03/06/2017 Breakfast


03/06/2017

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Hello, this is Breakfast, with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:00:00.:00:00.

Tough questions for both Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn,

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as they face a television audience of voters.

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My wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what I earn today. How can

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that be fair? Will you allow North Korea or some idiot in Iran to bomb

:00:27.:00:33.

us? It will be too late to start talking them.

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The Prime Minister was forced to defend the government's record

:00:35.:00:36.

public spending, while Mr Corbyn denied he would be weak on defence.

:00:37.:00:41.

We will put more money into the NHS but there is no magic money tree.

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Any circumstance where someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is

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disastrous for the entire planet. Good morning, it's Saturday

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the third of June. Ariana Grande returns to Manchester

:01:02.:01:04.

and visits children in hospital, Hope for ovarian cancer patients,

:01:05.:01:08.

as the early trial of a new drug In sport, it's the biggest prize

:01:09.:01:14.

in European club football, and Cardiff is preparing to host

:01:15.:01:19.

the final of the Champions League between Juventus and Real Madrid,

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for whom, Welsh star Gareth Bale Meanwhile, I've been getting

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to grips with the post war sport As a new production

:01:27.:01:39.

of Annie opens in London - we hear from its star Miranda Hart

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about her West End debut. Suddenly doing something new when

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you are known for other things was intimidating now I love it. I

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totally love it. Good morning. We have swept away the

:02:00.:02:10.

warmth and humidity from the last few days. A cool and fresh weekend

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ahead with spells of sunshine, a few showers and the details coming up.

:02:15.:02:16.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:02:17.:02:22.

audience, just days before the general election.

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They were challenged separately in a special edition

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Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:02:27.:02:29.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:02:30.:02:33.

Our political correspondent Vicky Young was there.

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They came here hoping to persuade people that they have what it takes

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to lead the country. No-one expected an easy ride but from the start it

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was clear that this would be a testing evening. Theresa May was

:02:57.:03:01.

accused of being untrustworthy, of changing her mind on calling an

:03:02.:03:05.

election had on policies such as social care. Others were angry about

:03:06.:03:10.

funding for schools and hospitals. My wage slips from 2009 reflect

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exactly what I am earning today. How can that be fair? We have had to

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take hard choices across the public sector in relation to pay restraint.

:03:21.:03:24.

We did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public

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spending under control as it was not under control under the previous

:03:29.:03:31.

labour government. Brexit is why Theresa May said she called this

:03:32.:03:35.

election. She said she was determined to deliver. We take this

:03:36.:03:40.

opportunity of Brexit, new trade deals around the rest of the world,

:03:41.:03:45.

seeing how we can build a prosperous stronger and fairer Britain. I think

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we can do that and I think we can do that because I believe in Britain

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and the British people. For Jeremy Corbyn, this was a chance to prove

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he was ready to take the top job in politics. He was unapologetic about

:03:59.:04:02.

plans to raise taxes for companies and higher earners. Where will

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skilled workers come from tomorrow? Where are the consumers of tomorrow?

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I think we looked at our society and used public investment in order to

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improve services and give real chances to everybody. Poverty is a

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waste. But Jeremy Corbyn had his most difficult moment when he was

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pressed to say whether or not he would ever use nuclear weapons.

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Would you allow North Korea or some idiot in Iran to bomb us and then

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start talking? It will be too late. No, of course not. The general

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election is less than one week away. This was a great opportunity for

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voters to see both the people will want to be Brymon is a full setting

:04:47.:04:50.

out their vision but coming under real pressure over policies. But

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hope that this will be the moment when the public swings behind them.

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One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

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Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:04:59.:05:00.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:05:01.:05:04.

the Daily Telegraph the party was "not in the business

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Labour has already said it would increase income tax rates

:05:08.:05:18.

to 45 pence in the pound for those earning more than ?80,000.

:05:19.:05:21.

The singer Ariana Grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured

:05:22.:05:24.

in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

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The star spent time with youngsters at the Royal Manchester Children's

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Hospital in a surprise appearance ahead of a benefit concert

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The smiles say it all. Fans like this eight-year-old girl who was

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still recovering from her injuries in hospital, reading the singer who

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means so much to them. The children had been getting ready for bed when

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the star arrived unexpectedly, bringing gifts and signing

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autographs. There were thanks as well for the nurses. And tomorrow

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she will perform at a concert to raise funds for the victims and

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their families. The 22 lives are lost have been at Saint Ann 's

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Square which has become the focal point for those wish to pay tribute,

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to contemplate and to grieve. The Manchester City council says that

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this may be the last weekend the flowers remain in place as it needs

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to look at relocating them respectively. It will now consider

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setting up a permanent memorial in the city. It is a must. The 22 who

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died... Just have to have something that is a testament to what

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happened. I think people will want to come for ever, just to pay their

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respects, really because, as I say, it should not have happened and they

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were babies, won't they? And should have been the night of their life

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and it wasn't. It is sad. A big heart was all of the names on the

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date of birth of all of them would be a good idea. Alongside the

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remembrance, the police operation goes on. Last night a car was taken

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away which they say could be significant to their investigation.

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Police will be out again in force for tomorrow's concert.

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Just after eight we will be speaking to Lily Harrison's dad Adam

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about that encounter with Ariana Grande.

:07:24.:07:27.

A new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising

:07:28.:07:31.

Charities have called it an important step in treating

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Developed by the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS

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Foundation Trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15

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women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part

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The drug enters a cell exactly like folic acid or vitamin B nine. The

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difference is it does not involve getting into normal selves. That is

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why this drug attacks the tumour and you see an encouraging tumour

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response but you do not see side-effects like diarrhoea, hair

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loss or susceptibility to infections as you see another chemotherapy

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patients. -- in other chemotherapy patients.

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Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

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could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%,

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Scientists in China who analysed research involving 200,000 women,

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found patients who took the drug were less likely

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Charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical

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The consumer group Which is calling on British Airways to create

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an automatic compensation system for passengers who are affected

:09:00.:09:02.

by serious flight-delays and cancellations.

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It comes a week after a major IT failure caused hundreds

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of the airline's flights to be grounded.

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Here's our business correspondent Joe Lynam.

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The images of the week from BA. We rear passengers waiting for flights,

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some of which ended up being cancelled. The compensation bill

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could exceed ?100 million for the airline. BA says it will treat

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customers fairly and refund legitimate expenses but consumer

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advocates say that is not enough. In a letter to the chief executive it

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says it compensation should be automatic for patients out

:09:33.:09:37.

passengers out of pocket. They should not have to apply directly to

:09:38.:09:41.

airlines for a refund. An automated system would seem time and money for

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BA as well is prevent companies from making profit from misery of others.

:09:47.:09:50.

People are entitled to money but they are not given it automatically.

:09:51.:09:54.

Passengers are often not realising what they are entitled to. The

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airlines compete compensation because they know what's what you

:09:58.:10:00.

were wrong and what you are entitled to and we think that should be the

:10:01.:10:05.

rules. There are other sectors in energy and water where you are

:10:06.:10:09.

automatically paid compensation if you do not receive servers. In

:10:10.:10:15.

response, BA said it had put additional resources into its call

:10:16.:10:19.

centres to process claims quickly as possible. One group that is not out

:10:20.:10:24.

of pocket are investors in BA's parent company and. Its shares were

:10:25.:10:28.

up this week despite the whirlwind you are by customers. -- despite the

:10:29.:10:33.

world end you would by customers. Over 174 balls fans are due in

:10:34.:10:49.

Cardiff this weekend. Good morning, Thomas. The sun is shining and there

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is a real concern and focus on security. What will be an amazing

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match, won't it? A beautiful morning here today that, actually, the

:11:04.:11:06.

players playing in the National Stadium later on this evening will

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not be witnessing these conditions as the roof has been closed in

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Cardiff for security reasons. I was walking through the centre of town

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to get here this morning and you can see the huge police presence on the

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street. 1500 additional officers from neighbouring forces have come

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in to help in this operation. Today they are as offences around the

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centre of Cardiff and the roads have been blocked off so there are

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expected to be delays for people coming in and leaving. They ask fans

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to arrive at least two hours before into the Stadium as there will be

:11:41.:11:45.

additional security checks. This was always going to be a massive

:11:46.:11:49.

security operation for card of before the atrocities in Manchester

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but last Thursday just gone now, the football Association of Wales

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confirmed that this was the largest scale security operation for any of

:11:58.:12:03.

its sporting events in the UK. Many people looking forward. Thank you

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very much. And if you thought that was a big competition, you have seen

:12:07.:12:10.

nothing yet. The main competition this weekend is spelling. OK... It

:12:11.:12:17.

matters. It mattered to the competitors of an annual spelling

:12:18.:12:20.

bee in America. We have been taking a look. Could you repeat the word?

:12:21.:12:29.

From 11 million entrants, a 12 hour final and it all came down to this

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one word. M a R O seat a I N. And how do you spell dumbstruck? You

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could be forgiven for thinking it mattered less to the 12-year-old

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girl and more to her father. This is an institution in the United States

:12:54.:12:57.

and a monopoly for Indian Americans. This was the 13th time in the world

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and Indian-American took the trophy. How difficult can it be? He was the

:13:02.:13:11.

showman this year. Cockie does not always mean correct. And when this

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young boy stumbled over this world the game was up. So the trophy the

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kudos and the $40,000 first prize goes to this young girl. It leaves

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the rest of Australian the wake of junior genius. Here is one more for

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you. Can you spell inadequate? Did you know the meaning of those words?

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No, I had trouble with the definitions. Did you know what's

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mogollon was? It is an archaeological culture of Indigenous

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people. And the other will work? It was a type of grass. Not only do

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both of us not know how to spell these words, we'd had not even heard

:14:10.:14:15.

of them. This is call my Bluff at 14 minutes past six. The Saturday

:14:16.:14:20.

morning papers, let's have a quick look. The debate finished at ten

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o'clock last night so many papers are struggling to get it on the

:14:24.:14:27.

front page. The Guardian managed on a later edition. They said the Prime

:14:28.:14:30.

Minister faulted as she was challenged over her record on public

:14:31.:14:34.

services. But most of the online pundits seem to think that both

:14:35.:14:38.

candidates scored hits and misses last night. In Scotland yesterday,

:14:39.:14:44.

with Will looking at this story. Nicola Sturgeon saying she will help

:14:45.:14:49.

Jeremy Corbyn. There is talk of if there is a coalition or if the SNP

:14:50.:14:54.

needs to join hands with the Labour Party and the SNP will shore up the

:14:55.:15:00.

Jeremy Corbyn government if there is an inconclusive election result is

:15:01.:15:06.

that she she would not necessarily be part of a coalition but

:15:07.:15:09.

progressive issue by issue talks. Trying to get to the bottom of the

:15:10.:15:14.

Daily Telegraph story for you later, the Tory tax pledge with suggestions

:15:15.:15:18.

overnight from Boris Jens, Johnson that they make pledge more strongly

:15:19.:15:22.

than they have done in the manifesto but they will not do it via income

:15:23.:15:28.

tax. If not, where will the money come from? We will be talking to a

:15:29.:15:35.

former secretary at around ten past eight about that. It is quarter past

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six. And the weather is glorious ahead of the Champions League match.

:15:40.:15:46.

Ben, good morning. Will it be like that for everyone?

:15:47.:15:51.

Y-E-S. Well, not that simple. There is some nice weather, some spells of

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sunshine, but one or two match ours as well. Having said that, for many

:16:01.:16:04.

it will be a lovely start. This picture is from our Weather Watcher

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in St Ives, Cornwall. As I mentioned, there will be some

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passing showers to content with. One thing we have lost is the warmth and

:16:13.:16:15.

humidity over the past few days, swept away by a weather front. As

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band of cloud, which brought some of the thunderstorms yesterday. The

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cloud still hanging around for the time being across parts of eastern

:16:24.:16:26.

and south-eastern England. Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, East Anglia

:16:27.:16:29.

and the south-east will have a disappointing start with some cloud,

:16:30.:16:33.

outbreaks of Ah Chee rain and the odd heavy burst. -- patchy rain. We

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can start the day with a slice of sunshine further north, a bit

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chilly, perhaps the odd fog patches well. Fine for much of Scotland.

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Extra cloud the eastern and north-eastern areas and Northern

:16:47.:16:49.

Ireland. That is summed extra showers showing their hands across

:16:50.:16:52.

western Scotland and Northern Ireland. -- notice some extra

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showers. These will pep up later in the day, and we could see heavy

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thundery downpours in Scotland. We will lose the patchy rain from the

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south-east, so things will improve here. Lots of dry weather across

:17:05.:17:08.

England and Wales generally. Temperatures down on where they have

:17:09.:17:13.

been. So for the big match in Cardiff tonight, even to services

:17:14.:17:16.

Real Madrid, the Champions League final, it should be fine. Let

:17:17.:17:19.

sunshine, temperatures dipping away as the match goes on. We will see a

:17:20.:17:27.

few hours of sunshine for a time, leading us into a dry night for

:17:28.:17:30.

nearly everybody, with temperatures in towns and cities dipping to

:17:31.:17:35.

around 8- 11. Tomorrow it is another day of sunshine and showers. More of

:17:36.:17:38.

the same in many ways. Many places starting dry. The showers get going

:17:39.:17:41.

across parts of northern England, Northern Ireland and Scotland. Late

:17:42.:17:45.

in the day it will cloud of red for the south-west and Wales with some

:17:46.:17:48.

showery rain here as well. Temperatures cool around fresher

:17:49.:17:52.

than recently. Not feeling too bad in the sunshine, 16- 20 degrees. I

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have to briefly show you what happens as we head into the start of

:17:57.:18:00.

next week it has things look like they will turn much more unsettled

:18:01.:18:03.

from the west. Areas of low pressure swarming and ready to bring us

:18:04.:18:06.

somewhat, potentially quite windy weather as we had on through Monday.

