31/03/2017 Breakfast


31/03/2017

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Longer waits for hospital operations in England as the health service

:00:07.:00:10.

is forced to make a tough "trade-off".

:00:11.:00:13.

The head of NHS England says treatment is no longer guaranteed

:00:14.:00:16.

in the 18-week target time but in return there would be quicker

:00:17.:00:19.

Also this morning: As Britain prepares for Brexit,

:00:20.:00:43.

today the EU will set out its plans for two years of negotiation.

:00:44.:00:46.

Trying to save the African elephant - today, China will close almost

:00:47.:00:50.

half of its official ivory carving factories and shops.

:00:51.:00:52.

A payrise for Britain's lowest paid staff.

:00:53.:00:55.

The national minimum wage goes up to ?7.50 an hour tomorrow,

:00:56.:00:58.

but is it enough, and what does it mean for businesses?

:00:59.:01:05.

In sport, Manchester City's women are into the last four

:01:06.:01:08.

Lucy Bronze scores to book City's place in the semi-finals after a 2-0

:01:09.:01:12.

aggregate win over Danish side Fortuna Hjorring.

:01:13.:01:20.

After "the most challenging railway repair ever," today

:01:21.:01:22.

the Settle-Carlisle train line reopens to customers.

:01:23.:01:24.

Grey skies and rain might greet the day for many of you but things will

:01:25.:01:36.

brighten up quite nicely - I have details coming up and a full weekend

:01:37.:01:38.

broadcast. Patients will have to wait longer

:01:39.:01:39.

for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements,

:01:40.:01:44.

as a trade off so improvements can That's according to the Head of NHS

:01:45.:01:48.

England, Simon Stevens, who is today setting

:01:49.:01:52.

out a new strategy for Iris Ram is 96 and is recovering

:01:53.:01:55.

from a recent illness. Her GP called a local NHS service

:01:56.:02:08.

based in Nottinghamshire to give her the right care

:02:09.:02:14.

and the right place. The treatment at home has been

:02:15.:02:19.

absolutely wonderful. Iris is well cared for,

:02:20.:02:23.

a priority for the NHS, but it's acknowledged

:02:24.:02:26.

the system is under pressure, and tough financial

:02:27.:02:28.

choices are needed. Today NHS England leaders

:02:29.:02:31.

are taking stock of progress. Since their five-year plan

:02:32.:02:34.

was published in 2014. Aims set out in the new strategy

:02:35.:02:43.

include improving cancer survival rates, increased access to mental

:02:44.:02:46.

health therapies and recruitment But with limited resources it's

:02:47.:02:49.

likely to mean longer waiting times for non-urgent operations and fewer

:02:50.:02:56.

people being referred The problem is made worse

:02:57.:02:58.

by a shortage of beds. There are a significant proportion

:02:59.:03:06.

of people who don't need to be there, who don't want to be there,

:03:07.:03:10.

and if we could get them out, that would free up something

:03:11.:03:13.

like 2000 to 3000 beds in the NHS, which could be used more effectively

:03:14.:03:17.

for providing quicker Today is about setting out

:03:18.:03:19.

what is possible with the money allocated by the government

:03:20.:03:28.

to the NHS in England but, at a time of increased demand,

:03:29.:03:31.

what is not addressed is the extra funding

:03:32.:03:34.

that is needed. We'll be speaking to guests

:03:35.:03:37.

about this throughout the morning, including the President

:03:38.:03:40.

of the Royal College of Surgeons, A group of MPs have said it's

:03:41.:03:42.

"unacceptable" that residents who pay their own fees at care homes

:03:43.:03:48.

in England are charged on average 43% more than those

:03:49.:03:51.

funded by the state. The Communities and Local Government

:03:52.:03:54.

Committee blames a lack of funding, which it says is threatening

:03:55.:03:57.

the viability of adult The government says it's already

:03:58.:03:59.

given councils an extra ?2 billion. The President of the European

:04:00.:04:07.

Council, Donald Tusk, will issue draft guidelines this

:04:08.:04:10.

morning, setting out how the EU wants to handle the

:04:11.:04:13.

Brexit negotiations. The proposals will then be debated

:04:14.:04:14.

by the leaders of the 27 EU member states at a summit next month,

:04:15.:04:18.

as Marta Newman reports. First there was the latter. I choose

:04:19.:04:32.

to believe in Britain and that our best days of my head. Then the

:04:33.:04:40.

Repeal Bill. As we ex at the EU and seek Addae partnership with the EU

:04:41.:04:43.

we will be doing so from a position where we have the same standards and

:04:44.:04:49.

rules. But it will also ensure that it will deliver on the promise to

:04:50.:04:53.

end the supremacy of EU law in the UK as we exit. And now just two days

:04:54.:04:57.

after the Prime Minister fired the starting gun for Brexit, we will

:04:58.:05:01.

hear how the president of the European council wants negotiations

:05:02.:05:08.

to go. There has already been disagreement over whether

:05:09.:05:10.

discussions about trade can take place at the same time as the

:05:11.:05:14.

discussions about divorce. TRANSLATION: In the negotiations we

:05:15.:05:18.

first have to sort out how we can on tangle ourselves from one another.

:05:19.:05:21.

Only when that has been settled hopefully soon after we can speak

:05:22.:05:27.

about our future relationship. Donald Tusk will issue his

:05:28.:05:30.

guidelines today before they get debated by the 27 remaining member

:05:31.:05:36.

states. Setting the tone for two years of tough negotiation and

:05:37.:05:40.

efforts to finalise the deal. The document won't be finalised until

:05:41.:05:45.

the end of April at a special summit of EU leaders.

:05:46.:05:48.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has signed a letter

:05:49.:05:51.

to Theresa May, formally requesting a second independence referendum.

:05:52.:05:53.

In it, she reiterates her call for a vote within the next two years.

:05:54.:05:57.

The Prime Minister has already said it won't happen before

:05:58.:05:59.

There are warnings today of a recruitment crisis if Brexit

:06:00.:06:06.

leads to immigration being severely restricted.

:06:07.:06:08.

In the first major business intervention since Theresa May began

:06:09.:06:10.

the process of Britain's divorce from the EU,

:06:11.:06:13.

the British Hospitality Association has said the industry faces

:06:14.:06:16.

a shortfall of 60,000 workers a year.

:06:17.:06:18.

Our industry correspondent John Moylan has more.

:06:19.:06:26.

Here we go. They are gearing up for the summer season. Around 40% of

:06:27.:06:38.

staff are from outside the UK. The boss says they face a recruitment

:06:39.:06:42.

crisis if Brexit causes the supply of workers to be cut off. If the

:06:43.:06:46.

Tapie is turned off straightaway that would be very difficult. We are

:06:47.:06:51.

where we are at the moment. We rely on a third of the workplace from

:06:52.:06:55.

European employees. To be able to turn a straight off and replace it

:06:56.:06:58.

straight off would be very difficult. We are in the hospitality

:06:59.:07:03.

industry, the service industry. You have to employ people who like to

:07:04.:07:07.

serve people. Tourism and hospitality accounts for around 10%

:07:08.:07:11.

of the economy. Now a new report is reporting that restrictions on

:07:12.:07:14.

foreign labour could hit it harder than any other sector. The UK's

:07:15.:07:19.

hospitality sector employs around 3 million workers but it is highly

:07:20.:07:25.

reliant on overseas staff. 24% of the workforce are EU migrants. It

:07:26.:07:28.

could face a shortfall of 60,000 workers a year if immigration is

:07:29.:07:34.

tightly controlled. The industry wants to reduce its dependence on EU

:07:35.:07:40.

workers. Its new 10-year strategy includes recruiting more unemployed

:07:41.:07:44.

and all the workers in the UK. The government says that while it will

:07:45.:07:47.

end free movement as it is now it will design and new immigration

:07:48.:07:50.

system that is in the national interest.

:07:51.:07:56.

President Trump's former national security adviser has

:07:57.:07:58.

offered to give evidence about possible links

:07:59.:08:00.

between the Trump campaign and Russia, if he's given protection

:08:01.:08:03.

from what has been caled "unfair prosecution".

:08:04.:08:05.

General Michael Flynn was forced to resign in February

:08:06.:08:07.

after he misled the Vice-President over phone conversations he had

:08:08.:08:10.

His lawyer says he "has a story to tell."

:08:11.:08:14.

Israel has announced it's to build the first new settlement

:08:15.:08:16.

in the occupied West Bank in more than 20 years.

:08:17.:08:19.

Palestinian officials have condemned the plan and have called

:08:20.:08:22.

Half of China's existing legal ivory processing factories and stores

:08:23.:08:29.

will be permanently shut down today with the rest closed by the end

:08:30.:08:33.

The news has been welcomed by conservationists in their ongoing

:08:34.:08:36.

battle against the illegal trade in ivory.

:08:37.:08:39.

Despite a global ban on international sales,

:08:40.:08:41.

a surge in demand has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands

:08:42.:08:44.

And we are going to speak with a campaigner on that subject later in

:08:45.:08:59.

the programme. Fancy buying a second-hand space

:09:00.:09:05.

rocket? I've got one. Oh, you've got one already? Well, you could do.

:09:06.:09:07.

A Californian company has made history by launching rocket back

:09:08.:09:10.

Rockets are traditionally used only once before being scrapped

:09:11.:09:17.

but SpaceX has developed a way of landing its boosters safely

:09:18.:09:20.

on Earth, allowing them to be recycled.

:09:21.:09:22.

It's been described as "one small step for the company,

:09:23.:09:25.

but a giant leap in the search for cheaper space exploration."

:09:26.:09:29.

Which we have all been looking for. Oh, every day.

:09:30.:09:32.

You are looking at a rocket with a difference.

:09:33.:09:38.

Unlike the rest, it's fitted with a booster that has

:09:39.:09:41.

And now history, as it's successfully relaunched

:09:42.:09:46.

Boosters cost tens of millions of dollars, and are normally

:09:47.:09:51.

discarded and destroyed during an ascent.

:09:52.:09:54.

But the private Californian aerospace company SpaceX has found

:09:55.:09:56.

a way to eject them safely back to earth.

:09:57.:10:01.

After the successful launch, another key moment in the flight,

:10:02.:10:04.

to see if the second-hand booster can safely detach and fly back

:10:05.:10:07.

Rapturous cheers from the mission crew tell you it's a success.

:10:08.:10:25.

Minutes later, it's back on earth, an unprecedented double achievement

:10:26.:10:28.

of launching a reusable rocket, and recovering it

:10:29.:10:30.

This is gonna be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight.

:10:31.:10:34.

It's the difference between if you had aeroplanes

:10:35.:10:36.

where you threw away an aeroplane after every flight,

:10:37.:10:39.

versus you can reuse them multiple times.

:10:40.:10:50.

It represents a new era in the space race, where private

:10:51.:10:53.

enterprises compete against each other, instead of countries.

:10:54.:10:55.

This success will be a boost for a company with much more

:10:56.:10:58.

ambitious long-term goals, that includes sending two

:10:59.:11:00.

unidentified space tourists to the moon next year.

:11:01.:11:03.

Fancy that next holiday? A reusable rocket, why not? Never gonna

:11:04.:11:12.

happens. Let's check in with the sport. Morning, the Manchester City

:11:13.:11:19.

revolution continues. It is great to see, it was an amazing night for

:11:20.:11:23.

them. For the women's team of specially and we know how much money

:11:24.:11:27.

has been pumped in over the years into Manchester City and it is

:11:28.:11:30.

certainly paying off with the women's team, reaching the

:11:31.:11:32.

semifinals of the Champions League, laying Fortuna Hjorring from

:11:33.:11:37.

Denmark, winning 1-0, so it is looking quite rosy after the double

:11:38.:11:43.

last year. They are firing at the moment.

:11:44.:11:46.

It follows their victory over the Danish side in the first leg.

:11:47.:11:54.

A tough match to come, though, where they face the holders Lyon.

:11:55.:12:01.

We knew the FIFA World Cup was to be expanded from 32 teams

:12:02.:12:04.

But we now know how those additional places will be filled.

:12:05.:12:08.

Europe will have 16 spots at the finals, up from 13 nations.

:12:09.:12:14.

In a new move, two teams will have to qualify via a six-team play-off

:12:15.:12:18.

Johanna Konta's incredible run continues.

:12:19.:12:20.

She beat Venus Williams overnight to reach the final at the Miami

:12:21.:12:24.

Amazing to think she was just six years old when Venus won this

:12:25.:12:32.

It is an incredible run that she is on at the moment.

:12:33.:12:38.

England's Charley Hull is well in contention at the first women's

:12:39.:12:41.

major of the year, the ANA Inspiration in California.

:12:42.:12:43.

Shot of the day though came from South Korean teenage amateur

:12:44.:12:46.

And you know your luck is in, don't you, if you are producing shots like

:12:47.:12:58.

that. I love that, she looked more shocked than anyone, it was amazing.

:12:59.:13:02.

Mouth wide open. Watchers haven't? Yes. Thank you very much indeed. Is

:13:03.:13:10.

it golfing weather, Matt? Good morning, not quite. It will be later

:13:11.:13:16.

on. One thing to note, this morning it is incredibly mild for March.

:13:17.:13:22.

Temperatures in Dover 14 degrees, close to record-breaking. I don't

:13:23.:13:25.

think we will break records but it is very near. The downside I suppose

:13:26.:13:30.

is it is cloudy and bled for many of you. On the radar chart the heaviest

:13:31.:13:34.

rain in the Northern Ireland and western Scotland parts, thoroughly

:13:35.:13:41.

warm. Rainy for the Devon areas and Cornwall, clearing away, skies

:13:42.:13:45.

brightening before showers gather later on, so enjoy the dry morning

:13:46.:13:48.

commute, different on the way home. Rain will spread across the Midlands

:13:49.:13:51.

and south-east England though it should be dry for eastern England at

:13:52.:13:55.

the start of the day. Outbreaks of rain in Wales mainly in the west,

:13:56.:13:59.

north-west England too but Northern Ireland and western and

:14:00.:14:02.

south-western Scotland have wettest conditions at the moment. The rain

:14:03.:14:05.

will remain across Scotland for a good part of the day. It will ease

:14:06.:14:09.

away from Northern Ireland around the morning onwards. We will see the

:14:10.:14:13.

rain across England and Wales depart for a time, Sunderland will come

:14:14.:14:17.

out. One or two showers in eastern England in the afternoon and then

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showers return for Devon, Cornwall and western Wales and Northern

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Ireland. A breeze blowing across the country from the south-west but

:14:25.:14:27.

still temperatures not as high as yesterday but warm enough at 13- 17

:14:28.:14:32.

degrees with the sunshine in central, eastern England and

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south-east Scotland this afternoon. Into the night the windfall is a

:14:36.:14:39.

little bit lighter, we will see showers around, though, mainly in

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the west, eastern areas will be dry and cooler than in the last few

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nights with temperatures in most areas dropping to single figures.

:14:49.:14:52.

That will give us a chilly start to the weekend compared to this

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morning. As for the weekend forecast it is a new month, quite aptly,

:14:56.:14:59.

April showers on Saturday, chilly to take us on through the night but

:15:00.:15:02.

Sunday not looking too bad. Details on that - showers from the start of

:15:03.:15:06.

the day for the country, well scattered, some heavy with hail and

:15:07.:15:10.

plunder, slow-moving, sunshine in between, so some will have a largely

:15:11.:15:14.

dry day around some of the coastal areas tomorrow. Temperatures not

:15:15.:15:19.

quite as high as today. And showers gradually depart through the evening

:15:20.:15:22.

and into the night. I pressure builds in, that means a chilly start

:15:23.:15:26.

on Sunday morning, even a touch of frost around for one or two

:15:27.:15:33.

sheltered spots, but Soni for most. Showers few and far between, most

:15:34.:15:37.

will have a fun and dry day with some good, long sunny spells --

:15:38.:15:40.

sunny. We will talk to you again soon - it has been a lovely couple

:15:41.:15:44.

of days. It is sweaty and boiling this morning. Really?

:15:45.:15:46.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:15:47.:15:48.

Patients will have to wait longer for routine operations such as hip

:15:49.:15:56.

and knee replacements in what the Head of the NHS

:15:57.:15:58.

in England says is a trade-off so improvements can be made

:15:59.:16:01.

Details on how the EU plans to negotiate Brexit will be released

:16:02.:16:05.

later today by the president of the European Council,

:16:06.:16:08.

Let's have a look at the papers this Friday. We are joined by Ben. Good

:16:09.:16:19.

morning. And John with the sports papers. The front pages and then we

:16:20.:16:23.

will talk to you guys? Lots of papers talking about the story we

:16:24.:16:27.

just mentioned, changes in the NHS, the Guardian's front page says the

:16:28.:16:33.

NHS will axe a commitment to 18 week target for operations as we return

:16:34.:16:41.

to quicker and better diagnosis for cancer. The Daily Mirror also has

:16:42.:16:47.

the NHS story. The new government plan to be revealed today which will

:16:48.:16:51.

include even longer waiting times and not an extra penny to be

:16:52.:16:55.

invested. We are talking waiting times later this morning and how

:16:56.:16:59.

that will affect people waiting a long time for a knee replacement,

:17:00.:17:03.

hit replacement, that sort of thing. We've reported a lot over the last

:17:04.:17:07.

few weeks about the impact of NHS delays on social care and the Daily

:17:08.:17:12.

Mail front page refers to that, how care homes hit the middle classes,

:17:13.:17:15.

that figure we mentioned about people paying for their own social

:17:16.:17:22.

care in residential homes are charged significantly more than

:17:23.:17:25.

those being paid for in the same homes and sometimes by the council.

:17:26.:17:29.

The front page of the times has a different story, about a funding

:17:30.:17:32.

shortfall, they say military chiefs have begun a review to find at least

:17:33.:17:36.

?1 billion in savings per year in addition to the savings they are

:17:37.:17:40.

already making over the next decade. And that picture, you may not

:17:41.:17:44.

recognise her but you might know her name, Karen Millen, she used to own

:17:45.:17:49.

a huge chain of retailers on the high street, she has gone bankrupt,

:17:50.:17:54.

her receiving her OBEs here many years ago, but hit by a ?6 million

:17:55.:18:01.

tax bill. -- her OBEs. The Daily Telegraph looking at the Brexit

:18:02.:18:05.

negotiations, well, they have really started, but they're cut the red

:18:06.:18:09.

tape campaign, with the UK retraining the power to deport. And

:18:10.:18:15.

a picture or Nicola Sturgeon in Edinburgh last night. Very relaxed.

:18:16.:18:21.

This is the letter about a second independence referendum, they are

:18:22.:18:24.

comparing it with this picture of Margaret Thatcher on her sofa in

:18:25.:18:28.

Downing Street two or three decades ago penning a similar letter,

:18:29.:18:32.

similar pose. A lot of letter writing going on at the moment. Good

:18:33.:18:38.

days to be a postman! Exactly! Ben, what! Ben, what have you got? A lot

:18:39.:18:43.

of scrutiny over the way the pens are being used. It was an American

:18:44.:18:49.

company's pen, a Parker. A lot of concern about that. It's very

:18:50.:18:54.

important, the details! Let's pick up on Brexit, another word for our

:18:55.:19:01.

dictionaries, Brexodus, JP Morgan Chase overseas ball where it might

:19:02.:19:05.

base its offices and they are suggesting Dublin, Frankfurt or

:19:06.:19:11.

Paris -- for. Lloyds of London, this story at the bottom, will set up a

:19:12.:19:16.

subsidiary office in Brussels. It is easy to think of this as the big

:19:17.:19:21.

banks getting a bit sniffy about Brexit, but in JP Morgan's case,

:19:22.:19:26.

they employ 16,000 in the UK, the largest investment bank in Europe,

:19:27.:19:30.

they make a third of their money over in Europe. They say it is

:19:31.:19:34.

crucial for them to have an office there. I want to pick up on this,

:19:35.:19:39.

it's interesting which paper you read, the Lloyds of London story in

:19:40.:19:43.

the Telegraph, making a point that tens of employees are moving to

:19:44.:19:47.

Brussels in the case of Lloyds of London, so therefore not a huge move

:19:48.:19:51.

overseas but nonetheless important as the banks try to work out the

:19:52.:19:58.

future. John, what have you got? The Daily Telegraph have campaigned into

:19:59.:20:02.

research between the link between footballers suffering dementia...

:20:03.:20:08.

There you go. The FA have said it will set aside some money for

:20:09.:20:13.

research. Hopefully it is something they have been campaigning for...

:20:14.:20:20.

Basically heavy footballs through the 60s and the damage it has done

:20:21.:20:25.

to their brains. It looks like the FA will set aside money for that

:20:26.:20:30.

research. And the PFA have been involved? Yes. Remember we talked

:20:31.:20:35.

about this statue, turns out the guy that made it said Cristiano Ronaldo

:20:36.:20:40.

likes it. Of course he does. People said it looked nothing like him,

:20:41.:20:45.

apparently he likes it. He would like anything that shows him in this

:20:46.:20:48.

kind of vain! You're not wrong there! Let me bring you this about

:20:49.:20:54.

mapping, my favourite thing to do. Having a little nap in the day, a

:20:55.:20:59.

short one, makes you a happier person. -- napping. How long does it

:21:00.:21:05.

have to be? I know that more than an hour is bad, 30 minutes they are

:21:06.:21:09.

saying, you have to be disciplined to get up after 30 minutes. Then you

:21:10.:21:14.

are in a deep sleep and then there is no coming back. You wake up and

:21:15.:21:18.

you don't know who you are all where you've been! Apparently there are

:21:19.:21:24.

half a million more cats in the UK than a year ago. -- or. Do you know

:21:25.:21:31.

why? Because single men are buying cats. The idea of a little old lady

:21:32.:21:36.

buying a cat is untrue. Is that because they are lonely and they

:21:37.:21:41.

want a bit of company? Single men are fuelling the rise. That is a

:21:42.:21:47.

cute picture. Have you got a cat? No, not yet, I'm never home enough.

