15/05/2017 Breakfast


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15/05/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern.

:00:07.:00:09.

A warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber attack,

:00:10.:00:11.

when workers switch on their computers for the first

:00:12.:00:14.

time at the start of the working week.

:00:15.:00:18.

Microsoft says the attack should be treated as a wake-up call.

:00:19.:00:21.

It is still causing serious issues at seven NHS organisations.

:00:22.:00:38.

Also this morning: Theresa May will pledge time off to care

:00:39.:00:43.

for relatives and expansion of workers' rights if her party wins

:00:44.:00:46.

Average pay will go up just 1% this year, the lowest rise

:00:47.:00:56.

So, if we are feeling the squeeze, what does it mean for the economy?

:00:57.:01:01.

In sport: Hull City are relegated from Premier League following defeat

:01:02.:01:04.

to Crystal Palace, and it was an emotional day

:01:05.:01:07.

at White Hart Lane, as Tottenham say farewell to their home of more

:01:08.:01:10.

He is the sky diver who has broken a world record by jumping out

:01:11.:01:25.

Good morning. Certainly not whether for skydiving. It is a wet start to

:01:26.:01:37.

the week for many of you but I will see if I can find some sunshine in

:01:38.:01:41.

the forecast to get you through the next few days. All the details

:01:42.:01:43.

coming up in 15 minutes. First, our main story:

:01:44.:01:44.

There is a warning of fresh disruption from the global cyber

:01:45.:01:48.

attack this morning, when workers switch

:01:49.:01:50.

on their computers for the first time at the start

:01:51.:01:53.

of the working week. Microsoft has described the attack,

:01:54.:01:55.

which began on Friday, as a wake-up call, and criticised

:01:56.:01:57.

customers who didn't Let's take a look at where things

:01:58.:02:00.

stand this morning. It is thought there are more

:02:01.:02:04.

than 200,000 victims of Friday's cyber attack, but that figure may

:02:05.:02:07.

rise as people return Organisations in 150

:02:08.:02:10.

countries were targeted, including Germany's rail network,

:02:11.:02:13.

Spanish telecommunications operator Telefonica, French carmaker Renault,

:02:14.:02:15.

and Russia's interior ministry. The cost of the attack to date

:02:16.:02:17.

is unknown, but BBC analysis of three accounts linked

:02:18.:02:20.

to the ransom demands suggest hackers have already been paid

:02:21.:02:23.

the equivalent of ?22,080. Our correspondent

:02:24.:02:25.

Richard Galpin reports. The computer virus which first hit

:02:26.:02:44.

the health Service on Friday is still causing serious problems at

:02:45.:02:49.

seven hospitals and other NHS organisations in England,

:02:50.:02:55.

particularly the ability to diagnose medical conditions. The images from

:02:56.:03:00.

MRI and CT scanning machines, as well as x-rays, can no longer be

:03:01.:03:04.

sent via computer to operating theatres. But the other big worry

:03:05.:03:08.

this morning is what will happen when medical staff, especially at

:03:09.:03:14.

GPs' surgeries, return to work and switch on their computers for the

:03:15.:03:19.

first time since Friday. Organisations that were did on

:03:20.:03:22.

Friday and over the weekend might find that some of the problems have

:03:23.:03:26.

spread. That is not to say that the attacks are new. It is a

:03:27.:03:30.

repercussion of what happened on Friday. This map shows how the

:03:31.:03:33.

malicious software has spread across the world. There are now 200,000

:03:34.:03:40.

victims, including large businesses and organisations in more than 150

:03:41.:03:47.

countries. And Microsoft, whose popular computer operating systems

:03:48.:03:50.

were the target of the attack, has warned governments of what happens

:03:51.:03:54.

is a wake-up call. Particularly for those governments deliberately

:03:55.:03:58.

keeping quiet about software vulnerabilities so they can exploit

:03:59.:03:59.

these themselves. There are fears that more medical

:04:00.:04:12.

staff may discover their computers are affected when they switch them

:04:13.:04:14.

on this morning. Let's get the latest now

:04:15.:04:15.

from our reporter Holly Hamilton, who is outside York Hospital,

:04:16.:04:17.

one of those affected It has certainly been a busy weekend

:04:18.:04:25.

for them. What do we know this morning? Good morning. That's right.

:04:26.:04:28.

I think our problem this morning is that we just don't quite know the

:04:29.:04:32.

full extent of this attack on the NHS, and out of those 47 in England

:04:33.:04:36.

that were affected there are seven NHS trusts still struggling this

:04:37.:04:40.

morning. 11 in Scotland. And bear in mind that this attack happened on

:04:41.:04:45.

Friday so they will be thousands of NHS staff who will be returning to

:04:46.:04:48.

work this Monday morning, locking back onto PCs and devices for the

:04:49.:04:54.

first time since this attack. -- logging back on. So perhaps we may

:04:55.:04:59.

get some indication how far this has spread. This caused huge problems

:05:00.:05:04.

over the weekend, causing major backlogs in appointments. Many

:05:05.:05:07.

ambulances had to be diverted to other hospitals. Here in York, as

:05:08.:05:11.

you mentioned, they have been working around the clock to try and

:05:12.:05:14.

get those appointments back to normal. And they have told us that

:05:15.:05:18.

they are hoping this morning those will return to normal. And in York,

:05:19.:05:24.

at this trust alone, some 6000 systems were affected and trying to

:05:25.:05:27.

look at every single one of those devices and machines has been

:05:28.:05:33.

extremely time-consuming. I mean, if operations alone were affected here,

:05:34.:05:38.

30 on Saturday a loan, and this is a trust that did have the right

:05:39.:05:42.

operations in place. They did have the right systems. They had invested

:05:43.:05:45.

in patches to prevent an attack like this happening. But this morning the

:05:46.:05:50.

advice from health officials in Scotland and England is if you do

:05:51.:05:53.

have an appointment, please do attend as normal. This is an attack

:05:54.:05:58.

which was unprecedented in its scale but they are hoping that things will

:05:59.:06:01.

return to normal, and I think the issue now this morning is that there

:06:02.:06:06.

will be a backlog. GP practices are already saying to attend as normal

:06:07.:06:10.

but the issue with that is that some of those systems are online, there

:06:11.:06:14.

are people who are struggling to see the appointments, if you have made

:06:15.:06:17.

an appointment online you may not get through. So this will be a very

:06:18.:06:21.

difficult day for the NHS and with this huge backlog in operations and

:06:22.:06:26.

appointments, this may have an effect for days to come. Thank you

:06:27.:06:30.

very much, we will see you a bit later on.

:06:31.:06:31.

So what you should you be doing if you are going into work this

:06:32.:06:35.

morning, and turn on your computer for the first time since

:06:36.:06:38.

The BBC's technology reporter Chris Foxx is here.

:06:39.:06:42.

You will be out here throughout the morning, and if you have any

:06:43.:06:47.

questions, you will be here throughout the day as well. So if

:06:48.:06:51.

you see that screen that we have seen over the weekend, what should

:06:52.:06:55.

you do? For the majority it will be business as usual. You will probably

:06:56.:06:59.

go to work today and see nothing different at all. You might at most

:07:00.:07:02.

have an e-mail from your IT department telling you what to do.

:07:03.:07:06.

My first piece of advice is know who to call, get there straightaway in

:07:07.:07:10.

the morning and find out who to call if you see that screen pop up. If it

:07:11.:07:14.

does pop up, taking action quickly as the key. A reminder of what some

:07:15.:07:18.

people have been seeing this week. That is the screen shot there. Get

:07:19.:07:22.

on the IT straightaway, they might have more advice in terms of

:07:23.:07:25.

shutting down your computer so it can't spread further. The reason it

:07:26.:07:29.

might pop up again today is because computers have been switched off all

:07:30.:07:32.

weekend and if there is something lurking back, when people go back to

:07:33.:07:36.

work, it could continue spreading. Luckily IT managers had all we can

:07:37.:07:41.

to do overtime and patch the systems, if they can. And cyber

:07:42.:07:44.

criminals have had a whole weekend to develop new versions which can

:07:45.:07:49.

continue spreading. A lot of people working harder than ever, trying to

:07:50.:07:54.

sort this out. And we will be available to answer any questions

:07:55.:07:57.

about this. You can get in contact by the normal e-mail, social media,

:07:58.:07:59.

all the normal business. We will be talking to the Minister

:08:00.:08:03.

responsible for cyber crime and security, Ben

:08:04.:08:06.

Wallace, at 7:40am. Theresa May will today promise

:08:07.:08:08.

the biggest expansion of workers' rights of any Conservative

:08:09.:08:10.

administration if her party wins The Prime Minister will outline

:08:11.:08:13.

a series of pledges described as a new deal for workers,

:08:14.:08:16.

but Labour said Mrs May is taking Our political correspondent

:08:17.:08:20.

Iain Watson is in Westminster. Iain, is this a Conservative Party

:08:21.:08:23.

pitch for Labour voters? I mean, this is an interesting one.

:08:24.:08:32.

We have heard Theresa May talk in the past about workers' rights. What

:08:33.:08:37.

is different about this? It is a bigger package of workers' writes,

:08:38.:08:41.

as we spoke about. She is repeating this idea of having workers sitting

:08:42.:08:46.

on company boards, something she mentioned when she first became

:08:47.:08:50.

prime minister, distancing herself from David Cameron. She is making a

:08:51.:08:54.

pitch for votes by offering rights which the last Labour government

:08:55.:08:57.

didn't get around to doing. You mentioned the year off if you want

:08:58.:09:01.

to look after a relative, but also new rights or bereaved parents to

:09:02.:09:05.

take time off legally from work, something that wouldn't be at the

:09:06.:09:09.

behest of their employer. So there is a package of rights that, but I

:09:10.:09:13.

think she is also trying to reassure people about the Brexit process as

:09:14.:09:17.

well and saying we are not going to become some kind of bargain basement

:09:18.:09:21.

economy, as she suggests, because you will still have the same rights

:09:22.:09:25.

as you have under the European Union. In a sense she is making this

:09:26.:09:29.

pitch for Labour territory, Labour playing on Seipt territory today,

:09:30.:09:33.

talking about the NHS, Jeremy Corbyn speaking to nurses in Liverpool

:09:34.:09:36.

telling people he will lift their pay cap and offering more money for

:09:37.:09:40.

the NHS, including ?10 billion for a whole range of new projects.

:09:41.:09:44.

Including, very relevantly, I suppose, upgrading the IT systems.

:09:45.:09:50.

Interesting, and of course an important time for that. We will be

:09:51.:09:51.

talking to you later as well. Workers in the public sector

:09:52.:09:53.

will receive an average pay rise of nearly ?780 if the Liberal

:09:54.:09:56.

Democrats win the general election. The party is pledging to abolish

:09:57.:09:59.

a cap which has seen pay rises for nurses and teachers

:10:00.:10:02.

limited to 1% since 2012. Labour's manifesto is also expected

:10:03.:10:05.

to include a promise to get rid of the cap, but the Conservatives

:10:06.:10:08.

say it is needed to help North Korea says the missile it

:10:09.:10:11.

tested successfully on Sunday was a new type of rocket capable

:10:12.:10:19.

of carrying a nuclear warhead. The North Korean news agency

:10:20.:10:23.

said the launch involved a mid-to-long-range ballistic

:10:24.:10:25.

missile known as Hwasong-12. It said the leader, Kim Jong-un,

:10:26.:10:27.

personally oversaw the launch. The United States called for further

:10:28.:10:30.

sanctions in response to the test, calling North Korea

:10:31.:10:33.

a flagrant menace. But, speaking in Seoul,

:10:34.:10:35.

this South Korean resident says President Trump has been urged

:10:36.:10:37.

to hand over any recordings of conversations between him

:10:38.:10:42.

and sacked FBI director James Comey Senior opposition politicians

:10:43.:10:44.

continue to pressure the President over allegations Russia meddled

:10:45.:10:47.

in last year's election. They warn destroying any tapes,

:10:48.:10:50.

if they exist, would be The gritty police drama Happy Valley

:10:51.:10:52.

was among the winners at last night's BAFTA television

:10:53.:11:04.

awards in London. The BBC nature series

:11:05.:11:06.

Planet Earth II won twice, including prize for

:11:07.:11:08.

Best Television Moment, for a chase involving newly hatched

:11:09.:11:10.

iguanas and racer snakes. Here is our entertainment

:11:11.:11:12.

correspondent Lizo Mzimba. It was an evening when the BBC

:11:13.:11:38.

dominated, winning more than three quarters of the night's awards. Its

:11:39.:11:40.

strongest showing in recent years. Happy Valley was a double award

:11:41.:11:42.

winner. The Yorkshire-set crime drama won

:11:43.:11:51.

Best Drama Series and Best Actress It is the most demanding piece I

:11:52.:12:00.

have ever done as an actor. I pray for justice.

:12:01.:12:07.

Damilola, Our Loved Boy a moving drama about the murdered schoolboy,

:12:08.:12:10.

including Best Supporting Actress for Wunmi Mosaku.

:12:11.:12:15.

I want to thank the tailors for your courage and your honesty. Best Actor

:12:16.:12:24.

went for a drama about so-called honour killing, Murdered by a

:12:25.:12:34.

Father. Everyone knows! Best Supporting Actor, for the Night

:12:35.:12:36.

Manager. The BBC Victoria Derbyshire

:12:37.:12:41.

programme won the news award. There were a couple of awards

:12:42.:12:44.

for Planet Earth II, including that for the moment

:12:45.:12:52.

of its snake-versus-iguana chase. Best live event went to Her

:12:53.:13:04.

Majesty's 90th birthday celebrations. She has never won a

:13:05.:13:11.

BAFTA. She was given an honorary Fellowship of years ago but she has

:13:12.:13:15.

never won a BAFTA. So tonight the Queen has finally won a BAFTA. And

:13:16.:13:21.

actress Joanna Lumley received a standing ovation as she presented

:13:22.:13:24.

with BAFTA's highest accolade, the Fellowship. Yes, chairs, sweeties,

:13:25.:13:38.

thanks a lot. -- cheers. In recognition of a career which

:13:39.:13:39.

spanned almost half a century. During that you have produced the

:13:40.:13:47.

most amazing BAFTA stat. You get a free spray tan as you go into the

:13:48.:13:54.

Baftas, apparently. In the build-up? On the night you could get a bit

:13:55.:14:01.

sticky, but yes. So you have to look around? No, it is just very few want

:14:02.:14:05.

to. That is an insight into the world of showbiz. We will watch that

:14:06.:14:11.

again and see if they look tanned. We will have all the weather very

:14:12.:14:16.

shortly. John is here with a look at the weekend's sport. And mixed

:14:17.:14:21.

emotions all round. At the top in the bottom. There is not long to go

:14:22.:14:25.

and you can see by that picture, Hull City are down, which means they

:14:26.:14:28.

are joining Sunderland. And Middlesbrough. But for Tottenham as

:14:29.:14:35.

well, they were saying goodbye to their stadium after 100 years. Great

:14:36.:14:37.

scenes. Real highs and lows

:14:38.:14:40.

in the Premier League yesterday. Hull beaten 4-0 by Crystal Palace,

:14:41.:14:43.

meaning they will join Sunderland and Middlesbrough in

:14:44.:14:46.

the Championship next season. Very different emotions

:14:47.:14:50.

at White Hart Lane, as Spurs said goodbye to their home of 118 years,

:14:51.:14:53.

beating Manchester United 2-1. Elsewhere, Liverpool are up to third

:14:54.:14:56.

after a 4-0 win over West Ham. Lewis Hamilton has trimmed the gap

:14:57.:15:06.

on Sebastian Vettel to six points at the top of Formula One's

:15:07.:15:09.

Drivers' Championship. He was second for much of the race,

:15:10.:15:11.

but overtook in the closing stages to secure his second

:15:12.:15:15.

race win of the season. Geraint Thomas's hopes of winning

:15:16.:15:19.

the Giro d'Italia have suffered a major blow, after he dislocated

:15:20.:15:21.

a shoulder in a crash He got back up to finish,

:15:22.:15:24.

but trails the overall leader, Nairo Quintana, by more

:15:25.:15:30.

than five minutes. A bit of a sad end, with still some

:15:31.:15:49.

11 stages to go. He was doing really well but that crash has put in

:15:50.:15:51.

completely out of it. Here's Matt with a look

:15:52.:15:54.

at this morning's weather. The headline says it all. We will

:15:55.:16:10.

see rain at some point today. Some of more than others. Across the

:16:11.:16:15.

hills of North Wales and north-west England, some of you will see more

:16:16.:16:20.

rain in the next 24 hours than you have done in the past six weeks.

:16:21.:16:25.

Let's look at the details. Not the start of the week that you want but

:16:26.:16:30.

we do need the rain. It is courtesy of this area of cloud pushing up

:16:31.:16:33.

from the south-west. It brings increasingly mild air to take us

:16:34.:16:36.

through the day but that my dad brings moisture. -- mild air. North

:16:37.:16:45.

and East Scotland, a dry start, I few glimmers of sunshine. Around

:16:46.:16:48.

Murray first, some of the warmest conditions today. Not too bad. --

:16:49.:16:57.

rain across Wales, south-west England. A dry enough start to the

:16:58.:17:04.

day across eastern counties of England where we have sunshine and a

:17:05.:17:10.

chilly start. Here, only a few splashes of rain. The breeze will be

:17:11.:17:21.

freshening up. A few breaks of cloud around the Moray Firth. Because it

:17:22.:17:29.

averages in the high-teens across north-east England. We stick with a

:17:30.:17:33.

lot of clout. Outbreaks of rain coming and going. -- cloud.

:17:34.:17:43.

Extensive missed and low cloud -- mist. Note the temperatures into

:17:44.:17:47.

tomorrow morning. It will be a mild night. Mid-teens tomorrow morning.

:17:48.:17:54.

Another great start. Some warm and tie to the eastern flank of this

:17:55.:17:58.

weather front. Brighter conditions for Scotland, Northern Ireland. They

:17:59.:18:02.

will still be a scattering of showers around. Lots of cloud for

:18:03.:18:10.

England and Wales. East Anglia, south-east, a bit of sunshine

:18:11.:18:15.

tomorrow. You could see temperatures, on the outside chance,

:18:16.:18:20.

up to 24. Further north and west, to bridges in the upper teens. More

:18:21.:18:25.

sunshine to the north and west on Wednesday across southern and

:18:26.:18:30.

eastern parts, some very heavy rain stop the heaviest we have seen for

:18:31.:18:34.

quite a while. We will keep you up dated. We do need to rain, after

:18:35.:18:46.

all. I liked that we had a 24 in death. Short on! -- in there.

:18:47.:18:53.

You're watching Breakfast from BBC News.

:18:54.:18:55.

Let's take a look at this morning's papers.

:18:56.:19:01.

If you have any questions about what has happened with the web hackers,

:19:02.:19:12.

sending your questions. A lot of papers picking up on the election

:19:13.:19:16.

manifestoes coming out. The Conservative Party says workers will

:19:17.:19:20.

be allowed to take a year's sabbatical to care for sick

:19:21.:19:24.

relatives. I will be talking to them later on about that. Poldark is on

:19:25.:19:28.

the front page of the sun and there story is about the Moors murderer

:19:29.:19:32.

being on his deathbed this morning. The front page of the Times, workers

:19:33.:19:40.

rights. May give all workers new rights to time off. Do Labour feel

:19:41.:19:51.

under attack from Mrs May and the Conservatives this morning? Oh,

:19:52.:19:56.

sorry I ignored the French kiss. That is Emmanuel Macron and his

:19:57.:20:03.

wife. He is named French President this morning. We talked a lot about

:20:04.:20:11.

fake news. In the Financial Times, they say the main parties are

:20:12.:20:16.

pointing at Facebook is their most potent weapon. There are some

:20:17.:20:19.

interesting quotes if you read into it. A Labour source saying lots of

:20:20.:20:26.

lights are an effective digital campaign. They can engage younger

:20:27.:20:30.

voters three social media that they are putting a lot of budget into

:20:31.:20:37.

Facebook this year. A quick story in the Guardian. They could be a

:20:38.:20:44.

shortage of all sorts of fruit because of the frosty start to

:20:45.:20:49.

April. It is no good that the warm weather is coming now. It was so

:20:50.:20:56.

damp because they could have been a shortage of apples, pears, plums and

:20:57.:21:01.

bananas. It it while you can. I'm allergic to bananas. Allergic? Yeah,

:21:02.:21:08.

they give me a... Too much information for everyone at

:21:09.:21:16.

Breakfast. I ate a Kiwi once. With the skin. I found out I was rather

:21:17.:21:20.

allergic to the skin. My lips swelled up. Says it getting any work

:21:21.:21:30.

done on your lips. -- saves you. How do you follow that? We saw the

:21:31.:21:35.

pictures of White Hart Lane yesterday. An emotional day for

:21:36.:21:39.