:18:07.:18:10.

That rain will sweep in from the south-west, potentially with some

:18:11.:18:12.

strong winds as well. For the weekend, not looking too bad. A mix

:18:13.:18:18.

of sunshine and showers. Lets down Saturday and Sunday, that

:18:19.:18:20.

doesn't look so nice. It is 6:18am. It's now time to join James King

:18:21.:18:24.

and Ben Brown for the Film Review. They're taking a look

:18:25.:18:28.

at the latest cinema releases, including Wonder Woman

:18:29.:18:31.

and After the Storm. Hello, and welcome to the film

:18:32.:18:50.

review on BBC News. Taking us through this week's cinema releases

:18:51.:18:54.

as James King. James, what do you have for us? A globetrotting week

:18:55.:19:00.

this week. From America via ancient Greece, we have DC's new superhero

:19:01.:19:08.

blockbuster Wonder Woman. And from Japan, the quiet and pensive drama

:19:09.:19:15.

After the Storm. And from France and Switzerland, stop motion animation,

:19:16.:19:19.

My Life as a Courgette. If nothing else, that is one of the best titles

:19:20.:19:23.

of the year, isn't it? It certainly is, it is intriguing. Let's begin

:19:24.:19:28.

with Wonder Woman. It has had some pretty good reviews, actually. Yes,

:19:29.:19:33.

a good ours. We had a bit more than eclipse of Wonder Woman last year in

:19:34.:19:37.

Batman versus Superman, a fairly painful experience, but she was good

:19:38.:19:42.

in it. Then she is going to be just this week later on this year, again

:19:43.:19:45.

with Batman and Batman and Superman and various other superheroes. This

:19:46.:19:49.

is her on her own, a stand-alone movie directed by Patty Jenkins. It

:19:50.:19:52.

is an origin story, so where did she come from? She has never referred to

:19:53.:19:57.

as Wonder Woman in the movie, she is Diana Prince. We hear about are up

:19:58.:20:01.

ringing on this remote, magical island created Ivy ancient Greeks,

:20:02.:20:04.

run by these Amazonian warrior women. We learn about her

:20:05.:20:08.

involvement in the First World War. This is Gal Gadot, she is with Chris

:20:09.:20:15.

Pyne, an American pilot and despite a crash lands on this magical island

:20:16.:20:19.

where she lives, and is taken prisoner. -- Chris Pine. My, uh...

:20:20.:20:32.

My name is Steve Trevor, pilot, American expeditionary forces. That

:20:33.:20:38.

is all I am at liberty to say. Assigned to British intelligence.

:20:39.:20:45.

What the hell is this thing? The compels you to reveal the truth. It

:20:46.:20:53.

is really hot. What is your mission? Whoever you are, you more danger

:20:54.:20:56.

than you think. What is your mission? I am a spy. I am a spy. I

:20:57.:21:10.

am a spy. I suppose we are used to seeing all the male superheroes.

:21:11.:21:14.

Superman and iron man and so on. But this is a female superhero. It feels

:21:15.:21:18.

different and refreshing because of that. Also with Patty Jenkins, a

:21:19.:21:21.

female director, as well. Having said that, a lot of it, and part of

:21:22.:21:26.

the reason I enjoyed it, is that it feels quite old-fashioned and

:21:27.:21:29.

traditional. What I mean by that is that it has this refreshing lack of

:21:30.:21:33.

cynicism. I remember in the 1980s and early 1990s when some of what us

:21:34.:21:37.

as were not things to be embarrassed about. They were full of fun,

:21:38.:21:40.

happiness, Joy, rather campy. This is like that. Certainly a lot of DC

:21:41.:21:46.

comic book movies like suicide squad from last year, they have been

:21:47.:21:49.

pretty cynical and pretty moody and fairly miserable. They have done

:21:50.:21:52.

very well but they haven't exactly been full of fun. Wonder Woman is

:21:53.:21:57.

fun. And it feels like stand-alone movie, that doesn't particular

:21:58.:22:00.

connect to anything else. It doesn't particular connect to the rest of

:22:01.:22:05.

the DC world. It has, shock horror, a beginning and a middle and an end.

:22:06.:22:09.

And it makes sense. If you don't like it movies, if you have never

:22:10.:22:13.

seen another comic movie, you could watch this and still enjoy it. I

:22:14.:22:17.

think that is why people love it so much. We also have a Japanese film,

:22:18.:22:20.

After the Storm. Yes, written and directed by Hirokazu Koreeda. He is

:22:21.:22:28.

a great filmmaker of family dramas. Our Little Sister is a few years

:22:29.:22:32.

old, it is well worth seeing. This one is about a writer who is washed

:22:33.:22:36.

up. He had some early success but in his Middle Ages he is struggling to

:22:37.:22:40.

write again, and actually use gambling more than he is writing. He

:22:41.:22:44.

is a strange from his son and his ex-wife. He has a difficult

:22:45.:22:46.

relationship with his mother. They are brought together in his mother's

:22:47.:22:50.

flat one night while they are sheltering from a tornado. It does

:22:51.:22:54.

take quite a while to get to that point and certainly for maybe the

:22:55.:22:57.

first half-hour you do wonder where this is going. But actually, I think

:22:58.:23:01.

that meandering quality tyres is ultimately its real power. It is a

:23:02.:23:05.

film that takes things slowly, it allows characters to blossom slowly,

:23:06.:23:09.

it allows us to get to know them slowly. And it is the antithesis,

:23:10.:23:13.

really, the hyperactive block us. It is very much a slow character piece.

:23:14.:23:19.

It reminded me a little bit, oddly perhaps, of some Michael Lee films.

:23:20.:23:23.

It has that domestic setting, that kitchensink setting. Humour and

:23:24.:23:28.

drama. It is a character driven film rather than a plot driven film.

:23:29.:23:31.

Modest, definitely, but actually really moving. You mentioned the

:23:32.:23:37.

great title, My Life as a Courgette. Yes, all my life as a zucchini if

:23:38.:23:44.

you are in America. It is about a boy sent to a foster home with other

:23:45.:23:48.

orphans whose age. Yes, stop motion animation. This was Oscar-nominated

:23:49.:23:51.

this year, alongside Zootropolis, which one. To get to that was

:23:52.:23:57.

amazing, because this was a small film, a French and Swiss

:23:58.:24:00.

coproduction, 66 minutes. That is how long it is. Really small-scale

:24:01.:24:03.

stuff. To get Oscar-nominated was amazing. Like you said, a boy goes

:24:04.:24:08.

into a foster home. I saw it with subtitles but the clip we have here

:24:09.:24:17.

is dubbed. How old are you, son? Nine. So can you tell me a little

:24:18.:24:29.

bit about your mother? Uh... She really liked to drink beer. Her

:24:30.:24:35.

mashed potatoes were always good and sometimes we had fun. OK. Not

:24:36.:24:41.

always? So, where is your father? Here. Hmm. It has made's chick on it

:24:42.:24:55.

too, my mum always said that mother like chips, so put one on them. OK.

:24:56.:25:01.

I am going to take you to a really nice place with other children who

:25:02.:25:04.

are like you. Kids who have no mum or dad. Does it work? It really

:25:05.:25:11.

does. Heartbreaking, actually. But uplifting. It is not a film about

:25:12.:25:17.

how miserable it is to be in care. There is misery in the film, of

:25:18.:25:21.

course there is. But ultimately it is about the friendships that this

:25:22.:25:24.

character makes. Courgette is his nickname. The friendships he makes,

:25:25.:25:29.

the relationships he has, why it was a great place for him to go to. It

:25:30.:25:34.

is actually quite uplifting. I was think that children's films should

:25:35.:25:37.

have darkness and pain in them, and that is in that, but ultimately it

:25:38.:25:41.

is a feelgood movie. And 66 minutes? It packs a lot in. People often

:25:42.:25:45.

complain of films are too long, but I wonder if people complain this is

:25:46.:25:49.

too short. It is a possibility, because you will be paying the same

:25:50.:25:53.

amount of money. But it shows that if you are economical with your

:25:54.:25:56.

screenplay and write a brilliant story you can pack a lot in, even

:25:57.:26:00.

with a short running time. I have seen films that are to three hours

:26:01.:26:03.

and have much lessened and in this movie. Let's talk about best out at

:26:04.:26:08.

the moment. There were previews of this last weekend, Stephen Fry wrote

:26:09.:26:12.

the book on which this is based, and he did a question-and-answer session

:26:13.:26:14.

in lots of seminars with Roger Allen, the lead actor in this. He

:26:15.:26:19.

plays the title character, really, because the title character is

:26:20.:26:22.

likened to a hippo. He is this rotund, boozy writer and poet

:26:23.:26:27.

investigating some rather strange goings on at a stately home. He is

:26:28.:26:32.

the reason to watch it. Roger Allen is a fantastic actor and he has some

:26:33.:26:37.

outrageous lines in this. He is definitely not PC, but by the end of

:26:38.:26:41.

the movie he is rather heroic Andy rather admire his common sense.

:26:42.:26:46.

Certainly there are some jawdropping lines, some jawdropping dialogue. He

:26:47.:26:50.

is having a whale of a time, just this doozy, couldn't care less kind

:26:51.:26:54.

of guy. Of course the film itself, the plot is hardly edge of your seat

:26:55.:26:58.

stuff. It is a movie to watch because of that league formance.

:26:59.:27:02.

Mixed reviews, but you recommend it? I recommend it because of that lead

:27:03.:27:06.

performance. He is so much fun to spend time with. Stephen Fry wrote

:27:07.:27:10.

the book in 1994 and he said, you know what, I like this character so

:27:11.:27:13.

much I want to revisit him because he does have so many great lines.

:27:14.:27:19.

All right, your best DVD the moment? Yes, so this is The Founder, it is

:27:20.:27:23.

about Raymond crocs, the man who in the 1950s and 1960s turned

:27:24.:27:27.

McDonald's into the big franchise, the multinational franchise that it

:27:28.:27:32.

is now. And it stars Michael Keaton, there was a bit of an Oscar buzz

:27:33.:27:36.

about this when it was announced, but actually a couple of things

:27:37.:27:38.

happen. The release they changed which didn't help things, and people

:27:39.:27:42.

watch the movie and said, well, Michael Keaton is brilliant but

:27:43.:27:45.

actually this guy doesn't seem that likeable. He doesn't really seem

:27:46.:27:48.

that nice. It's got great reviews and I would give it a great review,

:27:49.:27:52.

but the problem with this film is, do you want to watch two hours about

:27:53.:27:55.

someone who doesn't actually seem that likeable layperson? I think it

:27:56.:27:59.

is very interest wise, had driven and determine he was to make this

:28:00.:28:04.

restored into a big success, but he is not someone you are going to

:28:05.:28:08.

think, he is a real big hero. -- restaurant into a big success.

:28:09.:28:11.

People do like success stories and how people create things, though,

:28:12.:28:15.

like Steve jobs. Yes, and in that film he was not lovable all the way

:28:16.:28:19.

through. I do recommend it. Lots of people missed it in the cinema, I

:28:20.:28:22.

recommend it for the small screen. There is that slight issue about it.

:28:23.:28:26.

Michael Keaton is back on form with Spotlight and Bird Pav man. He is

:28:27.:28:31.

brilliant at this because he can do those grey areas where he is playing

:28:32.:28:34.

people who are not obvious or clear-cut. Great stuff. Thank you

:28:35.:28:38.

for being with us. That is it for this week. Thank you so much for

:28:39.:28:42.

watching the Film Review. Goodbye to now.

:28:43.:29:13.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:29:14.:29:15.

Coming up before seven, Ben has the weather.

:29:16.:29:17.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:29:18.:29:24.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:29:25.:29:27.

audience, just days before the general election.

:29:28.:29:29.

They were challenged separately in a special edition

:29:30.:29:31.

Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:29:32.:29:35.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:29:36.:29:38.

One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

:29:39.:29:49.

Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:29:50.:29:51.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:29:52.:29:54.

the Daily Telegraph the party was "not in the business

:29:55.:29:57.

Labour has already said it would increase income tax rates

:29:58.:30:01.

to 45-pence in the pound for those earning more than ?80,000.

:30:02.:30:09.

The pop star Ariana Grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital

:30:10.:30:12.

who were injured in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

:30:13.:30:16.

The singer spent time chatting to patients and posing

:30:17.:30:18.

for photographs at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital ahead

:30:19.:30:20.

of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid

:30:21.:30:23.

A new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising

:30:24.:30:33.

Charities have called it an important step in treating

:30:34.:30:37.

Developed by the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS

:30:38.:30:42.

Foundation Trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15

:30:43.:30:45.

women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part

:30:46.:30:48.

Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

:30:49.:30:57.

could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%,

:30:58.:31:00.

Scientists in China who analysed research involving 200,000 women,

:31:01.:31:04.

found patients who took the drug were less likely

:31:05.:31:07.

Charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical

:31:08.:31:10.

Do you know when I comes after E and how many Cs

:31:11.:31:27.

Are you a good speller? ... Two. Two Cs. It's on the autocue... I almost

:31:28.:31:47.

got away with it. A 12-year-old girl from California

:31:48.:31:49.

has won the US National Spelling Bee Ananya Vinay correctly

:31:50.:31:52.

spelled the word marocain - a type of dress fabric -

:31:53.:31:56.

to defeat Rohan Rajeev and win She says she will split the money

:31:57.:31:59.

with her younger brother. She had to spell about 200 words get

:32:00.:32:12.

that. It will go through some of them later. How was your spelling,

:32:13.:32:18.

