

It's not new, unfortunately, for this country.

:02:32.:02:39.

It is something that we seriously need to find a positive way forward.

:02:40.:02:44.

You're not a fan particularly of Trump?

:02:45.:02:51.

I really pray for the best for our country, and not just pray,

:02:52.:03:06.

but I am energised to do whatever I can to make my own community

:03:07.:03:10.

Country, patriotism, nationalism, it's not our way to go.

:03:11.:03:24.

How much of a challenge, or how difficult, is it,

:03:25.:03:31.

balancing carrying a baby and your career at the same time?

:03:32.:03:34.

Pregnancy changes some things, but it is possible to do almost

:03:35.:03:37.

It does not feel particularly complicated.

:03:38.:03:44.

Although there are some days I would like to just lie

:03:45.:03:47.

You have moved to Los Angeles after living in Paris.

:03:48.:03:51.

Do you find that Los Angeles gives you more of what you need?

:03:52.:03:59.

I love both places and I feel lucky to get to have had both experiences,

:04:00.:04:04.

and still have both in my life, because we still have so many

:04:05.:04:07.

friends and family in Paris, and work, and we go there often

:04:08.:04:10.

Inform them that I will work with Jack tomorrow.

:04:11.:04:20.

Why are you doing this? I am just doing my job.

:04:21.:04:29.

How important is it to you that women make headway

:04:30.:04:32.

They lag in terms of the opportunities they are offered

:04:33.:04:37.

It's not just in the film industry, it's in every sphere of leadership.

:04:38.:04:48.

We are really lacking female roles still, and female

:04:49.:04:50.

It is very important for women to take the initiative to be leaders

:04:51.:05:01.

and also for us to make sure that there is not the barriers that

:05:02.:05:05.

You have been through the Oscars machine before, does the feeling

:05:06.:05:12.

of being within the bubble feel less exciting than it did

:05:13.:05:14.

I can focus on enjoying the people I get to be around more this time.

:05:15.:05:28.

I'm able to remind myself that a lot of the time I'm getting

:05:29.:05:31.

to spend with people who I really admire, it can be positive time,

:05:32.:05:34.

You can engage with a lot of the people that you meet.

:05:35.:05:40.

I'm guessing you won't allow me to write any of that?

:05:41.:05:44.

No. Because I never said that.

:05:45.:05:50.

We'll be speaking to the director Carly Wijs.

:05:51.:06:01.

She has done a play, of a child's view of a terror attack. Very

:06:02.:06:09.

interesting. Raises all sorts of questions about how you talk to your

:06:10.:06:13.

kids regarding what happens in the news.

:06:14.:07:49.

at Umfreville Road - with queues to Manor House.

:07:50.:07:51.

A cold, bright and frosty start - staying sunny and dry later.

:07:52.:07:56.

Feeling cold with a top temperature of 5 degrees celsius.

:07:57.:07:58.

I'll be back with your lunchtime news at 130pm.

:07:59.:08:02.

In September 2004 a group of militants took more than 1,000

:08:03.:08:05.

people hostage at a school in the Russian city of Beslan.

:08:06.:08:07.

The siege lasted for three days and more than 300 people

:08:08.:08:10.

You'd be forgiven for thinking that the events wouldn't make

:08:11.:08:17.

the most obvious story for a children's play,

:08:18.:08:20.

but a new production coming to the National Theatre aims

:08:21.:08:23.

to explore what happened there, and the way children respond

:08:24.:08:26.

The director of the play Carly Wijs joins us now.

:08:27.:08:35.

You have done this for a very specific reason? Yes, I was asked by

:08:36.:08:46.

the Bronx Theatre which is based in Brussels and makes productions for

:08:47.:08:49.

children, to do a performance, and that was at the time of the Nairobi

:08:50.:08:56.

attacks. The shopping mall. Do you remember them? Yes. My son was eight

:08:57.:09:02.

at the time and he had seen it on the news for the he had seen it on

:09:03.:09:07.

children's news. He came to me and he said, there are terrorists and

:09:08.:09:12.

they are attacking a shopping mall and there was a boy hiding and then

:09:13.:09:15.

they shot his mother and then they gave him Mars bars and they let him

:09:16.:09:22.

go. Then he said, can I go on the iPad please? He gave this

:09:23.:09:27.