Tottenham fans. How emotional would you have to be to kiss the grass at

:21:40.:21:47.

the Stadium. You can imagine stealing a blade of grass but would

:21:48.:21:53.

you ever imagine lie yourself facedown on the turf to kiss it? Did

:21:54.:21:58.

he not just trip up? I was thinking that was orchestrated. Can you

:21:59.:22:05.

imagine leaving your house and going into the garden to kiss the grass.

:22:06.:22:11.

Maybe he is a bit embarrassed. He should be a bit embarrassed. You

:22:12.:22:17.

can't really make out who he is. Gender neutral uniforms. One of

:22:18.:22:25.

England's leading private schools is consulting people on a mixed matched

:22:26.:22:29.

design that way be called girls or boy stressed. -- dress. A girl who

:22:30.:22:38.

wants to play football, that's fine. Or a boy who wants to go into ballet

:22:39.:22:46.

class. Just allow them to explore and experiment without thinking and

:22:47.:22:51.

reacting. Some say it's a great idea and others are saying well, just

:22:52.:22:55.

allow them to give a bit of direction that let them do what they

:22:56.:22:58.

want. Young boys and young girls experimenting. Plenty to talk about.

:22:59.:23:03.

We could talk about it for quite sometime. Thank you very much.

:23:04.:23:07.

The votes of 18-24 year olds could be crucial in deciding

:23:08.:23:10.

who will walk through the door of ten Downing Street on June 8th

:23:11.:23:14.

- but the number of those signing up to vote when the leave school has

:23:15.:23:18.

fallen by a third in the last three years.

:23:19.:23:20.

That's according to the Electoral Reform Society.

:23:21.:23:22.

With one week to go before the deadline to register

:23:23.:23:25.

to vote our reporter Nesta McGregor has been to meet some of the six

:23:26.:23:29.

million young people eligible to cast a ballot.

:23:30.:23:31.

I'm very excited to vote. It will be asked that will be the next

:23:32.:23:39.

politicians, the next MPs. This is the first time this six people have

:23:40.:23:43.

met. Aged between 18 and 24, they have agreed to a chat during their

:23:44.:23:47.

lunchtime. The only thing on the menu is an meaty discussion about

:23:48.:23:52.

politics. There is a massive distrust between young people and

:23:53.:23:55.

most institutions and spend government being the institution of

:23:56.:24:00.

institutions. Two of them are first-time voters, one would be

:24:01.:24:03.

voting and the rest are undecided. One thought kept coming up, politics

:24:04.:24:07.

and politicians seem an million miles away from their everyday

:24:08.:24:13.

lives. It's so complex. In the run-up to this, especially for young

:24:14.:24:17.

people, it should be able to have a Google search and know exactly what

:24:18.:24:24.

voting for. Have an app. As a poster going through all the government

:24:25.:24:30.

papers. You would probably know where you find these things! Young

:24:31.:24:34.

people don't feel they are in control feel that their vote is

:24:35.:24:38.

going to matter, regardless. Any politician... Is it your job to

:24:39.:24:48.

engage politicians? Widowed walk outside and young people think we

:24:49.:24:53.

are to young to be affected -- we don't. A lot of people may not even

:24:54.:24:59.

the use these things again after. If you start teaching them about

:25:00.:25:04.

politics and it will be there throughout their entire lives, it

:25:05.:25:12.

works the politicians as well. I did algebra at school but I never used

:25:13.:25:16.

it again, so... Analysis of the last general election shows that 18 to 24

:25:17.:25:21.

-year-olds that voted was just over 40%. Compare that to the number of

:25:22.:25:27.

over 65 is where that figure was just under 80%. Their names have

:25:28.:25:32.

been wiped. Immigration database is black. BBC comedy the thick of it

:25:33.:25:38.

satirises the inner workings of government. Its creator is trying to

:25:39.:25:43.

get a clear message across in order to the young people to get their

:25:44.:25:47.

voice heard it important to be part of the process. The politicians will

:25:48.:25:51.

just respond to those who vote. That's all they will respond to. If

:25:52.:25:55.

that number gets fewer and fewer, you will end up Web politicians are

:25:56.:26:01.

responding to fewer and fewer people, getting elected and then

:26:02.:26:04.

governing countries as a whole on the basis of a tiny minority. The

:26:05.:26:11.

offices of the charity By the Ballot. They aim to get more young

:26:12.:26:16.

people registered to vote. You go from being a 16 or 17-year-old and

:26:17.:26:21.

ask for permission to go to the toilet and then one year later you

:26:22.:26:24.

are given this big decision or challenge, Pete who is going to run

:26:25.:26:31.

the country. -- pick. With one week to go before the deadline to

:26:32.:26:35.

register to vote. There are almost 6 million young votes potentially up

:26:36.:26:37.

for grabs. They're some of the most famous

:26:38.:26:45.

images ever taken - we'll take a look round the new home

:26:46.:26:55.

of some of the world's most well known photographs -

:26:56.:26:59.

all 80 million of them. Time now to get the news,

:27:00.:27:02.

travel and weather where you are. dry. Some are press of rain for

:27:03.:30:25.

today, tomorrow and Wednesday. -- outbreaks.

:30:26.:30:25.

I'm back with the latest from the BBC London newsroom

:30:26.:30:28.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern.

:30:29.:30:36.

Coming up on Breakfast today: Pay rises are set to be the worst

:30:37.:30:42.

Also this morning, we will be joined by the Minister for State

:30:43.:30:52.

and Security, who will give us the latest on the global hacking

:30:53.:30:55.

crisis, which has so far affected more than 200,000 victims,

:30:56.:30:58.

And, aged 101 years and 38 days, D-Day veteran Verdun Hayes has

:30:59.:31:04.

broken a record to become the world's oldest sky diver.

:31:05.:31:06.

He will join us later on the programme.

:31:07.:31:09.

But now, a summary of this morning's main news:

:31:10.:31:24.

There are concerns that the global cyber attack could cause more

:31:25.:31:27.

problems this morning, as people switch on their computers

:31:28.:31:29.

for the first time after the weekend.

:31:30.:31:31.

It is thought there are more than 200,000 victims of Friday's

:31:32.:31:34.

cyber attack, which included NHS England.

:31:35.:31:36.

Microsoft described it as a wake-up call, criticising customers

:31:37.:31:39.

who didn't keep their systems up to date.

:31:40.:31:42.

Let's get the latest now from our reporter Andy Moore,

:31:43.:31:45.

who is outside one of the hospitals affected, the Royal London Hospital,

:31:46.:31:48.

part of Barts Health Trust, which is the biggest in the country.

:31:49.:31:56.

So what exactly is happening there this morning, and how much of an

:31:57.:32:02.

impact Hazard had on the weekend? Well, problems still continuing here

:32:03.:32:11.

-- has it had on the weekend. Problems still continuing, longer

:32:12.:32:16.

than expected waiting list send some ambulances being diverted. A lot of

:32:17.:32:21.

our patients coming in today. The hospital says where it needs to

:32:22.:32:25.

cancel those appointments, hopefully they will be in touch with patients,

:32:26.:32:29.

but they can't guarantee it so some people might be turning up here and

:32:30.:32:32.

finding they can't be treated. It should be put in context. The vast

:32:33.:32:37.

majority of the NHS was not hit in the first place and a lot of

:32:38.:32:40.

hospitals have solved their problems. Where they still

:32:41.:32:44.

experiencing problems, they are quite severe in a handful of trusts.

:32:45.:32:50.

We have heard for example from Northumbria trust, who are still

:32:51.:32:54.

trying to get their computers up and running, and they say patients may

:32:55.:32:59.

not have access to test results and scans, so problems are carrying on.

:33:00.:33:02.

We will be talking to the Minister responsible for cyber crime

:33:03.:33:05.

and security, Ben Wallace, at 7:40am.

:33:06.:33:06.

Theresa May will today promise the biggest expansion of workers'

:33:07.:33:09.

rights of any Conservative administration, if her party wins

:33:10.:33:11.

The Prime Minister will outline a series of pledges,

:33:12.:33:15.

including worker representation on company boards and the legal

:33:16.:33:17.

right to take leave to care for family members.

:33:18.:33:20.

Labour has dismissed the plans, saying Mrs May is taking working

:33:21.:33:22.

Labour says it will spend an extra ?37 billion on the NHS in England

:33:23.:33:35.

The party's new deal for the health service includes a pledge to take

:33:36.:33:45.

a million people off waiting lists, and to upgrade IT systems

:33:46.:33:48.

following the cyber attack on the NHS.

:33:49.:33:50.

The Conservatives said they were already increasing health funding.

:33:51.:33:54.

A father has died after falling while walking with his daughter on a

:33:55.:34:00.

mountain in Wales. Rescue workers say the man, who is believed to be

:34:01.:34:05.

from the south of England, slipped in Snowdonia. He was airlifted to

:34:06.:34:09.

hospital where he was sadly pronounced dead.

:34:10.:34:10.

The new French President, Emmanuel Macron, is expected

:34:11.:34:12.

to name his Prime Minister today, on his first full day in office.

:34:13.:34:15.

Mr Macron, who was inaugurated as the country's youngest President

:34:16.:34:18.

yesterday, will also travel to Germany today for talks

:34:19.:34:20.

President Trump has been urged to hand over any recordings

:34:21.:34:30.

of conversations between him and sacked FBI director James Comey

:34:31.:34:33.

Senior opposition politicians continue to pressure the President

:34:34.:34:42.

over allegations Russia meddled in last year's election.

:34:43.:34:45.

They warn destroying any tapes, if they exist, would be

:34:46.:34:47.

Joanna Lumley received Bafta's highest honour,

:34:48.:34:50.

the Fellowship, at the BAFTA television awards in

:34:51.:34:52.

The gritty BBC One police drama Happy Valley came away with two

:34:53.:34:56.

awards, Best Drama and Best Actress for Sarah Lancashire.

:34:57.:34:59.

Damilola, Our Loved Boy was another big winner,

:35:00.:35:01.

picking up Best Single Drama and Best Supporting Actress,

:35:02.:35:03.

while Planet Earth II's infamous "snakes chasing a baby iguana" won

:35:04.:35:06.

I still get edgy when I see that. It was the thing that everyone was

:35:07.:35:30.

talking about the next day. You were absolutely screaming for the iguana.

:35:31.:35:38.

Talking about watching Eurovision over the weekend? I haven't seen it

:35:39.:35:43.

but apparently I look like the Hungarian violinist. There was a

:35:44.:35:46.

horse on a ladder, a guerrilla dancing but Portugal were the

:35:47.:35:49.

winners and their first-ever Eurovision winner has returned home.

:35:50.:35:54.

Adoring fans back in Portugal. Normally reserved for sporting

:35:55.:36:00.

heroes, when Portugal won the Euros it was like this. A national hero

:36:01.:36:07.

after his triumph in Kiev. 2000 fans cheered his return. That is why we

:36:08.:36:12.

don't win Eurovision, because of Lucie Jones had won, it would be a

:36:13.:36:17.

handshake and a journalist at the airport. This is what it means to

:36:18.:36:22.

the people in Portugal. It was a ballad as well. It was a moving

:36:23.:36:29.

ballad. When it was announced at the end as the winner, he got his sister

:36:30.:36:34.

up and she sang it alongside him as well.

:36:35.:36:37.

A 101-year-old war veteran from Devon has become the oldest

:36:38.:36:40.

person in the world to complete a skydive.

:36:41.:36:42.

Verdun Hayes, who fought on D-Day, jumped 15,000 feet from a plane

:36:43.:36:45.

along with three generations of his family yesterday afternoon.

:36:46.:36:48.

He beats the previous record, set by a man 35 days younger.

:36:49.:36:55.

Look at that, though. I wouldn't even do that now, let alone at 101.

:36:56.:37:04.

I would have a go. I thought you were a bit of a daredevil, Steph! If

:37:05.:37:12.

it involves aeroplanes, you are not keen. Maybe not. It is one of those

:37:13.:37:17.

Monday mornings when various fans are waking up thinking that is not

:37:18.:37:21.

the weekend for me. They cling on with such hope that you are going to

:37:22.:37:25.

get out of this difficult period you are in, but the damage was done for

:37:26.:37:31.

Hull early in the season. Even before the season got under way when

:37:32.:37:35.

their manager, Steve Bruce, he left, Mike Phelan came in, that didn't

:37:36.:37:42.

last long. He left, and Marco Silva, their latest manager, a good

:37:43.:37:46.

manager, did well but left too big a job, I think, in the end. A real mix

:37:47.:37:51.

of highs and lows, as we will show you this morning.

:37:52.:37:52.

Manager Marco Silva unable to work his magic to keep them

:37:53.:37:55.

They needed a win to give them any realistic chance of survival,

:37:56.:37:59.

but made the worst possible start, conceding after two minutes,

:38:00.:38:02.

The result secured top-flight football for Palace,

:38:03.:38:05.

but leaves Hull with some rebuilding to do, and no idea if their manager

:38:06.:38:09.

will stay on to lead the team next season.

:38:10.:38:20.

It is a sad day for us, of course, for our fans. For our boys, for the

:38:21.:38:29.

club. It is not a good moment to the club, and now is the moment the club

:38:30.:38:36.

will take the next step, and start to understand why this happened

:38:37.:38:41.

again, and why the club had many, many problems this season.

:38:42.:38:44.

Spurs celebrated their final game at their old White Hart Lane ground

:38:45.:38:47.

with a 2-1 win against Manchester United.

:38:48.:38:49.

They made the perfect start, an early goal from Victor Wanyama

:38:50.:38:52.

and Harry Kane securing the club victory and second place

:38:53.:38:55.

They will play home games at Wembley next year,

:38:56.:38:58.

We will miss a lot, because White Hart Lane a special, but at the same

:38:59.:39:20.

time, with the new stadium, we will move on and I think we will be very

:39:21.:39:25.

happy with time, the star to play in the new White Hart Lane. -- to start

:39:26.:39:29.

to play. Liverpool are back up to third

:39:30.:39:30.

and just one win away from securing Champions League football next

:39:31.:39:33.

season, after they thrashed Forest Green Rovers will play

:39:34.:39:35.

in the Football League for the first time in their history,

:39:36.:39:41.

after beating Tranmere Rovers 3-1 in the National League

:39:42.:39:43.

play-off final at Wembley. Kaiyne Woolery scored twice,

:39:44.:39:45.

with all the match's goals coming The Forest Green players

:39:46.:39:48.

celebrated with the trophy. And the team from Nailsworth,

:39:49.:39:51.

in Gloucestershire, with a population of under 6,000,

:39:52.:39:53.

can now look forward to a first There was a thrilling

:39:54.:39:56.

Barcelona Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton winning,

:39:57.:40:06.

to trim the gap on Sebastian Vettel to six points at the top

:40:07.:40:09.

of Formula One's Drivers' The Briton was second

:40:10.:40:12.

for much of the race, despite starting on pole,

:40:13.:40:20.

but overtook Vettel's Ferrari Vettel and Hamilton have two race

:40:21.:40:23.

wins each as Formula 1 rolls Rafa Nadal has continued his

:40:24.:40:27.

impressive clay-court season with another win, this time

:40:28.:40:31.

at the Madrid Masters. The world number four beat

:40:32.:40:33.

Dominic Thiem in straight sets. It is his third consecutive title,

:40:34.:40:36.

with the first Grand Slam of the season, the French Open,

:40:37.:40:39.

just a week away. Ian Poulter hopes to use his second

:40:40.:40:48.

place at golf's unofficial fifth Major, the Players Championship

:40:49.:40:51.

as a stepping stone for the rest The Englishman finished three shots

:40:52.:40:54.

behind South Korea's Kim Si-woo, Poulter only played 13 tournaments

:40:55.:41:01.

last year because of a foot injury, and had slipped to 197th

:41:02.:41:07.

in the world, but will now be back into the top 100, after playing

:41:08.:41:10.

some excellent golf. Hopes of a first British winner

:41:11.:41:16.

of cycling's Giro d'Italia are effectively over,

:41:17.:41:19.

after a crash on the ninth stage. Team Sky's Geraint Thomas

:41:20.:41:21.

and Orica-Scott's Adam Yates were both caught up in a collision

:41:22.:41:24.

with a stationary police motorbike, on the roadside, nine

:41:25.:41:27.

miles from the finish. The pair, who were second and third

:41:28.:41:29.

going into Sunday's stage, now trail new overall leader

:41:30.:41:32.

Nairo Quintana by five minutes. This was the ninth stage, still 12

:41:33.:41:52.

stages to go but that crash means it is all over for him. Which must be

:41:53.:41:59.

frustrating, because he was going so well. Now

:42:00.:42:13.

-- Narwhals, the sea mammals known for their long tusks,

:42:14.:42:15.

are thought of as one of the most enigmatic creatures in the sea.

:42:16.:42:19.

Now, for the first time, scientists have filmed them

:42:20.:42:21.

Canadian researchers working in the Arctic saw them hit

:42:22.:42:25.

In the footage, you can see the narwhal, often called

:42:26.:42:29.

the unicorn of the sea, swishing its head to knock the fish,

:42:30.:42:32.

It doesn't look like much of a scoop, it is too pointy! And how

:42:33.:42:58.

would you get it... They scoop it in and move over and hoover it up. And

:42:59.:43:03.

how do you know so much about them? I should have been studying at your

:43:04.:43:08.

school, clearly. It is the basics, you have to know what your narwhals

:43:09.:43:22.

are about. And you have to watch the Octonauts. They have a narwhal.

:43:23.:43:31.

If you were hoping for a pay rise this year, you might be

:43:32.:43:37.

disappointed. It could be a big election issue, paid, and the fact

:43:38.:43:42.

we are not getting paid as much as we thought we would. People who are

:43:43.:43:46.

actually in work, working hard, but not feeling any better off for it.

:43:47.:43:56.

The CIPD says average pay rises will come in at 1%, lower than inflation,

:43:57.:44:01.

which means we will probably feel worse off. We will talk to those

:44:02.:44:05.

behind the report in just a minute. First, we caught up with one

:44:06.:44:09.

business who told us it is hard to get the balance right.

:44:10.:44:12.

The cost of living is going up but at the same time we have our

:44:13.:44:18.

customers, and we have the rates that we charge and what customers

:44:19.:44:21.

will pay so is much as people say inflation is there and we should put

:44:22.:44:26.

our wages up, we can only do that if we can charge more revenue and get

:44:27.:44:30.

more revenue to the business. For us it is about what the employer can

:44:31.:44:33.

add in terms of value, so we don't subscribe to everyone get a pay rise

:44:34.:44:37.

every year, we look at every employee and think how can they

:44:38.:44:40.

bring skills to the business, in which case we will pay them more

:44:41.:44:44.

money and if they can't bring additional value, then there won't

:44:45.:44:45.

be additional pay for that. I am joined by a member of the team

:44:46.:44:50.

of employment experts behind that report. Good morning. We heard it is

:44:51.:44:54.

really difficult for employers. They are struggling to pay more but at

:44:55.:44:57.

the same time their staff might go elsewhere if they don't. First of

:44:58.:45:02.

all, why our wages not rising? The underlying problem facing the UK

:45:03.:45:06.

economy is our poor productivity record which is limiting firms'

:45:07.:45:10.

ability to be more generous in basic pay awards. That is why wage growth

:45:11.:45:14.

has been sluggish since the financial crisis. More recently we

:45:15.:45:18.

have seen Labour costs increase, including the introduction of a levy

:45:19.:45:26.

last month, and that has tipped the balance in a downward direction. And

:45:27.:45:29.

when you talk about productivity, that means we are putting in the

:45:30.:45:32.

hours but not making as much and therefore we are not producing as

:45:33.:45:37.

much, not being able to sell as much, and that means businesses are

:45:38.:45:40.

making less money. Is that the issue? That's right, and what they

:45:41.:45:43.

are having to do is employ more people to generate the same level.

:45:44.:45:47.

If you employ more people there is less money to go around the

:45:48.:45:50.

workforce that you have got, which is why it awards have been so

:45:51.:45:54.

disappointing. So I guess it is about improving the productivity,

:45:55.:45:57.

and we have talked about the productivity puzzle, that is not

:45:58.:46:00.

easy to do. At the same time, is this a long-term problem? Are we all

:46:01.:46:04.

going to be stuck on sluggish wages for quite awhile? Well, it has been

:46:05.:46:09.

stubbornly, resist and the low over the last few years. Certainly some

:46:10.:46:13.

commentators have expected growth to sharply from next year, and they are

:46:14.:46:17.

expecting productivity growth but what we need is some kind of skills

:46:18.:46:23.

revolution in the UK, and there are a number of steps the government can

:46:24.:46:27.

make to achieve that. One of the things that we are calling for his

:46:28.:46:30.

for the apprenticeship levy to be broadened into a training levy to

:46:31.:46:34.

ensure that employers are making the best use of their skills. At the

:46:35.:46:38.

same time employers really need to increase their investment in skills,

:46:39.:46:41.

which is very disappointing in relation to our OECD competitors,

:46:42.:46:45.

and employers really need to up their game.