Mike? Isn't there a rhyme about when I comes before E? There are

:32:19.:32:24.

exceptions, however. Test later. I would like that. Sure we do now?

:32:25.:32:36.

Committee? I think that is enough for now.

:32:37.:32:43.

Talking now about the Champions League final in Cardiff will Gareth

:32:44.:32:51.

bale LA? It probably will not start. But he is fit. Is a Spanish

:32:52.:33:00.

journalist walking from Madrid to Cardiff. He is in somewhere in

:33:01.:33:08.

Bristol at the moment. He will be singing, that is how you recognise

:33:09.:33:09.

him. Whether Bale plays or not,

:33:10.:33:12.

Real Madrid, are aiming to become the first team since 1990

:33:13.:33:15.

to win back to back So it could be a historic

:33:16.:33:18.

night in Cardiff. heavyweights, Juventus,

:33:19.:33:21.

whom the Madrid Manager Zinedine Real Madrid and Juventus fans have

:33:22.:33:41.

travelled here in their tens of thousands. Cardiff has welcomed to

:33:42.:33:46.

the giants of European football for what could be a classic. It will be

:33:47.:33:52.

great. If you win it is going to be the best experience in my life. We

:33:53.:33:56.

have a balanced teams were confident we can win. For us to defeat

:33:57.:34:08.

Juventus... Real Madrid always win the finals. At 39, the goalkeeper

:34:09.:34:16.

knows it may be his last chance. In a season when British teams again

:34:17.:34:20.

fell short in Europe at least one British player has reached the

:34:21.:34:24.

final. A homecoming for Gareth bale. The trouble is he is unlikely to

:34:25.:34:30.

start or Real Madrid. He may be at the heart of the market into this

:34:31.:34:34.

final. He is plastered all over town. But he has not actually been

:34:35.:34:38.

in the Madrid team for about six weeks because of injury. It is

:34:39.:34:42.

disappointing, especially in his hometown but I think it would

:34:43.:34:46.

probably get his head around it if he doesn't start he will come on and

:34:47.:34:50.

make an impact on what he does and that 20 minutes or half an hour,

:34:51.:34:54.

maybe even longer in extra time. He is a special player who can score

:34:55.:35:01.

all types of goals. He won the Champions League in 2008 and the FA

:35:02.:35:09.

Cup here in 2004. A teenage scoring star than he has developed into an

:35:10.:35:14.

icon of the game. A brand that is still a serial winner. A man to the

:35:15.:35:18.

grand occasion. That is what tonight promises to be.

:35:19.:35:19.

It was a positive evening for Northern Ireland as they beat

:35:20.:35:22.

New Zealand 1-0 in Belfast last night.

:35:23.:35:25.

The friendly had been organised as Michael O'Neill's side warm up

:35:26.:35:28.

for next week's World Cup qualifier in Azerbaijan.

:35:29.:35:31.

The only goal of the game, came from the Scottish Premiership's

:35:32.:35:35.

leading scorer: Ross County's, Liam Boyce.

:35:36.:35:37.

In just a couple of hours, the British and Irish Lions

:35:38.:35:40.

will kick off their tour of New Zealand with a match

:35:41.:35:43.

against the Provincial Barbarians, in Whangarei.

:35:44.:35:45.

Head coach Warren Gatland, has named a starting fifteen,

:35:46.:35:47.

largely made up, of those who were in camp together before

:35:48.:35:50.

the tour, with captain Sam Warburton part of an all-Welsh back-row.

:35:51.:35:54.

The Provincial Barbarians' Number 10, is Bryn Gatland,

:35:55.:35:57.

a 22-year-old who has represented the Auckland Blues,

:35:58.:35:59.

He can probably expect to make a few tackles on the weekend but we have

:36:00.:36:17.

not spoken too much about the game and he is excited about the

:36:18.:36:21.

opportunity, if he does get a chance to play against us looking forward

:36:22.:36:23.

to seeing how he goes. England all rounder Chris Woakes has

:36:24.:36:25.

been ruled out of the rest of the Champions Trophy,

:36:26.:36:28.

due to a side strain, he picked up in the opening

:36:29.:36:31.

match of the tournament. Woakes only played, two overs,

:36:32.:36:33.

of Thursday's win, over Bangladesh England are unlikely

:36:34.:36:37.

to name his replacement, until this afternoon,

:36:38.:36:42.

after the England Lions match, which involves two of the possible

:36:43.:36:44.

candidates: Steve Finn and Tom Some better news for England though,

:36:45.:36:47.

because elsewhere in their group, the match between Australia

:36:48.:36:51.

and New Zealand ended in a draw - after rain forced the

:36:52.:36:54.

match to be abandoned. That means England now need only one

:36:55.:36:59.

more win to guarantee a place At the French Open,

:37:00.:37:03.

Britain's Andy Murray and Kyle Edmund are

:37:04.:37:06.

in action later today while defending mens

:37:07.:37:08.

champion Novak Djokovic is through to the fourth round,

:37:09.:37:10.

but he had to fight for it. Argentine Diego Schwartzman,

:37:11.:37:14.

the world number 41, took Djokovic, to

:37:15.:37:15.

five sets yesterday. The world number two though had

:37:16.:37:17.

enough, to see out the victory. The nine-time champions

:37:18.:37:21.

at Roland Garros through in straight sets against, Nikoloz Basilashvili,

:37:22.:37:26.

dropping only one game, The defending women's champion,

:37:27.:37:28.

Garbine Muguruza, is safely She beat Yulia Putintseva,

:37:29.:37:37.

in straight sets. It's a big day in the racing

:37:38.:37:43.

calendar with the Derby at Epsom. There was a surprise on day one

:37:44.:37:46.

of the meeting where Enable, ridden by Frankie

:37:47.:37:50.

Dettori, won the Oaks. John Gosden's filly was a 6-1 shot

:37:51.:37:52.

for the mile-and-a-half Classic, run in driving rain,

:37:53.:37:56.

after a thunderstorm hit the track Odds-on favourite

:37:57.:37:59.

Rhododendron finished second. It grew up in the bomb sites of

:38:00.:38:04.

Britain, after the Second World War, and is once again now proving to be,

:38:05.:38:08.

one of the fastest growing cycling It is cycle speedway

:38:09.:38:12.

and as the British team, arrive in Poland today,

:38:13.:38:15.

as they build up to the World Championship later this year,

:38:16.:38:19.

I've been to train at Coventry No brakes, no gears just dirt and

:38:20.:38:39.

plenty of guts. And cycle Speedway is accessible to all ages, even if

:38:40.:38:46.

you are five. Like Lucy. It is a little bit slippery. I love it

:38:47.:38:54.

because I dislike it. It is cycling at its purest, really. It is rough,

:38:55.:39:01.

ready and raw. It took off in the rubble of bombsites after the Second

:39:02.:39:08.

World War. Only a bomb site, a bunch of kids having fun. But here is

:39:09.:39:12.

where stars of speed are born. Sit back and see if you can spot a

:39:13.:39:16.

champion of tomorrow. One day the crowd will rule so the children who

:39:17.:39:20.

learnt it all the hard way on a cycle Speedway. It started after the

:39:21.:39:24.

war on the bombsites and, you know, a load of kids with nothing to do.

:39:25.:39:31.

Decided to make like a Speedway. It boomed. Tracks were absolutely

:39:32.:39:38.

everywhere. As cities were rebuilt in the post-war years, the cycle

:39:39.:39:41.

Speedway tracks disappeared. But now purpose-built ones like this one in

:39:42.:39:45.

Coventry have brought it back as a cheaper and safer alternative to

:39:46.:39:49.

motor Speedway. There are leagues again and the World Championships in

:39:50.:39:52.

Australia later this year. We are trying to reinvent it a little bit

:39:53.:39:57.

and add some flair. Really trying to get people involved from all age

:39:58.:40:03.

groups. It is far more accessible and not so worrying about being on

:40:04.:40:07.

the back of a motorbike. It also makes it easier to turn up and pay a

:40:08.:40:12.

couple of quid, hire a bike and enter a race. This is where the

:40:13.:40:16.

nerves kick in. This is the position you need to adopt for the maximum

:40:17.:40:17.

speed up to the first corner. Cut up there, trying to come inside.

:40:18.:40:36.

Ooh sometimes... Nearly at the fence. It is fast and explosive with

:40:37.:40:43.

four riders competing over four labs. They say in this sport it is

:40:44.:40:49.

first or dirt and most races are won as you skid around the corners. It

:40:50.:40:54.

is a little frightening because you do not know where if you will fall.

:40:55.:40:59.

You just want to get the inside of people and overtake them. I get

:41:00.:41:02.

quite aggressive. It is full contact. And you either come out on

:41:03.:41:08.

the right side or the wrong side. Indeed, the whole British

:41:09.:41:11.

championship was won on the very last bend last season. I was ten

:41:12.:41:17.

yards away from being a champion. I was happy with second. It can

:41:18.:41:23.

certainly hurt when your dreams and up in the dirt. How incredible, to

:41:24.:41:34.

go the whole season and have decided on the final bend. Cycling at its

:41:35.:41:39.

purest form. Talking about the difference about that and the

:41:40.:41:45.

velodrome. These are free will bikes unlike the ones in the velodrome. No

:41:46.:41:50.

gears, no brakes. It is the purest cheapest dirtiest bikes because they

:41:51.:41:54.

are so raw and simple. When you are doing it, did you feel you are

:41:55.:41:59.

constantly leaning left. It is a small track. That is part of it,

:42:00.:42:04.

when you go around the bend. I suppose that is why thrives in the

:42:05.:42:07.

inner city. You just don't need a lot of base. Thank you very much.

:42:08.:42:09.

She's become one of Britain's biggest stars after appearing

:42:10.:42:16.

Now the actor Miranda Hart is making her West End debut

:42:17.:42:21.

She's playing Miss Hannigan - the infamous orphanage manager -

:42:22.:42:25.

in the musical which first opened in America 40 years ago.

:42:26.:42:28.

Our arts editor, Will Gompertz has been to meet Miranda and three

:42:29.:42:32.

of her co-stars as they prepare for next week's opening night.

:42:33.:42:38.

# It's a hard knock life... The show may be called Annie that this

:42:39.:42:49.

particular West End reduction is all about around. It is a vulnerable

:42:50.:42:55.

place when you are the face on the poster. You think if people are

:42:56.:43:02.

wanting to knock me down. There is that fear. We are very good at

:43:03.:43:11.

celebrating success, we prefer to pick on the things we are not good

:43:12.:43:16.

at. Does it feel like this is a content rich story? Kind. You can

:43:17.:43:21.

relate to it with orphans. There will always be orphans in the world

:43:22.:43:26.

like people in Syria and the it is kind of putting old-fashioned

:43:27.:43:32.

stories into today's life. # It's a hard knock life... Who has got the

:43:33.:43:40.

worst American accent? Oh, that is a harsh question! Probably me. I was

:43:41.:43:50.

going to say that! That is a great idea. Basically call them, I am

:43:51.:43:58.

moving on. Miranda made her name with a sitcom she is now a star.

:43:59.:44:03.

What advice does she have? Being yourself and doing things out guided

:44:04.:44:08.

and having fun and not getting caught up with any trappings of

:44:09.:44:14.

fate, wanting to be about fame or money because that does bring you

:44:15.:44:18.

happiness. There has been discussion of Veranda coming back. I like the

:44:19.:44:24.

idea of Miranda and Gary being married. It could be a sitcom. Don't

:44:25.:44:29.

get married. I am not. I am best man. I miss my sitcom family and the

:44:30.:44:36.

character but whether that means I will start writing again, I do not

:44:37.:44:41.

know. She does have plenty to get on with. Not least spending the summer

:44:42.:44:44.

living her dream and starring in this West End musical.

:44:45.:44:49.

That has going to be on your brain all day. I do like the song,

:44:50.:44:57.

however. By the end of the day you won't, I will sing it to you.

:44:58.:45:04.

That doesn't look like a hard knock weather day.

:45:05.:45:10.

I wish I could think of a number pun now. Yes, a lovely start in many

:45:11.:45:16.

places today. A sunny start in those spots. Through the day we will see

:45:17.:45:20.

one or two showers starting to develop. Some of those could be on

:45:21.:45:24.

the heavy side. One thing we haven't lost is all the warmth and humidity

:45:25.:45:28.

we had over the last couple of days. It has been swept away by this

:45:29.:45:32.

stripe of clouds, a weather front which has moved through.

:45:33.:45:34.

Thunderstorms across parts of the south-east yesterday. The remnants

:45:35.:45:38.

of this front still hanging on a path -- across parts of Yorkshire

:45:39.:45:42.

and East Anglia. A bit of patchy rain here for a time. A nice slice

:45:43.:45:46.

of sunshine before showers start to march in from the north-west. Some

:45:47.:45:50.

of these showers will really be on the heavy side. Showers probably

:45:51.:45:53.

have used in the middle part of the day for Northern Ireland. It will be

:45:54.:45:57.

in the middle part of the afternoon that the showers turned heavy across

:45:58.:46:00.

Scotland. Some of these could contain rumbles of thunder. Lots of

:46:01.:46:04.

rain in a short space of time. The showers could be slow-moving across

:46:05.:46:07.

north-eastern parts of Scotland. 12 showers the Northern England. It

:46:08.:46:10.

should be largely dry this afternoon across the East Midlands and East

:46:11.:46:14.

Anglia, down into the south-east. 3122, not too bad in the sunshine,

:46:15.:46:18.

but not assume human as yesterday. A few showers into the afternoon.

:46:19.:46:23.