:21:48.:21:53.

That is very cute. A little bit of trivia from inside as well, which I

:21:54.:21:55.

know you all love! A few stats! They're known as education's hidden

:21:56.:21:57.

army, but BBC Breakfast has been hearing how eeaching assistants

:21:58.:22:00.

are facing challenges as a result of growing financial pressures

:22:01.:22:03.

across the education system. Unions also say teacher shortages

:22:04.:22:05.

and budget cuts mean too many are being left to teach

:22:06.:22:08.

classes on their own. Though the Department for Education

:22:09.:22:10.

says savings can be made Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin has been

:22:11.:22:13.

speaking to support staff John, not his real name, is not a

:22:14.:22:29.

real teacher, but he is frequently called in to cover a class when a

:22:30.:22:33.

real teacher is off. Originally it was only meant to be a few days.

:22:34.:22:38.

What it turned into what month after month. He said he is used as a cheap

:22:39.:22:42.

alternative to a substitute teacher with no qualification and no

:22:43.:22:47.

authority. Mis- behaviour meant you spend your time firefighting, that's

:22:48.:22:50.

what you're doing, you're controlling behaviour, you're not

:22:51.:22:58.

teaching. It can happen as well when the kids will have me looking after

:22:59.:23:01.

them in one lesson and in another lesson they'll have another

:23:02.:23:04.

unqualified member of staff from a different subject, so they could

:23:05.:23:08.

have two or three hours of this in the same date. I'm not dubious at

:23:09.:23:11.

the head teacher, the budget's just not there. In Scotland, only a

:23:12.:23:16.

qualified teacher can lead a class. In English and Welsh state schools,

:23:17.:23:20.

it's at the discretion of the head and all heads are facing financial

:23:21.:23:26.

pressures. Here in Burnage they value TAs more than most, because

:23:27.:23:31.

many students and speak English as a foreign language, many have special

:23:32.:23:34.

educational needs but even here they are increasingly used to full gaps.

:23:35.:23:38.

That added pressure is taken away from the role they have to do, which

:23:39.:23:42.

is incredibly valuable. It has the domino effect of one child is not

:23:43.:23:48.

understanding something, they then feel they can't cope within that

:23:49.:23:51.

situation, it then affects other children, it then affects the

:23:52.:23:54.

teacher, the whole environment is not one for learning. In other

:23:55.:23:58.

schools, financial pressures are more intense. Hilton Primary is

:23:59.:24:07.

?120,000 in the red. TAs like Jill Ange just filling gaps, they are

:24:08.:24:11.

being axed. A third of the 40 employed here have just received a

:24:12.:24:17.

redundancy notice. -- aren't just. It is very upsetting. The plastic

:24:18.:24:22.

now is as far as it is going to stretch. Losing these TAs is a

:24:23.:24:27.

disaster, it really is a disaster -- elastic. Three years ago -- seven

:24:28.:24:35.

years ago three in school... With a further ?3 billion of cuts ahead,

:24:36.:24:40.

that will get worse. The Department for Education told me they believe

:24:41.:24:43.

efficiencies can be made without having to cut staff without an

:24:44.:24:47.

impact on education. There was a time when we didn't have teaching

:24:48.:24:52.

assistants. Yes, in years gone by we had one teacher to teach a class

:24:53.:24:56.

full of pupils but now we expect more from our educational system and

:24:57.:25:00.

we are going to let a generation of pupils down if we don't provide this

:25:01.:25:03.

support for them. Parents' expectations might be for more, but

:25:04.:25:11.

in terms of funding, the reality is less. Head teachers will have to

:25:12.:25:14.

find how to strike a balance. Jayne McCubbin, BBC News.

:25:15.:25:16.

Don't be surprised if people seem a bit more friendly

:25:17.:25:19.

I hadn't noticed anything so far! Thanks, that's really kind!

:25:20.:25:31.

And a campaign's being launched for us all to

:25:32.:25:34.

do at least one random act of kindness.

:25:35.:25:40.

Whether it's paying for someone's bus ticket or buying

:25:41.:25:45.

And we've been to find out what good deeds people have done.

:25:46.:25:58.

Gone to the theatre and I saw there were some chaps wanting coffees and

:25:59.:26:05.

things, they wanted money really, I just thought, you know what, for the

:26:06.:26:09.

sake of another ?20 I would rather get them summing to eat. I went to a

:26:10.:26:18.

random homeless person and got them something. There was this lady

:26:19.:26:26.

carrying large luggage, so I carried her bag until she got down the

:26:27.:26:31.

stairs. A homeless person was sat outside Blackpool or station and we

:26:32.:26:36.

were getting off the train -- Blackpool or.

:26:37.:26:37.

All that kindness. -- Blackpool North. They are all very kind

:26:38.:26:49.

things! I am going to let you read the next big! This is what John was

:26:50.:26:51.

going to say! -- next bit. You can e-mail us at

:26:52.:26:53.

[email protected] or share your thoughts with other

:26:54.:26:55.

viewers on our Facebook page. And you can Tweet

:26:56.:26:58.

about today's stories using #bbcbreakfast or follow us

:26:59.:27:00.

for the latest from the programme. Let us know. I would like some

:27:01.:27:09.

ideas. What can I do for John and what can John do for me? You can get

:27:10.:27:14.

me another coffee, as many as you like! We've got a break now so maybe

:27:15.:27:17.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:27:18.:30:38.

Now, though, it's back to Sally and Jon.

:30:39.:30:41.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay.

:30:42.:30:46.

We'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment.

:30:47.:30:53.

Also on Breakfast this morning: An estimated 100 elephants

:30:54.:30:55.

We'll find out why China's ivory ban could be a monumental move

:30:56.:31:00.

It's full steam ahead for the Settle to Carlisle railway as it reopens

:31:01.:31:08.

to the public, after what's been described as "the most challenging

:31:09.:31:11.

And before the end of the programme, we'll travel into the future,

:31:12.:31:21.

As we meet John Higgins, the man behind one of the most

:31:22.:31:30.

iconic characters in British comic books.

:31:31.:31:33.

But now a summary of this morning's main news.

:31:34.:31:43.

Patients will have to wait longer for routine operations,

:31:44.:31:45.

such as hip and knee replacements, as a trade off so improvements can

:31:46.:31:49.

That's according to the Head of NHS England, Simon Stevens,

:31:50.:31:53.

who is today setting out a new strategy for

:31:54.:31:56.

Iris is 96 and is recovering from a recent illness.

:31:57.:32:05.

Her GP called a local NHS service based in Nottinghamshire

:32:06.:32:09.

to give her the right care and the right place.

:32:10.:32:12.

The treatment at home has been absolutely wonderful.

:32:13.:32:21.

Iris is well cared for, a priority for the NHS,

:32:22.:32:24.

but it's acknowledged the system is under pressure,

:32:25.:32:26.

and tough financial choices are needed.

:32:27.:32:28.

Today NHS England leaders are taking stock of progress

:32:29.:32:30.

since their five-year plan was published in 2014.

:32:31.:32:38.

Aims set out in the new strategy include improving cancer survival

:32:39.:32:41.

rates, increased access to mental health therapies and recruitment

:32:42.:32:44.

But with limited resources it's likely to mean longer waiting times

:32:45.:32:50.

for non-urgent operations and fewer people being referred to hospital

:32:51.:32:53.

The problem is made worse by a shortage of beds.

:32:54.:33:01.

There are a significant proportion of people who don't need to be

:33:02.:33:04.

there, who don't want to be there, and if we could get them out,

:33:05.:33:08.

that would free up something like 2000 to 3000 beds in the NHS,

:33:09.:33:11.

which could be used more effectively for providing

:33:12.:33:14.

Today is about setting out what is possible with the money

:33:15.:33:20.

allocated by the government to the NHS in England but,

:33:21.:33:23.

at a time of increased demand, what is not addressed is the extra

:33:24.:33:26.

We'll be speaking to guests about this throughout the morning,

:33:27.:33:36.

including the President of the Royal College of Surgeons,

:33:37.:33:39.

A group of MPs have said it's "unacceptable" that residents

:33:40.:33:46.

who pay their own fees at care homes in England are charged on average

:33:47.:33:50.

43% more than those funded by the state.

:33:51.:33:52.

The Communities and Local Government Committee blames a lack of funding,

:33:53.:33:55.

which it says is threatening the viability of adult

:33:56.:33:58.

The government says it's already given councils an extra ?2 billion.

:33:59.:34:10.

The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk,

:34:11.:34:14.

will issue draft guidelines this morning, setting out how the EU

:34:15.:34:17.

wants to handle the Brexit negotiations.

:34:18.:34:23.

The proposals will be sent to the governments of the 27 member

:34:24.:34:26.

states and will help set the tone for the next two years of talks.

:34:27.:34:30.

It's thought Mr Tusk will try to break negotiations down

:34:31.:34:33.

into three phases - the terms of separation,

:34:34.:34:35.

a future trade partnership and the transition to

:34:36.:34:37.

a new relationship between Britain and the EU.

:34:38.:34:40.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has signed a letter

:34:41.:34:42.

to Theresa May, formally requesting a second independence referendum.

:34:43.:34:44.

In it, she reiterates her call for a vote within the next two years.

:34:45.:34:48.

The Prime Minister has already said it won't happen before

:34:49.:34:51.

Hotels, restaurants and tourist attractions have warned ministers

:34:52.:34:54.

of the possible consequences of restricting the movement

:34:55.:34:56.

The British Hospitality Association predicts a shortfall of 60,000

:34:57.:35:04.

workers a year if immigration is limited

:35:05.:35:06.

The government says it will design a new immigration system

:35:07.:35:10.

President Trump's former national security adviser has

:35:11.:35:15.

offered to give evidence about possible links

:35:16.:35:17.

between the Trump campaign and Russia, if he's given protection

:35:18.:35:20.

from what has been called "unfair prosecution".

:35:21.:35:22.

General Michael Flynn was forced to resign in February

:35:23.:35:24.

after he misled the Vice President over phone conversations he had

:35:25.:35:27.

His lawyer says he "has a story to tell."

:35:28.:35:37.

Israel has announced it's to build the first new settlement

:35:38.:35:40.

in the occupied West Bank in more than 20 years.

:35:41.:35:42.

Palestinian officials have condemned the plan and have called

:35:43.:35:45.

China will close almost half of its official ivory carving

:35:46.:35:54.

factories and shops today, with the rest due to close

:35:55.:35:56.

The news has been welcomed by conservationists in their ongoing

:35:57.:36:00.

battle against the illegal trade in ivory.

:36:01.:36:03.

Despite a global ban on international sales,

:36:04.:36:04.

a surge in demand has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands

:36:05.:36:08.

of African elephants in recent years.

:36:09.:36:12.

A Californian company has made history by launching rocket back

:36:13.:36:15.

How do you do that? Rockets, of course, traditionally used just once

:36:16.:36:28.

and then they are scrapped. But SpaceX has developed a way

:36:29.:36:30.

of landing its boosters safely on earth, allowing

:36:31.:36:33.

them to be recycled. This is going to be ultimately a

:36:34.:36:41.

huge revolution in spaceflight. It is the difference between if you

:36:42.:36:45.

have aeroplanes where you through a way an aeroplane after every flight,

:36:46.:36:49.

versus you could reuse them multiple times.

:36:50.:36:51.

That is a whole new level of recycling. It makes it cheaper, so

:36:52.:36:58.

anything is possible. I still don't think it is a bargain. Talking of

:36:59.:37:05.

which, Manchester City. It continues for the women's team especially at

:37:06.:37:09.

the moment, with a great run of form, a domestic double last season,

:37:10.:37:13.

and now the semi-final of the Champions League. This is just what

:37:14.:37:16.

the club wants as they look to build themselves as a sort of football

:37:17.:37:21.

superpower and they are certainly doing that at the moment as they

:37:22.:37:23.

reached the semifinals last night. Lucy Bronze scored the only goal

:37:24.:37:25.

in last night's second leg to seal a 2-0 aggregate win over Danish

:37:26.:37:28.

side Fortuna Hjorring. Next up for them, the holders,

:37:29.:37:31.

Lyon, in the semi-finals. We don't stop here. We are excited

:37:32.:37:41.

to move onto the semi-final. We know that Lyon are a very experienced

:37:42.:37:45.

team, and they have got a team full of world-class individuals. But so

:37:46.:37:49.

have we. It is going to be an exciting game for sure.

:37:50.:37:51.

Stoke City striker Saido Berahino says the eight-week drugs ban

:37:52.:37:53.

he served earlier this season came after his drink was spiked

:37:54.:37:56.

Berahino didn't play for former club West Brom between September

:37:57.:38:00.

For me to get banned for something that you really haven't done is hard

:38:01.:38:11.

to take. So it was spiked? Yes, definitely. Because if I was going

:38:12.:38:16.

together high, like talking about whether you wanted to get higher,

:38:17.:38:21.

maybe the numbers would have came higher, if it was found in my

:38:22.:38:25.

system. But it was really, really low, so why would you want to take

:38:26.:38:30.

something and not get a buzz off it? And that was the question. But

:38:31.:38:34.

because I am in the Premier League, the FA have to have zero tolerance.

:38:35.:38:36.

He believes there was such a small amount in his system he thinks it is

:38:37.:38:42.

clear that it wasn't intentional. And you can watch the full interview

:38:43.:38:43.

on Football Focus on BBC One FIFA have announced how the places

:38:44.:38:47.

will be allocated for the new larger It'll feature 48 teams

:38:48.:38:51.

and there will be a six team tournament to confirm

:38:52.:38:55.

the final two spots. They'll be more chance of seeing

:38:56.:38:57.

another European nation lift the trophy like Germany did in 2014

:38:58.:39:00.

too, as they'll be 16 European

:39:01.:39:03.

countries instead of the current 13. The proposals are expected to be

:39:04.:39:05.

confirmed by the FIFA Council Joanna Konta has become the first

:39:06.:39:08.

British woman to reach Konta beat Venus Wiliams

:39:09.:39:12.

for the third successive time to set up a meeting with

:39:13.:39:16.

Caroline Wozniacki. Konta was just six years

:39:17.:39:17.

old when Williams first won this Williams is one of Konta's all time

:39:18.:39:20.

heroes but there was no room for sentiment last night

:39:21.:39:25.

with Konta winning 6-4, 7-5. England's Charley Hull is two under

:39:26.:39:30.

after seven holes at the first women's major of the year,

:39:31.:39:33.

the ANA Inspiration in California. Hull and Scotland's Catriona Matthew

:39:34.:39:36.

were still out on the course Shot of the day, though,

:39:37.:39:39.

came from South Korean teenage amateur

:39:40.:39:43.

Seong Eun-jeong. And look at the surprise as well on

:39:44.:39:55.

her face. Amazing. What a feeling that must be.

:39:56.:39:57.

Salford Red Devils continued their impressive start to the season

:39:58.:40:00.

with a 22-14 win over St Helens to move joint top of Super League.

:40:01.:40:04.

This is the try that sealed it for Salford,

:40:05.:40:06.

four minutes from time, Ryan Morgan's mistake

:40:07.:40:09.

was capitalised on by Michael Dobson,

:40:10.:40:10.

to claim his second try of the night and put the game beyond Saints.

:40:11.:40:14.

The Red Devils have now won four of their last five matches.

:40:15.:40:18.

World number one Mark Selby is into the quarter-finals

:40:19.:40:21.

The defending champion edged out a tense final frame decider

:40:22.:40:26.

Judd Trump and Ding Junhui are also through.

:40:27.:40:34.

No Ronnie O'Sullivan, though, who has been knocked out. So, there we

:40:35.:40:40.

are. Manchester City women going well at the moment. How long is it

:40:41.:40:45.

going to be before Manchester United have a women's team? Yes, that is a

:40:46.:40:50.

surprise, isn't it? What are they thinking, maybe there are plans on

:40:51.:40:54.

foot? You would wonder, surely. The success of Manchester City's women,

:40:55.:41:00.

come on, that rivalry. More less likely, I am not sure. Good

:41:01.:41:03.

question, they should settle it on the pitch. So you later.

:41:04.:41:05.

Hundreds of African elephants are killed every year at the hands

:41:06.:41:09.

of poachers who feed Asia's insatiable appetite for Ivory.

:41:10.:41:11.

China accounts for 70% of the market.

:41:12.:41:15.

But, in a move welcomed by conservationists,

:41:16.:41:17.

the country says it will close half of its ivory factories and shops

:41:18.:41:21.

today, with a total ban by the end of the year.

:41:22.:41:24.

We'll discuss this in more detail in a moment,

:41:25.:41:26.

but first let's get a sense of the scale of the problem.

:41:27.:42:51.

Let's speak now to Heather Sohl, the chief advisor on wildlife

:42:52.:42:56.

Morning, thank you for looking and joining us today. Some of those

:42:57.:43:06.

figures I think will surprise people a lot, that the global statistics

:43:07.:43:10.

are pretty shocking. How much difference will this change in China

:43:11.:43:15.

today, the closing of half of the ivory factories and workshops, how

:43:16.:43:20.

much difference will it make? As you mentioned in your introduction,

:43:21.:43:23.

China is the country with the world's largest ivory market, that

:43:24.:43:28.

is where we see the greatest demand. So this change is going to make a

:43:29.:43:31.

real difference for African elephants. If we can reduce that

:43:32.:43:37.

demand, all law-abiding citizens will not be buying the ivory and

:43:38.:43:41.

that means people also won't be buying ivory for investment

:43:42.:43:45.

purposes, and that means that criminals who have this high demand

:43:46.:43:50.

won't be able to use these legal markets in order to launder the

:43:51.:43:55.

illegal ivory they are taking from the poaching of elephants. That

:43:56.:43:59.

assumes this ban is going to work, isn't it, so there is a risk it

:44:00.:44:02.

could be pushed underground and create a black market. Absolutely,

:44:03.:44:06.

they are not going to solve this problem. What we need to see is

:44:07.:44:10.

effective law enforcement to make sure that the officials are in

:44:11.:44:17.

shoring that there isn't going to be a growing underground trade because

:44:18.:44:20.

it is being driven away from the legal markets. So that is why it is

:44:21.:44:26.

important to have effective law enforcement, and also WWF and our

:44:27.:44:30.

partner organisation Traffic are working in China to make sure the

:44:31.:44:34.

public are educated about the ban, so they are not looking to purchase

:44:35.:44:38.

the ivory and also to make sure we understand the reasons why people

:44:39.:44:42.

want to conceal ivory and take the ivory and by the ivory and

:44:43.:44:45.

addressing those motivations and encouraging people to change

:44:46.:44:48.

behaviour and not seek out ivory any more. If that doesn't happen, if

:44:49.:44:52.

there is not an overall change, is there a genuine risk elephants might

:44:53.:44:56.

disappear from the planet. We have seen the gorgeous pictures, is it a

:44:57.:45:06.

real risk? In the last decade we have lost 1011 African elephants, so

:45:07.:45:10.

that dropped the population down to 415,000 elephants. The area where we

:45:11.:45:17.

have the greatest concern is central Africa, where it is haemorrhaging

:45:18.:45:21.

ivory from the poaching of elephants. So if we continue down

:45:22.:45:27.

this road and the trends in poaching continue, we could see the extension

:45:28.:45:31.

of elephants in Africa within our lifeline. We taught about China and

:45:32.:45:35.

what they are doing and what needs to be done in Africa, what about

:45:36.:45:39.

here in the UK, what you think charities and government can do in

:45:40.:45:43.

Great Britain? Well, looking at the ivory trade, here in the UK, while

:45:44.:45:48.

we are not a major contributor to the illegal market globally, there

:45:49.:45:53.

is some laundering of the illegal modern-day ivory as antiques, which

:45:54.:45:58.

currently are legal to trade here in the UK. And there is some illegal

:45:59.:46:02.

trade of ivory from the UK to markets in Asia, and so WWF and

:46:03.:46:08.

other organisations and other high-profile people are calling for

:46:09.:46:13.

a ban on the ivory trade here in the UK in order to ensure that we have

:46:14.:46:18.

absolutely no involvement in illegal ivory trade at the global level.

:46:19.:46:21.

Even when we talk about things that might be hundreds of years old,

:46:22.:46:25.

antiques, you know, those elephants were poached many years ago. Yes,

:46:26.:46:30.

well, there is evidence that buyers from Asia are coming to the UK,

:46:31.:46:34.

coming to EU markets in order to buy this legal antique, these legal

:46:35.:46:40.

antique items, then taking them back to China. Sometimes the larger

:46:41.:46:45.

pieces that are made completely from ivory are actually even reworked

:46:46.:46:48.

into different carvings and those are sought after in Asian markets as

:46:49.:46:53.

high status symbols, they are given as business gifts to show that you

:46:54.:46:57.

have the wealth to be able to afford these items. OK, thank you for

:46:58.:46:59.

joining us on Breakfast is morning. Lots of schools are no breakup

:47:00.:47:09.

today, some are next week. We have a bit of holiday time coming up, what

:47:10.:47:11.

does that mean for the weather? Next week not looking too bad for

:47:12.:47:19.

many, Sally and John, a lot of dry weather to come, a bit of rain, not

:47:20.:47:23.

as much as this morning, though, not a great start to Friday but it is a

:47:24.:47:28.

very mild one, warmest at the moment is Dover in the south-east, but even

:47:29.:47:32.

as far as Aberdeen, temperatures unusually high for this stage in

:47:33.:47:36.