:46:46.:46:51.

The stuff might go elsewhere and businesses are stuck in a tough

:46:52.:47:00.

place. -- staff. The evidence we have picked up is that they want

:47:01.:47:06.

higher wages. We see these job to job flows, people moving from one

:47:07.:47:16.

job to another and that is it -- increasing. Many are increasing the

:47:17.:47:25.

number of hours that people work but also looking at wider groups within

:47:26.:47:29.

the labour market whose potential is not being maximised until recently,

:47:30.:47:37.

in young people, apprentices, women returning from maternity leave and

:47:38.:47:40.

they will tap into those resources before we see any pressure to raise

:47:41.:47:42.

the pay. We will keep an eye on it. Will be talking more about pay

:47:43.:47:53.

coming up. Here's Matt with a look

:47:54.:48:02.

at this morning's weather. I was looking forward to another

:48:03.:48:13.

dreary rain shot but you have some lovely picture there. Take along

:48:14.:48:31.

long --a long look at it. There is more rain forecast that we need it.

:48:32.:48:37.

It has been piling up from the south-west overnight. It could give

:48:38.:48:44.

more rain today than we have seen over the past six weeks. There is

:48:45.:48:48.

still some brightness to be found across the of Scotland. We could see

:48:49.:48:52.

some of the warmest weather around the Moray Firth. The rain is

:48:53.:49:01.

spreading to Edinburgh. It is turning wet across parts of northern

:49:02.:49:06.

England. Across much of Wales, south-west England and into the

:49:07.:49:12.

Midlands, the rain more sporadic. You have another hour or two of

:49:13.:49:18.

brightness. Patchy rain and mainly light. It is turning murky around

:49:19.:49:26.

some of the coasts later on. It is a south-westerly wind bringing

:49:27.:49:31.

increasingly muggy air. The bit of brightness, could city of it is up

:49:32.:49:35.

to 21 degrees. Most in double figures even with the grey skies.

:49:36.:49:40.

Temperatures won't drop overnight very much. Outbreaks of rain mainly

:49:41.:49:48.

across western areas. Lots of mist and low cloud around the hills.

:49:49.:49:53.

Confirmation that temperatures would drop much. Still in the mid teens as

:49:54.:49:58.

we start Tuesday morning. A warm enough commute but are fairly grey

:49:59.:50:02.

one. Still some rain on the cards. This cold front is responsible.

:50:03.:50:06.

Eastern and southern parts of England, particularly muggy air. A

:50:07.:50:11.

few breaks in that may boost the tablature. -- temperature. Scotland

:50:12.:50:18.

and Northern Ireland, still not too many showers. Still into the

:50:19.:50:25.

high-teens but a little bit of brightness, East Anglia, we could

:50:26.:50:34.

potentially get to 24. Some very heavy rain, the heaviest we have

:50:35.:50:39.

seen. Time. Bright conditions to the north and west. -- we have seen for

:50:40.:50:44.

some time. More updates throughout the morning. The whole programme is

:50:45.:50:55.

live from Bristol and that map did not look good. Get your brollies

:50:56.:50:57.

out. Doctors, teachers and members

:50:58.:50:57.

of the armed services have all seen their pay rises capped

:50:58.:51:01.

to 1% for the last five years. The Conservatives say it is needed

:51:02.:51:04.

in order to reduce the deficit. However today, the Liberal

:51:05.:51:07.

Democrats has joined Labour in calling for

:51:08.:51:09.

that cap to be removed. Sir Vince Cable, the Treasury

:51:10.:51:12.

spokesperson for the Liberal Democrats, joins us

:51:13.:51:14.

from our Westminster studio. There are about a million in the

:51:15.:51:38.

wider public sector, people are employed on different kinds of pay

:51:39.:51:46.

arrangements, some involve government. Our estimate based on

:51:47.:51:55.

what the government itself says, taking account of inflation, we are

:51:56.:52:01.

talking about the cost of 1.4 billion per year. We believe this is

:52:02.:52:10.

necessary. Public sector employees being squeezed. To get around the

:52:11.:52:20.

recruitment problems, we have two approach public sector pay in a more

:52:21.:52:24.

positive way. It has now been frozen effectively since the financial

:52:25.:52:28.

crisis. You are saying it will cost 1.4 billion but harmony people will

:52:29.:52:34.

eat directly affect? Will it help 5 million? People are on different

:52:35.:52:45.

arrangements. It could potentially affect the whole of the public

:52:46.:52:51.

sector. So what is the 1.4 billion figure based on? The larger number

:52:52.:52:57.

and the government's own estimate of what public sector pay costs them.

:52:58.:53:01.

There is the red book reduced every year and beauty treat this as a

:53:02.:53:09.

flight plus 1% or if you look at it with a higher rate of inflation, you

:53:10.:53:13.

get higher numbers and that's where the 1.4 billion comes from. You

:53:14.:53:19.

mentioned about the cap coming in after the financial crisis in 2010

:53:20.:53:24.

which is of course when you were in the coalition. You guys brought this

:53:25.:53:30.

in. Actually, it was first introduced by the Labour government.

:53:31.:53:33.

It did apply through the coalition government, I was there, it was

:53:34.:53:37.

tough, it wasn't popular. But the financial situation of the country

:53:38.:53:42.

was extreme and we had to apply this. We are now almost one decade

:53:43.:53:47.

on from the financial crisis. We are now in a different situation where

:53:48.:53:51.

inflation is moving up. It was roughly flat and is now moving up.

:53:52.:53:56.

Partly because of the re-evaluation in place after the Brexit vote and

:53:57.:54:00.

we have to take account of that. We have to take account of the fact

:54:01.:54:04.

that where there was a serious unemployment at that point, we are

:54:05.:54:07.

now close to full employment and there are serious recruitment issues

:54:08.:54:10.

and a different approach to public sector pay now these to be adopted.

:54:11.:54:16.

-- needs to be. In terms of the rises, public sector pay rises have

:54:17.:54:23.

large behind the private sector. -- lagged. But here is a quote, on the

:54:24.:54:29.

whole, public sector employees have higher salaries than their private

:54:30.:54:35.

sector people. The private sector has some people who are

:54:36.:54:43.

extraordinarily well paid and people on a subsistence level wage. There

:54:44.:54:51.

is a big red in the private sector. We have these core services, health,

:54:52.:54:56.

education. Unless people are properly paid, the services are

:54:57.:54:59.

simply not going to be delivered because it will be delivered --

:55:00.:55:06.

difficult to recruit people. You think you are getting through to

:55:07.:55:10.

voters even the problems that Labour are facing with popularity? These

:55:11.:55:19.

are early the stages of a very long campaign. It becomes increasingly

:55:20.:55:23.

apparent that this isn't really a contest but a correlation. The

:55:24.:55:31.

Labour Party are not seen by large numbers of people as electable.

:55:32.:55:44.

There is increasing anxiety that the Conservative government are looking

:55:45.:55:47.

at an alternative. Our resources are concentrated in parts of the country

:55:48.:55:51.

where we can win seats. We have to do that because of the weight the

:55:52.:55:55.

system operates. -- the way. We are optimistic. Thank you for your time

:55:56.:55:59.

this morning. We have a bit of a treat. We

:56:00.:56:11.

mentioned that the Aquinas versus snakes -- iguana versus snakes.

:56:12.:56:16.

Let's see this footage. This beat Ed Balls on Strictly Come

:56:17.:56:33.

Dancing. It is all about the Aquinas. With most of them killed by

:56:34.:56:39.

the snakes at that guy managed a miraculous as gate. A beautiful

:56:40.:56:44.

shot. Look at his legs go! -- miraculous escape. It was

:56:45.:57:02.

incredible. He got away. Well, we assumed he got away. It was a

:57:03.:57:10.

standout moment of TV. Award-winning. We need Planet Earth

:57:11.:57:18.

III. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:57:19.:00:37.

with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern. A warning of fresh disruption

:00:38.:00:46.

from the global cyber attack when workers switch

:00:47.:00:52.

on their computers for the first time at the start

:00:53.:00:55.

of the working week. Microsoft says the attack should be

:00:56.:00:57.

treated as a wake-up call. It is still causing serious issues

:00:58.:01:00.

at seven NHS organisations. Also this morning: Theresa May

:01:01.:01:14.

will pledge time off to care for relatives and expansion

:01:15.:01:22.

of workers' rights if her party wins Yeah, Cheers, sweeties, thanks a

:01:23.:01:24.

lot. Top gongs for Joanna Lumley,

:01:25.:01:40.

Happy Valley and Planet Earth at last night's Baftas,

:01:41.:01:43.

but Netflix hit The Crown failed Don't call us, we will call you. A

:01:44.:01:51.

new campaign wants to make it mandatory for employers to give

:01:52.:01:53.

feedback after job interviews, rather than just saying no, thanks.

:01:54.:02:00.

But with employers back the scheme? -- will employers back the scheme?

:02:01.:02:04.

In sport: Hull City are relegated from the Premier League,

:02:05.:02:06.

And it was an emotional day at White Hart Lane,

:02:07.:02:10.

as Tottenham say farewell to their home of more

:02:11.:02:13.

The skydiver who has been setting a new world record by jumping out

:02:14.:02:17.

Good morning, and the sky is not quite so blue. A soggy Monday in

:02:18.:02:28.

store for many of you but a little bit of sunshine and warmth in the

:02:29.:02:32.

forecast. I will try and pick those bits out for you as well. See you in

:02:33.:02:35.

15 minutes. First, our main story:

:02:36.:02:37.

There are concerns that the global cyber attack could cause more

:02:38.:02:41.

problems this morning. as people switch on their computers

:02:42.:02:43.

for the first time Microsoft has described the attack,

:02:44.:02:46.

which began on Friday, as a wake-up call, and criticised

:02:47.:02:49.

customers who didn't Let's take a look at where things

:02:50.:02:51.

stand this morning. It is thought there are more

:02:52.:02:56.

than 200,000 victims of Friday's cyber attack, but that figure may

:02:57.:02:59.

rise as people return Organisations in 150

:03:00.:03:01.

countries were targeted, including Germany's rail network,

:03:02.:03:04.

Spanish telecommunications operator Telefonica, French carmaker Renault,

:03:05.:03:06.

and Russia's interior ministry. The cost of the attack to date

:03:07.:03:08.

is unknown, but in the last hour, we have had updated BBC analysis

:03:09.:03:12.

of three accounts linked to the ransom demands which suggest

:03:13.:03:15.

hackers have already been paid Our correspondent

:03:16.:03:18.

Richard Galpin reports. The computer virus which first hit

:03:19.:03:34.

the health service on Friday is still causing serious problems

:03:35.:03:39.

at seven hospitals and other NHS organisations in England,

:03:40.:03:41.

particularly the ability The images from MRI and CT scanning

:03:42.:03:43.

machines, as well as x-rays, can no longer be sent via computer

:03:44.:03:50.

to operating theatres. But the other big worry this morning

:03:51.:03:56.

is what will happen when medical staff, especially at GPs' surgeries,

:03:57.:04:00.

return to work and switch on their computers for

:04:01.:04:03.

the first time since Friday. Organisations that were hit

:04:04.:04:07.

on Friday and over the weekend might find that some of the

:04:08.:04:14.

problems have spread. That's not to say that

:04:15.:04:19.

the attacks are new. It's a repercussion

:04:20.:04:21.

of what happened on Friday. This map shows how the malicious

:04:22.:04:24.

software has spread There are now 200,000 victims,

:04:25.:04:26.

including large businesses and organisations in more

:04:27.:04:29.

than 150 countries. And Microsoft, whose popular

:04:30.:04:34.

computer operating systems were the target of the attack,

:04:35.:04:37.

has warned governments what happened is a wake-up call, particularly

:04:38.:04:41.

for those governments deliberately keeping quiet about software

:04:42.:04:47.

vulnerabilities so they can We will try and keep you updated

:04:48.:04:49.

throughout the morning on Breakfast. There are fears that more medical

:04:50.:05:05.

staff may discover their computers have been infected when they

:05:06.:05:09.

switch on this morning. Let's get the latest now

:05:10.:05:11.

from our reporter Holly Hamilton, who is outside York Hospital,

:05:12.:05:14.

one of those affected Good morning. There has been a lot

:05:15.:05:27.

going on over the weekend to try and sort this out, but still there are

:05:28.:05:31.

problems this morning, aren't they are? That's right. Out of the 47 NHS

:05:32.:05:38.

trusts in England, seven have been affected this morning, including

:05:39.:05:42.

here at York Hospital, where staff have been working throughout the

:05:43.:05:46.

weekend, 24 hours a day, trying to get things back to normal. And that

:05:47.:05:51.

this trust alone some 600 systems were affected. Each of those

:05:52.:05:55.

devices, computers, machines, have to be looked at individually and

:05:56.:06:00.

investigated, and that is extremely time-consuming. On Saturday alone

:06:01.:06:03.

that led to 30 operations being cancelled. Now this is a trust, of

:06:04.:06:12.

course, that says that they did invest in antivirus software, that

:06:13.:06:15.

they have the latest technology in place. And yet this attack still

:06:16.:06:19.

affected them. Now, the advice this morning is to attend appointments as

:06:20.:06:22.

normal. As staff arrive at the hospital they are being handed

:06:23.:06:25.

leaflets like this. They are being told if they have any doubts at all

:06:26.:06:29.

and they work in certain areas, do not switch on their computers under

:06:30.:06:32.

any circumstances, demonstrating how this is still having an effect here.

:06:33.:06:35.

The public are being told that waiting times could be longer than

:06:36.:06:39.

normal but if you do have an appointment, attend as normal unless

:06:40.:06:42.

you have been specifically advised not to do so. And of course we have

:06:43.:06:46.

medical practices across the country who are logging on for the first

:06:47.:06:50.

time and can't have access to medical records, for example, but

:06:51.:07:04.

they are still being told to come to GP practices as normal and they will

:07:05.:07:07.

try and get people seen as quickly as possible. But the concern now, of

:07:08.:07:11.

course, is that with that backlog of operations and appointments, this

:07:12.:07:14.

could still have an effect in days to come. Important advice for

:07:15.:07:16.

everyone. So what you should you be doing

:07:17.:07:16.

if you are going into work this morning, and turn on your computer

:07:17.:07:20.

for the first time since The BBC's technology

:07:21.:07:23.

reporter Chris Foxx is here. Thank you for coming back. I know

:07:24.:07:29.

you will be with us throughout the morning. A lot of questions coming

:07:30.:07:33.

in, and people like John asking if tanks have been targeted, and lots

:07:34.:07:36.

of people asking, like Charles and many others, saying what about my

:07:37.:07:39.

home computer? Will that be an issue, at home? Most of the attacks

:07:40.:07:43.

have been in workplaces, haven't they? Let's start with John. It is

:07:44.:07:46.

possible that banks have been hit, but with banking, it is their bread

:07:47.:07:50.

and butter to deal with this kind of thing and cyber security is

:07:51.:08:00.

important to them. More so than the NHS, who -- and they might not be

:08:01.:08:08.

using Windows, with sensitive applications. With Charles saying

:08:09.:08:12.

what about the home user, cyber security experts say if you are

:08:13.:08:16.

using Wi-Fi, your Wi-Fi routers should lock these anyway, this

:08:17.:08:20.

particular attack. It hasn't really been affecting home users as much,

:08:21.:08:24.

but if you are worried at home the best thing you can do is turn off

:08:25.:08:28.

your internet this morning, back up your files onto an external drive,

:08:29.:08:32.

so make a copy of anything important, any pictures, get them

:08:33.:08:36.

onto an external drive before you switch your internet back on, and

:08:37.:08:40.

then pop your internet tack on, and make sure your operating system has

:08:41.:08:43.

the latest security updates installed. And Steph mentioned they

:08:44.:08:49.

have made ?30,000, which seems like a small amount for an attack which

:08:50.:08:52.

has been so widespread across the world. They are asking for $300

:08:53.:08:57.

worth of Bitcoin 's, which is an online currency which is much harder

:08:58.:09:02.

to track where it is going to. That is probably a few hundred people who

:09:03.:09:08.

have paid, so it is very easy money, and cyber security experts will tell

:09:09.:09:13.

you don't pay, because there is no guarantee you will get your files

:09:14.:09:17.

back and it might be money down the drain. One thing to look out for

:09:18.:09:20.

today's you might get e-mails from security experts or even from your

:09:21.:09:24.

IT team saying just so you know you have probably heard about this cyber

:09:25.:09:27.

security attack, here is something to download to protect yourself.

:09:28.:09:31.

Criminals off the news very well-publicised attacks like we have

:09:32.:09:35.

seen over the weekend to launch a follow-up attacks. If you get a

:09:36.:09:39.

suspicious e-mail today from the IT team, saying download this thing we

:09:40.:09:43.

have made to protect you, you might not want to do that. Ring up your IT

:09:44.:09:49.

team and ask them. It is so complicated, you don't know who to

:09:50.:09:54.

believe! It is not very nice, in the middle of an attack something saying

:09:55.:09:57.

download this to stop that, and that is part of the problem. And do carry

:09:58.:10:02.

on sending in your questions, because Chris will be back for us.

:10:03.:10:04.

We will be talking to the Minister responsible for cyber crime

:10:05.:10:08.

and security, Ben Wallace, at 7:40am.

:10:09.:10:09.

Theresa May will today promise the biggest expansion of workers'

:10:10.:10:12.

rights of any Conservative administration, if her party wins

:10:13.:10:14.

There would be a statutory right to a year's unpaid leave to care

:10:15.:10:20.

for a relative under the election plans.

:10:21.:10:22.

Labour said Mrs May is taking people for fools.

:10:23.:10:24.

Our political correspondent Iain Watson is in Westminster.

:10:25.:10:26.

Iain, is this a Conservative Party pitch for Labour voters?

:10:27.:10:38.

That's certainly a blatant attempt to try and get Labour votes but I

:10:39.:10:47.

think the prime minister is trying to do another couple of things as

:10:48.:10:50.

well. First of all reassure people about the Brexit process. She is

:10:51.:10:53.

saying she will write the Conservative that people will keep

:10:54.:10:58.

the rights they currently enjoy as EU citizens, writes to paid leave,

:10:59.:11:05.

and things like that. She is trying to rebrand the Conservative Party is

:11:06.:11:09.

a different kind of party to the party run by David Cameron, and she

:11:10.:11:13.

is putting into place a package of rights which last Labour government

:11:14.:11:17.

at least didn't get around to. You mentioned the right to take time

:11:18.:11:22.

off, to care for relatives, bereaved parents would have a legal right to

:11:23.:11:26.

take time off. She is indicating with not much detail that she will

:11:27.:11:31.

do more for people in insecure employment. Labour say that the

:11:32.:11:36.

government is not implementing existing laws around trade union

:11:37.:11:40.

rights but although this is an attempt to invade Labour territory,

:11:41.:11:44.

Labour are playing to the home crowd, saying we are the party you

:11:45.:11:49.

can trust on the NHS. Jeremy Corbyn is talking to nurses, saying he will

:11:50.:11:53.

lift the pay cap in the public sector and saying that Labour will

:11:54.:11:56.

invest billions of pounds in the NHS including ?10 billion on projects to

:11:57.:12:00.

improve hospital buildings, but also given the current news story they

:12:01.:12:04.

are also saying that part of that funding will go into improving IT

:12:05.:12:09.

systems and improving cyber security. A very timely pledge.

:12:10.:12:15.

Thank you very much, we will see you a bit later on.

:12:16.:12:16.

Workers in the public sector will receive an average pay rise

:12:17.:12:19.

of nearly ?780 if the Liberal Democrats win the general election.

:12:20.:12:22.

The party is pledging to abolish a cap which has seen pay rises

:12:23.:12:26.

for nurses and teachers limited to 1% since 2012.

:12:27.:12:28.

Labour's manifesto is also expected to include a promise to get rid

:12:29.:12:31.

of the cap, but the Conservatives say it is needed to help

:12:32.:12:35.

Steph was talking to servants cable about that just before 7am -- Sir

:12:36.:12:44.

Vince Cable. The new French President,

:12:45.:12:49.

Emmanuel Macron, is expected to name his Prime Minister today,

:12:50.:12:51.

on his first full day in office. Mr Macron, who was inaugurated

:12:52.:12:55.

as the country's youngest President yesterday, will also travel

:12:56.:12:58.

to Germany today for talks The gritty police drama Happy Valley

:12:59.:13:00.

was among the winners at last The BBC nature series

:13:01.:13:04.

Planet Earth II won twice, including prize for

:13:05.:13:08.