Quite hit and miss in east Wales and the south-west, but they should

:46:24.:46:26.

clear away as we head into the first part of the evening. The big match

:46:27.:46:29.

in Cardiff tonight, the Champions League final, it should be fine,

:46:30.:46:33.

some late sunshine, but it will turn cooler as the match goes on. It is

:46:34.:46:37.

going to turn into a fairly cool night for many of us. They largely

:46:38.:46:41.

dry night as well. Showers will continue for a time across Northern

:46:42.:46:44.

Ireland Scotland but even here they will fade away. And cities, 9- 11

:46:45.:46:48.

degrees. Tomorrow, essentially we do it all again. Another day of

:46:49.:46:52.

sunshine and showers. A few more showers across northern England

:46:53.:46:54.

tomorrow. Northern Ireland Scotland seeing heavy showers, clouding over

:46:55.:46:58.

a bit for the south-west and Wales late in the day, with some showery

:46:59.:47:01.

rain starting to develop. Temperature wise we're looking at

:47:02.:47:06.

highs 16- 20 degrees. Still that's slightly cooler and fresher feel.

:47:07.:47:09.

You might not want to think about the start of the new wheat just yet

:47:10.:47:13.

but I have to show you this because things are going to change, turning

:47:14.:47:17.

much more unsettled from the western areas of low pressure piling in,

:47:18.:47:20.

bringing wet and potentially windy weather for some of us on Monday.

:47:21.:47:25.

You don't have to show us that. You just don't. It is not his fault, I

:47:26.:47:29.

must remember, it is never their fault.

:47:30.:47:30.

It's 6:47 and you're watching Breakfast.

:47:31.:47:32.

This week the team is at the Hay Literature Festival.

:47:33.:47:59.

Summer is on the way and, well, it wouldn't be a British summer

:48:00.:48:03.

without a visit to a good old fashioned festival.

:48:04.:48:09.

Known as the Town of Books, Hay-on-Wye, in Wales,

:48:10.:48:16.

It's a literary mecca, an annual gathering of artists,

:48:17.:48:22.

authors, Daleks and, yep, even Royals.

:48:23.:48:33.

It's even been called the Woodstock of the Mind by none other

:48:34.:48:36.

than former US President Bill Clinton.

:48:37.:48:39.

This year it's the 30th Hay Festival and the line-up is pretty stellar.

:48:40.:48:42.

Well, for the second year in a row, we've been invited to share some

:48:43.:48:46.

of our favourite experiences and show off some really good tech,

:48:47.:48:49.

all in front of a real, live audience of actual people.

:48:50.:48:52.

A packed tent waited, all that we had to do

:48:53.:49:02.

We have robots falling over, experiments in haptic feedback

:49:03.:49:08.

and demos in binaural sound, but that was nothing compared

:49:09.:49:13.

to the climax - a Click-created wavy, shouty game built

:49:14.:49:19.

In the meantime, it can't have have escaped your attention that around

:49:20.:49:24.

the UK things are getting a touch political.

:49:25.:49:27.

As the general election looms, those politicians are using increasingly

:49:28.:49:29.

sophisticated techniques in order to learn more about us.

:49:30.:49:42.

The advertising reach of Facebook has long been an open secret,

:49:43.:49:46.

but now it's something the political parties are getting in on too.

:49:47.:49:49.

In fact, both the Trump campaign and the Leave.EU groups credited

:49:50.:49:54.

Facebook as being a vital part of their electioneering.

:49:55.:49:58.

We know that the personal details that you give to social networks

:49:59.:50:02.

allow them to send you relevant, targeted content, and it goes much

:50:03.:50:05.

deeper than just your basic demographics.

:50:06.:50:08.

There are now data analytics companies claiming to be able

:50:09.:50:13.

to micro-target and micro-tweak messages for individual readers,

:50:14.:50:18.

If you know the personality of the people you're targeting,

:50:19.:50:24.

you can nuance your messaging to resonate more effectively

:50:25.:50:27.

What's also emerging is that political parties have been

:50:28.:50:33.

using this data to reach potential voters, on a very granular level.

:50:34.:50:37.

So who is being targeted on Facebook and how?

:50:38.:50:41.

Well, until now, there's been nothing around to analyse any

:50:42.:50:45.

of this, but the snap general election galvanised

:50:46.:50:47.

Louis Knight-Webb and Sam Jeffers to develop Who Targets Me,

:50:48.:50:51.

a plug-in to tell each of us how we're being targeted.

:50:52.:50:57.

When you install the plug-in for the first time, it asks

:50:58.:51:00.

for your age, your gender and your location, and then it

:51:01.:51:03.

starts scouring your Facebook feed looking for adverts

:51:04.:51:09.

So once you've installed the plug-in, it works

:51:10.:51:17.

in the background to extract the whole advert that you see

:51:18.:51:20.

So it pulls out the headline, the subtitle, any related videos,

:51:21.:51:24.

We also get the reaction - so how many likes, how many

:51:25.:51:28.

comments, how many shares - so we can see which messages

:51:29.:51:31.

Are they particularly clandestine messages,

:51:32.:51:34.

are they slightly subversive, are they even fake news?

:51:35.:51:36.

But how do data companies get the information in the first place?

:51:37.:51:40.

A lot of the quizzes you fill out on Facebook or,

:51:41.:51:43.

you know, you open a survey, it asks your Facebook profile

:51:44.:51:46.

Sometimes you'll notice that there's a lot of permissions attached

:51:47.:51:50.

and as soon as you click yes, all of your data is mined,

:51:51.:51:53.

and it's then sold on to data brokers who then, eventually,

:51:54.:51:56.

sell it to the political parties for use in their campaigns.

:51:57.:51:59.

Although Facebook says it doesn't sell our information on,

:52:00.:52:04.

data brokers can overlay any details they mine from the site with other

:52:05.:52:11.

datasets that they have on people based on their email addresses.

:52:12.:52:14.

The next step after that of course is to find similar users that

:52:15.:52:18.

are using Facebook and then target adverts, from that advertiser that

:52:19.:52:21.

supplied the email addresses, to those users.

:52:22.:52:22.

There are just some people that you don't find on Twitter.

:52:23.:52:28.

The very nature of the fact that I can't see your adverts,

:52:29.:52:32.

you can't see my adverts, means that this approach had to be

:52:33.:52:35.

It's a first of its kind anywhere in the world on this scale,

:52:36.:52:42.

giving us citizens some transparency into what we're being shown,

:52:43.:52:44.

Do you think that people wouldn't know that certain things are advert

:52:45.:52:51.

A lot of the time people are scrolling through Facebook

:52:52.:53:03.

and the adverts fit into this weird intersection of friend

:53:04.:53:06.

It's quite easy to miss the adverts on Facebook.

:53:07.:53:09.

So far, Who Targets Me has some 6,700 users in 620 constituencies,

:53:10.:53:12.

and it's rising as we near polling day.

:53:13.:53:15.

On the down side, it's only as good as the data it's managed

:53:16.:53:18.

to crowd-source, so it isn't necessarily representative,

:53:19.:53:20.

and it also doesn't work with mobile Facebook,

:53:21.:53:22.

So we're seeing a mixture of two things.

:53:23.:53:27.

We're seeing, firstly, A/B testing, which is where I try out two

:53:28.:53:34.

different messages with the same group.

:53:35.:53:36.

I see which one gets the best reaction and then

:53:37.:53:39.

We're also seeing targeting, which is where I pick a particular

:53:40.:53:43.

demographic of people, and then I send a message that's

:53:44.:53:45.

So, for example, it might be young people targeted

:53:46.:53:49.

The data from Who Targets Me is also being poured over by analysts

:53:50.:53:58.

One aspect of their research is collecting dark posts,

:53:59.:54:02.

ads which are here one day and gone the next.

:54:03.:54:09.

It gives us the ability to create a repository of those dark posts.

:54:10.:54:13.

So if promises are being made on Facebook, in ads which will

:54:14.:54:16.

disappear the day after you use them, we should be able to go back

:54:17.:54:22.

to those after the election, look at them, evaluate them

:54:23.:54:28.

and maybe discuss them in the cold light of day.

:54:29.:54:31.

And the irony is that, as we demand more transparency

:54:32.:54:35.

from public bodies, the whole basis of political propaganda could be

:54:36.:54:39.

on the brink of a revolutionary change.

:54:40.:54:41.

What's interesting, I think, about the new environment

:54:42.:54:43.

is the potential for using paid advertising and other techniques

:54:44.:54:46.

to create individual propaganda bubbles around individual voters.

:54:47.:54:49.

And that's not about controlling the market as a whole,

:54:50.:54:52.

but it's about using smart targeted which, in a sense,

:54:53.:54:55.

creates such a compelling and overarching information

:54:56.:54:57.

environment for individual people that that in some ways constrains

:54:58.:55:01.

what they do and controls what they do.

:55:02.:55:04.

I think that's why some academic commentators and others

:55:05.:55:06.

are beginning to think some of this is a bit spooky.

:55:07.:55:14.

But politicians aren't the only ones with Facebook on their minds.

:55:15.:55:17.

The social network was one of many topics on the very large brain

:55:18.:55:21.

of national treasure and tech geek Stephen Fry.

:55:22.:55:24.

I met up with him after he gave a lecture at the Hay Festival

:55:25.:55:28.

highlighting how he thinks the world is being changed by social media,

:55:29.:55:31.

The very current conversation is whether Facebook and platforms

:55:32.:55:34.

like them should actually be considered publishers?

:55:35.:55:37.

Should they take responsibility for what ends up on the site?

:55:38.:55:39.

They are aware there is a problem, a serious problem.

:55:40.:55:42.

If 80%, some people have said, is the...

:55:43.:55:44.

You know, in proportion of people who get their news from Facebook

:55:45.:55:48.

rather than from mainstream media, then surely it is incumbent

:55:49.:55:51.

upon someone who is providing 80% of their news sources to make sure

:55:52.:56:02.

that those news sources are not defamatory, blatant lies,

:56:03.:56:04.

propaganda, the wrong kind of, you know, insulting...

:56:05.:56:14.

I would posit there that a publisher is responsible for all the people

:56:15.:56:17.

They are employed by that publisher and Facebook is clearly not that.

:56:18.:56:22.

So do we need a third definition, a third thing?

:56:23.:56:25.

I think there is a median sort of definition that it's not

:56:26.:56:28.

beyond the wit of lawyers of the right kind to find that.

:56:29.:56:32.

Your presentation was a warning that people should prepare

:56:33.:56:35.

for the changes that are coming, for example, artificial

:56:36.:56:37.

I said that it was a sort of transformation of

:56:38.:56:44.

You know, it's an obsolescence of certain types of job,

:56:45.:56:49.

but that doesn't mean forced redundancy of millions of workers.

:56:50.:56:51.

I mentioned one of the pleasing things about AI and robotics,

:56:52.:56:54.

and that is what's known as Moravec's paradox,

:56:55.:56:56.

that what we're incredibly bad at, as individuals, machines tend to be

:56:57.:57:00.

Complicated sums, rapid and incredible access of memory

:57:01.:57:04.

from a database of a kind that we could never do,

:57:05.:57:07.

sorting and swapping of information and cataloguing

:57:08.:57:09.

But things we can do without even thinking,

:57:10.:57:20.

like walk across the room or pick up a glass and have a sip of water,

:57:21.:57:24.

But that's fine, because we don't want them to do that for us.

:57:25.:57:29.

Where it gets difficult is in medium sort of service jobs,

:57:30.:57:32.

Well, you could go the etymological route, and you could say

:57:33.:57:38.

Legere is read and inter, interleg, and that's pretty good,

:57:39.:57:43.

Just being able to see connections in things and people are talking

:57:44.:57:52.

about the moment that we arrive at AGI, artificial general

:57:53.:57:55.

intelligence, and that's when the various types of pattern

:57:56.:58:01.

recognition, you know, numbers, data, you know,

:58:02.:58:02.

certain faces and things like that, they all come together

:58:03.:58:05.

so that they can be intelligent across these different things.

:58:06.:58:12.

If you've got an artificial intelligence that's good at that

:58:13.:58:14.

and another one that's good at that and another one that's good at that

:58:15.:58:18.

Surely, just a collection of specialists of intelligences

:58:19.:58:20.

under one umbrella is a general intelligence.

:58:21.:58:26.

It doesn't have to be a breakthrough, it just has to be

:58:27.:58:30.

I think that's very likely to be the way it goes.

:58:31.:58:39.

But maybe you give it something else, some other kind of instinct

:58:40.:58:42.

Its reward is similar to our reward system which is really

:58:43.:58:46.

It's tryptophan and serotonin and endorphins of various kinds that

:58:47.:58:50.

reward us and then we have a pain system to deter us, and there's

:58:51.:58:53.

nothing to stop us giving that to a machine.

:58:54.:58:56.

Stephen, thank you so much for your time.

:58:57.:58:58.

Thank you for having us at your place.

:58:59.:59:01.

That is it for this shortcut of Click.

:59:02.:59:05.

The full-length version is on iPlayer.

:59:06.:59:06.

You can follow us on Facebook for loads of extra content as well.

:59:07.:00:06.

Hello, this is Breakfast, with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:00:07.:00:09.

Tough questions for both Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn,

:00:10.:00:11.

as they face a television audience of voters.

:00:12.:00:20.

My wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what I am earning today. How

:00:21.:00:26.

can that be fair was to mark we will put more money into the NHS but

:00:27.:00:31.

there is no magic money tree. Would you allow North Korea or some idiot

:00:32.:00:37.

in Iran to bomb us and then start talking? Any second stands in which

:00:38.:00:41.

someone is prepared to use a nuclear weapon is disastrous to the whole

:00:42.:00:42.

planet. Good morning, it's

:00:43.:00:49.