March and this could be a day when we see sky is bright and.

:47:37.:47:40.

Brightening already to the south-west of a cloudy and wet night

:47:41.:47:46.

-- skies brightened. The same area of rain pushing across the Midlands

:47:47.:47:49.

to the south-east and East Anglia but before it arrives in the

:47:50.:47:52.

south-east, morning brightness for your commute, a few showers later, a

:47:53.:47:57.

wet start to the north and west of Wales, wet in Northern Ireland,

:47:58.:48:01.

parts of north-west England and the south and west of Scotland, rain for

:48:02.:48:04.

the morning commute. Some of that will be heavy. Blasting longest in

:48:05.:48:09.

Scotland, the rain clearing from Northern Ireland by around mid to

:48:10.:48:13.

late morning -- lasting. Skies brightening in England and Wales

:48:14.:48:17.

later, showers in eastern districts by the afternoon and then showers in

:48:18.:48:21.

Cornwall, west Wales and Northern Ireland later in the date. Wettest

:48:22.:48:29.

of in the far north of Scotland -- later in the day. 13-7 team

:48:30.:48:36.

expected. Tonight, showers in western areas, drying out in Orkney,

:48:37.:48:42.

Shetland and the Hebrides -- 13 -17. Cooler than last night, temperatures

:48:43.:48:46.

into single figures as we start Saturday morning. A cooler start to

:48:47.:48:50.

tomorrow compare to the past few mornings, a bit of sunshine here and

:48:51.:48:54.

there, especially in eastern areas but as we start the day, a

:48:55.:48:58.

scattering of showers around, most parts will see one shower through

:48:59.:49:02.

the day, some in England and Wales will be slow-moving, heavy and

:49:03.:49:05.

thundery. The coasts should stay dry and temperatures down on today, but

:49:06.:49:10.

not bad, 13-6 team. With high pressure building in, we clear the

:49:11.:49:15.

showers Saturday evening and dry to take us into Sunday morning -- 13 --

:49:16.:49:21.

16. Sunday the better day of the weekend with dry and sunny weather

:49:22.:49:26.

dominating, showers few and far between with temperatures around

:49:27.:49:30.

11-6 team. A weekend of two halves, the start of April, April showers

:49:31.:49:36.

coming our way -- 11- 16. The best of the weather on Sunday. For those

:49:37.:49:40.

starting your Easter break heading into Europe this weekend, what can

:49:41.:49:45.

you expect? Dry and sunny for eastern areas, not looking great for

:49:46.:49:50.

Italy, Corsica, the Balearics, but lovely in some parts of Spain and

:49:51.:49:55.

Portugal. Test whether this weekend will be the Canaries and I'm free if

:49:56.:49:59.

you need me to carry your bags -- best weather. Let's book that

:50:00.:50:01.

flight! That is just mean showing us those

:50:02.:50:08.

temperatures! It will be all right the next couple of here, though! --

:50:09.:50:15.

couple of days. Britain's lowest paid staff should

:50:16.:50:17.

get a pay-rise this weekend. From tomorrow the

:50:18.:50:19.

minimum wage goes up. goes up from ?7.20

:50:20.:50:29.

an hour to ?7.50 an hour and that's equivalent to ?281.25

:50:30.:50:36.

for a full time 37.5 hours a week. It's what the Government calls

:50:37.:50:39.

the National Living Wage. All businesses have

:50:40.:50:52.

to pay it or face a fine. But can businesses,

:50:53.:50:56.

especially small firms, I'm Janine, I am a company director

:50:57.:51:10.

at a nursery. We currently employ 68 full-time members of staff. For the

:51:11.:51:14.

staff, the staff are very valued and they're worth every penny and they

:51:15.:51:19.

deserve a pay rise and they deserve the money. We worked out figures

:51:20.:51:25.

yesterday and it's going to cost us an extra ?26,000 this year in the

:51:26.:51:29.

increases in wages alone, and that's without all the other increases

:51:30.:51:33.

coming in, like business rates and everything else that's coming our

:51:34.:51:36.

way as well. So it's going to have to come back on the families that we

:51:37.:51:39.

actually serve. Could be tough for businesses,

:51:40.:51:39.

but what about staff? If you look at the increase

:51:40.:51:42.

as a percentage the cost of living

:51:43.:51:44.

has risen by 3.2%. So that jump in the minimum wage

:51:45.:51:51.

for over 25s is still higher But, as ever, it's not

:51:52.:51:54.

quite that simple. Campaigners say the living wage

:51:55.:52:00.

needs to be much higher. They base their sums on actual

:52:01.:52:03.

living costs and say it should be So what would that mean

:52:04.:52:06.

back in South Wales? As a working parent with two small

:52:07.:52:21.

children, every little penny helps going towards childcare and everyday

:52:22.:52:26.

living expenses. It means you don't live on the breadline, day-to-day

:52:27.:52:30.

living, sort of, without living outside of our means and maybe be

:52:31.:52:36.

able to go on holidays as well. The rise in the National Living Wage

:52:37.:52:39.

would help me greatly, would help me pay for things like holidays, things

:52:40.:52:43.

like that. Help me out with my bills. Recently I've bought my own

:52:44.:52:52.

house so it would help with that. An extra ?500 a year would make a big

:52:53.:52:56.

difference with household bills, holidays, a bit of luxury money

:52:57.:52:57.

then. It's also worth bearing in mind that

:52:58.:52:58.

change only affects those over If you're between 21

:52:59.:53:01.

and 24 your wage will go up by 10p you get a 5p increase

:53:02.:53:06.

to ?5.60 an hour. And the same applies

:53:07.:53:14.

to those under 18 years old, So there really is a difference

:53:15.:53:17.

depending on how old you are. Apprentices get a 10p per hour pay

:53:18.:53:30.

rise to ?3.50. Very different depending on your age

:53:31.:53:38.

and what job you are in. And remember, those pay rates

:53:39.:53:42.

are your basic rights. So if you don't get

:53:43.:53:46.

the increase from tomorrow it's against the law

:53:47.:53:48.

and you should contact We need to get out for some fresh

:53:49.:54:05.

air! It's Friday, you had to think about that, didn't you?

:54:06.:54:06.

It runs through some of the country's most stunning

:54:07.:54:09.

scenery, along the Yorkshire Dales and Cumbrian Fells.

:54:10.:54:16.

But last year, a section of the Time now to get the news,

:54:17.:54:22.

was forced to shut when 500,000 tons of earth gave way

:54:23.:54:25.

Network Rail has described the line's repair as one

:54:26.:54:29.

of the biggest challenges it's ever faced.

:54:30.:54:31.

But today, the route is finally reopening and are reporter

:54:32.:54:34.

Allison Freeman boarded this morning's service.

:54:35.:54:39.

You have been on the train, you were on the very first one? That's right,

:54:40.:54:48.

Sally. Good morning. The sun is just coming up here and we've just got

:54:49.:54:53.

off that very first train to travel from Carlisle to Appleby fear in the

:54:54.:54:58.

beautiful Eden Valley since it shut just over a year ago -- here in. It

:54:59.:55:04.

was another victim of storm Desmond, those heavy rains really

:55:05.:55:07.

destabilised what was already a slightly unstable bit of track and

:55:08.:55:11.

it meant Network Rail had to undertake one of the biggest repair

:55:12.:55:15.

jobs they have ever done. Joining me to tell me more is Martin Frobisher,

:55:16.:55:20.

he is from Network Rail. Martin, tell me, this was a expensive drop,

:55:21.:55:25.

how much did it cost to get it all going? ?23 million to repair the

:55:26.:55:30.

track. It was an incredibly complicated job. When we first

:55:31.:55:35.

looked at it we had half 1 million tons of earth slipping down a gorge

:55:36.:55:39.

into the Eden Valley on a moped hillside in Cumbria. It's beautiful

:55:40.:55:44.

countryside here but that brings challenges. -- remote. What kind of

:55:45.:55:49.

challenges did you go through to clear the area before you got

:55:50.:55:52.

started? We had to clear the area but then to derided we needed to

:55:53.:56:00.

drill down steel piles into the bedrock of the Eden Gorge -- them to

:56:01.:56:06.

drive it. Then we built the railway abrupt. -- them to drive it. --

:56:07.:56:14.

railway above -- then to. A few passengers, why is it so exciting

:56:15.:56:17.

for people to have this line-backer open again? This is such an

:56:18.:56:21.

important artery for the region. -- Leinbach open. It supports tourism.

:56:22.:56:29.

-- line back open. It is an important freight railway, it

:56:30.:56:32.

carries aggregate, coal and all sorts of freight services around the

:56:33.:56:36.

country. It is vitally important. Tell me about the celebrations,

:56:37.:56:41.

there's a special visitor today? Absolutely, we have the Flying

:56:42.:56:45.

Scotsman locomotive bringing a train across the line Carlisle at

:56:46.:56:52.

lunchtime today. That's a really special occasion. Word ??D ELWORD

:56:53.:56:55.

it's taken a year but we can well and truly. It's taken a year but we

:56:56.:57:02.

can well and truly say that the Carlisle to line is back on track!

:57:03.:57:08.

Excuse line is back Hello, this is Breakfast,

:57:09.:00:28.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. Longer waits for hospital

:00:29.:00:36.

operations in England, as the health service is forced

:00:37.:00:38.

to make a tough trade-off. The head of NHS England says

:00:39.:00:41.

treatment is no longer guaranteed in the 18-week target time,

:00:42.:00:44.

but in return, there would be quicker cancer diagnosis

:00:45.:00:47.

and emergency care. Good morning, it is

:00:48.:01:05.

Friday 31 of March. Also this morning: As Britain

:01:06.:01:08.

prepares for Brexit, today the EU will set

:01:09.:01:11.

out its guidelines for two The private spaceflight company

:01:12.:01:13.

SpaceX has made history by successfully flying a rocket that

:01:14.:01:23.

has already been to space. In sport: Manchester City's women

:01:24.:01:29.

reach the semi-finals Lucy Bronze with the goal,

:01:30.:01:31.

as City reach the last four, after 2-0 aggregate win over Danish

:01:32.:01:37.

side Fortuna Hjorring Will you be A homeless person was sat outside

:01:38.:02:01.

Blackpool North Station, and I had a jacket, so gave it to him.

:02:02.:02:07.

On National Kindness Day, we will hear about plans to make

:02:08.:02:10.

My idea of kindness is to offer you brighter skies later on. Wet for

:02:11.:02:20.

some of you, mild out there, but the weekend forecast does show some

:02:21.:02:25.

promise. I will have all the details in 15 minutes.

:02:26.:02:25.

Patients will have to wait longer for routine operations such as hip

:02:26.:02:29.

and knee replacements, as a trade-off for improvements

:02:30.:02:31.

That is according to the head of NHS England, Simon Stevens,

:02:32.:02:35.

who is today setting out a strategy for the next few years.

:02:36.:02:38.

Let's join our health correspondent Sophie Hutchinson,

:02:39.:02:40.

who is outside St Thomas's Hospital in Central London.

:02:41.:02:44.

Well, as you say, it is two years since this transformation plan was

:02:45.:02:58.

launched by the NHS. It is a five-year plan. Today we have had an

:02:59.:03:02.

update on the progress that they are making. The chief executive, Simon

:03:03.:03:06.

Stevens, has described it as an honest assessment, but he wouldn't

:03:07.:03:10.

comment on whether he felt the NHS had been given enough money to carry

:03:11.:03:14.

out the full plan. What he said they are working towards is quicker

:03:15.:03:19.

diagnosis for cancer care, extending GP opening times, and also speeding

:03:20.:03:25.

up weights at A But he said there had to be a trade-off somewhere, and

:03:26.:03:29.

he said that could mean longer waits, more patients waiting longer

:03:30.:03:33.

than 18 weeks for non- urgent operations. Now, those are things

:03:34.:03:38.

like cataracts, hip and knee replacements. He also said that GPs

:03:39.:03:42.

would be asked to review the number of patients that they are referring

:03:43.:03:46.

on for treatment in hospitals, and they would be asked to look instead

:03:47.:03:50.

for some of those at things like physiotherapy, so patients instead

:03:51.:03:54.

of going to hospital for treatment might get a treatment outside

:03:55.:03:58.

hospital instead. Well, as you can imagine, there has been some

:03:59.:04:02.

positive comments for some parts of the plans, but concerns from

:04:03.:04:07.

organisations about the more negative side of the plans. The

:04:08.:04:10.

Royal College of surgeons has said today's announcement means patients

:04:11.:04:15.

will wait longer and in more pain before planned surgery. It said we

:04:16.:04:19.

risk returning to the days of unacceptably long waits for elective

:04:20.:04:24.

surgical treatment. And the British Medical Association said achieving

:04:25.:04:27.

one delivery promise by missing another one is a textbook example of

:04:28.:04:33.

rationing access to care. Thank you very much indeed.

:04:34.:04:34.

We will be speaking to guests about this throughout the morning,

:04:35.:04:37.

including the president of the Royal College of Surgeons,

:04:38.:04:39.

A group of MPs have said it is unacceptable that residents

:04:40.:04:43.

who pay their own fees at care homes in England are charged on average

:04:44.:04:47.

43% more than those funded by the state.

:04:48.:04:49.

The Communities and Local Government Committee blames a lack of funding,

:04:50.:04:52.

which it says is threatening the viability of adult

:04:53.:04:54.

The Government says it has already given councils an extra ?2 billion.

:04:55.:05:04.

The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk,

:05:05.:05:07.

will issue draft guidelines this morning, setting out how the EU

:05:08.:05:10.

wants to handle the Brexit negotiations.

:05:11.:05:11.

The proposals will then be debated by the leaders of the 27 EU member

:05:12.:05:15.

Dan, it is all quite procedural today, isn't it?

:05:16.:05:28.

I guess we begin to get a glimpse of where the EU wants this to head.

:05:29.:05:35.

Yes, that is what we should get later today but the rules matter

:05:36.:05:39.

here in Brussels and the diplomats and politicians who are leading the

:05:40.:05:42.

negotiation from this side think it is very important that they are

:05:43.:05:46.

stuck to and that the process plays out. Today the focus will be on

:05:47.:05:51.

Donald Tusk, he is one of the main players in the European Union, the

:05:52.:05:54.

president of the council. He represents the other leaders around

:05:55.:05:58.

Europe, the 27 member nations, and he has to co-ordinate what they want

:05:59.:06:03.

to be the important priorities in this negotiation. So today he will

:06:04.:06:06.

send them a letter saying what he thinks the right guidelines should

:06:07.:06:11.

be the best negotiation. Now, he is not publishing that letter, we will

:06:12.:06:14.

not see the full detail, he will give a press conference so we should

:06:15.:06:18.

get some idea about what he thinks is the best way forward and what the

:06:19.:06:22.

priorities will be. The BBC understands that he is going to

:06:23.:06:25.

suggest that they should first be a phase which talks about how Britain

:06:26.:06:28.

should leave the EU, then another phase of talks which deals with a

:06:29.:06:32.

trade relationship in the future, then a third phase which deals with

:06:33.:06:34.

exactly what the transitional arrangements would be as Britain

:06:35.:06:37.

leaves and six that new relationship. That is different from

:06:38.:06:41.

what the British government wants, so already we can see that there are

:06:42.:06:45.

going to be disagreement even about the best way to start those talks.

:06:46.:06:52.

Not the only Brexit related story, you will be surprised to hear. Not

:06:53.:06:55.

too much, don't want to put everybody off.

:06:56.:06:57.

Scotland's First Minister, Nicola Sturgeon, has signed a letter

:06:58.:06:59.

to Theresa May formally requesting a second independence referendum.

:07:00.:07:02.

In it, she reiterates her call for a vote within the next two years.

:07:03.:07:06.

The Prime Minister has already said it won't happen before

:07:07.:07:09.

There are warnings today of a recruitment crisis if Brexit

:07:10.:07:12.

leads to immigration being severely restricted.

:07:13.:07:14.

In the first major business intervention since Theresa May began

:07:15.:07:16.

the process of Britain's divorce from the EU,

:07:17.:07:19.

the British Hospitality Association has said the industry faces

:07:20.:07:21.

a shortfall of 60,000 workers a year.

:07:22.:07:25.

Our industry correspondent John Moylan has more.

:07:26.:07:29.

They are gearing up for the summer season.

:07:30.:07:40.

Around 40% of staff here are from outside the UK,

:07:41.:07:44.

and the boss says they face a recruitment crisis if Brexit

:07:45.:07:47.

causes that supply of workers to be cut off.

:07:48.:07:51.

If the tap was just turned off, straightaway

:07:52.:07:53.

that would be very difficult.

:07:54.:07:55.

We rely on a third of the workplace from European employees.

:07:56.:08:01.

To be able to turn that straight off, and replace it straight off,

:08:02.:08:05.

We're in the hospitality industry, the service industry.

:08:06.:08:08.

You actually have to employ people who like to serve people.

:08:09.:08:11.

Tourism and hospitality accounts for around 10% of the economy.

:08:12.:08:13.

Now, a new report is reporting that restrictions on foreign labour

:08:14.:08:17.

could hit it harder than any other sector.

:08:18.:08:19.

The UK's hospitality sector employs around 3 million workers

:08:20.:08:21.

but it is highly reliant on overseas staff.

:08:22.:08:26.

24% of the workforce are EU migrants.

:08:27.:08:29.

It could face a shortfall of 60,000 workers a year if immigration

:08:30.:08:32.

The industry wants to reduce its dependence on EU workers.

:08:33.:08:41.

Its new ten-year strategy includes recruiting more unemployed and older

:08:42.:08:44.

The Government says that, while it will end free movement

:08:45.:08:49.

as it is now, it will design a new immigration

:08:50.:08:52.

system that is in the national interest.

:08:53.:08:56.

President Trump's former national security adviser has offered to give

:08:57.:08:59.

evidence about possible links between the Trump campaign

:09:00.:09:01.

and Russia, if he is given protection from what has been

:09:02.:09:04.

General Michael Flynn was forced to resign in February

:09:05.:09:07.

after he misled the Vice President over phone conversations he had

:09:08.:09:10.

His lawyer says he has a story to tell.

:09:11.:09:24.

China will close almost half of its official ivory carving

:09:25.:09:26.

factories and shops today, with the rest due to close

:09:27.:09:29.

The news has been welcomed by conservationists in their ongoing

:09:30.:09:33.

battle against the illegal trade in ivory.

:09:34.:09:35.

Despite a global ban on international sales,

:09:36.:09:37.

a surge in demand has resulted in the deaths of tens of thousands

:09:38.:09:40.

of African elephants in recent years.

:09:41.:09:44.

A Californian company has made history by launching a rocket back

:09:45.:09:47.

Rockets are traditionally used only once, before being scrapped.

:09:48.:09:51.

But SpaceX has developed a way of landing its boosters safely

:09:52.:09:54.

on Earth, allowing them to be recycled.

:09:55.:09:56.

It has been described as one small step for the company,

:09:57.:09:59.

but a giant leap in the search for cheaper space exploration,

:10:00.:10:02.

You are looking at a rocket with a difference.

:10:03.:10:16.

Unlike the rest, it is fitted with a booster that has

:10:17.:10:19.

And now history, as it is successfully relaunched

:10:20.:10:26.

Boosters cost tens of millions of dollars, and are normally

:10:27.:10:30.

discarded and destroyed during an ascent.

:10:31.:10:34.

But the private Californian aerospace company SpaceX has found

:10:35.:10:38.

a way to eject them safely back to earth.

:10:39.:10:43.

After the successful launch, another key moment in the flight,

:10:44.:10:49.

to see if the second-hand booster can safely detach and fly back

:10:50.:10:53.

Rapturous cheers from the mission crew tell you it's a success.

:10:54.:11:03.

Minutes later, it is back on earth, an unprecedented double achievement

:11:04.:11:06.

of launching a reusable rocket, and recovering it

:11:07.:11:08.

This is gonna be, ultimately, a huge revolution in spaceflight.

:11:09.:11:14.

It's the difference between if you had aeroplanes

:11:15.:11:16.

where you threw away an aeroplane after every flight,

:11:17.:11:20.

versus you could reuse them multiple times.

:11:21.:11:28.

It represents a new era in the space race, where private enterprises

:11:29.:11:31.

compete against each other, instead of countries.

:11:32.:11:33.

This success will be a boost for a company with much more

:11:34.:11:36.

ambitious long-term goals, that include sending two

:11:37.:11:38.

unidentified space tourists to the moon next year.

:11:39.:11:40.

Let's return to our top story, and patients in England

:11:41.:11:47.

are being told they will have to wait longer for some routine

:11:48.:11:50.

operations, such as hip replacements, as part of a trade-off

:11:51.:11:53.

for improvements in other areas, like A

:11:54.:11:55.

The boss of NHS England, Simon Stevens, is today setting

:11:56.:11:58.

out his strategy for the NHS for the next two years.

:11:59.:12:01.

Let's get the thoughts on this of Clare Marx,

:12:02.:12:03.

who is president of the Royal College of Surgeons in England.

:12:04.:12:12.

Good morning to you. Good morning, Sally. First of all, your initial

:12:13.:12:22.

reaction to what he is going to say today? We understand NHS England

:12:23.:12:27.

have some difficult is because we know that demand for healthcare has

:12:28.:12:31.

gone up and up in the resource we have in terms of money and staff has

:12:32.:12:35.

not kept pace with that. So there are some good things in this report,

:12:36.:12:39.

and I am very pleased that we are going to be able to look at the way

:12:40.:12:43.

we can provide plant care for surgery more effectively in the

:12:44.:12:47.

centres which specialise in planned care. But clearly, from the public's

:12:48.:12:54.

point of view, they are going to be wondering what exactly this means

:12:55.:12:57.

and how it will impact on their ability to get planned surgery when

:12:58.:13:02.

they need it. Sorry to interrupt, but what is life like for people who

:13:03.:13:07.

are on a waiting list, perhaps waiting for hip or need surgery?