Best Television Moment, for a chase involving newly hatched

:13:09.:13:09.

iguanas and racer snakes. Here is our entertainment

:13:10.:13:12.

correspondent Lizo Mzimba. It was an evening when the BBC

:13:13.:13:22.

dominated, winning more than three quarters of the night's awards,

:13:23.:13:25.

its strongest showing Happy Valley was a

:13:26.:13:28.

double award winner. The Yorkshire-set crime drama took

:13:29.:13:40.

home Best Drama Series and Best Actress,

:13:41.:13:43.

for Sarah Lancashire. Damilola, Our Loved Boy,

:13:44.:13:50.

a moving drama about the murdered schoolboy, also won two prizes,

:13:51.:13:54.

including Best Supporting Actress Best Actor went to Adeel Akhtar

:13:55.:13:57.

for a drama about so-called honour Best Supporting Actor

:13:58.:14:03.

to Tom Hollander, There were a couple of awards

:14:04.:14:10.

for Planet Earth II, including Must-See Moment for its

:14:11.:14:26.

thrilling snake-versus-iguana chase. She has never been well-behaved, she

:14:27.:14:36.

is the non- conform's non- conform. Portugal's first Eurovision winner

:14:37.:14:52.

has returned home to crowds In scenes usually reserved

:14:53.:14:54.

for global celebrities or sporting heroes, Salvador Sobral arrived back

:14:55.:14:57.

in Lisbon a national hero Around 2,000 fans cheered his

:14:58.:15:00.

return, after the singer led Portugal to its first Eurovision

:15:01.:15:04.

win, at the 49th time of asking. Sobral said he was looking forward

:15:05.:15:07.

to a rest, and denied he was a hero, saying that position was reserved

:15:08.:15:11.

for Cristiano Ronaldo. He was very laid back. When they

:15:12.:15:31.

announced the most complicated voting system ever in the history of

:15:32.:15:35.

the world, is that said, is it me? We have one? He just strolled to the

:15:36.:15:37.

stage. Very cool about it all. We are talking a lot today about

:15:38.:15:54.

cyber attacks and how to deal with it. Many people back to work for the

:15:55.:15:59.

first time. It has been a big problem especially froggy NHS. --

:16:00.:16:02.

for the NHS. A cyber attack at the heart

:16:03.:16:04.

of the NHS has once again re-ignited the debate surrounding funding

:16:05.:16:07.

for the health service. Labour is today pledging

:16:08.:16:09.

a 'new deal' for the NHS saying spending cuts are to

:16:10.:16:12.

blame for the hack. However, the Conservatives said

:16:13.:16:14.

they have already pledged more Labour's Shadow Health Secretary Jon

:16:15.:16:17.

Ashworth joins us from Westminster. Good morning. You are pledging more

:16:18.:16:31.

money for NHS IT. We were always planning to announce an extra 10

:16:32.:16:37.

billion for the industry -- infrastructure. It is to do with

:16:38.:16:44.

upgrading equipment as well. Various NHS experts in recent weeks as the

:16:45.:16:50.

NHS needs an extra 10 billion baht infrastructure. I am also announcing

:16:51.:16:55.

a new deal for patients in the NHS. Substantial investment to reduce

:16:56.:17:00.

waiting lists by 1 million. Not just putting money in and I'm not

:17:01.:17:07.

expecting anything in return. We are producing even tougher waiting lists

:17:08.:17:12.

in the future, tougher standards. We are saying people need to be moved

:17:13.:17:17.

out of hospitals as quickly as possible. A new tougher standard on

:17:18.:17:22.

a end to it and when you have 26,000 people waiting for cancer treatment,

:17:23.:17:26.

we are saying that's not good enough. We want people to get their

:17:27.:17:30.

cancer treatment not in two months but four weeks. Big money going into

:17:31.:17:35.

the NHS but in return we are asking for tougher standards of care

:17:36.:17:40.

because we believe patients receive the very best. Cancer patients to be

:17:41.:17:47.

dealt with in four weeks. What is your pledge for AMD waiting lists.

:17:48.:17:57.

-- AME. We believe it means treating an extra 1 million patients there.

:17:58.:18:02.

We want to go one step further. The most serious cases in A, you want

:18:03.:18:10.

to see them treated in one hour. By putting the money in, we think you

:18:11.:18:14.

can meet the existing targets which are being met under the Tories but

:18:15.:18:18.

we want to see tougher targets met in the future. We are putting money

:18:19.:18:22.

into the NHS that in return, we are asking for this level of reform as

:18:23.:18:27.

well. You said a lot about putting this extra money in. It seems to be

:18:28.:18:32.

another day in the election campaign and another day were a Labour

:18:33.:18:35.

politician is sitting saying this money will come from corporation

:18:36.:18:43.

tax. How far can that money go? There seems to be so many Labour

:18:44.:18:46.

policies funded from corporation tax. What you will see tomorrow is

:18:47.:18:51.

John McDonnell and Jeremy Corbyn outlining their new tax plans. We

:18:52.:18:55.

are being clear and direct, people who are 80 thousand people on more,

:18:56.:19:02.

we are asking them to pay a little bit extra in tax and all that tax

:19:03.:19:07.

that is raised will go directly to the NHS. Every single piece of it

:19:08.:19:14.

will be given to improving patient care fundamentally, we have a big

:19:15.:19:23.

choice now. It is a very direct offer to people that if people want

:19:24.:19:28.

to fund the NHS, if they do, we are saying whether money is coming from

:19:29.:19:32.

and we are prepared to put the money in. Sure you've seen the this

:19:33.:19:39.

morning. Many saying Theresa May, she will boost rights for workers.

:19:40.:19:45.

This is classic Labour territory, isn't it? The reason they are trying

:19:46.:19:50.

to give the Tories a much broader appeal. -- Theresa May. It is

:19:51.:20:03.

certainly not the ?10 living wage that the Labour Party is putting

:20:04.:20:07.

forward in this election. If the Conservatives want to broaden their

:20:08.:20:10.

appeal, they need to tell us why they are cutting the NHS next year.

:20:11.:20:15.

Why they are cutting primary school budgets next year. The schools and

:20:16.:20:19.

the city that I represent a set to do something in the region of ?700

:20:20.:20:23.

per pupil under Conservative cuts. That doesn't suggest to me a party

:20:24.:20:28.

broadening its appeal, it suggests to me a party more interested in the

:20:29.:20:33.

few rather than the many. The polls suggest they are broadening their

:20:34.:20:38.

appeal. The opinion polls are very challenging for Labour which is why

:20:39.:20:41.

I am challenging for every single vote in Ryan Kelly people watching a

:20:42.:20:45.

show this morning that there is a big choice. Invest in the NHS with

:20:46.:20:50.

Labour or cut it with the Conservatives will. -- if they

:20:51.:21:02.

persist in refusing to meet the waiting targets. Leaked documents

:21:03.:21:08.

will show that waiting times will increase under the Conservatives. We

:21:09.:21:12.

want to be reducing waiting lists not see them go up. Good to talk to

:21:13.:21:17.

you. John Ashworth from the Labour Party.

:21:18.:21:21.

Here's Matt with a look at this morning's weather.

:21:22.:21:34.

Good morning to you. This is the scene across Norfolk in the last

:21:35.:21:40.

half an hour. Now you have seen the sunshine. Take a good look at it

:21:41.:21:47.

because you need to your brolly. The scene is typical this morning. This

:21:48.:21:53.

is taken in Lancashire. Across the UK at the moment, it is heading

:21:54.:21:57.

eastwards. It is raining miserably across Northern Ireland at the

:21:58.:22:00.

moment. Western Scotland, north-west England. The reign of it more

:22:01.:22:05.

sporadic as it pushes eastwards. -- the rain. Taking a look at the rest

:22:06.:22:11.

of us for the rush-hour. It will get wetter across Scotland. It eases off

:22:12.:22:17.

in Northern Ireland by the time we get to mid-morning but heady bursts

:22:18.:22:22.

to come later on. Past of East Scotland. The wet weather continues.

:22:23.:22:31.

We will see as much as 60- 80 millimetres of rain over the hills.

:22:32.:22:35.

It is more than we have seen over the past six weeks. It is a bit more

:22:36.:22:40.

hit and miss further south. A few millimetres a specially across East

:22:41.:22:44.

Anglia and the south-east. Nothing hugely soaking but it still reigns

:22:45.:22:49.

quite heavily on the heels and further low cloud developer. --

:22:50.:22:54.

hills. We are talking chiefly a round the Murray Firth we could hit

:22:55.:23:02.

21 degrees. -- Moray Firth. 90 degrees. But 19.

:23:03.:23:14.

The big story tonight and into tomorrow is just how mild and muggy

:23:15.:23:21.

it will be as we started Tuesday. Temperatures in the mid teens to

:23:22.:23:25.

start the day that it will be fairly grey. We have weather front on the

:23:26.:23:28.

charts for tomorrow and still a bit of a south-westerly breeze. To the

:23:29.:23:32.

east of that, the warmer air will be contained. Cloudy across the rest of

:23:33.:23:39.

England and Wales. Outbreaks of rain pushing eastwards throughout the

:23:40.:23:43.

day. To the north and west of that, not as bright. There will still be a

:23:44.:23:47.

case of catering for Sunburst of rain every now and again.

:23:48.:23:50.

Temperatures fill into the high-teens but she could get close

:23:51.:23:54.

to around 24 Celsius across East Anglia in the afternoon. We will

:23:55.:23:58.

swap the warm for the rain in East Anglia on Wednesday. Some heavy

:23:59.:24:03.

burst of rain, heaviest for some time. It turns more fresh for the

:24:04.:24:09.

rest of the week with sunshine and showers in the mix.

:24:10.:24:14.

Delivered with a smile but let's face it, loads of rain on the way.

:24:15.:24:24.

There was 124 and it was nowhere near where we live. -- one 24.

:24:25.:24:33.

We've heard lots about the voice of the next generation not

:24:34.:24:36.

being heard in this election campaign.

:24:37.:24:38.

The number of 18-24 year olds signing up to vote when they leave

:24:39.:24:41.

school has fallen by a third in the last three years.

:24:42.:24:44.

That's according to the Electoral Reform Society.

:24:45.:24:46.

With one week to go before the deadline to register to vote,

:24:47.:24:49.

BBC's Nesta McGregor has been to meet some of the six million

:24:50.:24:53.

young people eligible to cast a ballot.

:24:54.:25:02.

It will be us that are going to be the next politicians,

:25:03.:25:06.

This is the first time these six people have met.

:25:07.:25:10.

Aged between 18 and 24, they have agreed to a chat

:25:11.:25:13.

The only thing on the menu is an meaty discussion about politics.

:25:14.:25:18.

There is a massive distrust between young people and most

:25:19.:25:20.

institutions and then government being the institution

:25:21.:25:22.

Two of them are first-time voters, one won't be voting

:25:23.:25:33.

One thought that kept coming up - politics and politicians seem

:25:34.:25:37.

a million miles away from their everyday lives.

:25:38.:25:39.

It's so jargonistic and it's so complex.

:25:40.:25:41.

I think, in the run-up to this, especially for young people,

:25:42.:25:44.

you should be able to have a Google search and just know exactly

:25:45.:25:48.

Or have an app, that's where young people are at.

:25:49.:25:51.

As opposed to having to look through all the government papers.

:25:52.:25:54.

I'm just making this up, you'd probably be better to know

:25:55.:25:57.

Young people don't feel like they're in control,

:25:58.:26:05.

they don't feel their vote is going to matter, regardless.

:26:06.:26:07.

I think any politician, they don't speak to me in any

:26:08.:26:10.

Isn't it your job to engage your friends and engage people

:26:11.:26:14.

We're not London-based, we don't walk past house

:26:15.:26:19.

Young people think we are to far out of it to be affected.

:26:20.:26:25.

English, maths and science GTSEs that a lot of people may not even

:26:26.:26:29.

Wheras if you actually start teaching them about politics

:26:30.:26:32.

and something that will be there throughout their entire lives,

:26:33.:26:34.

works for education, it works for young people,

:26:35.:26:37.

That's what you actually want to learn in school.

:26:38.:26:41.

I did algebra, I never used it again, so...

:26:42.:26:45.

Analysis of the last general election showed that the number

:26:46.:26:48.

of 18 to 24-year-olds that voted was just over 40%.

:26:49.:26:51.

Compare that to the number of over-65s where that figure

:26:52.:26:53.

BBC comedy The Thick Of It satirises the inner workings of government.

:26:54.:27:01.

Its creator is trying to get a clear message across -

:27:02.:27:04.

in order for young people to get their voice heard,

:27:05.:27:07.

it's important to be part of the process.

:27:08.:27:14.

Politicians will just respond to those who vote.

:27:15.:27:18.

So if that number gets fewer and fewer, you will end up

:27:19.:27:23.

with a state where politicians are responding to fewer and fewer

:27:24.:27:26.

people, getting elected and then governing the country as a whole

:27:27.:27:29.

The offices of the charity Bite the Ballot.

:27:30.:27:34.

They aim to get more young people registered to vote.

:27:35.:27:42.

It's almost bizarre that you go from being a 16 or 17-year-old

:27:43.:27:45.

and having to ask for permission to go to the toilet and then a year

:27:46.:27:49.

later you are given this big decision or

:27:50.:27:51.

challenge, pick who is going to run the country.

:27:52.:27:54.

With one week to go before the deadline to register to vote,

:27:55.:27:57.

there are almost 6 million young votes potentially up for grabs.

:27:58.:28:14.

There will be an election special presented by Tina to Healy.

:28:15.:28:21.

Time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.

:28:22.:31:40.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern.

:31:41.:31:57.

Companies around the world are braced for further problems

:31:58.:32:00.

with computer systems this morning, after the major cyber attack

:32:01.:32:02.

It is thought there are more than 200,000 victims

:32:03.:32:06.

Microsoft described it as a wake-up call, criticising customers

:32:07.:32:12.

who didn't keep their systems up to date.

:32:13.:32:19.

Let's get the latest now from our reporter Andy Moore,

:32:20.:32:21.

who is outside one of the hospitals affected, the Royal London Hospital,

:32:22.:32:25.

part of Barts Health Trust, which is the biggest in the country.

:32:26.:32:31.

Are they still on pens and papers and chalk boards? Yes, they are. And

:32:32.:32:39.

then some other places around the country. The vast majority of the

:32:40.:32:44.

NHS is working as normal, and people should use it if they are due to

:32:45.:32:49.

today, but it is probably worth checking your local NHS website, and

:32:50.:32:52.

where there are still problems they are pretty severe. The NHS said

:32:53.:32:56.

there were seven trusts in England requiring extra support, not more

:32:57.:33:01.

than seven experiencing problems. And we are hearing of more and more

:33:02.:33:06.

as the morning goes through. For instance, Southport and Ormskirk,

:33:07.:33:13.

they are saying don't attend for surgery unless you hear otherwise.

:33:14.:33:16.

All outpatient appointment are cancelled. GP services are

:33:17.:33:21.

interrupted in North Cumbria, where you may have made your booking

:33:22.:33:25.

online on a computer, so when you turn up they may not be expecting

:33:26.:33:29.

you. That is indicative of the sort of problems which may be experienced

:33:30.:33:34.

in parts of the NHS around the country today. Thank you very much

:33:35.:33:35.

for that this morning. We will be talking to the Minister

:33:36.:33:38.

responsible for cyber crime and security, Ben

:33:39.:33:41.

Wallace, at 7:40am. And lots of people asking questions

:33:42.:33:46.

about what it means for them, locking in at work and at home.

:33:47.:33:51.

Chris, our technology correspondent, will be looking at that. One

:33:52.:33:56.

important it is that other attackers tend to attack at times like this,

:33:57.:34:01.

saying download this to protect yourself from attack. If that

:34:02.:34:06.

happens, check with your IT provider, with the desk, and make

:34:07.:34:09.

sure it is not another dodgy e-mail which will install a virus on your

:34:10.:34:11.

computer. Theresa May will today promise

:34:12.:34:12.

the biggest expansion of workers' rights of any Conservative

:34:13.:34:14.

administration, if her party wins The Prime Minister will outline

:34:15.:34:17.

a series of pledges, including worker representation

:34:18.:34:25.

on company boards and the legal right to take leave to care

:34:26.:34:28.

for family members. Labour has dismissed the plans,

:34:29.:34:30.

saying Mrs May is taking working Labour says it will spend an extra

:34:31.:34:33.

?37 billion on the NHS in England The party's new deal for the health

:34:34.:34:38.

service includes a pledge to take a million people off waiting lists,

:34:39.:34:42.

and to upgrade IT systems following the cyber

:34:43.:34:46.

attack on the NHS. The Conservatives said they were

:34:47.:34:47.

already increasing health funding. The new French President,

:34:48.:34:57.

Emmanuel Macron, is expected to name his Prime Minister today

:34:58.:34:59.

,on his first full day in office. Mr Macron, who was inaugurated

:35:00.:35:02.

as the country's youngest President yesterday, will also travel

:35:03.:35:05.

to Germany today for talks And some more news about narwhals.

:35:06.:35:08.

They are in a song by the B-52s. Narwhals, the sea mammals known

:35:09.:35:30.

for their long tusks, are thought of as one of the most

:35:31.:35:32.

enigmatic creatures in the sea. Now, for the first time,

:35:33.:35:36.

scientists have filmed them Canadian researchers working

:35:37.:35:38.

in the Arctic saw them hit In the footage, you can see

:35:39.:35:43.

the narwhal, often called the unicorn of the sea,

:35:44.:35:46.

swishing its head to knock the fish, You wonder why they don't poke each

:35:47.:36:10.

other in the eye. I'm sure they are aware they have a big thing sticking

:36:11.:36:11.

out. This is a very good point. A 101-year-old war veteran

:36:12.:36:16.

from Devon has become the oldest person in the world

:36:17.:36:19.

to complete a skydive. Verdun Hayes, who fought on D-Day,

:36:20.:36:21.

jumped 15,000 feet from a plane along with three generations

:36:22.:36:24.

of his family yesterday afternoon. He beats the previous record,

:36:25.:36:27.

set by a man 35 days younger. We will be speaking to him and his

:36:28.:36:44.

family a little bit later on in the programme. You would be gutted if

:36:45.:36:51.

you are the person 35 days younger. You would have to go again, wouldn't

:36:52.:36:57.

you? You think no one is ever going to beat that and someone beats you

:36:58.:36:59.

buy 35 days. Joanna Lumley received

:37:00.:37:01.

Bafta's highest honour, the Fellowship, at the BAFTA

:37:02.:37:03.

television awards in The gritty BBC One police drama

:37:04.:37:05.

Happy Valley came away with two awards, Best Drama and Best Actress,

:37:06.:37:09.

for Sarah Lancashire. Damilola, Our Loved Boy

:37:10.:37:12.

was another big winner, picking up Best Single Drama

:37:13.:37:14.

and Best Supporting Actress, while Planet Earth II's infamous

:37:15.:37:16.

"snakes chasing a baby iguana" won We have to see this to the end. You

:37:17.:37:36.

have to see the iguana get away, and the beautiful moment when you think

:37:37.:37:40.

they have got him. In the build-up to the programme, most of the iguana

:37:41.:37:44.

is were newly hatched and they get nabbed by those racer snakes. And

:37:45.:37:49.

even the camera operators and producers were amazed how many

:37:50.:37:53.

snakes they were on that beach. The footage is brilliant. You are

:37:54.:38:00.

screaming for the iguana. You are saying come on, son. And his mates

:38:01.:38:10.

say where have you been? I have a pint for you, Dave. I love the idea

:38:11.:38:17.

of an iguana called Dave. And the other one is called Derek. Imagine

:38:18.:38:21.

you are just hatched, and this is the first thing which happens to

:38:22.:38:22.

you, in your life. Coming up on the programme: Matt

:38:23.:38:29.

will have the weather. Apparently the snakes look like they

:38:30.:38:38.

are acting as a team, but we spoke to one of those who knows about

:38:39.:38:44.

racer snakes and he says they act individually, they are all out for

:38:45.:38:48.

themselves. They need a bit of teamwork. Sadly it hasn't really

:38:49.:38:52.

paid off for Hull this season. What a link! Sadly they have been

:38:53.:38:59.

relegated, Marco Silva, appointed back in January, came into guide

:39:00.:39:05.

them to safety, and their home form has been very good, their away form

:39:06.:39:20.

not so much. And Middlesbrough now save?

:39:21.:39:23.

Manager Marco Silva unable to work his magic to keep them

:39:24.:39:26.

They needed a win to give them any realistic chance of survival,

:39:27.:39:30.

but made the worst possible start, conceding after two minutes,

:39:31.:39:33.

The result secured top-flight football for Palace,

:39:34.:39:36.

but leaves Hull with some rebuilding to do, and no idea if their manager

:39:37.:39:40.

will stay on to lead the team next season.