Saturday the 3rd of June. Ariana Grande returns to Manchester

:00:50.:00:52.

and visits children in hospital who were injured

:00:53.:00:55.

in the arena bombing. Hope for ovarian cancer patients,

:00:56.:00:59.

as the early trial of a new drug In sport, it's the biggest prize

:01:00.:01:03.

in European club football, and Cardiff is preparing to host

:01:04.:01:09.

the final of the Champions League between Juventus and Real Madrid,

:01:10.:01:12.

for whom, Welsh star Gareth Bale Meanwhile, I've been getting

:01:13.:01:15.

to grips with the post war sport As a new production

:01:16.:01:28.

of Annie opens in London - we hear from its star Miranda Hart

:01:29.:01:32.

about her West End debut. Suddenly doing something

:01:33.:01:38.

new when you are known for other Good morning. We swept away the

:01:39.:01:59.

warmth and humidity from the last few days. OTHERS: fresh weekend

:02:00.:02:03.

ahead with spells of sunshine, a few passing showers and details coming

:02:04.:02:05.

up. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have

:02:06.:02:05.

faced tough questions from a TV audience, just days before

:02:06.:02:10.

the general election. They were challenged separately

:02:11.:02:12.

in a special edition Mrs May faced uncomfortable

:02:13.:02:14.

questions about NHS funding. While Mr Corbyn faced a robust

:02:15.:02:18.

exchange over whether he would use Our political correspondent

:02:19.:02:21.

Vicky Young was there. They came here hoping to persuade

:02:22.:02:29.

people that they have what it takes No-one expected an easy ride

:02:30.:02:33.

but from the start it was clear that this would be

:02:34.:02:40.

a testing evening. Theresa May was accused

:02:41.:02:44.

of being untrustworthy, of changing her mind on calling

:02:45.:02:46.

an election and on policies such Others were angry about funding

:02:47.:02:49.

for schools and hospitals. My wage slips from 2009 reflect

:02:50.:02:52.

exactly what I am earning today. We have had to take hard

:02:53.:02:56.

choices across the public sector in relation to public

:02:57.:03:08.

sector pay restraint. We did that because of the decisions

:03:09.:03:10.

we had to take to bring public spending under control

:03:11.:03:17.

because it was not under control under the previous

:03:18.:03:20.

Labour government. Brexit is why Theresa May

:03:21.:03:21.

said she called this She said she was

:03:22.:03:24.

determined to deliver. We take this opportunity

:03:25.:03:26.

of Brexit, new trade deals around the rest of the world,

:03:27.:03:28.

seeing how we can build a prosperous I think we can do that

:03:29.:03:32.

and I think we can do that because I believe in Britain

:03:33.:03:36.

and the British people. For Jeremy Corbyn, this

:03:37.:03:39.

was a chance to prove he was ready to take

:03:40.:03:41.

the top job in politics. He was unapologetic about plans

:03:42.:03:44.

to raise taxes for companies Where will the skilled

:03:45.:03:47.

workers come from tomorrow? I think it's time that we looked

:03:48.:03:50.

at inequality in our society and used public investment in order

:03:51.:04:02.

to improve services and give real But Jeremy Corbyn had his most

:04:03.:04:05.

difficult moment when he was pressed to say whether or not he would ever

:04:06.:04:11.

use nuclear weapons. Would you allow North Korea or some

:04:12.:04:13.

idiot in Iran to bomb us and then The general election

:04:14.:04:18.

is less than one week away. This was a great opportunity

:04:19.:04:28.

for voters to see both the people who want to be Prime

:04:29.:04:31.

Minister, setting out their vision but coming under

:04:32.:04:33.

real pressure over policies. One of Theresa May's most senior

:04:34.:04:36.

ministers has said a future Conservative government

:04:37.:04:48.

would not raise income tax - The Conservative manifesto did not

:04:49.:04:50.

rule out an increase but the Defence Secretary,

:04:51.:04:55.

Sir Michael Fallon, told the Daily Telegraph that the party

:04:56.:04:57.

was "not in the business Our political correspondent

:04:58.:05:00.

Leila Nathoo is in Westminster I think it is a signal. Because

:05:01.:05:22.

there has not been clarity on this issue of whether the Conservatives

:05:23.:05:27.

would raise income tax. As you say it was not explicit in their

:05:28.:05:30.

manifesto. Their only manifesto pledge was to not raise VAT.

:05:31.:05:34.

Previously, the Conservatives under David Cameron had promised not to

:05:35.:05:38.

raise National Insurance in contact or VAT so the tax triple lock, as it

:05:39.:05:46.

was called. Theresa May, I think now sending a signal, really, to her

:05:47.:05:50.

core supporters to try and ensure that they turn out and to reassure

:05:51.:05:55.

them that actually she is not going to raise income tax for higher

:05:56.:05:59.

earners. Labour says this is not as explicit for lower and middle-income

:06:00.:06:05.

earners. They say that only the lower and middle income earners can

:06:06.:06:10.

be saved from tax rises under them. It was clarification later from the

:06:11.:06:13.

Conservatives saying they have no plans to raise tax. This is a

:06:14.:06:17.

signal, not a promise, mind you, to the conservative base. Only five

:06:18.:06:22.

days left until the election day. What can we expect over the weekend?

:06:23.:06:29.

This is the final push. All parties will maximise the time. Whistlestop

:06:30.:06:36.

tours of constituencies. Labour are campaigning against the plans of

:06:37.:06:39.

Theresa May for social care and they are talking about her plans for

:06:40.:06:42.

winter fuel allowance means testing. The Liberal Democrats are also

:06:43.:06:46.

trying to attack the Conservatives on the social care plane. I think

:06:47.:06:53.

there will be plenty of attacking the other party weak spots as well

:06:54.:06:57.

as trying to get the core messages across with just days to go.

:06:58.:07:00.

The singer Ariana Grande has visited fans in hospital who were injured

:07:01.:07:03.

in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

:07:04.:07:05.

The star spent time with youngsters at the Royal Manchester Children's

:07:06.:07:08.

Hospital in a surprise appearance ahead of a benefit concert

:07:09.:07:10.

Fans like this eight-year-old Lily Harrison who was still

:07:11.:07:20.

recovering from her injuries in hospital, greeting the singer

:07:21.:07:23.

The children had been getting ready for bed when the star arrived

:07:24.:07:31.

unexpectedly, bringing gifts and signing

:07:32.:07:32.

There were thanks as well for the nurses.

:07:33.:07:34.

And tomorrow she will perform at a concert to raise funds

:07:35.:07:37.

The 22 lives lost have been remembered at Saint Ann's

:07:38.:07:47.

Square which has become the focal point for those wish to pay tribute,

:07:48.:07:50.

The Manchester City council says that

:07:51.:07:54.

this may be the last weekend the flowers remain in place as it

:07:55.:07:58.

needs to look at relocating them respectfully.

:07:59.:08:00.

It will now consider setting up a permanent memorial in the city.

:08:01.:08:07.

Just have to have something that is a testament

:08:08.:08:15.

I think people will want to come for ever, just to pay

:08:16.:08:21.

their respects, really because, as I say,

:08:22.:08:25.

it should not have happened and they were babies, won't they?

:08:26.:08:28.

And should have been the night of their life

:08:29.:08:30.

A big heart with all of the names on the

:08:31.:08:37.

date of birth of all of them would be a good idea.

:08:38.:08:42.

Alongside the remembrance, the police operation

:08:43.:08:44.

Last night a car was taken away which they say could be

:08:45.:08:48.

Police will be out again in force for tomorrow's concert.

:08:49.:08:57.

Just after eight o'clock we will be speaking to Lily Harrison's dad Adam

:08:58.:09:02.

Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

:09:03.:09:17.

A new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described promising after a

:09:18.:09:25.

small clinical trial. It has been called an important step in treating

:09:26.:09:29.

the cancer which at the moment has few drug options for. The drug

:09:30.:09:35.

shrunken tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced stages

:09:36.:09:39.

of the disease who took part in the trial.

:09:40.:09:41.

Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

:09:42.:09:44.

could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%,

:09:45.:09:47.

Scientists in China who analysed research involving 200,000 women,

:09:48.:09:51.

found patients who took the drug were less likely

:09:52.:09:55.

Charities have welcomed the news but say more clinical

:09:56.:10:01.

The consumer group Which is calling on British Airways to create

:10:02.:10:05.

an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious

:10:06.:10:09.

It comes a week after a major IT failure caused hundreds

:10:10.:10:17.

of the airline's flights to be grounded.

:10:18.:10:19.

The company says it has already taken steps to process claims

:10:20.:10:22.

Meanwhile British Airways cabin crew have voted for four more days

:10:23.:10:27.

of strike action starting on June 16th.

:10:28.:10:35.

A huge police and security operation is being deployed across Cardiff,

:10:36.:10:38.

as the city prepares for the Champions League Final.

:10:39.:10:40.

More than 170,000 football fans are due to visit the Welsh capital

:10:41.:10:43.

this weekend for the match between Real Madrid and Juventus.

:10:44.:10:46.

Our Wales correspondent, Tomos Morgan, is there.

:10:47.:10:55.

Security is important so let's talk to our correspondent about that. A

:10:56.:11:04.

glorious morning fare. Fans of is that quite excited about this match.

:11:05.:11:10.

The big picture is, and it is timely, that security is of utmost

:11:11.:11:15.

importance. The players will not be witnessing these beautiful

:11:16.:11:18.

conditions when they play the national stadium of Wales later on.

:11:19.:11:22.

The roof will be closed. It is closed for security reasons. As I

:11:23.:11:26.

was walking through town earlier to get to this location and as the

:11:27.:11:33.

Juventus fans will witness there is a significant security presence here

:11:34.:11:38.

on the grounds this morning. As you mentioned. There are 1500 additional

:11:39.:11:44.

police officers in Cardiff for this event and there are steel fences

:11:45.:11:47.

around the centre of Cardiff. The main roads right in the centre have

:11:48.:11:52.

been blocked off and there is no way for any vehicle to get into this

:11:53.:11:57.

location. This was always going to be a huge security operation even

:11:58.:12:00.

before the atrocities that we saw recently in Manchester. This

:12:01.:12:04.

operation was always going to be in place but up on Thursday the

:12:05.:12:08.

football Association of Wales said that this was now the largest

:12:09.:12:11.

security operation that has ever been put in place for a sporting

:12:12.:12:16.

event in the UK. All of that has been put in place, of course, to

:12:17.:12:20.

make certain that what happens in the Stadium runs as smoothly as

:12:21.:12:21.

possible this evening. If you think that's a big

:12:22.:12:24.

competition, you ain't Forget football - spelling

:12:25.:12:27.

is even more intense... It's been the annual

:12:28.:12:30.

spelling bee in America. From 11 million entrants,

:12:31.:12:32.

a 12 hour final and it all came down You could be forgiven

:12:33.:12:48.

for thinking it mattered less to the 12-year-old

:12:49.:13:08.

girl and more to her father. Spelling Bee is an institution

:13:09.:13:11.

in the United States This was the 13th time in a row

:13:12.:13:15.

an Indian-American took the trophy. And when this young boy

:13:16.:13:25.

stumbled over this word So the trophy, the kudos

:13:26.:13:36.

and the $40,000 first prize It leaves the rest of us trailing

:13:37.:13:43.

the wake of junior genius. Are you trying to spell and

:13:44.:14:12.

inadequate? Your spelling of that word was inadequate stock we have a

:14:13.:14:17.

list of far more confiscated works to test later. Ben will keep us up

:14:18.:14:28.

today the weather. The 14 minutes past seven.

:14:29.:14:32.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced a grilling from a live TV

:14:33.:14:36.

audience on a range of issues from public spending

:14:37.:14:38.

Jon Trickett is a Cabinet minister -- Shadow Cabinet minister, and

:14:39.:14:51.

joins us from Leeds. As far as your leader Jeremy Corbyn is concerned,

:14:52.:14:54.

there are some things that just won't go away, are there? Trident,

:14:55.:15:00.

and his preparedness or not to press the nuclear button, that seems to

:15:01.:15:03.

dog him at the end of this campaign. Well, I think those are the

:15:04.:15:07.

questions that the Conservatives are trying to put in front of us, and it

:15:08.:15:11.

is quite right that the questions are asked. Look, Labour is a patriot

:15:12.:15:17.

it party and have no doubt about it, if this country comes under attack,

:15:18.:15:22.