:13:08.:13:12.

Well, patients waiting for the poor knee surgery are a great deal of

:13:13.:13:16.

discomfort, usually. But our concern is not only for hip and knee surgery

:13:17.:13:20.

patients, but patients who perhaps I waiting for heart surgery. And for

:13:21.:13:24.

them, sometimes waiting for surgery may be part of the pathway where

:13:25.:13:30.

they may have a heart attack while they are waiting, or maybe they are

:13:31.:13:34.

waiting for brain surgery, or maybe they are waiting for gallbladder

:13:35.:13:39.

surgery, and all of these are extremely serious matters, and still

:13:40.:13:44.

fall within the whole remit of plant surgical care. So for hip and knee

:13:45.:13:49.

replacement, very painful, very demoralising, and after many years

:13:50.:13:54.

of waiting to get into planned surgery, there are people clearly

:13:55.:13:58.

who don't want to have to wait more than 18 weeks. But as we all know,

:13:59.:14:03.

cuts are coming, and more cuts are coming down the line. The NHS has to

:14:04.:14:07.

prioritise. Are you suggesting they have got their priorities wrong

:14:08.:14:11.

here? I don't think we should really be setting any particular group of

:14:12.:14:15.

patients against another group of patients, but I think this is a

:14:16.:14:18.

wake-up call for the public in general. People are going to have to

:14:19.:14:23.

realise that they will take more care of themselves. There are things

:14:24.:14:27.

people can do to try and prevent the need for heart surgery, like not

:14:28.:14:30.

smoking and not being overweight, and unless people are willing to

:14:31.:14:34.

take more active part in their own care, that is going to present us

:14:35.:14:38.

with an increasing stream of people wanting to have this sort of

:14:39.:14:42.

surgery. There are things that we can do to try and streamline the

:14:43.:14:45.

process is in the health Service, and there are things we can do in

:14:46.:14:49.

the community to try and make sure that every bed that we have in

:14:50.:14:53.

hospitals is occupied in the way we wish to be occupied, by people who

:14:54.:14:57.

either have emergency care or need planned care, rather than people who

:14:58.:15:00.

should be in the community. But I think this particular report tells

:15:01.:15:04.

us very clearly that we can no longer expect there to be an

:15:05.:15:11.

ever-increasing amount of money and resource within the health service.

:15:12.:15:15.

. Be done differently? We need to make the best of every penny we've

:15:16.:15:23.

got and the public need a good debate with the politicians about

:15:24.:15:26.

what it is they want from their health what should be done

:15:27.:15:29.

differently? We need to make the best of every penny we've got and

:15:30.:15:33.

the public need a good debate with the politicians about what it is

:15:34.:15:36.

they want from their health service -- what should be done differently?

:15:37.:15:39.

Clearly this is not something that we can cure with a

:15:40.:15:44.

The more staff on putting more staff on the frontline. Things are really

:15:45.:16:01.

laudable aims and I welcome all of all of those things are really

:16:02.:16:04.

laudable aims and I welcome all of them. Are facing is a clear what we

:16:05.:16:08.

are facing is a clear message who are having who are having an honest

:16:09.:16:18.

account and people... It is an honest account and people have what

:16:19.:16:22.

that means. Can be associated with increased

:16:23.:16:32.

death rates. So it is very important that people understand the

:16:33.:16:36.

importance of not completing planned surgery within an 18 week target. We

:16:37.:16:41.

have done fantastically well over the last ten years. We have had huge

:16:42.:16:45.

investment, and it is a real tribute to the Health Service that we have

:16:46.:16:49.

managed to deliver so much in such an efficient way. I am sorry to

:16:50.:16:54.

interrupt, but would you admit, we are talking about waiting times

:16:55.:16:58.

being basically the idea of a definitive and to waiting times at

:16:59.:17:02.

this point being thrown out the window. But in fact the practical

:17:03.:17:05.

waiting times are nowhere near as bad as they were ten years ago.

:17:06.:17:09.

Absolutely the waiting times are not as bad as they were ten years ago,

:17:10.:17:13.

when 60% of people managed to get their surgery within 18 weeks, and

:17:14.:17:17.

now we are looking at about 90%. But in some branches of surgery, like

:17:18.:17:23.

neurosurgery, it is 85%. And we have seen a deterioration in that level

:17:24.:17:29.

of waiting times for people over the last few months, and that is a 1-way

:17:30.:17:34.

process. So we know that people are going to start seeing a

:17:35.:17:38.

deterioration in the amount of time that they have to wait on waiting

:17:39.:17:43.

list, and that is obviously going to be extremely concerning for those

:17:44.:17:46.

people who are already in the system and needing surgery. We are not

:17:47.:17:50.

talking about frivolous surgery, we are talking about serious surgery

:17:51.:17:54.

for long-term conditions such as hips, and arthritis, where people

:17:55.:17:58.

are markedly affected in their quality of life. We are talking

:17:59.:18:02.

about serious surgery for heart operations, where people's life is

:18:03.:18:06.

being impacted by not been able to get that surgery. I am sorry to

:18:07.:18:12.

interrupt you, we are very much out of time there. Clare Marx, president

:18:13.:18:19.

of the Royal College of Surgeons, talking to us from our London studio

:18:20.:18:21.

this morning. You're watching

:18:22.:18:22.

Breakfast from BBC News. for routine operations such as hip

:18:23.:18:24.

and knee replacements in what the Head of the NHS

:18:25.:18:31.

in England says is a trade-off so improvements can be made

:18:32.:18:35.

elsewhere in the system. Details on how the EU plans

:18:36.:18:37.

to negotiate Brexit will be released later today by the president

:18:38.:18:40.

of the European Council, Quite a lot of schools breaking up

:18:41.:18:47.

for Easter today, still a couple of weeks away, but let's see what Matt

:18:48.:18:49.

has got, nice blue skies? Not quite! They will be on the way

:18:50.:18:57.

and this weekend not looking too bad, although a few showers on

:18:58.:19:02.

Saturday. Today, skies like this for a few, quite wet at the moment but

:19:03.:19:07.

if you're stepping out, not cold. The warmest, Preston, 13, even as

:19:08.:19:11.

far north as Edinburgh and Belfast, double figures. The rain clearing

:19:12.:19:18.

away from Devon and Cornwall from overnight, soon returning to the

:19:19.:19:22.

Isles of Scilly later, brightening up quickly along the Channel

:19:23.:19:26.

Islands. Quieter in the western half and middle part of England,

:19:27.:19:30.

spreading eastwards, patchy rain, eastern England dry and brighter for

:19:31.:19:35.

the morning rush hour. Wales, cloudy, wet in the Isle of Man and

:19:36.:19:39.

the north-west of England, Northern Ireland particularly damp with

:19:40.:19:42.

outbreaks of rain and that's the case in many western parts of

:19:43.:19:45.

Scotland. The north-east should start dry. The rain is going north,

:19:46.:19:49.

clearing away from Northern Ireland for a time before showers return

:19:50.:19:57.

later. Rain eases away from northern England, brightening up by lunchtime

:19:58.:20:00.

and much of England and Wales will see sunny spells into the afternoon,

:20:01.:20:03.

as will Scotland, but Northern Ireland, west Wales and Cornwall

:20:04.:20:09.

will the showers returning. 13 to 17 degrees this time of year is above

:20:10.:20:13.

where it should be, feeling pleasant in the sunshine and out of the

:20:14.:20:16.

breeze. Tonight, temperatures dropping further than last night.

:20:17.:20:20.

Showers throughout in western areas, eastern areas should start dry but

:20:21.:20:25.

into the weekend, a bit cooler to start with than we've had over the

:20:26.:20:29.

past few days. What about the weekend? A new month and with it a

:20:30.:20:33.

change to April showers, in fact we will see heavy and thundery showers

:20:34.:20:37.

around. Chilly conditions to take us into what will be a drier and

:20:38.:20:41.

brighter Sunday, so Sunday is the better of your two days. Let's look

:20:42.:20:47.

at Saturday, sunshine around, especially in eastern areas. Showers

:20:48.:20:51.

becoming widespread, heavy and in places thundery with hail, slow in

:20:52.:20:57.

eastern Wales. One or two will avoid showers altogether, some coastal

:20:58.:21:01.

districts best favoured for that, so you should do well if you're heading

:21:02.:21:05.

to the coast. Showers baiting through the evening, high pressure

:21:06.:21:12.

builds then on Sunday and with that temperatures could drop down to

:21:13.:21:15.

produce a touch of frost early in the morning but most places will

:21:16.:21:19.

have a fine day with sunny spells and temperatures of around ten to 16

:21:20.:21:23.

degrees. If you're heading further afield and starting your Easter

:21:24.:21:27.

break this weekend, some of the best places to go are the likes of Dubai

:21:28.:21:32.

and Mexico but even in Mexico, a few showers on Sunday and in New York,

:21:33.:21:36.

warming up after what has been quite a chilly few days. Good news, Matt.

:21:37.:21:41.

We end with greatness but a lovely picture! He keeps teasing us with

:21:42.:21:44.

holidays! Not fair! They're known as education's hidden

:21:45.:21:45.

army, but BBC Breakfast has been hearing how Teaching Assistants

:21:46.:21:48.

are facing challenges as a result of growing financial pressures

:21:49.:21:51.

across the education system. Unions also say teacher shortages

:21:52.:21:53.

and budget cuts mean too many are being left to teach

:21:54.:21:56.

classes on their own. Though the Department for Education

:21:57.:21:59.

says savings can be made Breakfast's Jayne McCubbin has been

:22:00.:22:01.

speaking to support staff John, not his real name,

:22:02.:22:05.

is not a real teacher, but he's frequently called

:22:06.:22:11.

in to cover a class when a real Originally it was only

:22:12.:22:15.

meant to be a few days. What it turned into

:22:16.:22:24.

was month after month. He said he's used as a cheap

:22:25.:22:26.

alternative to a substitute teacher with no qualification

:22:27.:22:29.

and no authority. Mis-behaviour meant you spent

:22:30.:22:31.

your time firefighting, that's what you're doing,

:22:32.:22:33.

you're controlling behaviour, It can happen as well when the kids

:22:34.:22:35.

will have me looking after them in one lesson and in another lesson

:22:36.:22:39.

they'll have another unqualified member of staff in a different

:22:40.:22:42.

subject, so they could have two or three hours of this

:22:43.:22:46.

in the same day. I'm not furious at the head teacher,

:22:47.:22:48.

the budget's just not there. In Scotland, only a qualified

:22:49.:22:51.

teacher can lead a class. In English and Welsh state schools,

:22:52.:22:55.

it's at the discretion of the head and all heads are facing

:22:56.:22:58.

financial pressures. Here in Burnage they value TAs more

:22:59.:23:08.

than most because many students speak English as a foreign language,

:23:09.:23:11.

many have special educational needs but even here they are

:23:12.:23:14.

increasingly used to fill gaps. That added pressure is taken away

:23:15.:23:22.

from the role that we have to do, It has the domino effect of one

:23:23.:23:26.

child is not understanding something, they then feel they can't

:23:27.:23:30.

cope within that situation, it then affects other children,

:23:31.:23:33.

it then affects the teacher, the whole environment

:23:34.:23:36.

there is not one for learning. In other schools, financial

:23:37.:23:38.

pressures are more intense. Hilton Primary is

:23:39.:23:44.

?120,000 in the red. TAs like Jill aren't just filling

:23:45.:23:47.

gaps, they are being axed. A third of the 40 employed here have

:23:48.:23:52.

just received a redundancy notice. The elastic now is as far

:23:53.:23:57.

as it is going to stretch. Losing these TIAs is a disaster, it

:23:58.:24:11.

really is a disaster. Seven years ago, three

:24:12.:24:16.

in ten secondary schools Now the National Audit Office say

:24:17.:24:18.

it's more than six in ten. And with a further ?3

:24:19.:24:23.

billion in cuts ahead, The Department for Education told me

:24:24.:24:25.

they believe efficiencies can be made without having to cut staff

:24:26.:24:29.

without an impact on education. There was a time when we didn't have

:24:30.:24:32.

teaching assistants. Yes, in years gone by we had one

:24:33.:24:35.

teacher to teach a class full of pupils but now we expect more

:24:36.:24:39.

from our education system and we're going to let a generation of pupils

:24:40.:24:42.

down if we don't provide this Parents' expectations might be

:24:43.:24:46.

for more, but in terms of funding, Head teachers will have to decide

:24:47.:24:50.

how they strike a balance. We are talking about one particular

:24:51.:25:10.

thing today. Kindness. Why? When you leave the house today you might find

:25:11.:25:14.

people being more generous and nicer to you, it is National Kindness Day,

:25:15.:25:19.

people have been getting in touch with us to tell us about what they

:25:20.:25:25.

have experienced. What have you got? Alex said my eight-year-old daughter

:25:26.:25:28.

one Easter eggs in the school raffle, she gave one away to her

:25:29.:25:32.

classmate that didn't win anything, a lovely thing to do, we are very

:25:33.:25:37.

proud. Nancy was going to Ben Nevis, wanting to go to the summit, parked

:25:38.:25:41.

the car, didn't have money for the parking metre, asked for some change

:25:42.:25:46.

and two or three people helped her, paid her ?5 and she got to the

:25:47.:25:51.

summit for free. Lovely. This is from Melanie, today I'm buying a

:25:52.:25:57.

bunch of flowers and leaving them in a random spot with a happiness

:25:58.:26:01.

kindness card and a pass it forward message, hopefully that will

:26:02.:26:04.

encourage someone to do the same. Janet, if you're going to the

:26:05.:26:08.

supermarket today you want to be there at the same time as her, if

:26:09.:26:13.

she has a trolley and someone else's nearby with a few items, she always

:26:14.:26:18.

let's them go first. Always, Janet, really? This is my favourite from

:26:19.:26:24.

Martin, a lady gave me 5p for a bag in Tesco last year. Which is kind,

:26:25.:26:28.

unless Martin works behind the checkout and that is just his job!

:26:29.:26:34.

And he was just paying for it! Let us know what you have done and what

:26:35.:26:40.

kindness you have received on National Kindness Day. I'm going to

:26:41.:26:43.

make John a tea. Know you're not. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:26:44.:30:05.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. Waiting times will be longer

:30:06.:30:21.

for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements,

:30:22.:30:23.

as a trade-off for improvements That is according to NHS England,

:30:24.:30:26.

which will today set out a strategy The body says increasing patient

:30:27.:30:31.

demand and the growth in new treatments mean

:30:32.:30:35.

choices have to be made. Clare Marx from the Royal College

:30:36.:30:37.

of Surgeons told Breakfast People are going to have to realise

:30:38.:30:40.

that they will have to take more There are things people can do

:30:41.:31:01.

to try and prevent the need for heart surgery, like not smoking

:31:02.:31:05.

and not being overweight, and unless people are willing

:31:06.:31:07.

to take more active part in their own care, that is going

:31:08.:31:10.

to present us with an increasing stream of people wanting to have

:31:11.:31:14.

this sort of surgery. A group of MPs have said

:31:15.:31:17.

it is unacceptable that residents who pay their own fees at care homes

:31:18.:31:19.

in England are charged on average 43% more than those

:31:20.:31:23.

funded by the state. The Communities and Local Government

:31:24.:31:26.

Committee blames a lack of funding, which it says is threatening

:31:27.:31:28.

the viability of adult The Government says it has already

:31:29.:31:31.

given councils an extra ?2 billion. The President of the European

:31:32.:31:36.

Council, Donald Tusk, will today issue draft guidelines

:31:37.:31:38.

on how the EU intends to negotiate The proposals will be sent

:31:39.:31:41.

to the governments of the 27 member states, and will help set the tone

:31:42.:31:48.

for the next two years of talks. It is thought Mr Tusk

:31:49.:31:52.

will try to break negotiations down into three phases, the terms

:31:53.:31:55.

of separation, a future trade partnership, and the transition

:31:56.:31:58.

to a new relationship Scotland's First Minister,

:31:59.:32:00.

Nicola Sturgeon, has signed a letter to Theresa May formally requesting

:32:01.:32:07.

a second independence referendum. In it, she reiterates her call for

:32:08.:32:10.

a vote within the next two years. The Prime Minister has already said

:32:11.:32:14.

it won't happen before Hotels, restaurants and tourist

:32:15.:32:16.

attractions have warned ministers of the possible consequences

:32:17.:32:25.

of restricting the movement The British Hospitality Association

:32:26.:32:28.

predicts a shortfall of 60,000 workers a year if immigration

:32:29.:32:31.

is limited from the EU. The Government says it will design

:32:32.:32:34.

a new immigration system President Trump's former national

:32:35.:32:36.

security adviser has offered to give evidence about possible links

:32:37.:32:51.

between the Trump campaign and Russia, if he is given

:32:52.:32:54.

protection from what has been General Michael Flynn was forced

:32:55.:32:57.

to resign in February, after he misled the Vice President

:32:58.:33:00.

over phone conversations he had His lawyer says he has

:33:01.:33:03.

a story to tell. Israel has announced it is to build

:33:04.:33:08.

the first new settlement in the occupied West Bank

:33:09.:33:12.

in more than 20 years. Palestinian officials

:33:13.:33:14.

have condemned the plan, and have called for

:33:15.:33:16.

international intervention. China will close almost half

:33:17.:33:18.

of its official ivory carving factories and shops today,

:33:19.:33:20.

with the rest due to close The news has been welcomed

:33:21.:33:23.

by conservationists in their ongoing battle against the illegal

:33:24.:33:27.

trade in ivory. Despite a global ban

:33:28.:33:29.

on international sales, a surge in demand has resulted

:33:30.:33:31.

in the deaths of tens of thousands of African elephants

:33:32.:33:35.

in recent years. A Californian company has made

:33:36.:33:40.

history by launching rocket back Rockets are traditionally used only

:33:41.:33:43.

once before being scrapped, but SpaceX has developed a way

:33:44.:33:47.

of landing its boosters safely on Earth, allowing

:33:48.:33:50.

them to be recycled. This is going to be, ultimately,

:33:51.:34:04.

a huge revolution in spaceflight. It's the difference

:34:05.:34:07.

between if you had aeroplanes where you threw away

:34:08.:34:09.

an aeroplane after every flight, versus you could reuse

:34:10.:34:12.

them multiple times. is there a lot of interesting reused

:34:13.:34:21.

rockets, second-hand rockets? It means we all have a chance of doing

:34:22.:34:26.

to space. No, it doesn't. It means one rocket is going to be used

:34:27.:34:30.

again. I don't think it is a great idea. John is here with the sport,

:34:31.:34:37.

and big celebrations at Manchester City. Yes, they look to turn

:34:38.:34:41.

themselves into a football superpower, and the women's team

:34:42.:34:44.

benefiting from all that investment. They have assembled a fantastic

:34:45.:34:53.

team, with Carli Lloyd, and now they are into the semifinals of the

:34:54.:34:56.

Champions League after domestic double last season.

:34:57.:34:58.

Lucy Bronze scored the only goal in last night's second leg,

:34:59.:35:02.

And that follows their victory in the first leg.

:35:03.:35:06.

They face the holders, Lyon, in the semi-finals,

:35:07.:35:09.

and their captain, Steph Horton, is clearly excited by the challenge.

:35:10.:35:19.

We are excited to move onto the semi-final.

:35:20.:35:23.

We know that Lyon are a very experienced team, and they have got

:35:24.:35:26.

a team full of world-class individuals.

:35:27.:35:28.

It is going to be an exciting game for sure.

:35:29.:35:35.

The Stoke City striker Saido Berahino served an eight-week

:35:36.:35:37.

doping ban earlier this season, and he says it was because his drink

:35:38.:35:41.

He didn't play for his former side, West Brom, between September

:35:42.:35:45.

and January, as he served his suspension.

:35:46.:35:47.

But he says there was such a small amount in his system,

:35:48.:35:50.

it proves he couldn't have taken the drug intentionally.

:35:51.:35:53.

For me to get banned for something that you really haven't done

:35:54.:35:56.

Because if I was going to get high, like talking about whether you

:35:57.:36:02.

wanted to get high, maybe the numbers would have came higher,

:36:03.:36:05.

But it was really, really low, so why would you want to take

:36:06.:36:11.

But because I am in the Premier League, the FA have

:36:12.:36:19.

And you can watch the full interview on Football Focus on BBC One,

:36:20.:36:27.

We know how a larger World Cup in 2026 is going to look.

:36:28.:36:33.

It will feature 48 teams, up from 32.

:36:34.:36:35.

And there will be more chance of seeing another European nation

:36:36.:36:38.

lift the trophy, as Germany did in 2014, too, as there will be 16

:36:39.:36:42.

European countries, instead of the current 13.

:36:43.:36:44.

And there is going to be a new six-team play-off tournament

:36:45.:36:47.

She has become the first British woman to reach the Miami Open final.

:36:48.:36:59.

She beat Venus Williams, and that means she will play

:37:00.:37:02.

Amazing to think Konta was just six years old when Williams first won

:37:03.:37:11.

Konta has said she is one of her all-time heroes.

:37:12.:37:16.

No room for sentiment, though, last night, as the British number

:37:17.:37:19.

England's Charley Hull is well-placed at the first women's

:37:20.:37:24.

major of the year, the ANA Inspiration, in California.

:37:25.:37:27.

No doubt what the shot of the day was.

:37:28.:37:31.

Have a look at this from South Korean teenage amateur

:37:32.:37:34.

When you are producing shots like that you know your luck is in.