:39:41.:39:43.

It is a sad day for us, of course, for our fans,

:39:44.:39:46.

And now is the moment the club will take the next step,

:39:47.:39:53.

and start to understand why this happened again,

:39:54.:39:55.

and why the club had many, many problems this season.

:39:56.:40:01.

Spurs celebrated their final game at their old White Hart Lane ground

:40:02.:40:05.

with a 2-1 win against Manchester United.

:40:06.:40:07.

They made the perfect start, an early goal from Victor Wanyama

:40:08.:40:10.

and Harry Kane securing the club victory and second place

:40:11.:40:12.

They will play home games at Wembley next year,

:40:13.:40:16.

We will miss a lot, because White Hart Lane is special.

:40:17.:40:33.

But at the same time, with the new stadium,

:40:34.:40:36.

And I think we will be very happy, with time, to start to play

:40:37.:40:41.

Liverpool are back up to third and just one win away from securing

:40:42.:40:49.

Champions League football next season, after they thrashed

:40:50.:40:51.

Forest Green Rovers will play in the Football League for the first

:40:52.:41:01.

time in their history, after beating Tranmere Rovers 3-1

:41:02.:41:03.

in the National League play-off final at Wembley.

:41:04.:41:05.

Kaiyne Woolery scored twice, with all the match's goals coming

:41:06.:41:08.

The Forest Green players celebrated with the trophy.

:41:09.:41:11.

And the team from Nailsworth, in Gloucestershire,

:41:12.:41:13.

with a population of under 6,000, can now look forward to a first

:41:14.:41:17.

There was a thrilling Barcelona Grand Prix,

:41:18.:41:22.

Lewis Hamilton winning, to trim the gap on Sebastian Vettel

:41:23.:41:25.

to six points at the top of Formula One's Drivers'

:41:26.:41:28.

The Briton was second for much of the race,

:41:29.:41:37.

despite starting on pole, but overtook Vettel's Ferrari

:41:38.:41:38.

Vettel and Hamilton have two race wins each as Formula 1 rolls

:41:39.:41:43.

Hopes of a first British winner of cycling's Giro d'Italia

:41:44.:41:55.

are effectively over, after a crash on the ninth stage.

:41:56.:41:58.

Team Sky's Geraint Thomas and Orica-Scott's Adam Yates

:41:59.:42:00.

were both caught up in a collision with a stationary police motorbike,

:42:01.:42:03.

on the roadside, nine miles from the finish.

:42:04.:42:05.

The pair, who were second and third going into Sunday's stage,

:42:06.:42:08.

now trail new overall leader Nairo Quintana by five minutes.

:42:09.:42:25.

Let's go back to our lead story now, and just how vulnerable is the UK

:42:26.:42:29.

is to another cyber attack in the days and weeks ahead?

:42:30.:42:32.

Could more have been done to protect the NHS?

:42:33.:42:34.

And what is being done to protect us from more global security breaches?

:42:35.:42:38.

We are joined now by Security Minister Ben Wallace.

:42:39.:42:55.

Thank you for joining us. There has been a lot of chaos over the

:42:56.:43:03.

weekend, particularly for the NHS. This is a right mess. How did it

:43:04.:43:08.

happen? There has been a lot of commentary about it. The NHS

:43:09.:43:11.

followed some pretty good procedures they have in place and I would like

:43:12.:43:18.

to pay treatment to the workers, who have made sure they restore from

:43:19.:43:22.

backup the data and improved and put in place the security patches which

:43:23.:43:28.

are required to make sure that hopefully this is stabilised, and

:43:29.:43:31.

today and for the rest of the week service returns to normal. Of

:43:32.:43:35.

course, this happened because of two things. Out there is an internet

:43:36.:43:40.

which is incredibly vulnerable to cyber attack. It is global, as we

:43:41.:43:44.

have seen from the attack, that is why the government put in ?1.2

:43:45.:43:54.

billion to counter cyber attacks in the last SDSR. That is why we have

:43:55.:43:59.

been out there with campaigns like cyber aware, telling people and

:44:00.:44:02.

private businesses that this is something important and something

:44:03.:44:06.

you have to deal with. The National Audit Office did warn in November

:44:07.:44:10.

that taking away from IT services in the NHS would leave them vulnerable.

:44:11.:44:15.

Would you admit a mistake was made that? After that report, and indeed

:44:16.:44:20.

numerous occasions after incidents where there are cyber attacks, small

:44:21.:44:25.

or large or around the world, we pass on information to the trust and

:44:26.:44:29.

make sure they are aware of their vulnerabilities, and ask them to

:44:30.:44:32.

make sure they keep themselves up-to-date. What we don't do in the

:44:33.:44:37.

NHS is micromanage from the desk. If they haven't got the money, it is

:44:38.:44:41.

hard for them to do what they need to do. There has been red herrings

:44:42.:44:46.

over the weekends focusing on Windows XP, it has exploded systems

:44:47.:44:51.

in both Windows XP, Windows seven and Windows 8.1. Use the operating

:44:52.:44:56.

systems of a number of platforms and I spoke a trust which operate eight

:44:57.:45:00.

out of 4000 computers on Windows XP. It is slightly a red herring. The

:45:01.:45:05.

real key is did they have in place regular backups to make sure they

:45:06.:45:08.

are protected from people blackmailing them, and were they

:45:09.:45:12.

installing the security patches? Some of the security patches were

:45:13.:45:15.

issued by Microsoft back in March, and some trust absolutely loaded

:45:16.:45:21.

those to protect themselves. We have to ask ourselves why was it not

:45:22.:45:25.

uniform. Just on that, the York trust deed, but they still were hit

:45:26.:45:30.

by this and had problems this morning. I can go back and find that

:45:31.:45:34.

the individual technical responses but the vulnerability this virus

:45:35.:45:38.

exploits was spotted earlier in the year, and a patch was issued by

:45:39.:45:42.

Microsoft back in March in order to update systems, which is actually...

:45:43.:45:47.

This ransom threat, not this particular virus, what it has been

:45:48.:45:52.

around for a long time and the guidance has always been if you

:45:53.:45:55.

backup your data, if you change your passwords regularly, if you make

:45:56.:45:58.

sure that you upload the latest updates to your operating systems

:45:59.:46:02.

and all your apps on your iPhone, and you take other measures such as

:46:03.:46:08.

buying antivirus software, you will be very, very well protected, and it

:46:09.:46:13.

is important we invest in that. If they have been red herrings over the

:46:14.:46:17.

weekend, and we have had so many people this morning asking us

:46:18.:46:20.

questions, why has there been no statement from your colleague Jeremy

:46:21.:46:23.

Hunt? Why has there been no statement from the man who looks

:46:24.:46:28.

after the NHS? I think because this is a criminal attack on an organ of

:46:29.:46:32.

the State, the NHS, it could have been on other parts of the state.

:46:33.:46:36.

When something like that or the defence of the realm comes into

:46:37.:46:39.

play, the Home Office takes over, the National cyber Security Centre

:46:40.:46:42.

that this government put in place a few months ago, takes what we call

:46:43.:46:46.

the incident lead. The National Crime Agency, which is under my

:46:47.:46:50.

portfolio, and indeed the home secretaries, they start the process

:46:51.:46:53.

of investigation around the world. And right now, as we speak, they are

:46:54.:46:57.

following lines of enquiry to try and get these perpetrators, both

:46:58.:47:02.

here and abroad. So it becomes effectively Home Office, it is

:47:03.:47:06.

defence of the realm. We have been saying over the weekend it is the

:47:07.:47:09.

NHS which is most affected. I understand this is a defence and

:47:10.:47:13.

national security issue, but people need reassuring from the man

:47:14.:47:17.

responsible for the NHS, and that hasn't happened this weekend, and

:47:18.:47:20.

that is people's major concern this morning. Jeremy Hunt attended the

:47:21.:47:34.

Cobber at meeting -- Cobra meeting. We have been out there on the front

:47:35.:47:38.

foot saying this is about security, and the issue about whether it is

:47:39.:47:42.

particularly NHS, the reason it is important the government was broader

:47:43.:47:45.

in that messaging is what we have seen across Europe is it his not

:47:46.:47:55.

just health services. Therefore the onus is on all of us, internally as

:47:56.:48:01.

government departments but also externally, private sector,

:48:02.:48:03.

businesses, individuals, to make sure that those steps which you can

:48:04.:48:07.

take to protect themselves, not just the NHS, it would be wrong to say

:48:08.:48:11.

this only applies to the NHS. When your viewers go to their computer,

:48:12.:48:15.

those steps are the same steps that you need to take to protect

:48:16.:48:18.

yourself. And by the way, the criminal is targeting you as much as

:48:19.:48:20.

they are the NHS. Do not pay the ransom. We will wait

:48:21.:48:37.

to see who they are busy few fund these people, you are usually

:48:38.:48:41.

funding organised crime, horrendous crimes elsewhere that those groups

:48:42.:48:47.

get involved in anti- just encourage them to go and do more. If you want

:48:48.:48:52.

to make sure you protect yourself, my own desktop computer, back up

:48:53.:48:56.

your system, back up your e-mails, backup your photos. If you get the

:48:57.:49:02.

icons on your smartphone and state, oh, I will put that off. Update your

:49:03.:49:07.

system and your computers and spend the money on antivirus software.

:49:08.:49:10.

Good advice. Happy birthday as well. Here's Matt with a look

:49:11.:49:22.

at this morning's weather. The rain is back? Yes, what you want

:49:23.:49:34.

for me on a Monday morning. Rain for just about all of you through today

:49:35.:49:38.

that at least the guidance certainly need it. Just about all of it gets

:49:39.:50:01.

the rain. The rain in certain areas. Some will see more rain in the next

:50:02.:50:05.

24 hours than you have done over the past six weeks. The details for the

:50:06.:50:10.

next rush-hour. Rain becomes heavy and more extensive through southern

:50:11.:50:14.

Scotland. Probably one of the brighter spots will be Shetland will

:50:15.:50:17.

stop heavy rain in Northern Ireland will ease off. More rain later.

:50:18.:50:23.

Still raining across north-west England for the rush-hour. Some of

:50:24.:50:27.

its making it to the east of the Pennines. It stays soggy to the rest

:50:28.:50:34.

of the Pennines. The rate is much more sporadic as it pushes

:50:35.:50:38.

eastwards. Light and patchy. Only a few millimetres. After what it has

:50:39.:50:45.

been a brute -- reasonably bright start. Scotland, north-west England

:50:46.:50:51.

and western parts of Wales. Low cloud tends misty and murky. Yes, we

:50:52.:51:00.

could see 21 Celsius around the Moray Firth. Higher than what we see

:51:01.:51:07.

on the coast of Aberdeen. Tonight, it will stay mild and breezy.

:51:08.:51:10.

Further outbreaks of rain mainly in the West and murky across the hills

:51:11.:51:16.

and the coast. What started Tuesday morning. Temperatures around 14- 15

:51:17.:51:21.

degrees on many. Still a grey start. Weather fronts on the chart. This

:51:22.:51:25.

one will be the focus for heavier bursts of rain. Generally speaking,

:51:26.:51:32.

a brighter day tomorrow. Some lengthy dry spells. The best of the

:51:33.:51:36.

brightness towards the north-east. Outbreaks of rain pushing southwards

:51:37.:51:42.

and eastwards. Heaviest birds -- verse. You may see close to 24

:51:43.:51:50.

degrees. Some of the warmest weather we have seen so far this year.

:51:51.:51:58.

Elsewhere, still not bad. 18 or 19. Southern and eastern parts including

:51:59.:52:03.

the Midlands seen a lot of rain. One to showers. We will see the cooler

:52:04.:52:09.

conditions develop towards the end of the week. A quick snapshot, it is

:52:10.:52:11.

a story of sunshine and showers. If you apply for a job,

:52:12.:52:19.

have an interview but then don't get it - should the employer

:52:20.:52:22.

give you feedback? Many don't - but there's

:52:23.:52:25.

a campaign to change it. Yes, it's a frustrating experience -

:52:26.:52:27.

you spend time and money preparing for an interview but then never hear

:52:28.:52:35.

back about what went wrong. And if it's happened to you -

:52:36.:52:39.

you're not alone - we asked these Salford Uni students

:52:40.:52:42.

the worst job application feedback they'd got - and whether

:52:43.:52:45.

they got any at all. My worst feedback was that I was

:52:46.:53:12.

overqualified. I went for 20 jobs and in Q4 19. They don't reply. They

:53:13.:53:20.

don't e-mail you back. You are just waiting for a callback and don't get

:53:21.:53:24.

one. Then you don't apply further another job. The most frustrating

:53:25.:53:32.

thing I heard was that you were told you didn't promote or sell yourself

:53:33.:53:37.

enough. Most of the time when I apply for jobs at 80 anything back,

:53:38.:53:39.

it's really frustrating. Disappointing. There is a campaign

:53:40.:53:48.

to force employers to give feedback and it has some high-profile

:53:49.:53:51.

backing. Charlie and bonito with me. They are part of the team to change

:53:52.:53:59.

the rules. -- Monique. You spend all that time preparing and you don't

:54:00.:54:02.

hear back. Why? Are employed as lazy? Are not sure. I do think any

:54:03.:54:10.

interview I have been to other than when I have had a job at I didn't

:54:11.:54:16.

get feedback. It's not just me. Everybody I have spoken to has had a

:54:17.:54:21.

similar experience in think it's so important. It gives confidence to

:54:22.:54:25.

the candidate, they want to go and developers and I think so

:54:26.:54:28.

disheartening when you don't. A bit of respect for the employee to give

:54:29.:54:37.

it to you. -- employer. If you don't hear back from them, that biggest

:54:38.:54:40.

problem because you don't know what you have done wrong and what you

:54:41.:54:43.

might change beyond next job application. I was a student if you

:54:44.:54:48.

years ago and it reminds me of a driving test we do try so hard and

:54:49.:54:53.

you put a lot of operation in and then your instruction stayed

:54:54.:54:56.

completely quiet and you have no visibility as to where to improve or

:54:57.:55:01.

to do better next time. Under Mobile as we launched for student careers

:55:02.:55:07.

1.5 years ago, we had 65 students using the app and 50 multinationals

:55:08.:55:11.

and when we spoke to them, they highlighted us as a problem and the

:55:12.:55:20.

economy. The chance of getting work on strengthening the economy. It's

:55:21.:55:23.

something all employers can do, provide feedback. We have heard from

:55:24.:55:29.

a lot of people. Keep the comments coming in. One of the issues is the

:55:30.:55:37.

scale of the tasks. You have a job. Rachel says her husband applied for

:55:38.:55:42.

a job, they had over 400 applicants that business couldn't possibly give

:55:43.:55:45.

feedback to everyone. Where should they make the cut-off? People that

:55:46.:55:51.

just the interview? Realistically, if you get a face-to-face interview,

:55:52.:55:55.

that's when you should be getting feedback. It is difficult for an

:55:56.:56:00.

employer if they have had 50,000 applications to go through and give

:56:01.:56:03.

every single person bit of individual feedback that if you have

:56:04.:56:06.

been selected to go for a face-to-face interview, you should

:56:07.:56:10.

be getting feedback. And when it comes to the issue of what feedback

:56:11.:56:14.

is useful. A lot of people getting in touch saying of course employers

:56:15.:56:19.

should give back the stock is totally possible. Helen says there

:56:20.:56:24.

is nothing is disheartening as when you have taken the trouble to

:56:25.:56:27.

research and show up. Should it just be employers who have seen you are

:56:28.:56:33.

suitable? No, I'm the founder of the school start-up we interview every

:56:34.:56:41.

week and our resources are super limited. We provide feedback at each

:56:42.:56:48.

stage. Our customers who have 50, 60,000 applications can't feasibly

:56:49.:56:53.

provide feedback early on that what we're saying is if students make it

:56:54.:56:58.

through all candidates it through to the penultimate stage of the

:56:59.:57:01.

face-to-face stage of an interview with a have put in four, five, six

:57:02.:57:06.

hours of research and there are a lot less candidates in the pipeline,

:57:07.:57:10.

they can afford, literally, a few sentences of feedback to improve

:57:11.:57:14.

their chances of getting a job and it will reduce the time for other

:57:15.:57:19.

employers. We have found from our research that four out of five of

:57:20.:57:22.

all candidates that we have serve eight never received any feedback at

:57:23.:57:36.

all. -- never received. Let us know on our website. We will talk later

:57:37.:57:41.

about it at about 830. That's all from me now. We have already had

:57:42.:57:46.

messages coming in as you were talking. Lots of people interested

:57:47.:57:48.

in that this morning. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:57:49.:01:12.

with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern. A warning of fresh disruption

:01:13.:01:16.

from the global cyber-attack when workers switch

:01:17.:01:18.

on their computers for the first time at the start

:01:19.:01:20.

of the working week. Microsoft says the attack should be

:01:21.:01:22.

treated as a "wake up call." It's still causing serious issues

:01:23.:01:25.

at seven NHS organisations. Good morning, it's

:01:26.:01:43.

Monday the 15th of May. Theresa May will pledge time off

:01:44.:01:46.

to care for relatives and expansion of workers' rights if her party wins

:01:47.:01:52.

the general election. Top gongs for Joanna Lumley,

:01:53.:02:01.

Happy Valley and Planet Earth II at last night's Baftas -

:02:02.:02:06.

but Netflix hit The Crown A new campaign wants to make it

:02:07.:02:09.

mandatory for employers to give feedback after job interviews,

:02:10.:02:17.

rather than just saying "no thanks". Coming up in the Sport,

:02:18.:02:21.

Hull City are relegated from the Premier League,

:02:22.:02:28.

and the nasty crash that effectively ended British hopes at this year's

:02:29.:02:31.

Giro D'Italia. We'll hear from the skydiver who's

:02:32.:02:36.

been setting a new world record - by jumping out of a plane

:02:37.:02:40.

at the age of 101. looking great for us. A soggy Monday

:02:41.:03:00.

on the way for Wales, south-west Scotland and North West England but

:03:01.:03:04.

there is a bit of sunshine to be found as well. I will show you in 15

:03:05.:03:09.

minutes. Thank you. Microsoft has described the attack,

:03:10.:03:12.

which began on Friday, as a wake-up call, and criticised

:03:13.:03:22.

customers who didn't Let's take a look at where things

:03:23.:03:24.

stand this morning. It's thought there are more

:03:25.:03:28.

than 200,000 victims of Friday's cyber-attack,

:03:29.:03:31.

but that figure may rise as people Organisations in 150

:03:32.:03:34.

countries were targeted - including Germany's rail network,

:03:35.:03:41.

Spanish telecommunications operator Telefonica,

:03:42.:03:44.

French car-maker Renault, The cost of the attack to date

:03:45.:03:46.

is unknown, but in the last hour we've had updated BBC analysis

:03:47.:03:53.

of three accounts linked to the ransom demands which suggest

:03:54.:03:56.

hackers have already been paid Our correspondent

:03:57.:03:59.

Richard Galpin reports. The computer virus which first hit

:04:00.:04:07.

the health service on Friday is still causing serious problems

:04:08.:04:10.

at seven hospitals and other NHS organisations in England,

:04:11.:04:15.

particularly the ability The images from MRI and CT scanning

:04:16.:04:18.

machines, as well as x-rays, can no longer be sent via computer

:04:19.:04:25.

to operating theatres. But the other big worry this morning

:04:26.:04:31.

is what will happen when medical staff, especially at GPs' surgeries,

:04:32.:04:37.

return to work and switch on their computers for

:04:38.:04:39.

the first time since Friday. Organisations that were affected

:04:40.:04:45.

on Friday and over the weekend might find that some

:04:46.:04:47.

of the problems have spread. That's not to say that

:04:48.:04:50.

the attacks are new. It's a repercussion

:04:51.:04:53.

of what happened on Friday. This map shows how

:04:54.:04:57.

the malicious software There are now 200,000 victims,

:04:58.:04:59.

including large businesses and organisations in more

:05:00.:05:05.

than 150 countries. And Microsoft, whose popular

:05:06.:05:10.

computer operating systems were the target of the attack,

:05:11.:05:13.

has warned governments what has happened is a wake-up call,

:05:14.:05:18.

particularly for those governments deliberately keeping

:05:19.:05:24.

quiet about software vulnerabilities so they can

:05:25.:05:25.

exploit these themselves. We'll keep you updated

:05:26.:05:36.

throughout Breakfast. Let's get the latest now

:05:37.:05:38.

from our reporter Holly Hamilton, who's outside York Hospital,

:05:39.:05:40.

one of those affected Good morning, Holly. Good morning.

:05:41.:05:53.

Yes, this is one of the 47 that was affected by the attack on Friday.

:05:54.:05:57.