Labour will defend our country. They should be no doubting anybody's mind

:15:23.:15:27.

that is what we will do. We think there are areas where we are

:15:28.:15:31.

exposed, for example, there are not enough police any more, and we also

:15:32.:15:34.

think the Border Force needs more people. We are promising to employ

:15:35.:15:38.

an extra 500 people. People coming in and out of the country are not

:15:39.:15:41.

being checked. It is a way for terrorists are coming. This defence

:15:42.:15:46.

issue is big and complicated, but we will defend our country if we come

:15:47.:15:49.

under attack, make a mistake about it. It is not just the Conservatives

:15:50.:15:53.

putting this to Mr Corbyn. Members of the audience repeatedly put it to

:15:54.:15:57.

him. That was one of the big issues they wanted explained from him. It

:15:58.:16:00.

is reconciling the fact that, yes, he stuck to his guns, well, let's

:16:01.:16:05.

not use the word guns, but he is adamantly against the use of nuclear

:16:06.:16:08.

weapons throughout his political life. What is the point in having a

:16:09.:16:12.

deterrent? It is only a deterrent if you say you are prepared to use it,

:16:13.:16:16.

isn't it? Let's think for a minute about nuclear weapons. Throughout

:16:17.:16:22.

the whole of human history that have been wars, but the weapons that were

:16:23.:16:26.

designed to be used on a battlefield against enemy combatants, the thing

:16:27.:16:29.

about nuclear weapons is, inevitably, they will be used to

:16:30.:16:32.

kill hundreds of thousands of individual citizens or innocent

:16:33.:16:37.

people, and that is the difference between nuclear weapons and all the

:16:38.:16:40.

others. So these weapons are immoral. The world accepts that. We

:16:41.:16:45.

have to find a way of getting rid of them overtime. I think what Jeremy

:16:46.:16:51.

is concerned about is the morale to you of a weapon being used against

:16:52.:16:55.

our citizens. -- morale at it. There are enough nuclear weapons in the

:16:56.:16:58.

well to destroy the entire planet. We need a realistic land to find a

:16:59.:17:02.

way out of the mess that the world has got ourselves into. -- realistic

:17:03.:17:07.

plan. Make no mistake about it, while nuclear weapons are there, we

:17:08.:17:12.

are going to rearm, that is the Labour Party position. But that is

:17:13.:17:17.

what people are saying. Why spend those billions of pounds on

:17:18.:17:20.

something if you say that you are not repaired to use it? I know we

:17:21.:17:24.

have been through this loads of times, but it is one of those issues

:17:25.:17:28.

which highlights the conflict, in a way, between who Jeremy Corbyn is,

:17:29.:17:31.

the party he leads, and the position he wants to hold. That is what

:17:32.:17:36.

voters are wrestling with. Well, each person will consider the whole

:17:37.:17:40.

range of issues before us, but the Labour Party is committed to

:17:41.:17:43.

renewing Trident. That is our position. I moved a resolution some

:17:44.:17:49.

years ago personally about it. I suggested that the whole world

:17:50.:17:51.

should be moving towards disarmament. By the way, we have a

:17:52.:17:56.

legal obligation to disarm, across the whole world, and Britain will

:17:57.:17:59.

try to do that. We will defend ourselves. There can be no doubt

:18:00.:18:03.

about that whatsoever. I thought the whole debate last night was very

:18:04.:18:07.

interesting. In a way, I think the stars were the audience. You are

:18:08.:18:11.

right. They ask difficult and probing questions. That was right,

:18:12.:18:15.

because democracy has come alive. It has come alive because the parties

:18:16.:18:19.

are offering very different ways forward for our country. I think it

:18:20.:18:24.

is amazing, if you are sitting on a train or sitting in the pub, people

:18:25.:18:27.

are talking about politics for the first time in a long time. I was in

:18:28.:18:31.

a Labour marginal seat this week, doing a peaceful Radio 4, and lots

:18:32.:18:35.

of people said, they like what they have seen of Jeremy Corbyn in this

:18:36.:18:39.

campaign, he has grown on them, they made positive remarks about him. But

:18:40.:18:43.

time and time again I heard, even Labour voters saying to me, at the

:18:44.:18:47.

end of the day I am still not sure about him. I am not sure he is a

:18:48.:18:51.

Prime Minister. You know that there are lots of the pullout there, even

:18:52.:18:55.

though they might like him, even though they might have warmed to

:18:56.:18:58.

him, they just cannot get out of that final hurdle of voting him into

:18:59.:19:03.

Downing Street. Well, look. Jeremy Corbyn is somebody who really

:19:04.:19:08.

received a huge amount of abuse and a lot of attacks from all kinds of

:19:09.:19:12.

sources in the last 18 months. People didn't get to know him until

:19:13.:19:16.

the last few weeks when the election started. And the thing is, he has

:19:17.:19:19.

been prepared to go anywhere and speak to anybody at any time. There

:19:20.:19:23.

has been another leader, as well, Mrs May, and she is like a

:19:24.:19:27.

submarine. She disappears for weeks on end when there is trouble and

:19:28.:19:31.

then occasionally reappears. That isn't me saying that. David Cameron,

:19:32.:19:35.

the Prime Minister, said she is like a submarine, a politician who

:19:36.:19:38.

disappears. The trick is she has never engaged with the public

:19:39.:19:41.

through this campaign. People have to make a choice, what kind of

:19:42.:19:45.

leader do we want? A modern leader who is prepared to mix with people

:19:46.:19:49.

and listen to what they say and act, or somebody who is promote and cold

:19:50.:19:53.

and wooden? Somebody who is really not very clear about what policies

:19:54.:19:56.

are? I think people are focusing both in Germany but also want

:19:57.:20:00.

Theresa May. I think they are warming to him, but they will

:20:01.:20:04.

continue to do so in the rest of the campaign. Jon Trickett, thank you.

:20:05.:20:08.

On Friday morning we will know. Five days left. Thank you.

:20:09.:20:11.

Here's Ben with a look at this morning's weather.

:20:12.:20:15.

I cannot promise you it will all be glorious. My hint is to watch the

:20:16.:20:21.

first two minutes of this. Then turn away.

:20:22.:20:25.

If you cut me short I will not get to the end and you will not have to

:20:26.:20:32.

look at the bad bit. We can do itself does not look too bad. A

:20:33.:20:35.

mixture of sunshine and showers. Some wet and windy weather to come

:20:36.:20:39.

for the start of next week. Decent weather to get out and about today

:20:40.:20:43.

and tomorrow some sunny spells. Bear in mind they will be passing

:20:44.:20:46.

downpours as well. This weather front, this band of cloud swept

:20:47.:20:48.

through overnight. It brought thunderstorms across parts the

:20:49.:20:51.

south-east yesterday. They are mostly cleared away now but still

:20:52.:20:53.

lingering across eastern and south-eastern parts of England. Some

:20:54.:20:56.

residual cloud, some mist and murk, some spots of rain here. A slice of

:20:57.:21:01.

sunshine and some showers beginning to pack in from the north-west.

:21:02.:21:04.

These showers will be heaviest around the middle part of the day

:21:05.:21:08.

for Northern Ireland. They will be turning heavier in the middle of the

:21:09.:21:11.

afternoon in Scotland. Here they can be quite slow-moving, especially in

:21:12.:21:14.

the north-east, where they will be light. Some thunder and lightning

:21:15.:21:19.

and a lot of rain in a short space of time. Some sunny spells between

:21:20.:21:22.

showers. A few sunny spells creeping into England, at things should be

:21:23.:21:28.

largely dry this afternoon. A fresher feel than we have had

:21:29.:21:31.

recently. So pleasant in the sunshine. One to make showers

:21:32.:21:34.

trundling across Wales and the south-west this afternoon. These

:21:35.:21:37.

should push away to the eastern into the evening. For the big match in

:21:38.:21:41.

Cardiff tonight, the final between Juventus and Real Madrid, it should

:21:42.:21:46.

be fine, late sunshine but it will start to cool off a bit as the match

:21:47.:21:50.

goes on. Showers continuing for a time across Northern Ireland

:21:51.:21:54.

Scotland but generally it will turn into a dry night with clear spells.

:21:55.:21:57.

Temperatures in towns and cities 9- 11. Into tomorrow, essentially we do

:21:58.:22:02.

it all again. Sunshine and showers, probably more than today across

:22:03.:22:06.

northern England, especially in the morning. Showers get going in the

:22:07.:22:09.

afternoon again for Northern Ireland Scotland. Then things cloud over a

:22:10.:22:12.

bid for the and Wales, showery rain moving in here as well. Temperatures

:22:13.:22:18.

again, cooler and fresher, 16- 20 degrees. I've got time, so I'm going

:22:19.:22:22.

to have to press a button and show you what happens on Monday. Areas of

:22:23.:22:25.

low pressure swarming out west will push in, bringing heavy bursts of

:22:26.:22:28.

rain and potentially some strong winds as well.

:22:29.:22:35.

Well, he has to be truthful. Next time we will cut him off. We'll get

:22:36.:22:40.

the controller. It is 7:22am. There were celebrations around

:22:41.:22:43.

the world when the Paris climate change agreement was

:22:44.:22:46.

signed two years ago. It was hailed as a major step

:22:47.:22:48.

forward in tackling global But the news that President Trump

:22:49.:22:50.

is withdrawing from the agreement has been widely criticised

:22:51.:22:54.

by world leaders and those 194 other countries have

:22:55.:22:57.

committed to the deal, which pledged to cut carbon

:22:58.:23:02.

emissions, and limit the rise in the global average temperature

:23:03.:23:05.

to 2 degrees Celsius So far America has spent almost ?780

:23:06.:23:07.

million on the Green Climate Fund which helps developing countries

:23:08.:23:13.

cope with the effects Alex Pearce ease the director of the

:23:14.:23:38.

overseas development in situ. How much should we care that the United

:23:39.:23:42.

States has pulled out of the climate change agreement? Obviously this is

:23:43.:23:45.

political ramifications, but in the sense that physically, how much

:23:46.:23:48.

difference, or monitor airily, how much difference will the withdrawal

:23:49.:23:58.

make? -- mightily. -- monteraily. I think that his abdication of

:23:59.:24:00.

responsibility on the Paris agreement will have profound

:24:01.:24:03.

short-term and long-term effects. I was in Africa last week, in Uganda

:24:04.:24:08.

and Kenya, and Uganda and Kenya are trying to grow out of poverty. They

:24:09.:24:12.

have signed up to the Paris agreement which is basically them

:24:13.:24:15.

saying, we are going to grow, but we will try to grow down a greener path

:24:16.:24:19.

in the United States and the United Kingdom. But in order to do that

:24:20.:24:23.

they need help. Theatre for the United States has been the largest

:24:24.:24:27.

donor in supporting countries like Kenya and Uganda to grow, but to

:24:28.:24:30.

grow greener. # heretofore the United States. So that they do not

:24:31.:24:36.

contribute to the greenhouse gases warming the planet. President Trump

:24:37.:24:39.

pulling back from these commitments and pulling out the rug from

:24:40.:24:42.

countries like Kenya and Uganda, that is going to give them a much

:24:43.:24:46.

harder choice to make stop if they end up building coal-fired power

:24:47.:24:49.

plants instead of solar plants, that is not only going to affect things

:24:50.:24:53.

today, but those plans will be with us for 20, 30, 40 years. Do you

:24:54.:24:57.

think is decision to take America out will weaken the resolve of those

:24:58.:25:02.

kinds of countries, to keep going? Thinking, if America is not going to

:25:03.:25:06.

do it, why should we bother? I absolutely think it will. Keeping up

:25:07.:25:09.

with commitments like Paris is not just a case of going to Paris and

:25:10.:25:13.

signing an agreement. This is actually a process of daily

:25:14.:25:17.

decision-making. People have to look at the trade-offs. If they are

:25:18.:25:22.

without the type of support, the political support, that America

:25:23.:25:26.

provides, as well as the financial support, then there are likely to be

:25:27.:25:29.

lots of countries and lots of decisions that are made which will

:25:30.:25:33.

take us in the wrong direction. But there are 194 countries signed up,

:25:34.:25:37.

and China is one of them, which was always a big sticking point when it

:25:38.:25:40.

came to China recognising its contribution to elution and to

:25:41.:25:42.

environment will change. Ashraf pollution. Is that not enough. How

:25:43.:25:49.

dependent of these countries and the well have to be on the US? The US is

:25:50.:25:54.

still the second largest polluter in the world. First of all, its own

:25:55.:25:58.

Paris commitments are critical to reducing the amount of greenhouse

:25:59.:26:01.

gases. Although there are many cities and states and businesses in

:26:02.:26:05.

the United States which say that they are still going to meet their

:26:06.:26:08.

Paris commitments, if the federal government in the United States does

:26:09.:26:11.

not support that trend towards less pollution and greener energy, then

:26:12.:26:16.

it will mean more pollution for the planet. There is increasing drought,

:26:17.:26:21.

increasing warming, all over the place. In the last 16 years we have

:26:22.:26:25.

had if Dean of those years being the hottest on record. -- 15 of those

:26:26.:26:30.

years. So what the US does today and what it does in the future actually

:26:31.:26:34.

really matters. We are going to talk to you again later in the programme,

:26:35.:26:38.

with somebody who is a supporter of Donald Trump, and believes that he

:26:39.:26:42.

has done the right thing, and we can have a debate about that later on. I

:26:43.:26:44.

look forward to that. It is 7:26am. Building flood defences can be

:26:45.:26:46.

a complex and expensive task, but scientists say they have found

:26:47.:26:49.

an army of expert engineers from the continent willing to do it

:26:50.:26:52.

for free: European beavers. They are controversial with farmers

:26:53.:26:55.

who say they damage fields, but as our environment analyst

:26:56.:26:58.

Roger Harrabin reports, their re-introduction could help

:26:59.:27:00.

clean up polluted water. In an ordinary Devon field, signs of

:27:01.:27:17.

the extraordinary. A toilet, and electrified fence powered by solar.

:27:18.:27:25.

This site is a scientific experiment on reintroducing beavers. In six

:27:26.:27:30.

years, a pair of sharp tooth beavers has re-engineered this would land

:27:31.:27:34.

into a Whitland. They fell the willow trees to lie horizontally

:27:35.:27:38.

because they like to chew the bark off the vertical sprouts. Their

:27:39.:27:42.

stick and have recreated the sort of landscape that existed for beavers

:27:43.:27:48.

were hunted to extinction. -- stick dam recreated. This is another of

:27:49.:27:53.

the ponds created by beavers. This demonstrates how much they can

:27:54.:27:56.

re-engineer the landscape. I am, it looks like there is grass growing

:27:57.:28:02.

out of the ground. Wrong. This is a beaver stick dam, right underneath

:28:03.:28:05.

me. The place has been shaped by the teeth of rodents. These are beta

:28:06.:28:10.

sticks. You can see the teeth marks where they have cut them off the

:28:11.:28:14.

tree. They use these to create the dams, and the way that they have

:28:15.:28:17.

manipulated the site has been dramatic. We have had a whole range

:28:18.:28:20.

of different species coming in, bats, amphibians, lots of wetland

:28:21.:28:24.

plants. It has been incredible. This site used to have 11 clumps of

:28:25.:28:29.

frogspawn. Since the dams appeared, there are 681 clumps. The frogs are

:28:30.:28:36.

food for grass snakes and herons. Then there is the benefit to soil

:28:37.:28:40.

and water quality, monitored ibis equipment. What we are looking at

:28:41.:28:45.

here is the quality of the water entering the beaver site. As we can

:28:46.:28:49.

see from this sample taken at the end of the last ready -- heavy

:28:50.:28:53.

rainfall event, there is lots of soil and water. It is leading this

:28:54.:28:59.

farmland. Downstream, with all the beaver dams, we see much cleaner

:29:00.:29:02.

water. The beaver dams have filtered the water and captured all the soil

:29:03.:29:07.

running from the farm. We see much better water quality downstream.