:37:35.:37:54.

What a turnaround for Super League club Salford Red Devils.

:37:55.:37:57.

They only just avoided relegation last season.

:37:58.:37:59.

This season, they are joint-top of the table, after ten games.

:38:00.:38:02.

A poor bit of defending, as St Helens lost the ball.

:38:03.:38:09.

And Salford were in, Michael Dobson receiving this pass

:38:10.:38:11.

to claim his second try of the night.

:38:12.:38:13.

The Red Devils have now won four of their last five matches.

:38:14.:38:16.

World number one Mark Selby is into the quarter-finals

:38:17.:38:19.

The defending champion edged out a tense final-frame decider

:38:20.:38:23.

Judd Trump and Ding Junhui are also through.

:38:24.:38:33.

No Ronnie O'Sullivan, he was knocked out in the early rounds. Great to

:38:34.:38:39.

see Manchester City women doing well. They are benefiting from all

:38:40.:38:44.

that investment, the incredible facilities they have on the site,

:38:45.:38:49.

the success of the men's and women's teams, and as I say, Carli Lloyd,

:38:50.:38:54.

two-time Player of the Year in their ranks, and they are reaping the

:38:55.:38:58.

benefits, into the semifinals of the Champions League. I tell you what,

:38:59.:39:04.

go out there now, so back and relax and put your feet up. You deserve

:39:05.:39:11.

it. Thank you so much for the sport, it is absolutely excellent. A rare

:39:12.:39:14.

moment of being nice to John. If people seem friendlier today,

:39:15.:39:16.

it could be because it is But, just in case you need a little

:39:17.:39:19.

more encouragement to do a good deed, a campaign is being launched

:39:20.:39:24.

with the aim of making The Diana Award charity,

:39:25.:39:27.

set up in memory of Princess Diana, wants to inspire 20,000 acts

:39:28.:39:31.

of kindness during 2017, so we have been asking some

:39:32.:39:33.

of you to share your experiences. Going to the theatre,

:39:34.:39:46.

and obviously there were some chaps wanting

:39:47.:39:49.

coffees and things, I just thought, you know what,

:39:50.:39:53.

for the sake of another ?20 I would rather get

:39:54.:39:57.

them summing to eat. I had a huge pot of coins once,

:39:58.:39:59.

I mean it was massive, I just went to a random

:40:00.:40:03.

homeless person. There was this old lady,

:40:04.:40:06.

she was carrying large luggage. There was a lift, but

:40:07.:40:12.

she couldn't see it. So I carried her bag

:40:13.:40:14.

until she got down the stairs. A homeless person, and he was just

:40:15.:40:17.

sat outside Blackpool North Station. We were getting off the train,

:40:18.:40:21.

and I had a bar of chocolate I am trying to think of the last

:40:22.:40:34.

time I did something that night. I am struggling. I could say ten

:40:35.:40:39.

minutes ago when I made a cup of tea. And yourself a cup of the! --

:40:40.:40:45.

cup of tea. Joining us now from London

:40:46.:40:46.

is Tessy Ojo who is the chief And with us here on the sofa is cafe

:40:47.:40:49.

owner Simon Whitter, who spends much of his time

:40:50.:40:54.

volunteering with vulnerable people. Simon made the headlines, because

:40:55.:41:00.

you made Christmas dinner. Talk us through what you did. The first year

:41:01.:41:03.

we did 170 breakfasts. In the year just gone, we started off to do 300

:41:04.:41:09.

on the day, we ended up doing 1000 across ten events. A thousand people

:41:10.:41:15.

across the city? Yes. And we know how grateful they will be forgetting

:41:16.:41:21.

the kind of service and food that we are showing on the pictures that you

:41:22.:41:25.

filmed, but what do you get back on return from it? What does it make

:41:26.:41:29.

you feel to help people in that way? I don't think it is about getting

:41:30.:41:33.

anything back from it. It is doing it because you can do it. I don't

:41:34.:41:37.

need anything back from it. There are people out there that do

:41:38.:41:39.

actually need... I don't know, support, that little bit of

:41:40.:41:43.

kindness. It is as simple as that, it is kindness. It changes moods, it

:41:44.:41:49.

changes so much about lives. As chief executive of the Diana Award,

:41:50.:41:55.

this is very much Molk on something that the late Princess of Wales

:41:56.:42:00.

spoke about. There is a great quote, carry out a random act of kindness,

:42:01.:42:05.

with no expectation of reward, and the knowledge that someone might do

:42:06.:42:08.

something nice for you. It is picking up on her own words, isn't

:42:09.:42:12.

it? Absolutely, and just like Simon said, giving and receiving a kind

:42:13.:42:18.

act has the Mendis impact on both the giver and the receiver. We know

:42:19.:42:22.

either during or receiving a kind act improves your mental well-being.

:42:23.:42:25.

We know that it also improves your self-esteem. And research shows it

:42:26.:42:33.

helps reduce depression. So just like Princess Diana carried out lots

:42:34.:42:37.

of acts, we know that everyone has value and ever and has the potential

:42:38.:42:41.

to give back. So today is about encouraging us. We want to inspire

:42:42.:42:45.

at least 20,000 people across our country to be kinder. We are pretty

:42:46.:42:53.

kind already, aren't we? We are, actually, because research we also

:42:54.:42:57.

have released today shows that as Brits we are very kind people, but

:42:58.:43:02.

we can do much more. We also know from the research that unfortunately

:43:03.:43:06.

men are less likely to get random acts of kindness so today is really

:43:07.:43:10.

about saying, look, we can do a bit more. There is so much more room.

:43:11.:43:14.

One of the things that we know is that we live increasingly less

:43:15.:43:18.

connected lives. We live increasingly quite insular lives,

:43:19.:43:23.

and today is about saying be a wet, think about the person next to you,

:43:24.:43:27.

think about what servers can you give? You know, Princess Diana was

:43:28.:43:31.

all about service and compassion, and this is the 20th anniversary of

:43:32.:43:35.

her death, and therefore we are saying, if you feel connected to

:43:36.:43:40.

Princess Diana, if you want to walk in her shoes, be that little bit

:43:41.:43:46.

kinder today. But also forever. It is interesting, isn't it? Not just

:43:47.:43:50.

today, also on every other day of the year. Well, you have got to try.

:43:51.:43:55.

Interesting that men are less likely to receive an act of kindness. Is

:43:56.:44:00.

that something you have experienced? Yes and no. I don't think... I mean,

:44:01.:44:05.

I do it because I like doing it, I have never received a random act of

:44:06.:44:10.

kindness, as such. No one has ever given you an act of kindness? No, I

:44:11.:44:16.

don't think so. Despite all your efforts for other people? It is not

:44:17.:44:20.

about me, it is about other people. Today might be the day when that

:44:21.:44:24.

kindness comes back to you. That is the point, it is like a chain

:44:25.:44:28.

letter, if you like, it goes from one person to the next. Absolutely,

:44:29.:44:33.

and sad to hear that Simon has never, so I encourage the public to

:44:34.:44:37.

give Simon an act of kindness today. We are leading incredibly insular

:44:38.:44:41.

lives, and it is about reaching out. We could all be that little bit

:44:42.:44:45.

kinder, so we are encouraging the public, but also do an act of

:44:46.:44:49.

kindness, and we want to register your act of kindness, we want to

:44:50.:44:53.

showcase it at the end of the year and show that Brits are quite cool

:44:54.:44:57.

people and they are also quite kind. Thank you very much indeed, and

:44:58.:45:02.

Simon, I hope this is the day. If you see Simon out on the street,

:45:03.:45:05.

help him, give him something in return after everything he has done.

:45:06.:45:09.

Thank you very much indeed. Lots of you have been in touch, Gena has

:45:10.:45:13.

said yesterday a work colleague was kind and gave me a lift home, I am

:45:14.:45:18.

getting her chocolates to repay the kindness today. And says she was at

:45:19.:45:23.

the doctor 's surgery, and the five door is heavy, difficult to open,

:45:24.:45:28.

and the young lady laptop and open the door for her. It is those things

:45:29.:45:32.

we used to automatically, we didn't have a day for it, but they clearly

:45:33.:45:36.

make a difference, and she says it really her date. And one

:45:37.:45:42.

correspondent said she has a day of kindness on the first day of each

:45:43.:45:46.

month. The rest of the month, not at all!

:45:47.:45:46.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:45:47.:45:48.

The main stories this morning: Patients will have to wait longer

:45:49.:45:51.

for routine operations such as hip and knee replacements

:45:52.:45:53.

in what the Head of the NHS in England says is a trade-off

:45:54.:45:57.

so improvements can be made elsewhere in the system.

:45:58.:45:59.

Details on how the EU plans to negotiate Brexit will be released

:46:00.:46:03.

later today by the president of the European Council,

:46:04.:46:05.

As we look ahead to the weekend, Matt is here to brighten our moods

:46:06.:46:10.

this morning. Aren't you? It's not that bad, I promise! This

:46:11.:46:18.

image from one of our Weather Watchers in south-east Wales sums up

:46:19.:46:22.

the day, some clouds but brightness on the horizon. If you're going out

:46:23.:46:27.

shortly, you may notice that it is incredibly mild, warmest at the

:46:28.:46:30.

moment is Preston in Lancashire, even as far north as Aberdeen we

:46:31.:46:36.

have ten at present. There are some dark clouds around, they have

:46:37.:46:40.

cleared away from the south-west, sunny spells developing over the

:46:41.:46:43.

next few hours. We'll see that into the south-west of Wales, lots of

:46:44.:46:47.

cloud in the rest of Wales, outbreaks to the north, cloud

:46:48.:46:57.

spreading from the Midlands to the south-east, affecting Cumbria,

:46:58.:46:59.

Cumbria especially wet in southern areas, eastern England dry with

:47:00.:47:02.

sunshine, wet in the Isle of Man, Northern Ireland, southern Scotland,

:47:03.:47:05.

it will take a long time view clear that rain from western Scotland. In

:47:06.:47:08.

Northern Ireland the rain should clear by mid-morning. Lorraine

:47:09.:47:11.

clears from north Wales, hitting other parts of northern England

:47:12.:47:16.

until early afternoon -- the rain. A few showers in eastern areas and

:47:17.:47:20.

returning to Northern Ireland, west Wales and Cornwall. For most, the

:47:21.:47:24.

afternoon dry and brighter than this morning, more sunshine around. Not

:47:25.:47:28.

as warm as 22 yesterday but for this stage of the year, 13 to 17 degrees,

:47:29.:47:34.

there should be no complaints. Tonight, the showers we have in the

:47:35.:47:38.

west will develop more widely in western areas, many eastern part of

:47:39.:47:41.

Scotland and eastern England will stay dry. Also tonight, a bit colder

:47:42.:47:46.

than last night, temperatures back into single figures, nowhere unusual

:47:47.:47:51.

for this stage of the year. But into Saturday, we will the showers get

:47:52.:47:54.

going quickly, already in the west are to begin with, developing

:47:55.:47:58.

elsewhere in the UK, you be hard-pressed to completely avoid

:47:59.:48:02.

them, some slow-moving, heavy and thundery, England and Wales

:48:03.:48:06.

especially, but not a washout of a date, some will see more sunshine

:48:07.:48:11.

and showers and in the sunshine, feeling reasonably pleasant. Cooler

:48:12.:48:16.

to take us into Sunday, a ridge of high pressure generally means dry

:48:17.:48:19.

weather and that's the story for Sunday, a fine day for the majority.

:48:20.:48:24.

A few isolated showers, the vast majority will see good sunny spells

:48:25.:48:29.

and highs of around 11 to 16. A bit cooler than it has been recently. As

:48:30.:48:34.

Sally and John have mentioned, some may start your Easter holiday this

:48:35.:48:38.

weekend and if you're heading into Europe, this is what you can expect

:48:39.:48:43.

on Sunday, the driest and sunniest weather in eastern parts, not

:48:44.:48:47.

looking great in Italy, though, Corsica and Sardinia. But if your

:48:48.:48:51.

act of kindness is to take your friendly local weatherman to

:48:52.:48:55.

southern Spain, Portugal, Tenerife or the Canary Islands, I wouldn't

:48:56.:48:57.

object, looking sunny and hot! Any of those would do! And I fit

:48:58.:49:06.

into the overhead locker as well! Get me out of here!

:49:07.:49:07.

Big tax changes are on the way for your car from tomorrow.

:49:08.:49:10.

Its designed to simplify the system, but it could mean many motorists

:49:11.:49:14.

Ben has nipped outside to have a look at the changes.

:49:15.:49:20.

It looks like in this random act of kindness he has got us all a car! I

:49:21.:49:27.

should be doing a game show this morning, I am channelling my inner

:49:28.:49:32.

used-car salesman. Big changes to car tax come into force tomorrow. It

:49:33.:49:39.

is designed to make it more simple but is it? Let's go through some of

:49:40.:49:44.

the details. This only applies to new cars bought from tomorrow, not

:49:45.:49:48.

existing cars or second-hand cars, keep an eye on that.

:49:49.:49:55.

First up, the easiest to remember change is that the annual tax bill

:49:56.:50:01.

Cars emitting zero carbon, electric vehicles,

:50:02.:50:11.

from gas guzzlers to a little run around

:50:12.:50:17.

pay a flat rate of ?140 a year.

:50:18.:50:21.

Shall we just be really kind to Ben and rescue him from that? Sorry,

:50:22.:50:28.

everybody, some technical problems, we might try and see if we can fix

:50:29.:50:33.

them but I know it was all going a bit wrong. We can go from all over

:50:34.:50:38.

the world, pictures from the International Space Station, but

:50:39.:50:41.

outside the front door, having problems this morning. Let's see if

:50:42.:50:45.

we can go back to him. We lost you for a moment but we have got you

:50:46.:50:49.

back. Nothing like shoving a cable out of the window! Jim Holder is

:50:50.:50:54.

with me, explain some of the changes, I was halfway through and

:50:55.:51:01.

we lost the line, it is all designed to make it more simple but it's not

:51:02.:51:05.

quite that simple, is it? The fact you were struggling to explain it

:51:06.:51:09.

shows how complicated it is, we once had a system where you bought a car,

:51:10.:51:13.

you knew what you are going to pay, now you have to pay attention to

:51:14.:51:17.

three things, the first year rate, across 13 different bands, then the

:51:18.:51:22.

supplementary years to-6 rates, a flat ?140 or most beer goals apart

:51:23.:51:26.

from hybrid and electric, then you have to be careful around the

:51:27.:51:38.

?40,000 threshold. -- most vehicles. You get a proper dashboard, but if

:51:39.:51:46.

that takes you over ?40,000 you are liable for a bigger tax bill?

:51:47.:51:49.

Absolutely, the tax will be worked out on the cost of the car plus

:51:50.:51:53.

options, you could take a ?10 option box that puts it over ?40,000 and

:51:54.:51:58.

then you could triple your tax bill, taking it from a few hundred pounds

:51:59.:52:03.

a year to over ?1000 a year so you have to be careful when you are

:52:04.:52:07.

inspecting a car on the cusp of that threshold. Why now? As we're told,

:52:08.:52:14.

it is meant to make it more simple and this only applies to cars that

:52:15.:52:18.

are new, bought from tomorrow, if you want to get in, do it today. You

:52:19.:52:23.

can beat the tax change by doing it today. The government has brought it

:52:24.:52:26.

in because of taxation, they want more money. The cars producing less

:52:27.:52:32.

than 100 g per kilometre of CO2 were free from tax, and around a quarter

:52:33.:52:36.

of all cars were being bought at that rate so they weren't earning

:52:37.:52:39.

enough. They've changed the rules to get more money for the larger

:52:40.:52:43.

vehicles and more expensive vehicles. What happens if you get

:52:44.:52:54.

this wrong? All of the process of the taxation should be automatic but

:52:55.:52:57.

if you have tipped yourself over the edge and bought a ?41,000 car, any

:52:58.:53:01.

comeback? Not really, you're in trouble if you make a mistake. Look

:53:02.:53:05.

at the dealer, they should be able to help and advise but they aren't

:53:06.:53:08.

obliged to, do your own homework, if you make a mistake you're committed

:53:09.:53:13.

to the car and you have to pay the new rate. Always good to see you,

:53:14.:53:16.

Jim Holder. I hope you managed to stay with us through that. It's a

:53:17.:53:20.

bit more complicated than many people would perhaps like. But big

:53:21.:53:24.

changes coming in. Whether you've got a little runaround or a bigger

:53:25.:53:28.

car, big changes in how much tax you pay, those changes come in from

:53:29.:53:32.

tomorrow. More from the later if we can get the line working! Thanks

:53:33.:53:38.

very much. It worked in the end, we persevered and it worked in the end!

:53:39.:53:45.

How do you think we prepare for really big interviews? The Prime

:53:46.:53:48.

Minister or a tough Brexit interview? Some homework? Let's see

:53:49.:53:53.

what David Dimbleby does for Question Time. This is what they

:53:54.:53:57.

make me do to try and get you to watch Question Time, if you like

:53:58.:54:01.

politics you watch Question Time, if you don't then you don't watch it.

:54:02.:54:06.

They are asking you to do it again. Who are? All the people online. Do

:54:07.:54:12.

you want to do it again? Let's do it one more. Look, if you have one shot

:54:13.:54:18.

all one opportunity to seize everything you ever wanted, in one

:54:19.:54:23.

moment, would you capture it or just let it slip? Play! We've triggered

:54:24.:54:36.

Article 50, May's why is nifty, are we going to have to be thrifty with

:54:37.:54:41.

a recession in 2050, rather than doom all gloom, the economy could

:54:42.:54:46.

boom as Fox's thousands of trade deals loom. With terror threats,

:54:47.:54:50.

Merkel frets and will we decide to pay our debts? There's immigration,

:54:51.:54:55.

vexation and questions from the nation, Theresa May's premiership

:54:56.:55:02.

is... What does Britain think, are we on the brink of a bright new dawn

:55:03.:55:09.

or might we sink? Emceed Dimbleby wrapping a bit of Question Time. --

:55:10.:55:17.

MC. Channelling a little bit of Eminem. What his father would think

:55:18.:55:22.

of that! You're watching Breakfast on BBC News. Still to come This

:55:23.:55:28.

Morning programme... It's full steam ahead for the Settle

:55:29.:55:34.

to Carlisle railway as it reopens Our reporter Allison Freeman

:55:35.:55:38.

is on the route for us this morning. We were on the first train to travel

:55:39.:55:46.

along the tracks, the tracks that have been shut for well over a year

:55:47.:55:50.

between Carlisle and Appleby on this iconic line. They have been shut

:55:51.:55:53.

because back in December of 2015 we have the rains and heavy storms, who

:55:54.:55:56.

could forget, which undermined the tracks and caused around 500,000

:55:57.:56:02.

tons of earth to be a landslide and to come away. That has caused

:56:03.:56:06.

Network Rail to carry out what they've described as their biggest

:56:07.:56:11.

repair job ever, its cost them ?23 million to build what has been

:56:12.:56:15.

described to me as an underground viaduct. Later on to celebrate the

:56:16.:56:22.

reopening of the line we're going to see the Flying Scotsman coming along

:56:23.:56:26.

this stretch of track. More on that much

:56:27.:59:45.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay.

:59:46.:00:12.

Longer waits for hospital operations in England as the health

:00:13.:00:15.

service is forced to make a tough "trade-off".

:00:16.:00:18.

The Head of NHS England says treatment is no longer guaranteed

:00:19.:00:20.

in the 18-week target time, but in return there would be

:00:21.:00:25.

quicker cancer diagnosis and emergency care.

:00:26.:00:41.

Good morning, it's Friday, 31st March.

:00:42.:00:44.

As Britain prepares for Brexit, today the EU will set

:00:45.:00:49.

out its guidelines for two years of negotiation.

:00:50.:00:52.

Trying to save the African elephant - we'll hear how they're

:00:53.:00:55.

cared for in Nairobi, and speak to campaigner

:00:56.:00:57.

In sport, Manchester City's women reach the semi-finals

:00:58.:01:15.

of the Champions League, Lucy Bronze with the goal as City

:01:16.:01:18.

reach the last four after a 2-0 aggregate win over Danish

:01:19.:01:21.

The private spaceflight company SpaceX has made history

:01:22.:01:26.

by successfully flying a rocket that has already been to space.

:01:27.:01:32.

Grey skies and rain may greet the day for some of you, but it will be

:01:33.:01:45.

getting better, brighter skies later and a weekend forecast that does

:01:46.:01:48.

contain a fair bit of sunshine as well. Details in the next 15

:01:49.:01:49.

minutes. Patients will have to wait longer

:01:50.:01:52.

for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements,

:01:53.:01:59.

as a "trade-off" for improvements That's according to the Head of NHS

:02:00.:02:03.

England, Simon Stevens, who is today setting out a strategy

:02:04.:02:09.

for the next few years. Our health correspondent

:02:10.:02:11.

Sophie Hutchinson is outside one You have been looking at the plans,

:02:12.:02:21.

the strategy, what does it mean for us as patients?

:02:22.:02:26.

It is two years since the NHS began a five-year transformation plan.

:02:27.:02:30.

This is the progress update, if you like, and the chief executive of the

:02:31.:02:34.