They are still trying to get operations up and running. They have

:05:58.:06:00.

been working throughout the weekend to return to some level of

:06:01.:06:06.

normality. I am joined by the chief executive of the trust, Patrick

:06:07.:06:11.

Crowley. How mammoth task has this been since Friday? Wants the

:06:12.:06:15.

situation on folded it became clear it was engulfing the organisation.

:06:16.:06:27.

At the last count we had 2000 of our 6000 PCs out of action. Clearly,

:06:28.:06:30.

that is quite disabling for clinical services in a health care

:06:31.:06:32.

environment. Over the weekend we have been working around the clock

:06:33.:06:34.

to get PCs back online and now half of them are back. The most important

:06:35.:06:39.

thing for people here is that all of our services are pretty much back as

:06:40.:06:42.

normal this morning and people can expect to receive the good quality

:06:43.:06:46.

health care that they have done to date. We have had one or two clinics

:06:47.:06:49.

which have had to be cancelled in our community settings, but in our

:06:50.:06:53.

two main hospitals in York and Scarborough it is all systems go.

:06:54.:07:04.

Yesterday you were very hopeful to get back to normal but is there any

:07:05.:07:06.

advice for patients who might be concerned this morning? Patients are

:07:07.:07:09.

advised that if they have any concern about their appointment, to

:07:10.:07:11.

call in, look on our website and look on the normal media channels.

:07:12.:07:14.

As I say, the general messages please come in and we will be ready

:07:15.:07:19.

for you. Two patients, it will seem like normal business in the main.

:07:20.:07:23.

For our staff they are working very hard in the background to ensure it

:07:24.:07:28.

feels normal for our patients. Just a little bit of understanding,

:07:29.:07:33.

things may run slower. Some services are still reliant to the degree on

:07:34.:07:38.

paper. So little bit of patience, understanding and huge appreciation

:07:39.:07:41.

for a huge army of staff who have done so well to get the services

:07:42.:07:46.

back online. Thank you. That is the chief executive of the NHS Trust

:07:47.:07:50.

here. As Patrick said, things are slowly getting back to normal but

:07:51.:07:55.

there will inevitably be a bit of a backlog. Some operations were

:07:56.:07:58.

cancelled over the weekend. This attack will continue to have an

:07:59.:08:02.

effect on the NHS for a few days to come. Thank you, Holly. That is

:08:03.:08:07.

Holly Hamilton outside York Hospital.

:08:08.:08:12.

A lot of people have been getting in touch about what they should do when

:08:13.:08:17.

they get into work and turn on the computer. BBC's technology

:08:18.:08:22.

correspondent Chris Foxx is here. A lot of people are worried about what

:08:23.:08:25.

they should do when they turn on the computer and have this message?

:08:26.:08:29.

Should be business as usual. You might have a message from your IT

:08:30.:08:34.

department. Make sure you know who to call if you see the ransomware

:08:35.:08:38.

message pop-up. You have to act quickly if you do. This is what it

:08:39.:08:45.

looks like. Yes, if you are worried at home you should be protected from

:08:46.:08:51.

this particular attack going round. Make sure you have antivirus

:08:52.:08:54.

installed and make a back-up of any important files you would not want

:08:55.:08:58.

to lose. We mentioned earlier that the people doing this attack are

:08:59.:09:02.

trying to make money out of it. So far they have only made ?30,000

:09:03.:09:06.

which is not much when you think about how massive it is. Tom is

:09:07.:09:11.

asking what has been done to catch those responsible? That is a good

:09:12.:09:16.

question. We know the National Crime Agency, the FBI and European police,

:09:17.:09:29.

Europol, are all investigating this. Criminals can break into a home and

:09:30.:09:33.

cover their tracks and it is exactly the same online. They can cover

:09:34.:09:35.

their tracks and make it very hard to trace. But we have had stories

:09:36.:09:38.

before where cyber attackers have been rounded up and caught and we

:09:39.:09:42.

may find the same happens here. And other criminals can try and make the

:09:43.:09:47.

most out of this. When something has been widely publicised as this

:09:48.:09:50.

attack has been, cyber criminals can send out e-mails saying you have

:09:51.:09:56.

probably heard about the big cyber attack, download this to protect

:09:57.:09:59.

yourself. If you get an e-mail like that, don't download it. Don't ever

:10:00.:10:07.

click links in unsolicited e-mails. This was not spread by e-mail but

:10:08.:10:11.

follow-up attacks might be. They may try and prey on you. Chris, that is

:10:12.:10:14.

good advice. Thank you. Worth mentioning that our colleagues

:10:15.:10:18.

on Rip Off Britain Live will take more of your questions

:10:19.:10:22.

here on BBC1 at 9:15. Ripoffbritain@bbc.co.uk

:10:23.:10:24.

is their email address. Theresa May will today promise

:10:25.:10:29.

the biggest expansion of workers' rights of any Conservative

:10:30.:10:32.

administration - if her party wins There would be a statutory right

:10:33.:10:36.

to a year's unpaid leave to care for a relative,

:10:37.:10:41.

under the election plans. Labour said Mrs May

:10:42.:10:44.

is taking people for fools. Our political correspondent

:10:45.:10:48.

Iain Watson is in Westminster. So Labour responding to the Tory

:10:49.:11:01.

promises but this sounds like a Labour policy? I think that is why

:11:02.:11:05.

Labour are responding so robust Lee, suggesting the Conservatives are

:11:06.:11:09.

taking people for fools, that the Conservatives will not even get

:11:10.:11:14.

around to police in existing Labour laws. This is a pitch for Labour

:11:15.:11:18.

votes rather blatantly from Theresa May saying she will do things which

:11:19.:11:22.

the last Labour government to get round to doing, including that time

:11:23.:11:25.

off for looking after relatives and if you are a bereaved parent, but

:11:26.:11:31.

you will get a legal right to take time off. She is doing something

:11:32.:11:34.

else as well, what she is also trying to do is to reassure people

:11:35.:11:38.

as she goes into the Brexit negotiations, neighbour suggested

:11:39.:11:42.

she might want to create a bargain basement economy, off the shores of

:11:43.:11:47.

Europe. She is then people will have the right to maintain everything

:11:48.:11:51.

they enjoy as EU citizens at the moment, and that will be a manifesto

:11:52.:11:58.

pledge. In addition to that, she is also suggesting more sadly that her

:11:59.:12:01.

party has changed since the days of David Cameron, no longer a party led

:12:02.:12:05.

by an old Etonian, somebody who wants to have a broader, wider

:12:06.:12:09.

appeal. Labour have been critical and the Lib Dems have suggested that

:12:10.:12:14.

Theresa May's party has restricted trade union rights so they cannot be

:12:15.:12:18.

taken at their words. Labour are defending their own territory today,

:12:19.:12:21.

on an issue they are usually popular, support for the NHS. They

:12:22.:12:26.

are promising far more funding for the NHS, ?10 million more for NHS

:12:27.:12:36.

buildings and given the current news, they are also suggesting part

:12:37.:12:39.

of that ?10 billion would go to updating IT systems and improving

:12:40.:12:40.

cyber security. That is quite relevant this morning. Thank you.

:12:41.:12:44.

The Liberal Democrats are talking about this as well.

:12:45.:12:47.

Workers in the public sector will receive an average

:12:48.:12:50.

pay rise of nearly ?780 if the Liberal Democrats win

:12:51.:12:52.

The party is pledging to abolish a cap which has seen pay rises

:12:53.:12:56.

for nurses and teachers limited to 1% since 2012.

:12:57.:12:58.

Labour's manifesto is also expected to include a promise to get rid

:12:59.:13:01.

of the cap but the Conservatives say it is needed to help

:13:02.:13:04.

A father has died after falling while walking with his daughter

:13:05.:13:11.

Rescue workers say the man, who's believed to be

:13:12.:13:15.

from the south of England, slipped on Tryfan in Snowdonia.

:13:16.:13:18.

He was airlifted to hospital where he was pronounced dead.

:13:19.:13:23.

The new French President, Emmanuel Macron, is expected

:13:24.:13:26.

to name his Prime Minister today on his first full day in office.

:13:27.:13:32.

Mr Macron, who was inaugurated as the country's

:13:33.:13:34.

youngest president yesterday, will also travel to Germany

:13:35.:13:36.

today for talks with Chancellor Angela Merkel.

:13:37.:13:41.

North Korea says the missile it tested successfully on Sunday

:13:42.:13:43.

was a new type of rocket capable of carrying a nuclear warhead.

:13:44.:13:46.

The United States says it would be prepared to impose more sanctions

:13:47.:13:49.

on the country if it continues to test ballistic missiles.

:13:50.:13:52.

The North Korean news agency said leader Kim Jong-Un

:13:53.:13:56.

It was the BAFTAs last night and Joanna Lumley received the

:13:57.:14:17.

Fellowship. The gritty police drama Happy Valley

:14:18.:14:22.

was among the winners at last The BBC nature series,

:14:23.:14:29.

Planet Earth II, won twice - including prize for best television

:14:30.:14:33.

moment for a chase involving newly-hatched

:14:34.:14:35.

iguanas and racer snakes. Do you ever name the animals and

:14:36.:14:41.

documentaries? I named them and give them voices, accents, the lot!

:14:42.:14:47.

I will have to come round to your house. That moment won the TV moment

:14:48.:14:53.

of the year, beating the likes of Danny Dyer and Ed Balls. It is good

:14:54.:15:00.

news for David the iguana. And also good news for Portugal at the

:15:01.:15:02.

weekend. Portugal's first Eurovision

:15:03.:15:05.

winner has returned home In scenes usually reserved

:15:06.:15:07.

for global celebrities or sporting heroes, Salvador Sabral arrived back

:15:08.:15:11.

in Lisbon a national hero That is the difference with us and

:15:12.:15:30.

the Portuguese. If it was us who had one we would just say well done,

:15:31.:15:35.

Lucie. A couple of people with flags. Well done to him. He has kind

:15:36.:15:40.

of downplayed it. He did not see bothered.

:15:41.:15:45.

It was a low-key ballad. No horse's head, gorillas or funky stuff, he

:15:46.:15:48.

kept it simple. Officials in Japan say 2,000

:15:49.:16:06.

computers, at 600 locations have been experiencing a problem.

:16:07.:16:11.

As we're hearing this morning, the official advice if you're

:16:12.:16:14.

heading out to hospital or to see your GP today

:16:15.:16:16.

is to keep your appointment, and turn up as planned.

:16:17.:16:18.

But there does seem to be some confusion, with at least one

:16:19.:16:21.

hospital still advising patients to check online or call

:16:22.:16:23.

Let's try and get some clarity now from Chris Hopson,

:16:24.:16:27.

who's the Chief Executive of NHS Providers, which represents health

:16:28.:16:29.

Good morning to you. Thank you for joining us. Certainly pa busy time.

:16:30.:16:37.

Can you just tell -- certainly a busy time. Can you tell us what is

:16:38.:16:41.

happening? Over the weekend on Friday we had about 48 NHS trusts

:16:42.:16:46.

that were affected. The majority of those are now back up and running.

:16:47.:16:51.

There are still a few that are still working on restoring their services.

:16:52.:16:56.

So I don't think the advice is confusing. The advice is really

:16:57.:17:00.

clear which is, I'm not formally involved in dealing with the

:17:01.:17:04.

incident, but the advice is clear which is go on to the NHS Choices

:17:05.:17:09.

website which has got very clear advice on what to do and what that

:17:10.:17:15.

says is turn up to your planned pointment unless the NHS has asked

:17:16.:17:19.

you not to. If you also want to double-check and it is a good thing

:17:20.:17:22.

to do, particularly if you're going into a hospital is just check the

:17:23.:17:25.

hospital's website. We know there are a few, a small number, that

:17:26.:17:30.

still are restoring services, but if you do those two things which is

:17:31.:17:36.

check the NHS Choices website and check the local hospital website

:17:37.:17:40.

then effectively that will let you know for the organisations I

:17:41.:17:43.

represent about what you need to do. OK. It's fair to say it caused a lot

:17:44.:17:49.

of chaos and concern for patients who might have appointments. How is

:17:50.:17:53.

this able to happen? Well, so we know this is a global incident. It

:17:54.:17:59.

has affected 200,000 different systems in 150 different countries.

:18:00.:18:02.

If you look at the kind of organisations that have been

:18:03.:18:07.

affected they include leading-edge companies who really completely rely

:18:08.:18:13.

on technology like FedEx, Nissan and Telefonica, so it is not an entire

:18:14.:18:17.

surprise that the NHS like a number of other institutions has been

:18:18.:18:20.

caught up in this. Though I just make the observation... 48 trusts is

:18:21.:18:25.

not slightly caught up. It is a major crisis. It was declared a

:18:26.:18:29.

major incident? What would have happened is as you'd expect. If

:18:30.:18:33.

there is a problem in an individual trust you will find that trust will

:18:34.:18:37.

quite rightly declare an incident to ensure that patient safety is

:18:38.:18:43.

protected. All I'm saying it is 28% of NHS trusts that have been

:18:44.:18:47.

affected. I was concerned if you don't mind me saying about the

:18:48.:18:51.

weekend media coverage that seemed to imply that the NHS has been

:18:52.:18:55.

particularly failing in terms of what it is been doing, we have got

:18:56.:18:59.

200,000 different institutions which have been affected including some

:19:00.:19:02.

who are at leading-edge of using technology. Yes, the NHS has been

:19:03.:19:08.

affected, but as the Home Secretary said NHS managers have been doing

:19:09.:19:11.

everything they can over the weekend to get services back up and running

:19:12.:19:14.

and thanks to all the staff who have been working over the weekend to

:19:15.:19:18.

achieve that. So what happens now? Well, so what happens now is I think

:19:19.:19:22.

as you'd expect, everybody in the NHS is focussing on ensuring that

:19:23.:19:25.

systems are back up and running. You heard in your news report the Chief

:19:26.:19:30.

Executive of Yorkshire teaching hospitals explaining what they were

:19:31.:19:33.

doing in terms of getting their systems back up online, getting

:19:34.:19:36.

their computers back up online and clearly, what we will need to do as

:19:37.:19:40.

an NHS, given that some institutions in the NHS have been affected, but

:19:41.:19:45.

the majority haven't, we'll just need to learn the lessons of what

:19:46.:19:51.

was about about those institutions that was different and clearly there

:19:52.:19:54.

will be some issues that we will need to learn from and ensure don't

:19:55.:19:57.

get repeated going forward. When I spoke to the security minister

:19:58.:20:00.

earlier on in the programme we talked about the fact that the

:20:01.:20:04.

National Audit Office had warned in November of the vulnerability that

:20:05.:20:10.

the NHS, IT projects were in. Do you agree, were you left vulnerable?

:20:11.:20:14.

Well, so I think what happened over the last couple of years is the NHS

:20:15.:20:17.

just like a whole load of other institutions has been subject to a

:20:18.:20:21.

number of malware attacks and sshl the Chief Executives that I talk to

:20:22.:20:25.

have been very aware of the need to protect their organisations. I think

:20:26.:20:29.

the point that that's been raised in terms of the NAO report is to make

:20:30.:20:34.

an important point which as has been proved over this weekend, the NHS

:20:35.:20:40.

can only work effectively if the underlining infrastructure, the

:20:41.:20:42.

buildings, the medical equipment, the IT are all up to scratch and I

:20:43.:20:47.

think what the NAO were pointing to which we would endorse is, we are at

:20:48.:20:51.

the moment in a five year period where we are robbing the NHS capital

:20:52.:20:57.

infrastructure budget to support day-to-day running costs. But the

:20:58.:21:00.

minister did say you have enough money? Well, again, in the middle of

:21:01.:21:05.

a general election campaign, it's not my job to play party politics.

:21:06.:21:09.

All I would do is point to the National Audit Office report that

:21:10.:21:12.

basically said you start to run risks if you don't properly invest

:21:13.:21:16.

in NHS infrastructure and that's what that NAO report said. Thank you

:21:17.:21:19.

very much for your time this morning. That's Chris Hobsob there.

:21:20.:21:25.

-- Hobson there. Here's Matt with a look

:21:26.:21:34.

at this morning's weather. Grey skies for the majority. This

:21:35.:21:44.

one was captured a short while ago in Barnsley. Rain is on the

:21:45.:21:53.

forecast. More persistent rain, Northern Ireland, north-west England

:21:54.:21:57.

and into western parts of Scotland. It is a thoroughly soggy rush hour

:21:58.:22:02.

and continues to see the rain. It does ease off for a time during the

:22:03.:22:06.

middle part of the morning in Northern Ireland. But the rain sets

:22:07.:22:10.

in now across much of central and Southern Scotland. Far north of

:22:11.:22:15.

Scotland particularly for Shetland, sunshine here and the Moray Firth

:22:16.:22:18.

shouldn't be too bad. The breeze picking up. Rain in north-west

:22:19.:22:21.

England and spreading east at times, but we could see more rain in the

:22:22.:22:29.

next 24 hours. And we will see that occasional rain make it towards

:22:30.:22:34.

eastern coastal counties of England where it has been a fine start. Grey

:22:35.:22:38.

conditions for most about all of the UK. The exception north-east

:22:39.:22:43.

Scotland and particularly towards Shetland. Temperatures could get up

:22:44.:22:49.

to 21 Celsius in the Moray Firth. Temperatures not doing too badly

:22:50.:22:52.

considering the cloud and the rain, but it will turn misty in the west.

:22:53.:22:56.

The mist and murk gets more widespread through tonight across

:22:57.:23:00.

northern and western areas. Some heavy bursts of rain at times.

:23:01.:23:04.

Occasional rain further south and east, but the big story is just how

:23:05.:23:08.

far the temperatures will not fall. They're going to hold around 14 or

:23:09.:23:11.

15 Celsius for many as we go into Tuesday morning. So mild morning

:23:12.:23:15.

commute tomorrow, but a particularly grey one with outbreaks of rain. The

:23:16.:23:19.

weather chart showing that we've got weather fronts straddling the UK,

:23:20.:23:23.

breezy conditions either side of it, but the warmest weather will be to

:23:24.:23:26.

the east of that weather front which will be pushing across England and

:23:27.:23:29.

Wales and bringing cloud and rain. Only a few spots of rab towards East

:23:30.:23:33.

Anglia and the South East and it is here with sunshine through the

:23:34.:23:37.

afternoon we could potentially get temperatures into the low 20s. Maybe

:23:38.:23:40.

24 Celsius possible. There will be rab for Scotland and Northern

:23:41.:23:42.

Ireland and north-west England and western parts of Wales, but it won't

:23:43.:23:48.

be quite as soggy a day as it will be today.

:23:49.:23:52.

I like the word, "Soggy"! You have been moonlighting. Every

:23:53.:24:07.

Sunday night on the Ten O'Clock News you're looking at a different issue,

:24:08.:24:12.

aren't you? Yes, it's called reality check.

:24:13.:24:18.

It was pensions the week before. This time it is pay. We have been

:24:19.:24:22.

looking at the analysis of pay and the cost of living. Look at this.

:24:23.:24:39.

The cost of living is going up, but at the same time

:24:40.:24:42.

we have our customers, and we have the rates that we

:24:43.:24:45.

Even though we have seen wages starting to up over the last few

:24:46.:24:55.

years, there is a lot of of catching up to do before the financial crisis

:24:56.:24:59.

average weekly earnings, when you take into account inflation, were

:25:00.:25:07.

?476, now they're down to ?467. By their very nature the figures are

:25:08.:25:11.

averages so therefore they vary, of course, depending on what you do and

:25:12.:25:14.

where you live. Look at this map because it shows the regional

:25:15.:25:17.

differences in terms of how much people are earning. The darker areas

:25:18.:25:21.

being where people on average are earning more and Paul has been doing

:25:22.:25:26.

research. Paul just explain why are there the differences? If you look

:25:27.:25:30.

at patterns of investment. The darker areas attract more high

:25:31.:25:35.

skilled type jobs, IT, smartphone app development, cinema special

:25:36.:25:40.

effects, highly paid jobsment further north, those lighter areas

:25:41.:25:46.

are call centres, lower skilled type manufacturing and are cheaper places

:25:47.:25:53.

to do business. Different types of jobs and different wages as a

:25:54.:25:56.

result. I'm going to leave you to clean that up. While pay has

:25:57.:26:00.

suffered unemployment has risen and there is more people in work than

:26:01.:26:04.

ever before, but people are working more flexibly now and one of the

:26:05.:26:08.

controversial areas is zero hours contracts. This is where you've got

:26:09.:26:13.

a job, but you're not guaranteed hours which can put pressure on

:26:14.:26:17.

people's pay. Dan, this is something you've been looking at, isn't it?

:26:18.:26:21.