:29:08.:29:10.

This is not without controversy. In Scotland, where beavers have brought

:29:11.:29:15.

back, some landowners have angrily complained that they have damaged

:29:16.:29:19.

farmland, trees and water courses. The NFU fear unintended consequences

:29:20.:29:23.

of beaver reintroduction but they say they are awaiting the formal

:29:24.:29:26.

publication of results from the Devon trial site. We return to the

:29:27.:29:33.

wetlands at dusk. Here is a treat. Email beaver has come out of hiding.

:29:34.:29:41.

-- the mail beaver. What a fantastic privilege. I have just seen my first

:29:42.:29:45.

beaver. They have not had a sighting like this to 18 months. He seems

:29:46.:29:49.

completely unafraid. The scientists working here say the beavers have

:29:50.:29:52.

not just improved water quality. They have also helped to protect

:29:53.:29:56.

downstream areas from flooding by slowing heavy rainfall with their

:29:57.:30:00.

dams. They want creatures like this reintroduced nationwide. Not all are

:30:01.:30:05.

convinced, at the beavers here are making their own watery case. Will

:30:06.:30:38.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:30:39.:30:41.

Coming up before eight, Ben has the weather.

:30:42.:30:44.

But first, a summary of this morning's main news.

:30:45.:30:51.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:30:52.:30:55.

audience, just days before the general election.

:30:56.:30:57.

They were challenged separately in a special edition

:30:58.:30:59.

Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:31:00.:31:03.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:31:04.:31:07.

The pop star Ariana Grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital

:31:08.:31:21.

who were injured in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

:31:22.:31:24.

The singer spent time chatting to patients and posing

:31:25.:31:27.

for photographs at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital ahead

:31:28.:31:29.

of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid

:31:30.:31:32.

One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

:31:33.:31:40.

Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:31:41.:31:42.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:31:43.:31:45.

the Daily Telegraph the party was "not in the business

:31:46.:31:47.

Labour has already said it would increase income tax rates

:31:48.:31:53.

to 45-pence in the pound for those earning more than ?80,000.

:31:54.:32:01.

A new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising

:32:02.:32:04.

Charities have called it an important step in treating

:32:05.:32:08.

Developed by the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden NHS

:32:09.:32:15.

Foundation Trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15

:32:16.:32:18.

women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part

:32:19.:32:21.

The consumer group Which is calling on British Airways to create

:32:22.:32:25.

an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious

:32:26.:32:28.

It comes a week after a major IT failure caused hundreds

:32:29.:32:33.

of the airline's flights to be grounded.

:32:34.:32:37.

The company says it has already taken steps to process claims

:32:38.:32:40.

Meanwhile British Airways cabin crew have voted for four more days

:32:41.:32:45.

of strike action starting on June 16th.

:32:46.:32:54.

you might would be here and we have delivered. He will deliver us in his

:32:55.:33:03.

call for the winner of the Champions League. Juventus, going for a

:33:04.:33:15.

back-to-back win. Gareth bale, of course it is home soil for him. But

:33:16.:33:20.

he won't start but he must play, at some point. Change the game with 20

:33:21.:33:24.

minutes to go or something. This evening, the biggest match

:33:25.:33:27.

in European club football, the Champions League

:33:28.:33:30.

final, will be played at the Principality

:33:31.:33:32.

Stadium in Cardiff. Security is tight of course

:33:33.:33:33.

following last week's attack in Manchester, as thousands

:33:34.:33:36.

of Real Madrid and Juventus fans A former Wales international

:33:37.:33:38.

and Champions League winner, thinks Cardiff is ready

:33:39.:33:41.

to host such an event. It is a great Stadium in the middle

:33:42.:33:54.

of the city. A real buzz around not only Cardiff but Wales in general to

:33:55.:33:59.

host a Champions League final and to host first is a good one with

:34:00.:34:03.

Juventus and Real Madrid is great. So many big games and League Cup

:34:04.:34:10.

finals have been played here as well and it is a tremendous venue.

:34:11.:34:13.

The President, of the football's European governing body,

:34:14.:34:16.

has told the BBC, that Britain deserves, to host a World Cup

:34:17.:34:19.

Aleksander Seferin, says he hopes the tournament will be

:34:20.:34:22.

They are absolutely capable of organising is from an organisational

:34:23.:34:33.

point of view from infrastructure point of view and, of course, it is

:34:34.:34:37.

a decision not just the FA but the government and all the others. But

:34:38.:34:43.

this you know everything about English or British football so...

:34:44.:34:51.

They deserve to have a World Cup in the near future.

:34:52.:34:54.

It was a positive evening for Northern Ireland as they beat

:34:55.:34:57.

New Zealand 1-0 in Belfast last night.

:34:58.:34:59.

The friendly had been organised as Michael O'Neill's side warm up

:35:00.:35:02.

for next week's World Cup qualifier in Azerbaijan.

:35:03.:35:04.

The only goal of the game, came from the Scottish Premiership's

:35:05.:35:07.

leading scorer: Ross County's, Liam Boyce.

:35:08.:35:13.

Pleased with what we got from the game. We won the game which was

:35:14.:35:20.

important and greater for Liam to get his goal. Disappointed that we

:35:21.:35:27.

did not add to the final score. Physically was a challenging and

:35:28.:35:30.

demanding game which was what we wanted and, as I said, it leaves us

:35:31.:35:35.

in a good place in terms of what we have now and in terms of preparation

:35:36.:35:37.

to play next week. The New British English Lions the

:35:38.:36:07.

provincial barbarians Number 10 is interesting, Ben Gatlin, a

:36:08.:36:11.

22-year-old was played to the Auckland blues and is the son of the

:36:12.:36:13.

Lions boss. He can probably expect to make a few

:36:14.:36:13.

tackles on the weekend but we have not spoken too much about the game

:36:14.:36:17.

and he is excited about the opportunity, if he does get a chance

:36:18.:36:21.

to play against us looking forward England all rounder Chris Woakes has

:36:22.:36:24.

been ruled out of the rest of the Champions Trophy,

:36:25.:36:35.

due to a side strain, he picked up in the opening

:36:36.:36:37.

match of the tournament. Woakes only played, two overs,

:36:38.:36:40.

of Thursday's win, over Bangladesh England are unlikely

:36:41.:36:42.

to name his replacement, until this afternoon,

:36:43.:36:45.

after the England Lions match, which involves two of the possible

:36:46.:36:47.

candidates: Steve Finn and Tom At the French Open,

:36:48.:36:50.

Britain's Andy Murray and Kyle Edmund are

:36:51.:36:56.

in action later today while defending mens

:36:57.:36:58.

champion Novak Djokovic is through to the fourth round,

:36:59.:37:00.

but he had to fight for it. Argentine Diego Schwartzman,

:37:01.:37:03.

the world number 41, took Djokovic, to

:37:04.:37:05.

five sets yesterday. The world number two though had

:37:06.:37:07.

enough, to see out the victory. The nine-time champions

:37:08.:37:10.

at Roland Garros through in straight sets against, Nikoloz Basilashvili,

:37:11.:37:14.

dropping only one game, The defending women's champion,

:37:15.:37:18.

Garbine Muguruza, is safely She beat Yulia Putintseva,

:37:19.:37:35.

in straight sets. Can you spell that players name? I

:37:36.:37:54.

know it ends with the letter eyes. Let's get back to rugby league. It

:37:55.:38:01.

is more straightforward. Two tries helped leads rhinos defeat Lee

:38:02.:38:06.

centurions. So for leads, it takes them to third.

:38:07.:38:11.

It grew up in the bomb sites of Britain, after the Second World War,

:38:12.:38:15.

and is once again now proving to be, one of the fastest growing cycling

:38:16.:38:18.

It is cycle speedway and as the British team,

:38:19.:38:22.

arrive in Poland today, as they build up to the World

:38:23.:38:25.

Championship later this year, I've been to train at Coventry

:38:26.:38:28.

And cycle speedway is accessible to all ages, even if you are five.

:38:29.:38:39.

It took off in the rubble of bombsites after the Second

:38:40.:38:59.

Only a bomb site, a bunch of kids having fun.

:39:00.:39:06.

But here is where stars of speed are born.

:39:07.:39:10.

Sit back and see if you can spot a champion of tomorrow.

:39:11.:39:16.

One day the crowd will roar for the children who learnt it

:39:17.:39:19.

all the hard way on a cycle speedway.

:39:20.:39:21.

It started after the war on the bombsites and,

:39:22.:39:24.

you know, a load of kids with nothing to do.

:39:25.:39:26.

As cities were rebuilt in the post-war years,

:39:27.:39:36.

the cycle speedway tracks disappeared.

:39:37.:39:39.

But now purpose-built ones like this one in Coventry have brought it back

:39:40.:39:42.

as a cheaper and safer alternative to

:39:43.:39:44.

There are leagues again and the World Championships

:39:45.:39:47.

We are trying to reinvent it a little bit

:39:48.:39:51.

Really trying to get people involved from all age groups.

:39:52.:39:56.

It is far more accessible and not so worrying about being on the back

:39:57.:40:00.

It also makes it easier to turn up and pay a couple of quid,

:40:01.:40:09.

This is the position you need to adopt for the maximum

:40:10.:40:16.

It is fast and explosive with four riders competing over four laps.

:40:17.:40:40.

They say in this sport it is first or dirt and most races are won

:40:41.:40:44.

It is a little frightening because you

:40:45.:40:51.

You just want to get the inside of people

:40:52.:40:57.

And you either come out on the right side or the wrong side.

:40:58.:41:06.

Indeed, the whole British championship was won on the very

:41:07.:41:09.

I was ten yards away from being a champion.

:41:10.:41:13.

It can certainly hurt when your dreams end

:41:14.:41:21.

So if you would like a taste of speedway without a motorbike it is a

:41:22.:41:36.

very accessible form it does look dangerous. It would really hurt if I

:41:37.:41:43.

fell off even though I was not going fast. And the Epsom Derby is in here

:41:44.:41:50.

today's. Under certain race with a horse we should all back, Naggers.

:41:51.:42:04.

It's not your horse, is it? No. No. Thank you, Mike.

:42:05.:42:09.

She's become one of Britain's biggest stars after appearing

:42:10.:42:12.

Now the actor Miranda Hart is making her West End debut

:42:13.:42:16.

She's playing Miss Hannigan - the infamous orphanage manager -

:42:17.:42:20.

in the musical which first opened in America 40 years ago.

:42:21.:42:23.

Our arts editor, Will Gompertz has been to meet Miranda and three

:42:24.:42:27.

of her co-stars as they prepare for next week's opening night.

:42:28.:42:30.

The show may be called Annie but this particular West End

:42:31.:42:36.

It is a vulnerable place when you are the face on the poster.

:42:37.:42:47.

You think "Are people wanting to knock me down?"

:42:48.:42:55.

We are not very good at celebrating success,

:42:56.:43:00.

we prefer to pick on the things we are not good at.

:43:01.:43:03.

Does it feel like this is a contemporary story?

:43:04.:43:06.

There will always be orphans in the world like people in Syria

:43:07.:43:16.

and it is kind of putting old-fashioned stories

:43:17.:43:19.

Who has got the worst American accent?

:43:20.:43:29.

Basically call Pickfords, I am moving on.

:43:30.:43:46.

Being yourself and doing things outside it and having fun and not

:43:47.:44:02.

getting caught up with any trappings of fame, wanting to be about fame

:44:03.:44:06.

or money because that does not bring you happiness.

:44:07.:44:08.

There has been discussion of Miranda coming back.

:44:09.:44:10.

I like the idea of Miranda and Gary being married.

:44:11.:44:13.

I miss my sitcom family and the character but whether that

:44:14.:44:24.

means I will start writing again, I do not know.

:44:25.:44:29.

Not least spending the summer living her dream and starring

:44:30.:44:35.

Lovely. We keep saying you will be on our mind all day, that song. With

:44:36.:44:56.

the bucket and the mop? Let's talk now to Ben and find out what is

:44:57.:45:00.

happening with the weather this morning. I am pleased we are going

:45:01.:45:05.

over to you now because I am happy you are not trying to sing with a

:45:06.:45:07.

mop and bucket. I think we try to do that once and I

:45:08.:45:18.

said no, that is my answer forever. It is not all good news if you like

:45:19.:45:23.

dry weather but not looking too bad to start for this Weather Watcher in

:45:24.:45:28.

Wales. There will be sunshine through the day but there will also

:45:29.:45:37.

be showers in northern and western areas you can already see the

:45:38.:45:41.

showers showing their hand out west, but in between, a nice slice of

:45:42.:45:44.

sunshine. Plenty of fine weather through this morning and into the

:45:45.:45:48.

afternoon. Things brightening up across east Anglia and the

:45:49.:45:51.

south-east, but the showers will get going through the afternoon,

:45:52.:45:54.

especially across Northern Ireland and Scotland. The heaviest around

:45:55.:45:57.

lunchtime for Northern Ireland, then the middle of the afternoon for

:45:58.:46:01.