NHS, Simon Stevens, described it as an honest assessment, though he

:02:35.:02:38.

would not go into details about whether he felt the NHS had enough

:02:39.:02:42.

money to carry out the plans. But he did say, given the limited

:02:43.:02:44.

resources, there needed to be some trade-offs, one of those, he said,

:02:45.:03:04.

would be around the 18 week target for non-urgent operations. He said

:03:05.:03:06.

that some patients would wait longer, that is for things like

:03:07.:03:08.

cataracts or hip and knee surgery. In addition, he said the other

:03:09.:03:10.

trade-off would be around GPs, that they would be asked to look at the

:03:11.:03:13.

numbers of patients they were referring to hospitals for

:03:14.:03:15.

treatment, and instead of referring them on to possibly look at other

:03:16.:03:18.

solutions such as physiotherapy instead. He said that was important

:03:19.:03:23.

for them to make progress in other areas, for example to extend GB oh

:03:24.:03:28.

pounds, to speed up cancer diagnosis, and also to make it

:03:29.:03:32.

quicker for patients when they come to A, so he said they were

:03:33.:03:40.

necessary trade-offs to improve the system in other ways. Interest to

:03:41.:03:45.

those, the positive aspects, they have been full of praise but there

:03:46.:03:49.

are concerns about the more negative aspects. The Royal College of

:03:50.:03:52.

Surgeons said it means more patients will make longer and in more pain

:03:53.:03:57.

before surgery, we risk returning to the days of unacceptably long waits

:03:58.:04:03.

for elective treatment. The British Medical Association said achieving

:04:04.:04:07.

one delivery promise only by missing another is a textbook example of

:04:08.:04:11.

rationing access to care. OK, for now, thank you very much

:04:12.:04:13.

indeed. We've been talking about this story

:04:14.:04:16.

all morning, and after 8.30am we'll get the thoughts of Niall Dixon

:04:17.:04:19.

from the NHS Confederation. A group of MPs have said it's

:04:20.:04:22.

"unacceptable" that residents who pay their own fees at care homes

:04:23.:04:26.

in England are charged on average 43% more than those

:04:27.:04:29.

funded by the state. The Communities and Local Government

:04:30.:04:32.

Committee blames a lack of funding, which it says is threatening

:04:33.:04:35.

the viability of adult The Government says it's already

:04:36.:04:37.

given councils an extra ?2 billion. The President of the European

:04:38.:04:46.

Council, Donald Tusk, will issue draft guidelines today

:04:47.:04:54.

setting out how the EU wants The proposals will then be debated

:04:55.:04:56.

by the leaders of the 27 EU member Chris Morris is in Malta, where

:04:57.:05:01.

European Leaders have been meeting. I know Mr Tusk is due to hold a

:05:02.:05:12.

press conference shortly and when we have seen him speak over the last

:05:13.:05:15.

couple of days about Brexit he was actually quite emotional, wasn't he?

:05:16.:05:20.

He was, I suspect we will see a more businesslike persona this morning.

:05:21.:05:26.

He is due to have sent the draft guidelines in the last couple of

:05:27.:05:29.

minutes to the 27 other national capitals, and they will set the tone

:05:30.:05:34.

for the two years of tough negotiations and deal-making ahead.

:05:35.:05:38.

In the next hour he will be coming to the building behind us, the Prime

:05:39.:05:42.

Minister's office in Malta, and he will have a press conference in

:05:43.:05:46.

which some of the details will be released. I understand the

:05:47.:05:49.

guidelines will be six or seven pages, starting with general

:05:50.:05:52.

principles. A lot of them will set out the way the EU thinks the

:05:53.:06:05.

negotiation should be structured, which means starting off with trying

:06:06.:06:07.

to get some agreement on the terms of divorce, and only then moving on

:06:08.:06:10.

to talk about a future trade agreement. The UK wants to talk

:06:11.:06:12.

about trade straightaway because those future trading relationships

:06:13.:06:14.

are absolutely critical, but if the other 27 countries agree with these

:06:15.:06:17.

guidelines it will be difficult for the UK to change their minds. That

:06:18.:06:22.

is one of the big things that has changed this week. Until Theresa May

:06:23.:06:25.

triggered Article 50 on Wednesday, she was in control of the timing and

:06:26.:06:31.

the process. Now a lot of that control passes to Brussels.

:06:32.:06:35.

Chris, thank you very much indeed. That press conference due to happen

:06:36.:06:40.

in the next 35, 40 minutes, we will bring you the latest if anything

:06:41.:06:41.

arises. Scotland's First Minister,

:06:42.:06:44.

Nicola Sturgeon, has written to Theresa May,

:06:45.:06:46.

formally requesting a second Here she is signing the letter,

:06:47.:06:48.

in which she reiterates her call for The Prime Minister has already said

:06:49.:06:53.

it won't happen before There are warnings today

:06:54.:06:59.

of a recruitment crisis if Brexit leads to immigration

:07:00.:07:06.

being severely restricted. In the first major business

:07:07.:07:09.

intervention since Theresa May began the process of Britain's

:07:10.:07:16.

divorce from the EU, the British Hospitality

:07:17.:07:17.

Association has said the industry faces a shortfall of 60,000

:07:18.:07:19.

workers a year. Our industry correspondent

:07:20.:07:21.

John Moylan has more. At Butlins in Bognor Regis,

:07:22.:07:27.

they are gearing up Around 40% of staff here

:07:28.:07:34.

are from outside the UK, and the boss says they'd face

:07:35.:07:37.

a recruitment crisis if Brexit causes that supply

:07:38.:07:39.

of workers to be cut off. If the tap was just turned

:07:40.:07:42.

off, straightaway that We rely on a third of our workplace

:07:43.:07:44.

from European employees. To be able to turn that straight

:07:45.:07:53.

off, and replace it straight off, We're in the hospitality industry,

:07:54.:07:56.

the service industry. You actually have to employ people

:07:57.:07:59.

who like to serve people. Tourism and hospitality accounts

:08:00.:08:03.

for around 10% of the economy. Now, a new report is warning that

:08:04.:08:10.

restrictions on foreign labour could hit it harder

:08:11.:08:13.

than any other sector. The UK's hospitality sector employs

:08:14.:08:15.

around 3 million workers, but it's highly reliant

:08:16.:08:18.

upon overseas staff. 24% of the workforce

:08:19.:08:20.

are EU migrants. It could face a shortfall of 60,000

:08:21.:08:25.

workers a year if immigration The industry wants to reduce

:08:26.:08:27.

its dependence on EU workers. Its new ten-year strategy includes

:08:28.:08:35.

recruiting more unemployed The Government says that,

:08:36.:08:38.

while it will end free movement as it is now,

:08:39.:08:44.

it will design a new immigration system that is in

:08:45.:08:46.

the national interest. President Trump's former

:08:47.:08:53.

National Security Adviser has offered to give evidence

:08:54.:08:56.

about possible links between the Trump campaign

:08:57.:08:58.

and Russia, if he's given protection from what has been called

:08:59.:09:00.

"unfair prosecution". General Michael Flynn was forced

:09:01.:09:02.

to resign in February after he misled the Vice-President

:09:03.:09:05.

over phone conversations he had His lawyer says he "has

:09:06.:09:08.

a story to tell". Australian authorities have

:09:09.:09:34.

ordered 40,000 people to evacuate to higher ground

:09:35.:09:44.

as flash flooding in the aftermath The storm hit Queensland's most

:09:45.:09:47.

populous region on yesterday after pummelling the north-east

:09:48.:09:50.

coast for two days. The state's capital, Brisbane,

:09:51.:09:52.

was hit with 20 centimetres More than 2,000 schools have been

:09:53.:09:54.

forced to close as tens of thousands A Californian company has made

:09:55.:09:58.

history by launching a rocket back Rockets are traditionally used only

:09:59.:10:02.

once, before being scrapped. But SpaceX has developed

:10:03.:10:05.

a way of landing its boosters safely on earth,

:10:06.:10:14.

allowing them to be recycled. It's been described as "one small

:10:15.:10:16.

step for the company, but a giant leap in the search

:10:17.:10:18.

for cheaper space exploration" - You are looking at a rocket

:10:19.:10:21.

with a difference. Unlike the rest, it is fitted

:10:22.:10:24.

with a booster that And now history,

:10:25.:10:27.

as it is successfully Boosters cost tens of millions

:10:28.:10:30.

of dollars, and are normally discarded and destroyed

:10:31.:10:34.

during an ascent. But the private Californian

:10:35.:10:35.

aerospace company SpaceX has found a way to eject them safely

:10:36.:10:37.

back to earth. After the successful launch,

:10:38.:10:40.

another key moment in the flight, to see if the second-hand booster

:10:41.:10:43.

can safely detach and fly back Rapturous cheers from the mission

:10:44.:10:46.

crew tell you it's a success. Minutes later, it's back on earth,

:10:47.:11:01.

an unprecedented double achievement of launching a reusable rocket,

:11:02.:11:03.

and recovering it for This is gonna be, ultimately,

:11:04.:11:06.

a huge revolution in spaceflight. It's the difference

:11:07.:11:11.

between if you had aeroplanes where you threw away an aeroplane

:11:12.:11:13.

after every flight, versus you could reuse

:11:14.:11:15.

them multiple times. It represents a new era in the space

:11:16.:11:20.

race, where private enterprises compete against each other,

:11:21.:11:23.

instead of countries. The success will be a boost

:11:24.:11:28.

for a company with much more ambitious long-term goals,

:11:29.:11:31.

that include sending two unidentified space tourists

:11:32.:11:33.

to the moon next year. They are looking for two space

:11:34.:11:46.

tourists? Shall we do it? Not for me! What about you?

:11:47.:11:51.

I'm busy. We would be terrible!

:11:52.:11:54.

It's estimated there are fewer than half a million

:11:55.:11:56.

elephants left in Africa, and poaching remains the biggest

:11:57.:11:58.

But now, in what's been described by conservationists

:11:59.:12:01.

as a game-changing move, the ivory trade's biggest

:12:02.:12:03.

market, China, is calling a halt to the practice.

:12:04.:12:07.

By the end of today, almost half of the country's

:12:08.:12:17.

government-approved factories and shops dealing

:12:18.:12:24.

with ivory will have closed their doors for good,

:12:25.:12:26.

with a total ban by the end of the year.

:12:27.:12:28.

A global ban on international sales is already in place,

:12:29.:12:31.

but does this go far enough in tackling the problem?

:12:32.:12:33.

Let's get the thoughts of chef Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall,

:12:34.:12:35.

who presented a BBC documentary about the ivory trade,

:12:36.:12:37.

and also Kirsty Smith, who joins us from the David

:12:38.:12:40.

Good morning to you both. Kirsty, I will continue first of all, can you

:12:41.:12:46.

first of all described where you are and the work that goes on with the

:12:47.:12:55.

elephants that are with you now? I'm at the Nairobi nursery of the David

:12:56.:13:01.

Sheldrick wildlife trust in Kenya. You can see some of the elephants

:13:02.:13:05.

behind me, someone whom are victims of poaching, their mothers killed

:13:06.:13:10.

for their ivory. It is a bright sunny day here in Nairobi. Can you

:13:11.:13:16.

tell me what a difference the news from China will make on the ground

:13:17.:13:21.

where you are? It is going to make a colossal difference, China are the

:13:22.:13:25.

biggest importers of ivory and already they're commendable work has

:13:26.:13:29.

made a difference so far. We have seen the price of ivory dropped more

:13:30.:13:34.

than two thirds since 2014, which is brilliant, but it is a step in the

:13:35.:13:38.

right direction but many other countries can now follow suit. Even

:13:39.:13:42.

the UK, who used to be at the forefront of combating wildlife

:13:43.:13:47.

crime, China is at the forefront now and many other countries can learn a

:13:48.:13:49.

lesson from this and take this forward. We will come back to you in

:13:50.:13:55.

a moment, let's just go to Hugh in Bristol, you don't have any

:13:56.:13:59.

elephants behind you under the Clifton suspension Bridge, but you

:14:00.:14:03.

have seen this trade up close for a BBC documentary. Remind us what you

:14:04.:14:09.

uncovered? What we uncovered was the classic route of ivory, one of the

:14:10.:14:12.

biggest problem places in the world at the moment is Mozambique, which

:14:13.:14:17.

is where we started our story. We saw the ivory going up across the

:14:18.:14:22.

border into Tanzania, up to the port of Mombasa. We found out that

:14:23.:14:27.

Mombasa is a pretty Lee Kee port and ivory is regularly getting out of

:14:28.:14:35.

there, often in shipments of tea. Unfortunately the poaching levels

:14:36.:14:39.

are still sky-high right now. What is happening in China is, as we just

:14:40.:14:43.

heard, fantastic news, but it won't be enough on its own. What is needed

:14:44.:14:48.

is concerted global effort and the UK definitely has to play its part

:14:49.:14:52.

in that, and a big part of our investigation was to try and find

:14:53.:14:57.

out what contribution, either knowingly or unwittingly, the UK

:14:58.:15:01.

ivory trade is making to the problem, and unfortunately it is

:15:02.:15:05.

considerable. A lot of UK ivory pieces are being exported to China,

:15:06.:15:14.

other countries in Asia, where the market remains robust. China is

:15:15.:15:16.

great news, but Vietnam and Laos still have robust markets. We have

:15:17.:15:20.

had a promise from the Government now for two election manifestos in a

:15:21.:15:24.

row to shut down the UK ivory trade, we need to see it delivered. It is

:15:25.:15:28.

great in countries where the trade has been so historic and massive

:15:29.:15:32.

they are taking action, but we should not forget we were probably

:15:33.:15:37.

the worst culprits for, between 1860 and 1920 we imported to the UK the

:15:38.:15:43.

ivory of over 1.2 million elephants. But a lot of people will say that is

:15:44.:15:48.

history, that goes back over a century, and we are talking today

:15:49.:15:50.

about maybe antiques being tackled and banned, people asking on social

:15:51.:15:57.

media, is that really relevant in 2017, does it make a difference?

:15:58.:16:03.

Yes, because we know for a fact that many of those antiques are being

:16:04.:16:09.

systematically brought a pencil to Asian dealers and exported. Over

:16:10.:16:16.

2000 people... Pieces of UK ivory arrived in Hong Kong in 2014, border

:16:17.:16:22.

force made 150 seizures last year. One packet destined for China had

:16:23.:16:28.

over 22 kilos of carved ivory pieces from the UK. These UK pieces go to

:16:29.:16:34.

prop up the market in Asia, they perpetuate the desirability of

:16:35.:16:38.

ivory. China has taken an incredible step in the last human is to say we

:16:39.:16:43.

no longer want to value carved ivory as an object, but it is no good just

:16:44.:16:48.

the Asian countries doing it if we will perpetuate the sense in the UK

:16:49.:16:58.

that carved ivory is something to be cherished with real value, something

:16:59.:17:00.

you can sell and profit from. It is absolutely the wrong message

:17:01.:17:03.

globally and we have to step in line. If we want to call ourselves

:17:04.:17:06.

leaders in global conservation, we have to do it. Kirsty, you deal with

:17:07.:17:12.

lots of tourists, what is the prevailing attitude of people who

:17:13.:17:16.

come to your camp about the ivory trade? Most to visit the orphanage

:17:17.:17:21.

are obviously very shocked, but not a lot of people understand the full

:17:22.:17:26.

consequences of it yet. They always come away extremely emotional.

:17:27.:17:31.

Obviously we do our best to put across the message of the damage of

:17:32.:17:36.

the ivory trade on the elephant population, Africa is losing 80

:17:37.:17:43.

elephants a day to poaching. Through our Foster And Often programme we

:17:44.:17:46.

try to spread the word through social media pages, just to put

:17:47.:17:53.

awareness out there and help people to spread the word. -- through our

:17:54.:17:57.

Foster an Orphan programme. People can't believe how many orphans we

:17:58.:18:03.

have, we have rescued 12 this year. Due to poaching and other matters,

:18:04.:18:06.

human wildlife conflict, the drought that Kenya currently faces, the

:18:07.:18:11.

shortage of water. There are many issues to be dealt with. Our boots

:18:12.:18:19.

on the ground, as Hughes said, they are not feeling the effects of this

:18:20.:18:24.

great change yet but we hope to in the future, it is a step in the

:18:25.:18:29.

right direction, but boots on the ground and strict penalties towards

:18:30.:18:32.

poachers and anyone breaking the law in regards to the ivory trade and

:18:33.:18:40.

rhino horn. Kirsty, if you would not mind, could you tilt down your

:18:41.:18:44.

laptop screen and moving to the side so we can see where you are. It is

:18:45.:18:49.

not often that we get a view like this. There we go. That is

:18:50.:18:57.

fantastic. These are with their keepers, they're human family who

:18:58.:19:01.

are now replacing the motherly role that these elephants have lost. Can

:19:02.:19:08.

you see them? Really clearly, that is a fantastic view and done a

:19:09.:19:12.

pretty miserable, grey morning in the UK that is a fantastic site to

:19:13.:19:20.

enjoy and see behind you. We see those lovely pictures, Hugh, I know

:19:21.:19:24.

elephants excite and intrigue everybody. Could you see a time in

:19:25.:19:28.

our lifetime that they could potentially be extinct, is that a

:19:29.:19:34.

realistic threat? Extinct is a very finite and depressing concept. I

:19:35.:19:37.

think there is a real danger that if we do not take action the

:19:38.:19:41.

populations will be tiny pockets scattered in a very few safe zones

:19:42.:19:47.

around Africa. As a truly wild species with its own dynamic on the

:19:48.:19:52.

planet, that is not far off extinct. We are heading in that direction.

:19:53.:19:56.

The replacement birth rate does not make up for poaching and we need to

:19:57.:20:01.

reverse this, we need to do it collectively, a global movement. The

:20:02.:20:06.

UK don't have a great deal to do next step to step up to a pledge

:20:07.:20:11.

that they made some time ago. -- except to step up to. Let's see a

:20:12.:20:15.

turnaround in the fortune of the African elephant. Thank you very

:20:16.:20:21.

much Hugh, and big thank you to Kirsty Smith from the David

:20:22.:20:25.

Sheldrick Wildlife Trust and the baby orphan elephant nursery. Thank

:20:26.:20:31.

you to Kirsty and her guests. They are gorgeous. Thank you. A beautiful

:20:32.:20:36.

sunny morning and blue skies in Nairobi. What is the weekend have in

:20:37.:20:49.

store in the UK, Matt? -- what does? Grey skies and cloudy conditions for

:20:50.:20:53.

many, like here in Aberdeenshire. The temperatures are high for the

:20:54.:20:59.

time of year, about ten in Aberdeenshire, 13 Baha'i in Preston

:21:00.:21:03.

in Lancashire. London is not too far behind. Some rain across some areas.

:21:04.:21:09.

-- 13 is the high in Preston. Lots of gloating North Wales, outbreaks

:21:10.:21:14.

of rain. Light and patchy rain in the Midlands, heading towards

:21:15.:21:17.

eastern England. It will not affect everyone but it will take away some

:21:18.:21:23.

of the sunshine. Wet in Cumbria and the Isle of Man, in the next few

:21:24.:21:26.

hours the rain should clear away for Fermanagh in the south-west of

:21:27.:21:31.

Northern Ireland. It has been very wet in Northern Ireland. In Scotland

:21:32.:21:35.

are just turns wetter, rain heavily foremost through the morning, dry in

:21:36.:21:40.

the north-east corner. It will linger across the Hebrides, the

:21:41.:21:43.

Highlands into the afternoon. Parts of Scotland will brighten up, most

:21:44.:21:48.

places see sunny spells for a time. Isolated showers in eastern England,

:21:49.:21:53.

showers in the afternoon, returning to Northern Ireland after dry

:21:54.:21:57.

spells. Not quite as warm as yesterday but highs of 13 to 17,

:21:58.:22:01.

pleasant enough for the time of year. It should be a fine evening

:22:02.:22:05.

across many eastern areas but tonight the shallots become more

:22:06.:22:09.

abundant in the West, some of those a little heavy. Compared to recent

:22:10.:22:18.

nights, a bit cooler. Some sunshine on Saturday Times, eastern areas and

:22:19.:22:24.

elsewhere. We will see Shell is developing quite widely, some

:22:25.:22:28.

slow-moving, heavier century. Typical April showers for the

:22:29.:22:31.

Newman. The showers Arts-Loi was moving across the heart of England

:22:32.:22:34.

and Wales, here they last the longest. The sunshine is still

:22:35.:22:42.

pleasant at 13 to 16 degrees. A ridge of high pressure builds, we

:22:43.:22:47.

move off the showers and brings cool conditions to start Sunday. For

:22:48.:22:51.

most, Sunday should be dry with sunny spells and feeling pleasant

:22:52.:22:55.

enough, even if a bit cooler than of late. With the start of the Easter

:22:56.:23:00.

holidays for some, not all, some of you may be heading further revealed.

:23:01.:23:05.

Looking great in the Canaries, Dubai and parts of Mexico. New York much

:23:06.:23:09.

like ourselves, we are probably a bit warmer.

:23:10.:23:13.

I wish you would stop doing that, it is not helping our mood!

:23:14.:23:20.

Never mind the weather, do you like a steam train? We will be talking

:23:21.:23:28.

about the most incredible railway across the Yorkshire Dales and the

:23:29.:23:29.

Cumbrian fells. to Carlisle railway line was forced

:23:30.:23:34.

to halt journeys on its tracks more than a year ago due

:23:35.:23:39.

to a 500,000 tonne landslide. Network Rail has described it as one

:23:40.:23:41.

of the biggest repair challenges And today, after much anticipation,

:23:42.:23:44.

the line has reopened. Our reporter Alison Freeman boarded

:23:45.:23:47.

the inaugural service at 5:50 this morning,

:23:48.:23:50.

and joins us now from On time or not? We were on time, the

:23:51.:24:00.

second train to come along it, about an hour or so ago, also one time.

:24:01.:24:08.

Things are going well. -- also on time. This is an iconic track which

:24:09.:24:13.

takes in the beautiful Eden Valley in Cumbria, travelling through to

:24:14.:24:17.