The pay squeeze is coming on the back of really significant falls in

:26:22.:26:25.

real wablings that we saw in the wake of the financial crisis. That

:26:26.:26:29.

means that sadly this decade looks like it will be the worst on record

:26:30.:26:33.

for rising pay packets in 2 hub years. Dab, thank you very much. So

:26:34.:26:37.

why can't employers just pay people more money? We've got Andy here who

:26:38.:26:44.

is a local businessman. Andy, why can't you pay people more? It's

:26:45.:26:48.

about sustainability, Steph. If we pay too much then clearly our costs

:26:49.:26:52.

will be too much and we become unattractive to our customers and

:26:53.:26:56.

we've got to get the balance right. So that's what businesses think, but

:26:57.:27:01.

what is does everyone out there think about their pay? It's really

:27:02.:27:05.

important that people are rewarded fairly for what they do and

:27:06.:27:08.

contribute and also they have got enough to live on because things are

:27:09.:27:15.

hard for people. ? It would be easier if they didn't pay people at

:27:16.:27:19.

the top so much. Probably expand the business enough to be able to take

:27:20.:27:23.

on extra people. It's just striking a balance with something that I can

:27:24.:27:27.

live off as well as have some money to put on the side with having a

:27:28.:27:31.

good job as well. I can't be working five jobs a day just to make the

:27:32.:27:36.

Living Wage. At the moment, inflation and wage increases are

:27:37.:27:39.

following a similar pattern, but if you're working in the

:27:40.:27:41.

president-elect, you'll be feeling the squeeze even more. Obviously tax

:27:42.:27:46.

and benefits play a part in people's income too. It looks bleak now, but

:27:47.:27:50.

the Bank of England forecast that by next year pay packets should start

:27:51.:27:58.

to pick up again. Look at you with your magic carpet.

:27:59.:28:05.

You've got different hair for the Ten O'Clock News. That's my posh

:28:06.:28:12.

quiff. We get more... They wanted to call me Stephanie rather than Steph,

:28:13.:28:17.

but I refused. We will be back with Stephanie McGovern after

:28:18.:31:35.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Dan Walker and Steph McGovern.

:31:36.:31:48.

Let's bring you up to date with the latest headlines this morning.

:31:49.:31:51.

Companies around the world are braced for further problems

:31:52.:31:53.

with computer systems this morning after the major cyber attack

:31:54.:31:56.

It's thought there are more than 200,000

:31:57.:31:59.

Microsoft described it as a wake-up call,

:32:00.:32:02.

criticising customers who didn't keep their systems up to date.

:32:03.:32:04.

Let's get the latest now from our reporter Andy Moore,

:32:05.:32:08.

who's outside one of the hospitals affected -

:32:09.:32:10.

the Royal London Hospital, part of Barts Health Trust -

:32:11.:32:13.

Morning to you, Andy, have things recovered from the weekend? What is

:32:14.:32:24.

the situation this morning? Still problems here this morning at A

:32:25.:32:29.

and elsewhere, and those problems are reflected at several trusts

:32:30.:32:32.

around the country, we're not quite sure of the number. The vast

:32:33.:32:36.

majority of the NHS, of course, is working properly, and you should use

:32:37.:32:40.

it as normal, but it might be worth checking your local NHS website for

:32:41.:32:46.

information. I asked a spokesperson here whether they had backed up

:32:47.:32:50.

their system to retrieve patient information. She couldn't give me an

:32:51.:32:54.

answer on that. The other big question is if the hospitals have

:32:55.:32:57.

not backed up their information, whether they are prepared to pay

:32:58.:33:00.

this ransom. The official advice from the head of NHS Digital is that

:33:01.:33:07.

it is a matter for the victim whether to pay the ransom or not. So

:33:08.:33:12.

it may be up to individual NHS trusts to make that decision, and

:33:13.:33:16.

again I ask this particular trust whether they were thinking of paying

:33:17.:33:19.

the ransom or not, and the spokeswoman said she had no

:33:20.:33:24.

information on that. OK, that seems to be an issue for quite a few

:33:25.:33:27.

different organisations this morning. Thank you Barry much for

:33:28.:33:28.

that, Andy. Theresa May will today promise

:33:29.:33:30.

the biggest expansion of workers' rights of any Conservative

:33:31.:33:32.

administration if her party wins

:33:33.:33:35.

the general election. The Prime Minister will outline

:33:36.:33:37.

a series of pledges, including worker representation

:33:38.:33:39.

on company boards and the legal right to take leave to care

:33:40.:33:41.

for family members. Labour has dismissed the plans,

:33:42.:33:43.

saying Mrs May is "taking Labour says it will spend

:33:44.:33:46.

an extra ?37 billion on the NHS in England

:33:47.:33:57.

if it wins power. The party's "new deal"

:33:58.:33:59.

for the health service includes a pledge to take a million people

:34:00.:34:01.

off waiting lists and to upgrade IT systems following

:34:02.:34:03.

the cyber attack on the NHS. The Conservatives said they were

:34:04.:34:06.

already increasing health funding. while walking with his daughter

:34:07.:34:11.

on a mountain in Wales. who's believed to be

:34:12.:34:17.

from the south of England, He was airlifted to hospital

:34:18.:34:21.

where he was pronounced dead. The new French President,

:34:22.:34:28.

Emmanuel Macron, is expected to name his Prime Minister today -

:34:29.:34:31.

on his first full day in office. Mr Macron, who was inaugurated

:34:32.:34:34.

as the country's youngest President yesterday,

:34:35.:34:37.

will also travel to Germany today for talks with

:34:38.:34:39.

Chancellor Angela Merkel. North Korea says the missile

:34:40.:34:44.

it tested successfully on Sunday was a new type of rocket capable

:34:45.:34:47.

of carrying a nuclear warhead. The United States says

:34:48.:34:52.

it would be prepared to impose more sanctions

:34:53.:34:54.

on the country if it continues to test

:34:55.:34:55.

ballistic missiles. leader Kim Jong-un

:34:56.:34:59.

personally oversaw the launch. We have been talking about narwhals

:35:00.:35:20.

today, we don't know much about them. One might you know loads about

:35:21.:35:22.

them! They're called the

:35:23.:35:23.

unicorns of the sea. Narwhals are sea mammals known

:35:24.:35:31.

for their very long tusks. There's a been a big debate

:35:32.:35:34.

over what that tusk is for. Some Canadian researchers have been

:35:35.:35:41.

looking into how they use the horns to catch fish, they will back them,

:35:42.:35:45.

stun them, swim over them again and eat them, that is how they use them.

:35:46.:35:50.

They have described the discovery is absolutely incredible. No excuse now

:35:51.:35:55.

not to dazzle people with the narwhal news!

:35:56.:35:59.

I am still concerned about poking someone in the IED was swimming past

:36:00.:36:07.

them. -- in the eye if you are swimming past them. A lot of people

:36:08.:36:12.

thought I looked like the Hungarian violinist. Did you have your ten

:36:13.:36:20.

o'clock news hair? I did, because I was out in Boro!

:36:21.:36:24.

Portugal's first Eurovision winner has returned home

:36:25.:36:26.

In scenes usually reserved for global celebrities or sporting

:36:27.:36:31.

heroes, Salvador Sabral arrived back in Lisbon a national hero

:36:32.:36:33.

He was very cool, very laid back, he won with that Portuguese ballad in

:36:34.:36:43.

Kiev. It went down very well in Portugal, something we will never

:36:44.:36:46.

see. That is mega, though, isn't it? I

:36:47.:36:54.

bet he felt like Ronaldo! I wonder what he will go on to now,

:36:55.:36:59.

a huge musical career? As so many of them do!

:37:00.:37:04.

Are you being disparaging?! Not at all!

:37:05.:37:06.

Victoria Derbyshire is on at nine o'clock this morning on BBC Two.

:37:07.:37:11.

Last night Victoria's programme won a well-deserved Bafta. I can confirm

:37:12.:37:18.

it is very heavy, and when you are bad a drink, it is even heavier to

:37:19.:37:25.

carry this around. No, we are so honoured, honestly, we couldn't

:37:26.:37:31.

believe it, and on the programme today, the first of our election car

:37:32.:37:38.

shares. It is the turn of Leanne Wood, the leader of Plaid Cymru, who

:37:39.:37:41.

reveals she is going through the menopause and that she has used

:37:42.:37:47.

illegal drugs. Plus, I can reveal to you that she can sing! Join us on

:37:48.:37:52.

BBC Two, the BBC News Channel and online.

:37:53.:37:59.

Coming up on Breakfast this morning, we'll meet Lisa,

:38:00.:38:03.

who was 48 when she was told she had terminal cancer.

:38:04.:38:09.

A new BBC documentary in which she talks about finding positives in

:38:10.:38:16.

that prognosis, an amazing lady, she is making the most of her life.

:38:17.:38:24.

Also, if you go for a job interview and don't get it, should the

:38:25.:38:28.

employer give you feedback? Ben will be here to tell us about a campaign

:38:29.:38:30.

to try and change this. We'll talk to adventurer Megan Hine

:38:31.:38:33.

about her close call and getting into the mindset

:38:34.:38:41.

of a survivor. All that still to come. We have got

:38:42.:38:51.

some brilliant guests, haven't we? She has been chased by an armed

:38:52.:38:55.

drugs gang as well, fascinating story. John is here with an equally

:38:56.:39:01.

fascinating weekend of sports. A real mix of highs and lows, the

:39:02.:39:04.

highs for Tottenham, leaving their home ground at the 118 years, that

:39:05.:39:09.

long association with their north London stadium. But the lows for

:39:10.:39:13.

Hull City, relegated from the Premier League.

:39:14.:39:18.

The Championship is better anyway! Who else will be joining them?!

:39:19.:39:22.

Tottenham are only moving about three feet, and they?

:39:23.:39:29.

I suppose they are, but it is the long association, for any fans who

:39:30.:39:32.

have been there week in, week out, it is a sad moment, isn't it? But

:39:33.:39:38.

you are right, the new stadium is very exciting, exciting times ahead

:39:39.:39:43.

for Spurs. Yes, not so for Hull at the moment, joining Middlesbrough

:39:44.:39:44.

and Sunderland in the Championship. Manager Marco Silva unable

:39:45.:39:47.

to work his magic They needed a win against

:39:48.:39:49.

Crystal palace but conceded after just two minutes,

:39:50.:39:52.

going on to lose 4-0. And as Hull drop back down

:39:53.:39:55.

to the Championship, no idea yet if their manager,

:39:56.:39:59.

who was only appointed in January, A sad day to us, of course, for our

:40:00.:40:02.

fans, for our boys, for the club. Of course, it's not

:40:03.:40:12.

a good moment to the club. And now is the moment the club

:40:13.:40:18.

needs the next step, it's hard to understand

:40:19.:40:20.

why this happened again and why the club have many,

:40:21.:40:22.

many problems during the season. Tottenham said goodbye

:40:23.:40:28.

to their home of 118 years with a 2-1 win

:40:29.:40:31.

over Manchester United. Victor Wanyama and Harry Kane

:40:32.:40:33.

with the goals to guarantee Spurs finish runners-up

:40:34.:40:36.

to champions Chelsea. And it was the perfect send-off

:40:37.:40:42.

for the club's fans and their long association

:40:43.:40:48.

with their North London home, which will be knocked down as part

:40:49.:40:54.

of their stadium redevelopment. It's being called the best race

:40:55.:40:57.

of the Formula One season so far. And Lewis Hamilton won it

:40:58.:41:00.

for Mercedes, beating Sebastian

:41:01.:41:02.

Vettel into second. The Briton was trailing

:41:03.:41:03.

for much of the race, he overtook the driver's Ferrari

:41:04.:41:05.

in the final stages. It's becoming a titanic

:41:06.:41:09.

battle between the pair, Vettel and Hamilton have

:41:10.:41:11.

two race wins each, as Formula One rolls

:41:12.:41:13.

on to Monaco next weekend. Hopes of a first British winner

:41:14.:41:22.

of cycling's Giro d'Italia are effectively over after a crash

:41:23.:41:26.

on the ninth stage. and Orica-Scott's Adam Yates

:41:27.:41:28.

both involved. It was caused by

:41:29.:41:31.

a stationary motorbike on the roadside nine miles

:41:32.:41:33.

from the finish. The pair, who were second and third

:41:34.:41:37.

going into Sunday's stage, now trail new overall leader

:41:38.:41:40.

Nairo Quintana by five minutes. So that one moment of misfortune

:41:41.:41:55.

ruins it for both of them. They need to find out what that

:41:56.:41:59.

copper was doing. What are you doing, starving there

:42:00.:42:06.

with a huge peloton coming up behind you?!

:42:07.:42:09.

Toilet break, do you think? Lunch maybe, he had his sandwiches

:42:10.:42:12.

in the back. I think he's going to it, though. A

:42:13.:42:18.

story we talked about earlier, a brilliant one.

:42:19.:42:20.

At 101 years old, anybody would forgive D-Day veteran

:42:21.:42:22.

Verdun Hayes for wanting to take a slower pace of life.

:42:23.:42:25.

But yesterday, from 15,000 feet above the earth,

:42:26.:42:30.

he leapt out of a plane and into the record books,

:42:31.:42:32.

becoming the oldest person in the world to skydive.

:42:33.:42:36.

Verdun's now back at home in Devon, planning his next big adventure.

:42:37.:42:38.

Our reporter Andrea Ormsby is with him.

:42:39.:42:43.

And quite a few members of the family, good morning to you all, hi,

:42:44.:42:49.

Andrea! Yes, good morning to their home in

:42:50.:42:54.

Devon, and joined by four members of the same family, we are having a

:42:55.:42:58.

celebratory cup of tea this morning. Let me introduce you to the man

:42:59.:43:03.

himself, Verdun. The world record holder, Verdun, did you sleep well

:43:04.:43:08.

knowing you were a world record holder? Oh, yes, yes, I woke up this

:43:09.:43:14.

morning one of the happiest men in the world. That is lovely! Talk me

:43:15.:43:19.

through, you have had a bit of time for it to sink in, the moment when

:43:20.:43:23.

you are standing on the edge of the plane and then you jump, what is it

:43:24.:43:28.

like? Well, just for a few seconds, it is OK. Once you are in the air,

:43:29.:43:38.

for two or three seconds, it is very cold to the face, and after that it

:43:39.:43:46.

is absolutely fine. Feijen is not a word I would use, but you fall at

:43:47.:43:53.

120 mph for quite a while. So they tell me! I have got to take their

:43:54.:43:58.

word for it. It doesn't take very long, really, it is very quick, and

:43:59.:44:06.

we were very lucky in as much as we didn't go through a cloud. It was

:44:07.:44:14.

clear right the way from 15,000 feet until we hit the bottom. I know one

:44:15.:44:18.

of the things that made it special for you was to be joined by these

:44:19.:44:24.

guys, Brian, your son, a spring chicken at just 74, how do you feel

:44:25.:44:29.

about your dad today? Amazed, he is an absolute star, I am so proud. To

:44:30.:44:35.

have done what he did yesterday, we all went with him, nine members of

:44:36.:44:40.

our family jumped, and it was incredible. I have done a bit of

:44:41.:44:43.

paragliding in my time, but I have never left a plane without a

:44:44.:44:47.

parachute, and it is quite an experience. And for dad to want to

:44:48.:44:52.

do it for a second time, yeah, I take my hat off to him, amazing.

:44:53.:44:59.

Roger, your son, a complete youth at 50! You didn't love it quite so

:45:00.:45:03.

much? I didn't have a fine experience at all, I got altitude

:45:04.:45:07.

sickness, which wasn't ideal. The jump actually got cancelled, it was

:45:08.:45:13.

due to go on Saturday, it went yesterday, and I was due to do a

:45:14.:45:18.

marathon yesterday, and jumping out is so much harder than running a

:45:19.:45:22.

marathon, I can assure you! Incredible what he did, absolutely

:45:23.:45:27.

incredible. And now for the real youngster, Stan, 16, how did it feel

:45:28.:45:30.

to be taking part with your great-grandfather? Amazing, such a

:45:31.:45:37.

privilege, it was amazing. And how does it feel for you to know that

:45:38.:45:42.

your great-grandfather is a world record holder? I can't believe it,

:45:43.:45:45.

none of my mates are going to believe it, he is amazing. Back to

:45:46.:45:53.

the legend himself, so, Verdun, you are 101 and 39 days today, what are

:45:54.:45:59.

you going to do when you are 102? Well, I am truthfully undecided. It

:46:00.:46:04.

depends a lot on my health, and if I am fit and well, and the doctor

:46:05.:46:15.

approves, I might try and do a bit of wing walking, that I would love

:46:16.:46:19.

to do. But we will have to wait and see. Well, I'm sure that bills Roger

:46:20.:46:24.

with delight, because if he does it, you have got to do and! Thank you

:46:25.:46:28.

very much for joining me, don't let's forget that Verdun fought for

:46:29.:46:33.

us in the Second World War, a veteran of the D-Day landings, and

:46:34.:46:35.

he never thought he would make it home alive, so we had made the most

:46:36.:46:41.

of every single day, and once a daredevil, always a daredevil.

:46:42.:46:45.

Thank you to all of the family, what an inspiration, I am sure a lot of

:46:46.:46:52.

people will be very jealous! What an absolute star, unknown to, a bit of

:46:53.:47:03.

wink walking! -- wing walking. Brilliant to get them on the

:47:04.:47:10.

programme, 101 and 39 days and skydiving and did it like a normal,

:47:11.:47:13.

everyday occurrence! Now straight after we go

:47:14.:47:15.

off air this morning, Angela Rippon, Gloria Hunniford

:47:16.:47:18.

and Julia Somerville will be here with a new series

:47:19.:47:20.

of Rip Off Britain Live and they join us from their studio

:47:21.:47:22.

now to tell us what's coming up. Good morning. Good morning. Nothing

:47:23.:47:35.

as exciting as skydiving! But we will be lit every morning this week

:47:36.:47:40.

and we are hoping that your viewers will get involved and stayed with

:47:41.:47:45.

us. We will be tackling some of your problems on the spot lived and also

:47:46.:47:49.

have the latest on the big consumer stories in the news like the global

:47:50.:47:54.

cyber attack, could it happen to your computer? And we will be

:47:55.:47:57.

looking at some of the extraordinary charges that some of you have that

:47:58.:48:02.

to pay to call directory enquiries. How can anybody justify ?6 a minute

:48:03.:48:10.

or thereabouts for a call to anything? I wouldn't pay that if I

:48:11.:48:15.

was winding Australia. That was bad enough but ?23.97 a minute if the

:48:16.:48:21.

highest prize we have come across so if you have anything to say about

:48:22.:48:24.

that or any of the other stories, tell us at this e-mail address. Or

:48:25.:48:30.

you can find us on Facebook. We will see you right here at 9:15am sharp.

:48:31.:48:33.

Thank you. Stay tuned afterwards. Now we have the weather, what more

:48:34.:48:42.

could you want? A beautiful picture! A lovely start of the new week. You

:48:43.:48:53.

might want to stay in and watch the TV because it is like this across

:48:54.:48:58.

most of the country. Some of the governors and wildlife are pleased

:48:59.:49:02.

about it, but it will be wet across the hills of south-west Scotland,

:49:03.:49:07.

north-west England and North Wales over the next 24-hour 's and there

:49:08.:49:10.

will be more rain in the next 24 hours than there has been over the

:49:11.:49:17.

last six weeks. It has been very wet in Northern Ireland, it will ease

:49:18.:49:20.

off for a time but another heavy burst later on this morning. The far

:49:21.:49:25.

north of Scotland might stay dry with some sunshine but Central and

:49:26.:49:29.

southern Scotland is wet in the mid-morning, the same in northern

:49:30.:49:35.

England and Western Wales. The breeze picks up, quite blustery for

:49:36.:49:40.

some. The rain in Central and southern England and Wales is more

:49:41.:49:44.

hit and miss as it pushes eastward and after a bright start in East

:49:45.:49:47.

Anglia and Lincolnshire, you will see at least a few splashes. Maybe a

:49:48.:49:52.

couple of millimetres in eastern England but up to 60 or 80

:49:53.:49:56.

millimetres in the south-west hills of Scotland, north-west England and

:49:57.:50:02.

Western Wales. Any sunshine this afternoon, it could feel pleasant.

:50:03.:50:10.

It could hit 21 in the Murray first. Elsewhere, temperatures in the

:50:11.:50:15.

mid-teens. They will not drop much overnight. Outbreaks of rain still

:50:16.:50:20.

in the West, increasingly misty over the hills and coasts in the West but

:50:21.:50:25.

14 or 15 degrees you're stopping temperatures for Tuesday morning.

:50:26.:50:30.

Mild and muddy for the timid but quite damp. -- muggy. More bursts

:50:31.:50:39.

pushing into Scotland and Northern Ireland, cloudy across much of

:50:40.:50:42.