matter-of-fact objective way of looking at it and he gave me this

:09:28.:09:33.

information as a parent. They him, the most emotional thing was the

:09:34.:09:39.

iPad. And that, for me, was kind of like a way in to talk about

:09:40.:09:45.

atrocities like that because I don't think... It's impossible for me to

:09:46.:09:49.

understand what happens when there is a terrorist attack and I'm an

:09:50.:09:52.

adult, so what is the use of trying to explain it to children? But they

:09:53.:09:58.

do know, they see it on television and they are confronted with it and

:09:59.:10:02.

they know it exists. That happens when you are nine, the world in

:10:03.:10:07.

large is and you realise there is a thing like Africa and America and

:10:08.:10:11.

the thing like terrorism. But you don't know what it means. How hard

:10:12.:10:17.

was it to get this made? We were talking this morning, to say that

:10:18.:10:22.

you are making a children's play about Beslan, which everyone

:10:23.:10:28.

remembers. Yes, they were thrilled. It did not look good on paper, it

:10:29.:10:32.

was impossible to sell. We have had a wonderful run. They could not sell

:10:33.:10:39.

it, the director at the time, the artistic director, she said, OK, we

:10:40.:10:44.

will do it. She trusted that I was not out to traumatise children, I

:10:45.:10:48.

was out to do something else. But not many people bought it. Most

:10:49.:10:54.

programmes were very interested, so the few that bought it, people came

:10:55.:11:01.

to watch it. The year after, we sold a good few performances will stop

:11:02.:11:03.

after that we went to Edinburgh. Here's a clip from the play

:11:04.:11:07.

where the actors describe the first That's definitely at

:11:08.:11:09.

the end of the second day. On the first day at 928 the door

:11:10.:11:13.

of the gymnasium is barricaded. 1148 people are trapped

:11:14.:11:16.

in the gymnasium. There are 365 fathers who have

:11:17.:11:28.

gone to work that day Those fathers will all come

:11:29.:11:35.

immediately when they One of the fathers, he's got

:11:36.:11:41.

the fastest tractor in the region. At 749 the father with the fastest

:11:42.:11:45.

tractor in the region has just So these are children explaining

:11:46.:12:00.

what happened in their particular language? They are telling the story

:12:01.:12:07.

of Beslan, both telling their own story, and they actually have

:12:08.:12:14.

different versions of the truth. This is a part where they are

:12:15.:12:17.

fantasising about the fathers because there weren't many fathers

:12:18.:12:22.

in the siege, they were out working. It was usually mothers and grow

:12:23.:12:24.

mothers going with the children to school. They start this fantasy of

:12:25.:12:30.

the fathers coming to rescue them. -- mothers and grandmothers. What is

:12:31.:12:36.

the significance of the string? I had to figure out a way to show a

:12:37.:12:40.

kind of packed situation because more than 1100 people were in that

:12:41.:12:45.

gymnasium packed together for three days. So we thought of these strings

:12:46.:12:51.

which symbolise a metaphor for the bombs which were hanging in the

:12:52.:12:56.

gymnasium. It fills up the space and it gives them not too much room to

:12:57.:13:00.

move and that is why we did that. It is called Us/Them, and you are

:13:01.:13:06.

trying to start a conversation about how we talk to children. We talk

:13:07.:13:12.

about these events all the time on BBC breakfast and this is a

:13:13.:13:16.

difficult conversation to have. Yes, because children repeat what we say,

:13:17.:13:20.

what else can we do and what else can they do? It is difficult for us

:13:21.:13:25.

to comprehend and it is even more difficult for children. I was

:13:26.:13:30.

thinking about what it action was that I wanted to communicate with

:13:31.:13:33.

children in this piece -- thinking about what it actually was. Trying

:13:34.:13:39.

to explain the atrocity on their level. But in the end we have

:13:40.:13:44.

different endings and what I want children to do is start thinking for

:13:45.:13:48.

themselves and not just accept anything they see on TV or any story

:13:49.:13:54.

that is being told, that they start thinking for themselves. Very

:13:55.:13:56.

relevant at the moment. Us/Them is at the National Theatre

:13:57.:14:00.

in London from now That's all from

:14:01.:14:02.

Breakfast this morning. We asked you who's left you feeling

:14:03.:14:07.

ripped off when it comes to

:14:08.:14:10.

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