North Yorkshire over the Ribblehead viaduct, people will surely

:24:18.:24:21.

recognise it, its iconic arches. Last month it had a tornado travel

:24:22.:24:26.

across it just in preparation for the fact that this day was coming,

:24:27.:24:30.

the Carlisle to Settle line was going to fully reopen once again

:24:31.:24:37.

after a year or so of closure. Back in December 2015 we had all the

:24:38.:24:42.

heavy rain, those terrible storms. The railway line was yet another

:24:43.:24:46.

casualty. Around half 1 million tonnes of earth was part of

:24:47.:24:51.

landslides beneath the line. Network Rail had a mammoth task of trying to

:24:52.:24:56.

repair that. They have created what has been described to me as an

:24:57.:25:01.

underground viaduct it. Concrete pillars which will keep the railway

:25:02.:25:06.

line standing even if the rest of it falls away. We have some 23 -- it

:25:07.:25:12.

cost ?23 million. But today everybody got back on the first

:25:13.:25:17.

train at 5:50am, I chatted to some of the excited passengers.

:25:18.:25:23.

Apart from the ungodly hour, it is really quite exciting because, for

:25:24.:25:26.

the first time in 13 months, we have a direct train from Carlisle through

:25:27.:25:33.

to Leeds. It is a great engineering feats and I wanted to be on the

:25:34.:25:38.

first train that passes over this structure.

:25:39.:25:41.

I was on one of the trains on the last day of August in 1970, so I

:25:42.:25:49.

felt it was appropriate to be at the reopening. It is the most

:25:50.:25:54.

spectacular train ride in England. I like railways anyway but it is an

:25:55.:25:58.

historic roots, an iconic route and it is nice to let last see the

:25:59.:26:06.

railway line reopened. As part of the celebrations there

:26:07.:26:10.

will be a very special visitor today, it will be the Flying

:26:11.:26:13.

Scotsman travelling at around lunchtime. A little train fact, do

:26:14.:26:18.

you see those pump on the left? That would be used to develop the

:26:19.:26:22.

Scotsman's water supplies if it was travelling on that side of the

:26:23.:26:28.

trucks -- would be used to fill up. For people living in the area it is

:26:29.:26:32.

fantastic for them that they will get this line back onto the first

:26:33.:26:38.

time in over 30 months. Alison, it looks beautiful.

:26:39.:26:41.

Lucky Allison. 13 months is a long time to wait for a train, I think I

:26:42.:26:44.

have done that in the past. More news on the BBC News Channel

:26:45.:26:52.

through the morning. All the weather and sports coming up and

:26:53.:26:56.

developments from Europe on Eno negotiations. But first the news,

:26:57.:26:57.

travel and weather where you are. will be back just after 9am, for

:26:58.:30:18.

now, Sally and John, see you soon. Hello this is Breakfast,

:30:19.:30:29.

with Sally Nugent and Jon Kay. waiting times will be longer

:30:30.:30:39.

for routine operations, such as hip and knee replacements,

:30:40.:30:42.

as a "trade off" for improvements That's according to NHS England,

:30:43.:30:45.

which will today set out The body says increasing patient

:30:46.:30:50.

demand and the growth in new treatments mean choices have

:30:51.:30:53.

to be made. Clare Marx from the Royal College

:30:54.:30:56.

of Surgeons of England told Breakfast the changes will be

:30:57.:30:58.

a wake-up call to the public. People are going to have to realise

:30:59.:31:06.

that they will have to take more care of themselves, there are things

:31:07.:31:10.

that people can do to try to prevent the need for heart surgery, like not

:31:11.:31:17.

smoking, not being overweight. Unless people are willing to take a

:31:18.:31:20.

more active part in their own care, that will present us with an

:31:21.:31:24.

increasing string of people wanting to have this sort of surgery.

:31:25.:31:29.

A group of MPs have said it's "unacceptable" that residents

:31:30.:31:31.

who pay their own fees at care homes in England are charged on average 43

:31:32.:31:35.

per cent more than those funded by the state.

:31:36.:31:37.

The Communities and Local Government Committee

:31:38.:31:39.

blames a lack of funding, which it says is threatening

:31:40.:31:42.

the viability of adult social care providers.

:31:43.:31:43.

The government says it's already given councils

:31:44.:31:45.

The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk, will today

:31:46.:32:03.

issue draft guidelines on how the EU intends to negotiate Brexit. The

:32:04.:32:06.

proposals will be sent to the governments of the 27 member states

:32:07.:32:09.

and will help set the tone for the next two years of talks. It's

:32:10.:32:11.

thought Mr Tusk will try to break negotiations down into three phases

:32:12.:32:14.

- the terms of separation, a future trade partnership and the transition

:32:15.:32:16.

to a new relationship between Britain and the EU. A couple of

:32:17.:32:26.

lines from that right now, there will be an orderly withdrawal, the

:32:27.:32:30.

leaders will decide when sufficient progress has been achieved to allow

:32:31.:32:34.

negotiations to proceed to the next stage. Theresa May has said that she

:32:35.:32:38.

wanted to deal with both things at the same time, separation and new

:32:39.:32:42.

relationship, the EU is saying you have to deal with separation first

:32:43.:32:44.

and then move on. Interesting. Scotland's First Minister,

:32:45.:32:47.

Nicola Sturgeon, has written to Theresa May,

:32:48.:32:49.

formally requesting a second Here she is signing the letter, in

:32:50.:32:56.

which she reiterates her call for a vote within the next two years. The

:32:57.:32:58.

Prime Minister has already said it won't happen before Brexit is

:32:59.:32:59.

complete. Hotels, restaurants and tourist

:33:00.:33:03.

attractions have warned ministers of the possible consequences

:33:04.:33:05.

of restricting the movement The British Hospitality Association

:33:06.:33:07.

predicts a shortfall of sixty thousand workers a year

:33:08.:33:09.

if immigration is The government says it will design

:33:10.:33:11.

a new immigration system President Trump's former

:33:12.:33:15.

National Security Adviser has offered to give evidence

:33:16.:33:28.

about possible links between the Trump campaign

:33:29.:33:31.

and Russia, if he's given protection

:33:32.:33:32.

from what has been called General Michael Flynn was forced

:33:33.:33:34.

to resign in February after he misled the Vice-President

:33:35.:33:39.

over phone conversations he had His lawyer says he "has

:33:40.:33:41.

a story to tell." Israel has announced it's to build

:33:42.:33:57.

the first new settlement in the occupied West Bank in more than

:33:58.:34:00.

twenty years. -- 20 years. Palestinian officials have condemned

:34:01.:34:02.

the plan and have called for international intervention.

:34:03.:34:14.

China will close almost half of its official ivory carving factories and

:34:15.:34:18.

shops today, with the rest due to close by the end of the year. The

:34:19.:34:20.

news has been welcomed by conservationists in their ongoing

:34:21.:34:22.

battle against the illegal trade in ivory. Despite a global ban on

:34:23.:34:24.

international sales, a surge in demand has resulted in the deaths of

:34:25.:34:27.

tens of thousands of African elephants in recent years.

:34:28.:34:33.

In the last hour the government has announced it's raised over 11

:34:34.:34:37.

billion pounds from the sale of mortgage loans bought during the

:34:38.:34:37.

financial crisis. The mortgages were originally issued

:34:38.:34:42.

by Bradford Bingley, a buy-to-let provider,

:34:43.:34:44.

which had to be bailed out by the government

:34:45.:34:46.

during the financial crisis. The Treasury said the insurer

:34:47.:34:48.

Prudential and buyout firm, Australian authorities have ordered

:34:49.:34:54.

40 thousand people to evacuate to higher ground - as flash flooding in

:34:55.:34:56.

the aftermath of Cyclone Debbie worsens.

:34:57.:35:03.

These pictures show one of the worst hit areas

:35:04.:35:06.

Yesterday, 20 cm of rain fell in just two hours

:35:07.:35:13.

More than 2,000 schools have been forced to close and tens

:35:14.:35:17.

of thousands of people remain without power.

:35:18.:35:19.

What you do with an old rocket? Sell it? We cycle it? Use it again! A

:35:20.:35:27.

California company has made history by launching a rocket back into

:35:28.:35:30.

space. Rockets are traditionally used only once before being

:35:31.:35:32.

scrapped, but SpaceX has developed a way of landing its boosters safely

:35:33.:35:35.

on Earth - allowing them to be recycled.

:35:36.:35:40.

Ultimately, this will be a huge revolution. Difference between if

:35:41.:35:46.

you have aeroplanes where you threw away an aeroplane after every

:35:47.:35:49.

flight, versus using them multiple times. It makes perfect sense.

:35:50.:35:59.

Cheaper all-round, I suppose cheaper is relative, when it comes to space

:36:00.:36:01.

travel! LAUGHTER Coming up here on

:36:02.:36:07.

Breakfast this morning. Ben will be on our makeshift

:36:08.:36:09.

Breakfast forecourt this morning as he investigates the link

:36:10.:36:11.

between carbon Would you buy a used

:36:12.:36:13.

car from that man? LAUGHTER

:36:14.:36:22.

Harmless person, he was sitting outside Blackpool North station, and

:36:23.:36:25.

we helped him as best we could. We're told a good deed

:36:26.:36:29.

is it's own reward, so why the need for a campaign to make

:36:30.:36:32.

the country kinder? We'll find out in around

:36:33.:36:34.

ten minutes' time. And before the end of the programme,

:36:35.:36:36.

we'll travel into the future, As we meet John Higgins,

:36:37.:36:39.

the man behind one of the most For anyone who does not know, that

:36:40.:36:47.

is... Judge Dredd. We would talking this morning about 2000 AD and how

:36:48.:36:51.

that seems rather retro! No longer in the future. Growing up, it was

:36:52.:36:55.

like an idea of the impossible to reach. Showing my age.

:36:56.:36:57.

Manchester City's ladies team. They are flying, into the semifinals of

:36:58.:37:08.

the Champions League, and it just goes to show, they are reaping the

:37:09.:37:11.

benefits come huge amount of investment has gone on there, not

:37:12.:37:15.

only the men's team, the facilities they have at the training base, but

:37:16.:37:19.

on the field as well, the women's team. Fantastic squad. The thing

:37:20.:37:27.

they have done... They have the luxury of cash, but they do have a

:37:28.:37:30.

proper stadium for people to go and watch them in, it is a great

:37:31.:37:35.

experience to go, young kids can go, families can go. They are into the

:37:36.:37:45.

semifinals of the Champions League, this is how they did it, the only

:37:46.:37:52.

goal scored by Lucy Bronze, 1-0, the Final Score, against the Danish

:37:53.:37:58.

side, Carli Lloyd grabbed the first goal in the first leg. Tough match

:37:59.:38:02.

to come, they face the holders, Lyon. The Stoke City striker Saido

:38:03.:38:13.

Berahino says the reason he failed a drugs test earlier this season, was

:38:14.:38:16.

because his drink was spiked in a club. He served an eight week ban

:38:17.:38:18.

whilst still with his former team West Brom. He said there was such a

:38:19.:38:22.

small amount found in his system, it proves he couldn't have taken the

:38:23.:38:23.

drug intentionally. For me to get banned for something

:38:24.:38:31.

that I really have not done is hard to take. So, it was spiked? Yes,

:38:32.:38:36.

definitely, if I was going to get high, like they said, you would have

:38:37.:38:39.

taken an amount where you want to get high. The numbers would have

:38:40.:38:44.

been higher, that they found in my system. It was really low. Why would

:38:45.:38:49.

you want to take something and not get a bus from it? That was the

:38:50.:38:54.

question. But because I am in The Premier League Show the FA have to

:38:55.:38:57.

have zero tolerance. -- have to. And you can watch the the full

:38:58.:39:09.

interview on Football Focus on BBC One on Saturday from 12:00. What a

:39:10.:39:12.

run Joanna Konta's on. She became the first British woman to reach the

:39:13.:39:14.

Miami Open final last night. Amazing to think, Konta was just six

:39:15.:39:25.

years old when Williams first won Konta's always said that she's

:39:26.:39:29.

a player she admires, but there was no room for sentiment

:39:30.:39:32.

out on court as the british number -- was not able to settle it first

:39:33.:39:42.

time around but second time around was able to, I am so pleased to be a

:39:43.:39:46.

part of the last day of the tournament. And England's Charley

:39:47.:39:50.

Hull is going well in the first women's golf major of the year - the

:39:51.:39:52.

ANA Inspiration in California - she's three shots off the lead. Shot

:39:53.:39:55.

of the day though went to the South Korean teenage amateur Seong

:39:56.:39:58.

Eun-jeong. She made a hole in one at the fifth.. All 182 yards, dropping

:39:59.:40:07.

straight in. When you are producing shots like that, you know that your

:40:08.:40:12.

luck is in! Cannot believe it. It is a rare thing. Cannot all be

:40:13.:40:18.

multitalented. Just imagine. Some time sitting on the sofa, too many

:40:19.:40:22.

talented people, people walk in and you think, harsh! I need to be

:40:23.:40:28.

trying a bit harder. Talking of which, we have another one. We do

:40:29.:40:32.

mean you, Andrew! We will explain why Andrew is joining us.

:40:33.:40:38.

It's as quintessentially British as the Queen or a nice cup of tea. And

:40:39.:40:48.

this weekend the Boat Race between Oxford and Cambridge universities

:40:49.:40:50.

returns to the Thames. On Sunday, crowds will cram along the rivers'

:40:51.:40:53.

banks, for the 163rd clash of the academic titans. Let's speak to

:40:54.:40:55.

Andrew Triggs Hodge who's an Olympic gold medallist and former member of

:40:56.:40:57.

the Oxford team. Do you love this weekend, the boat race? We get is a

:40:58.:41:02.

rowing in one of the best forms across the world, we have the

:41:03.:41:05.

Olympics, we see that once every four years, I've every year, we have

:41:06.:41:10.

the boat race. 15 million people watch it and it is bonkers, why do

:41:11.:41:14.

people do it? They come back in droves every year, lining the banks,

:41:15.:41:18.

it produces an amazing atmosphere. What is it like to be involved in?

:41:19.:41:23.

To row it is unique, nothing else like it, normally you are on

:41:24.:41:29.

courses, straight to UK, no avenue to get close together, no clashing,

:41:30.:41:38.

and... It is on a river, winding, a lot more going on. The crowds on the

:41:39.:41:42.

banks, all the way down, absolutely phenomenal. We train, very focused

:41:43.:41:49.

for the six months beforehand, absolutely committed to beating the

:41:50.:41:54.

opposite crew. And when you cross the line like that, it is... There

:41:55.:41:58.

is a release of a lot of passion, a lot of effort has gone into that,

:41:59.:42:03.

but the camaraderie, in the boat, walking down the boat there, you can

:42:04.:42:07.

see, absolutely, I am still best friends with those eight guys. What

:42:08.:42:11.

that boat has given me in my life is something I will never forget and I

:42:12.:42:16.

am very honoured to be part of that. You can see that from the pictures.

:42:17.:42:21.

How does that compare in the list of achievements, three gold medals that

:42:22.:42:23.

you have one at the Olympic Games, winning the boat race, where would

:42:24.:42:27.

that rank alongside those achievements? It is a difficult

:42:28.:42:33.

question to answer, for the Olympics, you put in four years and

:42:34.:42:37.

it is hard. It is a full-time employment, engagement, you

:42:38.:42:43.

sacrifice so much to do it. And then to get to the Olympics, to show at

:42:44.:42:48.

your absolute peak, physical peak, technical peak, mental peak, to

:42:49.:42:53.

produce that on Monday, it is an incredible achievement. A great

:42:54.:43:00.

position to be in. For the boat race, you give equally but it is

:43:01.:43:03.

only those six months. However, the feeling is no less... Is no less, to

:43:04.:43:10.

cross a line, to be part of the group, the bonds that you form,

:43:11.:43:14.

something really special. One of the reasons I am proud to be a roller

:43:15.:43:17.

and recommend running to people because of what it does give people.

:43:18.:43:22.

-- proud to be a rower. London, 2012, you went to Rio as well,

:43:23.:43:27.

having said that you did not fancy it. What happened there? I did not

:43:28.:43:33.

have anything better to do(!) LAUGHTER

:43:34.:43:36.

Well, I decided to carry on after London, London was a fantastic four

:43:37.:43:41.

years up to that point, it was tough, I decided to carry on because

:43:42.:43:47.

I thought, still an opportunity. Tough four years getting to Rio de

:43:48.:43:51.

Janeiro, had to take a year off with glandular fever and the year before,

:43:52.:43:56.

leading up to Rio, the question mark hanging over every

:43:57.:44:06.

everything, the boat was phenomenal, I cannot describe the feeling of

:44:07.:44:11.

being a length up at halfway, watching the rest of the field at

:44:12.:44:15.

the Olympic Games... I am lost for words. It was incredible. You

:44:16.:44:19.

mention your health, one of the things you have spoken about is you

:44:20.:44:22.

wonder what damage you have done to your body over the years. You do,

:44:23.:44:27.

anything to access is bad for you... This is excess. Prolonged access,

:44:28.:44:34.

yes. This is not normal. In the same vein, if you are working in a

:44:35.:44:37.

high-powered job and you cause yourself a lot of mental stress,

:44:38.:44:41.

physical stress, same with full-time athletes. You have got to be aware

:44:42.:44:46.

that when you go into something so hard, you have to take care of

:44:47.:44:50.

yourself. That is part of my decision, I am 37, two great kids,

:44:51.:44:55.

wonderful wife at home, also a doctor with her own life, and, you

:44:56.:45:02.

know, you have to take these things in measured. Now, Rio is done,

:45:03.:45:05.

looking forward to the future. Hopefully, repair some of that

:45:06.:45:09.

wonderful damage I have done to my body. Do you think that rowing has

:45:10.:45:13.

done enough to retain the big names, the key individuals? Looking at

:45:14.:45:18.

Brazil, we know that some people have already, in their mid-20s, top

:45:19.:45:22.

runners, have retired and walked away from the sport, do you think

:45:23.:45:28.

there needs to be more to retain the big names? British rowing is doing a

:45:29.:45:31.

lot to orient itself around making it more of a sustainable sport, it

:45:32.:45:37.

struggles with a number of things, perception... There is more state

:45:38.:45:42.

schools getting involved in rowing. The team has got more state school

:45:43.:45:47.

kids than private school kids. But still, you know, we have two survive

:45:48.:45:51.

off the notoriety and the success that the sport brings, which is

:45:52.:45:55.

fabulous for the country. I think that our sport needs to understand

:45:56.:46:00.

the difference between an amateur sport and a professional sport, they

:46:01.:46:05.

are getting there. We have a management team in place, they are

:46:06.:46:08.

trying really hard. Hopefully they will learn the lessons. And make

:46:09.:46:13.

this board kind of what the boat race does on an annual basis and

:46:14.:46:16.

what it can achieve on a more national basis for the World

:46:17.:46:17.

Championships. Do you want to know what the weather

:46:18.:46:27.

is going to be like? For sure. Not desperately windy but there will

:46:28.:46:40.

be some showers towards the London area and you could get gust of wind.

:46:41.:46:46.

Not as bad as it has been through recent years. A bit of rain around.

:46:47.:46:51.

Starting great but blue skies coming through. Wherever you are it is

:46:52.:46:59.

mild. Temperatures 13 degrees in some parts. North-west England one

:47:00.:47:04.

of the warmest places at the moment. Wet weather here for some. After the

:47:05.:47:10.

overnight rain across south-west England, South Wales have sunny

:47:11.:47:13.

spells developing. Coming into the Midlands and southern England.

:47:14.:47:18.

Patchy rain after a bright start towards eastern England but wait

:47:19.:47:20.

across North Wales and that will clear by mid-morning. It may be the

:47:21.:47:25.

end of the morning before the start of face seasonings turned riot in

:47:26.:47:29.

the north of England. Drier in Northern Ireland after a wet day so

:47:30.:47:34.

far. Further rain in Scotland. It has been wet in the west. That

:47:35.:47:39.

spreads to other parts through this morning and will linger across the

:47:40.:47:43.

Hebrides, Caithness, Orkney and Shetland. Lunchtime will be sunny

:47:44.:47:50.

for Northern Ireland. Showers returning across western Wales and

:47:51.:47:56.

Cornwall. Eastern Wales, England, southern Scotland, a fine afternoon

:47:57.:47:59.

with sunny spells. Not as warm as yesterday. 13 degrees not to

:48:00.:48:05.

complain about. Showers will continue on and off in the west.

:48:06.:48:11.

Eastern areas will stay dry. Tonight, cooler. Not desperately

:48:12.:48:15.

chilly but temperatures into single figures together is a fresh start on

:48:16.:48:19.

Saturday and the weekend. There will be showers in the west initially and

:48:20.:48:24.

they will become widespread through the day, some heavy and punditry.

:48:25.:48:28.

Slowest moving across England and Wales. A showery day. Some people

:48:29.:48:40.

will avoid them altogether. Still pleasant enough where you get the

:48:41.:48:44.

sunshine. Saturday into Sunday the showers fade away. A dry day on

:48:45.:48:52.

Sunday. Sunday is the driest and brightest day of the weekend. After

:48:53.:48:58.

a chilly start some good spells of sunshine and temperatures 11-16. If

:48:59.:49:02.

you are starting your Easter break this weekend, the good news is next

:49:03.:49:07.

week, apart from rain in northern and western areas on Monday, the

:49:08.:49:12.

week is looking dry. Carol is back on Monday. Have a good weekend.

:49:13.:49:22.

The President of the European Council, Donald Tusk,

:49:23.:49:24.

will issue draft guidelines this morning setting out how the EU wants

:49:25.:49:27.