England and Wales, a few showers in East Anglia and the south-east but

:50:43.:50:45.

with some sunshine in the afternoon you might get up to about 24

:50:46.:50:50.

degrees. Further north and west, high teens, not as wet as today but

:50:51.:50:55.

still a few showers with some sunshine at times. The warmest

:50:56.:51:00.

condition in the south and east on Wednesday which is where we will

:51:01.:51:03.

have some of the wettest weather. North and west will have showers and

:51:04.:51:07.

turning a bit cooler. Have a good day.

:51:08.:51:10.

Thank you, see you later. Now this is not an easy subject to discuss.

:51:11.:51:23.

To be told that you are suffering from a terminal illness is something

:51:24.:51:26.

that all of us would find devastating, but some

:51:27.:51:28.

people take it as a chance to change their lives for the better

:51:29.:51:31.

and a new documentary has followed a group of people

:51:32.:51:34.

The award-winning film-maker, Sue Bourne, spoke to 12

:51:35.:51:37.

people who had been told they were going to die.

:51:38.:51:39.

When I look in the mirror, I don't see the same person.

:51:40.:51:44.

Do you ever wonder what you'd do if you were given a

:51:45.:51:56.

terminal diagnosis and told you may only have months to live?

:51:57.:52:02.

Being told you've got a terminal illness hasn't got

:52:03.:52:04.

to be a death sentence - it can actually be a live sentence.

:52:05.:52:08.

I don't ever like to say that I'm dying.

:52:09.:52:10.

I set out to find people who knew death was around the corner

:52:11.:52:17.

but had chosen to make the most of the time they had left.

:52:18.:52:21.

My life isn't about motor neurone disease.

:52:22.:52:23.

Incredibly positive programme despite the subject matter.

:52:24.:52:35.

Documentary maker Sue Bourne joins us on the sofa now and speaking

:52:36.:52:38.

to us from her home in Surrey is Lisa Keech, who appears

:52:39.:52:41.

Thank you so much for your time. When we were mentioning we were

:52:42.:52:49.

going to speak to you, it is a difficult subject for many people to

:52:50.:52:53.

talk about and I note you are incredibly positive and your family

:52:54.:52:57.

are as well but that moment when you have to tell your two daughters and

:52:58.:53:02.

your husband, what is it like? What do you say and when does the

:53:03.:53:08.

positivity begin for you? I husband was with me when we got the news. We

:53:09.:53:13.

did have to tell our girls when we came home. It is a conversation you

:53:14.:53:19.

don't expect to have in your life. One of them asked me, how bad is it,

:53:20.:53:28.

and I said it's as bad as it can get because it is terminal. But what we

:53:29.:53:31.

have to do is make the most of everything. This is a challenge, you

:53:32.:53:38.

can't give up at school, you mustn't go off the rails because if you do

:53:39.:53:43.

that you let this disease take your future. It will probably take me but

:53:44.:53:48.

it up to you if it destroys your future. Carry on your life and

:53:49.:53:52.

overcome it. I suppose the positivity kicked in straightaway.

:53:53.:53:58.

What different had it made? You are incredibly inspirational for a lot

:53:59.:54:01.

of people out there who might have family members or friends who are

:54:02.:54:07.

suffering, you are a big inspiration and incredibly positive so where do

:54:08.:54:10.

you think it comes from and what different is it making? I have

:54:11.:54:15.

always been a glass over full person! It has always been bubbling

:54:16.:54:22.

over! I just think that every day is a blessing and I have always thought

:54:23.:54:26.

that. You have got to make the most of everything. As far as this nasty

:54:27.:54:33.

little disease is concerned, if I let it dent my everyday and let it

:54:34.:54:38.

control me, and I'm miserable and sad and I inflict that on other

:54:39.:54:42.

people, not only is it interfering with my health but with my daily

:54:43.:54:50.

life and it wins and I won't let it. Lisa's attitude is incredible but

:54:51.:54:53.

what made you want to make this programme as a film-maker? Lots of

:54:54.:55:00.

reasons, I've had cancer, I've had my nose squashed up against

:55:01.:55:04.

mortality and I think as a society we don't talk about it enough. We

:55:05.:55:09.

use humour as every body tends to, it's all going to be fine, and I

:55:10.:55:15.

think quite a few people died close to me and there were famous people

:55:16.:55:18.

who died last year and the timing was right. You look at how people

:55:19.:55:24.

approach it and there is no right or wrong way but maybe if you make the

:55:25.:55:29.

most of the time you have left, it could be that bit less hard. I

:55:30.:55:33.

really set out not to make a film about how you face your own death,

:55:34.:55:37.

but more about how you make the most of the time you have left and people

:55:38.:55:41.

like Lisa and everybody in the film, they were wonderful. They were

:55:42.:55:46.

inspirational. How did you find them? Months of research. It has

:55:47.:55:52.

taken a year to make the film because there are a lot of people

:55:53.:55:56.

with terminal illnesses but not a lot of them want to sit in front of

:55:57.:56:00.

a camera and answer questions. We went to charities, blogs, I did

:56:01.:56:06.

radio interviews, and Lisa heard me doing an interview on the radio and

:56:07.:56:10.

got in touch with the radio station and said, I've got terminal cancer

:56:11.:56:14.

but I'm loving every minute of light and you think, bloody hell, this is

:56:15.:56:21.

great. -- every minute of life. Not everybody can be like that, but Lisa

:56:22.:56:26.

said to me, if you have one weekend left, why spend that we can being

:56:27.:56:34.

sad? I took my inspiration from her! You have been inspiring Sue. Have

:56:35.:56:46.

you seen the attitude of your daughter changed a bit? At some

:56:47.:56:49.

stage they are obviously going to lose their mum. They have been

:56:50.:56:55.

dealing with cancer since they were 13. Nearly five years now, that has

:56:56.:57:02.

become the norm I think in some ways. Although it doesn't control

:57:03.:57:06.

our lives, it is a part of it. I think they have used it as a

:57:07.:57:16.

complete focus. They first found out that the drugs were waning and I had

:57:17.:57:19.

a terminal diagnosis as they were about to take their GCSEs. And they

:57:20.:57:29.

came out with a stars and As and with that hanging over your head, to

:57:30.:57:36.

achieve that is remarkable. They are focused and positive and incredibly

:57:37.:57:40.

strong girls. And we are very proud of them and for them. One thing I

:57:41.:57:46.

would say to anyone in this situation is that you have a choice.

:57:47.:57:50.

You can either lay down and your family can lay down or you can

:57:51.:57:55.

think, no, we have a life and we're still going. We have every day to

:57:56.:58:00.

live and we have to make the most of it. And I do think, whether you are

:58:01.:58:05.

in this position or not, you should be doing that, you should be living

:58:06.:58:10.

a wonderful life, happy and kind come what may. It is so

:58:11.:58:14.

inspirational, thank you so much for your time this morning we appreciate

:58:15.:58:19.

you look into it and congratulate your daughters on their brilliant

:58:20.:58:19.

results! You can watch A Time To Live on

:58:20.:58:23.

BBC Two on Wednesday evening at 9pm. If you apply for a job,

:58:24.:58:33.

have an interview but then don't get it, should the employer

:58:34.:58:36.

give you feedback? This is quite an interesting one. We

:58:37.:58:47.

have been talking about our experiences of going for jobs. I got

:58:48.:58:54.

turned down for a job at a popular burger joint and the problem was,

:58:55.:58:58.

they said I didn't have enough experience. I was 16 at the time!

:58:59.:59:06.

And the three people who also went for the interview, they were older

:59:07.:59:10.

than me so it might have been the right decision. It hasn't done you

:59:11.:59:11.

bad. I got a job that a month later! We asked these Salford Uni students

:59:12.:59:18.

the worst job application feedback they'd got,

:59:19.:59:21.

and whether they got any at all. My worst feedback from my job

:59:22.:59:23.

was that I was overqualified. I recently applied for about

:59:24.:59:27.

20 jobs, and I didn't hear back from 19 of them,

:59:28.:59:29.

so it was really disheartening. Usually, I mean, you get no

:59:30.:59:32.

response - they don't reply, they don't e-mail you back or phone

:59:33.:59:35.

you, they just leave it at that, then you're just waiting for a call

:59:36.:59:38.

back and you don't actually get one, so then you don't usually apply

:59:39.:59:42.

for another job because Most frustrating job feedback

:59:43.:59:44.

I've had is when you are told that you didn't promote

:59:45.:59:49.

or sell yourself enough, and that annoys me,

:59:50.:59:51.

I feel that's a copout answer. Most of the time, when I apply

:59:52.:59:55.

for jobs, I don't hear anything back, and it's really

:59:56.:59:58.

frustrating and disheartening. Is interesting. Ben is here with us.

:59:59.:00:10.

This is it the biggest nerve, I have never seen so many responses because

:00:11.:00:13.

we have all been there in that position where you have been through

:00:14.:00:16.

the interview and you are waiting by the phone hoping they will ring you

:00:17.:00:20.

and they will tell you. But what happens if they don't call at all?

:00:21.:00:24.

So many people have told us they have at no feedback, some people

:00:25.:00:28.

waiting ten years! I'm assuming they got another job. Gemma found out she

:00:29.:00:53.

didn't get the job because of a status update from the person who

:00:54.:00:58.

did. One employer says it is nearly impossible to respond to everyone.

:00:59.:01:03.

That is sort of the issue, because, look, if they are sending out so

:01:04.:01:06.

many applications, so many people coming in, do you have the time and

:01:07.:01:11.

resources to respond? A lot of people are suggesting that if

:01:12.:01:15.

feedback becomes compulsory, it will become generic, there is no point.

:01:16.:01:20.

Said the same thing to everyone. The joy of feedback is saying, we

:01:21.:01:24.

thought you were good, but actually you failed on this, this and this.

:01:25.:01:28.

You can use the advice for next time, maybe you need more experience

:01:29.:01:31.

or to prove something else. So that makes it useful for the future. We

:01:32.:01:36.

are always talking rugby skills shortage, businesses are worried

:01:37.:01:40.

about that, and feedback would help people if they knew what they were

:01:41.:01:46.

missing. We talk about the skills gap, training kids for jobs that do

:01:47.:01:50.

not exist yet, we do not know what the jobs of the future will be, so

:01:51.:01:54.

if you are applying for a job, you want to prove you are qualified, but

:01:55.:01:57.

if not, you want to know why and what you can do to maybe get the job

:01:58.:02:02.

next time it becomes available. Emma Bates an interesting point, there is

:02:03.:02:07.

nothing stopping candidate sending a polite e-mail asking for feedback,

:02:08.:02:11.

that would be the proactive approach, rather than just sitting

:02:12.:02:15.

waiting to find out. I didn't get it, what do I need to do next it is

:02:16.:02:22.

a pivotal moment, it could be something that takes you to your

:02:23.:02:26.

next job, and to be sat by the computer waiting for that

:02:27.:02:29.

information, it can be really stressful. As you said, it is about

:02:30.:02:34.

leading onto the next thing, this might just be a holiday job you are

:02:35.:02:37.

applying for, but it could lead onto the next thing, so be back is really

:02:38.:02:44.

useful. Good news, you got the job! You can stay! Back to work tomorrow!

:02:45.:02:49.

was among the winners at last night's Baftas in London.

:02:50.:02:55.

The BBC nature series Planet Earth II won twice,

:02:56.:03:01.

including prize for best television moment

:03:02.:03:02.

for a chase involving newly-hatched iguanas and racer snakes.

:03:03.:03:06.

Here's our entertainment correspondent Lizo Mzimba.

:03:07.:03:12.

It was an evening when the BBC dominated,

:03:13.:03:14.

winning more than three-quarters of the night's awards -

:03:15.:03:17.

its strongest showing in recent years.

:03:18.:03:19.

Happy Valley was a double award winner.

:03:20.:03:24.

The Yorkshire-set crime drama took home Best Drama Series

:03:25.:03:27.

and Best Actress, for Sarah Lancashire.

:03:28.:03:31.

It is the most demanding piece I've ever done as an actor.

:03:32.:03:35.

Damilola, Our Loved Boy, a moving drama about the murdered schoolboy,

:03:36.:03:41.

including Best Supporting Actress for Wunmi Mosaku.

:03:42.:03:48.

On stage, she thanked Damilola's family.

:03:49.:03:53.

I just wanted to thank the Taylors for your courage and honesty.

:03:54.:03:56.

for a drama about so-called honour killing, Murdered By My Father.

:03:57.:04:01.

Best Supporting Actor to Tom Hollander,

:04:02.:04:08.

The BBC's Victoria Derbyshire programme won the news award.

:04:09.:04:16.

There were a couple of awards for Planet Earth II,

:04:17.:04:19.

for its thrilling and emotional snakes-versus-iguana chase.

:04:20.:04:29.

Best Live Event went to the Queen's 90th birthday celebrations,

:04:30.:04:33.

They joked that while drama The Crown might have lost out,

:04:34.:04:40.

Her Majesty has ended up as one of the night's winners.

:04:41.:04:43.

She's the Queen, she can sort that out!

:04:44.:04:47.

She was given an Honorary Fellowship a few years ago,

:04:48.:04:49.

So tonight, the Queen has finally won a Bafta.

:04:50.:04:53.

And actress Joanna Lumley received a standing ovation

:04:54.:04:55.

as she was presented with Bafta's highest accolade, the Fellowship...

:04:56.:05:02.

Yeah, cheers, sweeties. Thanks a lot.

:05:03.:05:10.

..in recognition of a career that's spanned close to half a century.

:05:11.:05:18.

Lizo Mzimba, BBC News, at the Baftas.

:05:19.:05:21.

I was surprised by The Crown not winning anything, you were a big

:05:22.:05:29.

Pat. I definitely wasn't on the judging

:05:30.:05:33.

panel! Time for a last, brief look at the

:05:34.:07:07.

but I'll be back with our lunchtime news at 1:30.

:07:08.:07:16.

She's the person Bear Grylls turns to for help,

:07:17.:07:21.

and as a survival specialist, Megan Hine has done it all -

:07:22.:07:24.

she's escaped a potential attack from lions

:07:25.:07:26.

and been caught in crossfire between two tribal gangs in Kenya.

:07:27.:07:31.

And also managed somehow to escape an armed drugs gang in Thailand as

:07:32.:07:36.

well. that Megan says can help the likes

:07:37.:07:38.

of you and me in everyday life. Morning, lovely to see you, how on

:07:39.:07:51.

earth can it help us? And how do you survive? Welcome for me, it has

:07:52.:07:54.

become an everyday occurrence. I don't know a thing different, this

:07:55.:07:59.

has been my life from a very young age, and I have been very fortunate

:08:00.:08:02.

with some of the experiences I have had. But from a very young age, when

:08:03.:08:07.

I read Shackleton books and things, they talk about the physicality and

:08:08.:08:11.

the struggles that people go through in a wilderness environments, but

:08:12.:08:14.

there was very little about mental resilience. I am like, how do these

:08:15.:08:19.

adventurers and explorers overcome potentially negative emotions like

:08:20.:08:22.

the and anxiety to do what they are doing? And I think, through my own

:08:23.:08:27.

experiences and working with people in extreme environments, it is all

:08:28.:08:32.

about mental resilience and how you then deal with those emotions and

:08:33.:08:35.

what you do with them, so whether it is the coping mechanisms you

:08:36.:08:39.

develop, or putting them into a box, so you can separate out your

:08:40.:08:43.

emotions. That is where I think that the wild or the wilderness can teach

:08:44.:08:47.

us everyday lessons as well also Bible, and that is arriving everyday

:08:48.:08:52.

life like broken down washing machines all the school run and

:08:53.:08:59.

things! Let's start with the lions? Where were you, how many lines, how

:09:00.:09:11.

do copout -- compartmentalised that? I was working with a small team and

:09:12.:09:16.

a contributor who was being filmed in Namibia, and I have just got a

:09:17.:09:19.

machete and the clothes I am standing in, and that is it, to look

:09:20.:09:23.

after this team. The camera team go for the evening, we make fire, we

:09:24.:09:27.

make our little shelter down in the sand to lie on for the night. And I

:09:28.:09:33.

woke up in the middle of the night, as if something had jumped out on

:09:34.:09:37.

you, the fight or flight, I rolled my head over to the side, and there

:09:38.:09:42.

was a huge male lion just outside the fire, patrolling backwards and

:09:43.:09:46.

forwards. He was joined by two females, and it was a really good

:09:47.:09:50.

lesson - we had been out there for three weeks by this stage, literally

:09:51.:09:56.

just eating what I could catch, and the guy could catch as well, so

:09:57.:09:59.

lizards and snakes and things. Our energy was quite low, and it was

:10:00.:10:03.

down to the fact that every night we were preparing everything, and that

:10:04.:10:07.

is what is key, that you have a routine and you work on the

:10:08.:10:11.

preparation as well. Because we had a big pile of brushwood that we

:10:12.:10:14.

could put under fire. If I hadn't been able to keep the fire going, I

:10:15.:10:19.

might not be here today. I am totally amazed by this - what was

:10:20.:10:24.

the first thought going through your head?! A lot of swear words! And

:10:25.:10:30.

then it was just... Then it is like my brain steps into a whole... Well,

:10:31.:10:34.

you have got to deal with this situation, no point in falling

:10:35.:10:38.

apart, you have got to pull yourself together. Particularly when your

:10:39.:10:41.

life is on the line as well, you have to be able to step up and just

:10:42.:10:47.

get on with it. For most people, you actually do, because it is very rare

:10:48.:10:50.

in everyday life that you are in a situation where it is literally life

:10:51.:10:54.

or death. And that is where a lot of people say, we cannot cope with our

:10:55.:10:57.

everyday lives, because a lot of people do not know where the stress

:10:58.:11:02.

and anxiety is coming from, because it is so overwhelming. When you see

:11:03.:11:09.

a lion like that, your brain is so primal, really, it cannot

:11:10.:11:12.

distinguish between seeing somebody's perfect life on Facebook

:11:13.:11:19.

giving you that, wow, the emotional well-being is under fire, compared

:11:20.:11:23.

to a lion attack or whatever, and that is where the wilderness

:11:24.:11:26.

teachers us things about everyday life. Have you always been like

:11:27.:11:32.

this, then? Were you wild as a kid? How did you get into it? I was

:11:33.:11:36.

really fortunate, my parents were really into the outdoors, so all the

:11:37.:11:40.

family holidays were in the mountains of the UK, my dad was

:11:41.:11:44.

really into geology, so it was all about looking at Roxanne things in

:11:45.:11:50.

the Mountains, amazing. I used to escape over the back fence to go to

:11:51.:11:53.

the woods. Gender was never an issue, like it was OK for me to be

:11:54.:11:58.

covered in mud, ripped clothes, just as much as it was for my brother as

:11:59.:12:02.

well. I think that, for me, has set my life on track, and it was not

:12:03.:12:07.

about being male or female, just being me and what I wanted to do.

:12:08.:12:11.

And you do lots of television advisory roles these days, we

:12:12.:12:19.

mentioned Bear Grylls on Mission Survive, what would your rugby,

:12:20.:12:23.

advising him and the team? I work on lots of different shows

:12:24.:12:26.

behind-the-scenes, at the moment I am doing a lot of work with Bear,

:12:27.:12:31.

because he has got a huge amount of stuff going on. I am involved in the

:12:32.:12:35.

scouting process, setting up the journey, setting up the shows, and

:12:36.:12:38.

then I look after the safety of the crew when we are filming. And so,

:12:39.:12:48.

when you are doing all of this, and you are out there, have you ever

:12:49.:12:53.

felt scared? Because you come across as someone... Basie, I need you to

:12:54.:12:56.

be my best friend, having you in my life would make it much easier! Fear

:12:57.:13:04.

is such a natural emotion, and if you didn't feel fear, you would be

:13:05.:13:07.

in more danger because you do not understand the risks you are taking.

:13:08.:13:12.

It is very natural, but it is about controlling those emotions. If you

:13:13.:13:15.

are standing on top of a cliff 20 metres high, you can understand why

:13:16.:13:20.

somebody would be scared - it is exposed, you can pinpoint where the

:13:21.:13:24.

fear is coming from. Whereas in everyday life, you do not know where

:13:25.:13:28.

it stems from, it is much harder to then be able to control it. If you

:13:29.:13:33.

can learn to control it, on top of the cliff where you are exposed, you

:13:34.:13:37.

can then learn, by logical reasoning, to be like, OK, I am

:13:38.:13:41.

close to the edge, but I am not going to jump, I am not going to

:13:42.:13:45.

fall. And you can take that back to everyday life and control it there.

:13:46.:13:47.

Thank you very much for coming in. Megan's book is called

:13:48.:13:50.

Megan Hine: Mind Of A Survivor. We need to film you going on a night

:13:51.:13:54.

out with Steph! But now on BBC One,

:13:55.:13:57.

back with a new series of consumer investigations,

:13:58.:14:04.

it's over to Gloria, Angela

:14:05.:14:07.