Donald Tusk is speaking there this morning. I believe you have the

:49:28.:49:40.

guidelines in your hand. On my phone. They were sent about three

:49:41.:49:44.

quarters of an hour ago to the capital of the 27 other member

:49:45.:49:48.

states and this is the draft negotiating guidelines which will

:49:49.:49:53.

set out the tone for two years of negotiation to come. It sets out

:49:54.:49:58.

core principles and emphasises the UK is still a member of the European

:49:59.:50:02.

Union for the next two years and has rights as well as obligations. One

:50:03.:50:08.

sentence, preserving the integrity of the single market excludes

:50:09.:50:10.

participation based on a sector by sector approach, which means that

:50:11.:50:15.

one idea that have been floated by members of the government in the

:50:16.:50:20.

past, perhaps the car industry could stay in the single market while

:50:21.:50:23.

other bets leave, this document rules that out pretty explicitly. It

:50:24.:50:30.

says a non-member of the European Union does not enjoy the same

:50:31.:50:36.

benefits as a member. Most of the document talks about a phased

:50:37.:50:41.

approach to negotiations. The EU is insisting the first phase has to be

:50:42.:50:45.

about the terms of separation, the divorce. Only when they are

:50:46.:50:48.

convinced that sufficient progress has been made on that, it does not

:50:49.:50:53.

set out what that might be, only then is the EU prepared to move on

:50:54.:50:59.

to discuss issues like a future trading relationship. It talks about

:51:00.:51:03.

a potential third phase, talks about a transition from now, so

:51:04.:51:07.

membership, to a different relationship in the future. This

:51:08.:51:12.

reminds us that until article 50 was triggered Theresa May had their

:51:13.:51:17.

timing in her hands and now it rests with the European Council and the

:51:18.:51:21.

heads of the other 27 governments. Well done for gathering all that and

:51:22.:51:31.

explaining it to us so clearly. Donald Tusk goes on to say that

:51:32.:51:37.

Michael what he goes on say will be on the news channel.

:51:38.:51:42.

More on our top story now as the head of the NHS in England

:51:43.:51:45.

says patients will have to wait longer for some hospital

:51:46.:51:48.

operations, as a "trade off" for improvements in other areas

:51:49.:51:50.

Waiting time targets for things like knee and hip surgery will be

:51:51.:52:04.

scrapped and GPs are being asked to cut back on the number

:52:05.:52:07.

of patients they refer to hospital, so more money can be spent on A

:52:08.:52:10.

With us in the studio is the Chief Executive

:52:11.:52:14.

for the NHS Confederation, Niall Dixon.

:52:15.:52:16.

And Dr Aisha Awan, who is a GP based in Manchester.

:52:17.:52:16.

If you are waiting for a knee operation or something like that

:52:17.:52:19.

what difference could this potentially mean for you? It could

:52:20.:52:23.

mean you have to wait a little longer. It is worth remembering that

:52:24.:52:29.

17 years ago people used to have to wait 18 months and longer, not 18

:52:30.:52:33.

weeks, so enormous progress has been made by members on the NHS over that

:52:34.:52:40.

period of time. We are going back. There was a lot of money going into

:52:41.:52:44.

the health service in those days and there is less money going in at the

:52:45.:52:48.

moment. Inevitably something has to give. It is no use NHS single and

:52:49.:52:54.

saying we should be doing this or that, they have had to acknowledge

:52:55.:53:00.

the NHS cannot do everything and it was inevitable that some performance

:53:01.:53:04.

targets on another was going to have to give because you cannot say to

:53:05.:53:07.

people keep working hard, we are not going to give you the money, the

:53:08.:53:12.

rising demand is unprecedented what the services having to deal with.

:53:13.:53:16.

The government would say there is more money going in, it is just

:53:17.:53:21.

having to do more. NHS England are acknowledge is the health service

:53:22.:53:23.

has gone through a period of austerity. They may say that is

:53:24.:53:29.

justifiable alongside other public services but the difference in the

:53:30.:53:33.

health service is the levels of demand people are having to deal

:53:34.:53:38.

with, particularly the number of elderly people having not just

:53:39.:53:42.

healthy extra life years but also unhealthy extra life years and this

:53:43.:53:46.

is what doctors are having to deal with on a daily basis. GPs are being

:53:47.:53:53.

asked to cut back on the number of patients being referred. What does

:53:54.:53:58.

that mean in practical terms? Patients are not going to like it.

:53:59.:54:02.

We are running and national illness service. Doctors and nurses on the

:54:03.:54:07.

back foot trying to deal with massive demand and doing reactionary

:54:08.:54:10.

medicine rather than preventative care. It has come on the back of

:54:11.:54:18.

this document five year forward fear for the NHS and we are two years

:54:19.:54:23.

through that the vision is that all of these people unnecessarily going

:54:24.:54:28.

to see GPs are taking care of in the right place in a timely manner by

:54:29.:54:32.

the person most appropriate to see them. For example, somebody is

:54:33.:54:37.

playing football and goes to A at 6:30pm because they think their GP

:54:38.:54:42.

is closed, they have walked in, not in a huge amount of pain, beige or

:54:43.:54:49.

not have gone to A That person in the future would be able to call up

:54:50.:54:55.

their GP and see a physio. It's part of the problem people's

:54:56.:55:00.

expectations? The Royal College of Surgeons saying we are going to have

:55:01.:55:03.

to take more responsibility for our health and look at people who smoke,

:55:04.:55:08.

people who are obese perhaps, and they are going to be told to do

:55:09.:55:11.

something proactively about their health. Yes. There's an element of

:55:12.:55:17.

that. The way in which services have to change, doing more things in the

:55:18.:55:25.

community and changing the way that those services are delivered, is

:55:26.:55:27.

essentially the way forward. That means we are seeing two people who

:55:28.:55:33.

are suffering long-term conditions that they have to manage their care

:55:34.:55:38.

and they are often the expert more than the doctor in their individual

:55:39.:55:43.

care. The big challenge for the health service is how to move from a

:55:44.:55:47.

system that was designed in the 20th-century for a different set of

:55:48.:55:51.

patients to adapt to this new set of patients who need managing in the

:55:52.:55:55.

community, and doing that while money is tight and the pressure is

:55:56.:56:01.

heavy in the hospital sector. Do you think you're going to have to have

:56:02.:56:05.

frank conversations with your patience and say in the past you

:56:06.:56:08.

would have had the surgery but you cannot know because the money is

:56:09.:56:14.

going towards A and cancer diagnoses? Is that a realistic frank

:56:15.:56:18.

conversation Asians are going to have to get used to? We have been

:56:19.:56:26.

having those conversations for years -- patients. We will not know where

:56:27.:56:31.

that money is going. We will be seeing you will have to wait longer

:56:32.:56:34.

and that will put additional strain on practice. Those limited GP

:56:35.:56:40.

appointments we have will be used by those people coming in because they

:56:41.:56:45.

have an increased amount of pain and having social care problems which is

:56:46.:56:48.

another area of massive underfunding. We are in a

:56:49.:56:53.

transformative stage trying to shake the NHS for the future but trying to

:56:54.:56:59.

do it alongside the situation where demand is outstripping resources. It

:57:00.:57:03.

is a difficult time. We have to balance those two agendas. Is the

:57:04.:57:09.

NHS being reshaped for the future? It is happening. We have to be

:57:10.:57:13.

careful about not raising expectations about how quickly this

:57:14.:57:20.

can happen. What is being demanded. Organisations have to stop thinking

:57:21.:57:23.

like an organisation and start thinking about the whole system.

:57:24.:57:27.

Divisions between general practice and hospitals have to be mended and

:57:28.:57:33.

we have to start redesigning caso it is the patient and how the patient

:57:34.:57:38.

moves through the system. The system is very fragmented between local

:57:39.:57:43.

authorities and the NHS, hospitals and community, GPs and hospital

:57:44.:57:47.

doctors. These breaks in the system need to be mended. To NHS single's

:57:48.:57:53.

said that is what they are attempting to do. We as patients

:57:54.:57:58.

have higher expectations than ever as it is becoming more difficult to

:57:59.:58:04.

deliverables. Absolutely. Patient expectation is something we have to

:58:05.:58:08.

manage. Everybody has a deep love of the NHS and people do want it to

:58:09.:58:14.

succeed. People understand sometimes they have to wait and on the hole

:58:15.:58:18.

they will be OK and Corp. For the time being. They do not want this to

:58:19.:58:25.

be the direction of travel for the next ten, 15, 20 years. Thank you.

:58:26.:58:34.

From April 1st, those buying a new car will pay a new vehicle tax

:58:35.:58:37.

and although it only has three simple bands, many motorists

:58:38.:58:39.

Tomorrow are big changes to the way that car tax is calculated. It only

:58:40.:58:59.

applies to new cars. It is designed to make the process more simple but

:59:00.:59:01.

that could cost you more. With me now is Jim

:59:02.:59:05.

Holder from What Car? This process is designed to make

:59:06.:59:12.

things easier but in some cases it is anything but. In most cases it is

:59:13.:59:17.

anything but. You have to consider our first case tax rate across

:59:18.:59:22.

different bands according to the amount of carbon dioxide Europcar

:59:23.:59:29.

produces. Typically ?140 for most cars but zero emission and hybrid

:59:30.:59:34.

cars will have tax-free status or a slight reduction for hybrid

:59:35.:59:38.

vehicles. You have to consider that if the card will cost over ?40,000

:59:39.:59:41.

and if so it will cost ?310 extra. point, ?310 a year surcharge for the

:59:42.:59:44.

car for five years of ownership. , point, ?310 a year surcharge for the

:59:45.:59:52.

car for five years Located! -- complicated. What difference will it

:59:53.:59:57.

make for people in cars like this. On the end, begin die, that is a

:59:58.:00:01.

small engine petrol car, it would have cost 40 to ?60, two tags over

:00:02.:00:05.

three years, now it will cost well over ?400. -- Hyundai. In the

:00:06.:00:12.

middle, the Seat, it is a diesel car, lower CO2 emissions. It is

:00:13.:00:17.

cheaper to tax but it is the same height, from ?40 up to ?450. -- to

:00:18.:00:22.

tax. This one on the end, premium car, getting up to ?40,000, this is

:00:23.:00:28.

the crucial part that can make a big difference. If you get your options

:00:29.:00:32.

pricing wrong here, you could triple your tax bill, you have to be really

:00:33.:00:35.

careful to stay under ?40,000 threshold, even when adding the

:00:36.:00:40.

options onto the base price, otherwise you will be hit by the

:00:41.:00:43.

surplus charge. Options, things like leather seats, nicer interior, alloy

:00:44.:00:51.

wheels, if it goes over ?40,000, you could find yourself with a big tax

:00:52.:00:56.

bill. Even a small options box, a couple of hundred pounds, if it

:00:57.:01:01.

takes you over ?40,000, it will cost you thousands. Thank you for

:01:02.:01:05.

explaining all of that. Big change, comes into force tomorrow, a bit of

:01:06.:01:10.

time today if you want to nip out and buy one. Only applies to new

:01:11.:01:16.

cars, not second-hand, and not the vehicle that you already own.

:01:17.:01:25.

Taxation aside, people may be more nice today because it is national

:01:26.:01:31.

kindness day. You gave somebody a bottle of perfume, I think that was

:01:32.:01:36.

nice. But I did not know that it was national kindness day!

:01:37.:01:42.

Well, today is National Kindness Day, and the Diana Award charity

:01:43.:01:47.

aims to inspire 20,000 acts of kindness throughout the year.

:01:48.:01:57.

60 million of us, 20,000, we can do it!

:01:58.:02:00.

We've been to find out a few of the good deeds people have done.

:02:01.:02:03.

Gone to the theatre and obviously there were some chaps

:02:04.:02:05.

wanting coffees and things, they wanted money really.

:02:06.:02:07.

I just thought, you know what, for the sake of another ?20

:02:08.:02:10.

I would rather get them something to eat.

:02:11.:02:12.

I had a huge pot of coins once, I mean it was massive, this huge bag.

:02:13.:02:16.

I just went to a random homeless person.

:02:17.:02:18.

There was this old lady carrying large luggage.

:02:19.:02:20.

There was a lift but she couldn't see it.

:02:21.:02:22.

So I carried her bag until she got down the stairs.

:02:23.:02:24.

A homeless person and he was just sat outside Blackpool North Station.

:02:25.:02:27.

We were getting off the train, and I had a bar of chocolate

:02:28.:02:30.

One of the nicest things about this morning, you at home have been in

:02:31.:02:45.

touch to tell us about the acts of kindness you have been a part of,

:02:46.:02:48.

maybe you have been on the receiving end. Helen said, I was in Singapore

:02:49.:02:53.

for a year, broke my foot, single mother in a foreign country, a taxi

:02:54.:02:57.

driver drove me to several hospitals late at night, once we found the

:02:58.:03:00.

right place, after several hours, got me off and refused payment. I

:03:01.:03:06.

was in so much pain, I could not even insist at the time. Worldwide

:03:07.:03:10.

kindness, International Day of kindness. Kindness seems to happen

:03:11.:03:15.

in supermarkets, for some reason. And on buses. Jane says, I was in

:03:16.:03:19.

the supermarket last week, saw a lost little girl, he had lost her

:03:20.:03:23.

month, took her to customer services, waited with her until her

:03:24.:03:26.

mother and friends turned up, could not thank me enough, she would have

:03:27.:03:31.

been so upset. And in the supermarket again, if she has a

:03:32.:03:34.

trolley and somebody has a couple of items, she will let them go in front

:03:35.:03:39.

of her. This is from Erica, I have paid bus fares for people when their

:03:40.:03:42.

Oyster card is not working, I say, this is a random act of kindness,

:03:43.:03:47.

now you need to do three further random acts of kindness, if everyone

:03:48.:03:51.

does something like that, we will all notice the difference! She lets

:03:52.:03:54.

them go through? She will pay for them. She will pay them if their

:03:55.:04:00.

card is not working. And she says, go on and spread that kindness

:04:01.:04:02.

around. Lots of people talking about car parks, deck to the car park, in

:04:03.:04:09.

a hurry, does not have enough money for the machine, Nancy said that she

:04:10.:04:12.

was in that situation, people came to her aid and she got her parking

:04:13.:04:16.

for free. Do it today. Sometimes it is nice to smile at someone, Amy

:04:17.:04:20.

that can be your random act of kindness for the day! LAUGHTER

:04:21.:04:25.

See! Probably have nightmares after that. In a moment, the commit

:04:26.:04:31.

artist, John Higgins will be speaking with us about an exhibition

:04:32.:04:35.

of his work, which he hopes will inspire future generations of

:04:36.:04:40.

illustrators. Let's be kind to him. We'll be speaking to him in a moment

:04:41.:04:42.

but first let's take a last Some of the biggest movies of recent

:04:43.:06:26.

years have been based around super-heroes who first came to life

:06:27.:06:28.

in comic books. But a lot of fans would say

:06:29.:06:30.

the definitive version of their favourite character

:06:31.:06:33.

is the one they see on the page. Well our next guest is the man

:06:34.:06:36.

behind one of the most recognisable characters,

:06:37.:06:39.

Judge Dredd. With a career spanning four decades,

:06:40.:06:40.

illustrator John Higgins has also worked for giants of the comic world

:06:41.:06:42.

including DC and Marvel. You're hoping that a new exhibition

:06:43.:07:04.

will inspire the next generation. The most exciting thing for being

:07:05.:07:08.

displayed in Liverpool, Victoria Gallery Museum, it is my hometown,

:07:09.:07:19.

and what I would like to get across is that anybody can do what I do

:07:20.:07:22.

with a bit of a talent and ability. You just go for it. I don't believe

:07:23.:07:28.

you, I don't believe that just anyone can do that! The nice thing

:07:29.:07:31.

about the exhibition, I have never had it curated, I have had them

:07:32.:07:37.

around the world, but this has been curated, Matthew Clarke, he was one

:07:38.:07:40.

of the people that approach me first four years ago, and believe it took

:07:41.:07:45.

that long to get it on, but the exhibition has been placed in a way

:07:46.:07:50.

I have never seen a placed, usually, everything placed, squares, frames,

:07:51.:07:53.

but now, it is like, they have grouped them, I have not seen that

:07:54.:07:57.

done before in a graphic novel exhibition. In the gallery, such a

:07:58.:08:02.

wonderful way of presenting the work together. We see some of the

:08:03.:08:08.

pictures, how did you get started? One of those strange things, bit by

:08:09.:08:11.

bit, you build up a life and a career, best way to describe it, it

:08:12.:08:17.

is a jigsaw, your life becomes a jigsaw, you start off, I went to art

:08:18.:08:20.

college, you don't necessarily have to go to art college to become a

:08:21.:08:24.

comic book artist, it is not one of those things that you can ask your

:08:25.:08:28.

teacher about, probably the second person behind a reality show style

:08:29.:08:38.

wannabe, nobly would consider it as a career, telling stories, drawing

:08:39.:08:42.

everyday, that is what I love doing it. Judge Dredd, your most

:08:43.:08:45.

significant character, probably, but... He is behind you! Look at

:08:46.:08:53.

that chin. Is it easier to draw bad guys? Yes! The great thing about

:08:54.:09:00.

science fiction, which is the reason I got into comics in particular,

:09:01.:09:04.

2000 A.D. Started more or less the same year that I got into the

:09:05.:09:09.

business, as an illustrator, so that was 1977, which I cannot believe, 40

:09:10.:09:13.

years has passed in the blink of an eye. If you told me 40 years ago,

:09:14.:09:17.

that this is what I would be doing, 40 years later, I would not have

:09:18.:09:22.

believed it. When I was growing up, reading your comics, the idea of

:09:23.:09:28.

2000 AD... ... Felt so far away, that we would never get there! Now

:09:29.:09:33.

it is retro! You have a difficult position. It is strange, like 1984,

:09:34.:09:39.

George Orwell, still stands for a dystopian future, Big Brother, the

:09:40.:09:46.

number the future is behind us all right. -- the nominal closer. Do you

:09:47.:09:54.

go to the conferences, they are a huge industry. Are you mobbed when

:09:55.:09:58.

you go to these things? Unfortunately I am not, I'm a small

:09:59.:10:06.

part of the industry. It seems so strange that movies have been made

:10:07.:10:10.

on the characters that I have worked on, the big Marvel characters on

:10:11.:10:13.

screen, Judge Dredd, batsman, Superman. -- nomenclature. You feel

:10:14.:10:18.

quite touched when you see something you have worked on on the big

:10:19.:10:22.

screen. -- Batman. The stars, who interpret the characters, they are

:10:23.:10:26.

the people who are mobbed, quite rightly, I am at the back of the

:10:27.:10:31.

queue, mobbing them as well! Have you seen your influence in the

:10:32.:10:35.

movies? The nice thing is, a lot of the people now who are producing

:10:36.:10:39.

movies and directed them, Zacks Naidu, who directed watchmen, he's a

:10:40.:10:43.

huge fan of it, he thought he would not want to do it because he did not

:10:44.:10:50.

want to do it wrong. -- Zack Snyder. That was in his mind. But I thought

:10:51.:10:57.

that he did a brilliant job, and he used the basis of my colouring,

:10:58.:11:00.

which is what I was known for, it is part of that, on the screen, that is

:11:01.:11:06.

really nice. If summary had said to me, you will meet the artist behind

:11:07.:11:10.

Judge Dredd, I would have thought it would be a very loud, perhaps an

:11:11.:11:14.

American man, and yet you seem very unassuming and modest. Very quiet. I

:11:15.:11:19.

cannot see the connection between you and some of these brutal bold

:11:20.:11:27.

characters! You are getting a side of yourself out...? Every nightmare

:11:28.:11:32.

I have turns up on the page, I don't have nightmares, everything I do

:11:33.:11:36.

appears on the page. I eat cheese especially to have nightmares(!)

:11:37.:11:40.

great thing is what I have on my mind, I want to book on the page.

:11:41.:11:44.

The great thing about Judge Dredd, created in Britain, he is the

:11:45.:11:49.

biggest British character subsequent to Dan Dare, Dan and there was

:11:50.:11:52.

before him, the biggest British character, the great thing about

:11:53.:11:56.

Judge Dredd is that he is international, known all around the

:11:57.:11:59.

world. I have been invited to big conventions all around the world, I

:12:00.:12:02.

have been to Moscow, Australia, on the basis that I am one of the many

:12:03.:12:08.

artists that does Judge Dredd. What are you working on now? I'm excited

:12:09.:12:13.

about possibilities... We have looked at creating your own

:12:14.:12:17.

character, working on licensed characters, like Judge Dredd,

:12:18.:12:22.

Superman, Batman is very exciting because I am a fan but I have

:12:23.:12:27.

created my own character, Razorjack, and my character is going to be

:12:28.:12:31.

working with Judge Dredd. Michael Cowell, who collaborated, one of the

:12:32.:12:36.

great things is elaborating with very talented people, and we are in

:12:37.:12:39.

the process of creating a story with Judge Dredd and my character, which

:12:40.:12:43.

is going to come out that the end of the year. Me, that is the holy

:12:44.:12:48.

Grail! My favourite character, my own creative character. It is worth

:12:49.:12:53.

sticking with it, as you said, that stickability! Set it in 3000 AD

:12:54.:12:59.

instead! LAUGHTER That is the future indeed. Wonderful

:13:00.:13:05.

to meet you. The exhibition Beyond Dredd

:13:06.:13:11.

Watchmen: the Art of John Higgins is on at Liverpool University's

:13:12.:13:13.

Victoria Gallery and I would say stickability and some

:13:14.:13:21.

talent! Not just anybody can do what John has done!

:13:22.:13:23.

That's all from Breakfast this morning.

:13:24.:13:28.

But now on BBC One, Bill Turnbull, remember him?

:13:29.:13:30.

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