Scotland. These showers will be slow-moving, especially up to the

:46:02.:46:04.

north-east, where the winds will be fairly light, with rumbles of

:46:05.:46:07.

thunder and flashes of lightning, lots of rain in a short space of

:46:08.:46:10.

time. While two showers creeping into northern England. East anger

:46:11.:46:15.

and the south-east should be dry at, a fresher feel than we have had

:46:16.:46:19.

lately, although temperatures of 21 or 22, not feeling bad in the

:46:20.:46:23.

sunshine. A few showers trundling across Wales and the south-west.

:46:24.:46:27.

They will be quite hit and miss and should be gone by the time you get

:46:28.:46:32.

to this evening for the big match in Cardiff. The champions final should

:46:33.:46:34.

be fine, temperatures beginning to dip away as the match goes on. It

:46:35.:46:38.

should turn into a cool night, wherever you are. Showers continue

:46:39.:46:41.

where you are across Northern Ireland and Scotland, most places

:46:42.:46:44.

ending a drive through the early hours of Sunday morning.

:46:45.:46:48.

Temperatures around 9- 11 degrees. Tomorrow we do it all again. A day

:46:49.:46:52.

of sunshine and showers. A fine start for most. More showers than

:46:53.:46:55.

today, across northern England, especially in the morning. Northern

:46:56.:46:59.

Ireland and Scotland, more showers will get going and it will cloud

:47:00.:47:02.

over for the south-western parts of Wales was showery rain late in the

:47:03.:47:06.

day. Temperatures still down on where they have in the pleasant

:47:07.:47:09.

enough in the sunshine, 16- 20 degrees. A quick once at the start

:47:10.:47:14.

of next week, areas will change, low pressure gathering out west and

:47:15.:47:16.

threatening to throw frontal systems in across the country. Bands of RAM

:47:17.:47:20.

with potentially some strong winds as well. Make the most of your

:47:21.:47:22.

sunshine if you do get to see it. Now it's time for Newswatch,

:47:23.:47:25.

and this week, Samira Ahmed hears complaints about the audience

:47:26.:47:28.

at this week's election debate Jeremy Corbyn's comments went down

:47:29.:47:31.

well at Wednesday's election debate but was that because the audience

:47:32.:47:46.

was not representative or did the BBC just handle

:47:47.:47:49.

the programme wrongly? And where these pictures

:47:50.:47:51.

of the Manchester bomber out shopping, worthy of the attention

:47:52.:47:53.

they received on BBC News? First, election campaigns are often

:47:54.:48:11.

defined by actual or perceived blunders but politicians caught

:48:12.:48:13.

on camera or microphone and replayed endlessly, increasingly

:48:14.:48:16.

so in the social media age. After Diane Abbott's

:48:17.:48:18.

difficulties with numbers, during a radio interview

:48:19.:48:20.

a couple of weeks ago, Jeremy Corbyn had this

:48:21.:48:22.

encounter on Tuesday, How much will it cost to provide

:48:23.:48:24.

unmeans-tested childcare It will obviously cost a lot to do

:48:25.:48:36.

so, we accept that... I will give you the

:48:37.:48:45.

figure in a moment. You are logging

:48:46.:48:53.

into your iPad, here. You've announcing a major policy

:48:54.:48:56.

and if you do not know how much The Labour leader's failure

:48:57.:48:59.

to recall the cost of his proposal to extend free childcare in England

:49:00.:49:03.

featured prominently on BBC News throught the day, leading

:49:04.:49:06.

the three BBC1 bulletins, but many viewers felt that too much

:49:07.:49:09.

was being made of a mere memory Meanwhile, John Maynard

:49:10.:49:12.

twitted this question... Another viewer, Fiona McKenzie,

:49:13.:49:42.

recorded her thoughts On Tuesday, we had the perfect

:49:43.:49:46.

illustration of the differential treatment of Labour

:49:47.:49:54.

and the Conservatives. Headline news on all the broadcast

:49:55.:49:55.

media because Jeremy Corbyn Compare that to the treatment

:49:56.:49:58.

of Philip Hammond, Chancellor of the Exchequer, who on the Today

:49:59.:50:01.

programme got his figures for HS2 Coverage might have been balanced

:50:02.:50:05.

if they'd mention that Labour had a fully costed manifesto,

:50:06.:50:15.

whereas the Tories manifesto Another election controversy

:50:16.:50:20.

followed on Wednesday, after a BBC1 debate featuring

:50:21.:50:30.

representatives of the seven main parties, including Jeremy Corbyn

:50:31.:50:33.

and Home Secretary Amber Rudd, in the place of the

:50:34.:50:35.

absent Prime Minister. And I was thinking how chaotic it

:50:36.:50:38.

would be if they all got together, It was a rumbustious affair,

:50:39.:50:41.

which at times, felt some viewers, Denise Kingsley told us she found

:50:42.:50:45.

debates like that... More contentious though

:50:46.:51:02.

was the reaction of the audience put together by the polling company,

:51:03.:51:19.

ComRes, who were commissioned Here's how a couple of comments

:51:20.:51:22.

of Jeremy Corbyn's went down. Have you seen people sleeping

:51:23.:51:26.

around our stations, Jeremy Corbyn can you

:51:27.:51:28.

respond to that point... 300,000 people elected me to lead

:51:29.:51:40.

this party and I'm very proud When Amber Rudd spoke, though,

:51:41.:51:43.

the audience responded We have made a clear decision

:51:44.:51:54.

to make sure that we protect ..Which means the pensioners

:51:55.:52:01.

will be protected. The following morning,

:52:02.:52:05.

the Daily Mail front page screamed of "Fury and Bias at BBC TV Debate"

:52:06.:52:19.

and the Foreign Secretary Boris Johnson called the audience the most

:52:20.:52:23.

left-wing he had ever seen, describing the programme

:52:24.:52:26.

like this, on Breakfast... It was a yammering cacophony

:52:27.:52:28.

of views, many of them left wing. Even by the BBC's own standards,

:52:29.:52:34.

I think you would agree that that audience was notably to the left

:52:35.:52:38.

of many people in this country. Well, one of them,

:52:39.:52:41.

Judy Turner, joins me. Now, Judy, you watched

:52:42.:52:48.

the Leaders Debate, why I was actually shocked

:52:49.:52:52.

by the audience reaction. I thought the jeering

:52:53.:53:03.

and the cheering of some people but the jeering of others

:53:04.:53:05.

was actually unacceptable. And it seemed to be

:53:06.:53:12.

that the audience was, at the least, at least 80%,

:53:13.:53:16.

left of centre in its bias and I thought that was completely

:53:17.:53:20.

unrepresentative of how You raise firstly the issue

:53:21.:53:22.

of whether the audience And the polling organization,

:53:23.:53:25.

ComRes, put that whole audience Let's hear what they said about this

:53:26.:53:29.

earlier in the week... The reality was, that the audience

:53:30.:53:33.

was scrupulously put together, and selected and verified,

:53:34.:53:36.

and I think a politician's clapometer is probably not the best

:53:37.:53:38.

way to judge how representative it is of the voting public, it is,

:53:39.:53:41.

actually, to open the bonnet, as it were, and to understand how

:53:42.:53:44.

that audience was put together. It is like constructing

:53:45.:53:48.

a giant 3-D jigsaw. You have to look at

:53:49.:53:50.

how representative - making sure it is representative

:53:51.:53:52.

of the 2015 result, making sure it's representative of the current voting

:53:53.:53:55.

attention, making sure it's representative of the people

:53:56.:53:58.

who voted Remain and Leave, and then make sure it's

:53:59.:54:00.

demographically representative as well, and I can tell

:54:01.:54:02.

you that it absolutely was. But you have also raises a concern

:54:03.:54:09.

about the panellists themselves. What's your concern about the way

:54:10.:54:18.

that they came across and the kind I do not understand why

:54:19.:54:22.

there were seven speakers there and a number of them

:54:23.:54:30.

are from very small parties. If you look at the way people voted,

:54:31.:54:33.

I think Plaid Cymru got 0.6% And they all got an awful lot of air

:54:34.:54:36.

time, and I do not know They say that everyone was

:54:37.:54:42.

represented, was the Conservative audience, was it 40 times

:54:43.:54:50.

the amount of Plaid Cymru, I just do not believe

:54:51.:54:53.

that the audience was actually You also spoke about the sense that

:54:54.:54:56.

perhaps five of these leaders were essentially ganging

:54:57.:55:06.

up on Amber Rudd. What could or should the BBC have

:55:07.:55:09.

done differently in how they handled I thought Amber Rudd

:55:10.:55:12.

actually did very well, I think that the presenter should

:55:13.:55:22.

have stopped some of this shouting. I think perhaps the BBC should have

:55:23.:55:26.

thought about the format - Perhaps there should have

:55:27.:55:29.

been two presenters. Perhaps there should have been

:55:30.:55:34.

ground rules at the beginning about not making personal attacks

:55:35.:55:36.

and not shouting over people. I know a number of people

:55:37.:55:39.

who just turned off the TV, And I think it would put most

:55:40.:55:50.

people off politics. Well, the BBC, we did ask them

:55:51.:55:57.

for someone to come and talk No one was available but we do

:55:58.:56:00.

have a statement and here it is... So, Judy, that is what

:56:01.:56:05.

the BBC have had to say. What's your feeling and what message

:56:06.:56:39.

would you like to give the BBC? Well, actually, I do not

:56:40.:56:44.

think that is correct. I think that the militant side

:56:45.:56:47.

of the audience hijacked And I think it is happening more

:56:48.:56:51.

and more, and I think if there were a more central right

:56:52.:56:59.

wing viewers there then perhaps they did not want to speak up and be

:57:00.:57:02.

subjected to a barrage of abuse, just as Emma Barnett was last

:57:03.:57:06.

week in Woman's Hour, for asking a question that

:57:07.:57:09.

Jeremy Corbyn couldn't respond to. Finally, the aftermath of last

:57:10.:57:13.

week's bomb attack in Manchester continues to attract news headlines,

:57:14.:57:19.

with some CCTV footage of Salman Abedi heralded as a BBC

:57:20.:57:21.

exclusive, featuring at he top REPORTER: A young man in a hooded

:57:22.:57:24.

top, jogging pants and trainers, on his own, on a Sunday

:57:25.:57:35.

morning shop. In this footage obtained by the BBC,

:57:36.:57:38.

he looks relaxed as he is captured on CCTV browsing the shelves

:57:39.:57:41.

of the Manchester convenience store. His till receipt shows he spent

:57:42.:57:44.

?8.74 and he bought almonds, tuna, scouring pads

:57:45.:57:48.

and air fresheners. Staff in the shop believe

:57:49.:57:52.

this was Salman Abedi. Some viewers told us they found

:57:53.:57:55.

the prominent use of these pictures to be voyeuristic and lacking in any

:57:56.:57:58.

significant news value. One of them, Cristina White,

:57:59.:58:01.

recorded her thoughts I simply could not understand why

:58:02.:58:03.

that was considered to be major news Of course, such a grave event needed

:58:04.:58:15.

extensive coverage but the coverage should have been news

:58:16.:58:20.

and not sensationalism. So many other things happened that

:58:21.:58:22.

week which were not mentioned or received very scant coverage -

:58:23.:58:25.

to name one, 26 people were killed on a bus in Egypt and yet

:58:26.:58:28.

it was hardly mentioned. I felt really sad that taxpayers'

:58:29.:58:37.

money is used to fund public broadcasting that sometimes sinks

:58:38.:58:40.

to the level of tabloid journalism. Thank you for all your

:58:41.:58:55.

comments this week. If you'd like to send

:58:56.:58:57.

us your opinions on BBC News and current affairs,

:58:58.:59:00.

or even appear in person on the programme, do please

:59:01.:59:03.

call us on 03700106676. You can also post your comments

:59:04.:59:06.

on Twitter and do have a look We are off air next week

:59:07.:59:15.

in the aftermath of the general election but join us again

:59:16.:59:24.

in a fortnight where we will be looking back at the

:59:25.:59:27.

campaign coverage. Hello, this is Breakfast,

:59:28.:59:29.

with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty. Tough questions for both

:59:30.:00:13.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn, as they face a television

:00:14.:00:15.

audience of voters. My wage slips from 2009 reflect

:00:16.:00:24.

exactly what I am earning today, so how can that be fair? We will put

:00:25.:00:28.

more money into the NHS but there isn't a magic money tree. Would

:00:29.:00:33.

aallow North Korea or some idiot in Iran to bomb us and say we better

:00:34.:00:41.

start talking? Of course not. Of course I would not do that.

:00:42.:00:58.

Good morning, it's Saturday 3rd June.

:00:59.:01:00.

Ariana Grande returns to Manchester and visits children

:01:01.:01:02.

in hospital who were injured in the arena bombing.

:01:03.:01:12.

Hope for ovarian cancer patients, as the early trial of a new drug

:01:13.:01:15.

In sport, European club football's biggest night In sport, European

:01:16.:01:18.

Home fans will be hoping Gareth Bale gets to play at some point in the

:01:19.:01:26.

Champions League final. And Ben has the weather. Good

:01:27.:01:31.

morning. We have swept away the warmth and humidity from the last

:01:32.:01:34.

couple of days. A fresher weekend ahead with spells of sunshine and a

:01:35.:01:37.

few passing showers, all the details coming up.

:01:38.:01:42.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:01:43.:01:48.

audience, just days before the general election.

:01:49.:01:51.

They were challenged separately in a special edition

:01:52.:01:52.

Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:01:53.:02:00.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:02:01.:02:03.

Our political correspondent Vicky Young was there.

:02:04.:02:06.

They came here hoping to persuade people that they have what it takes

:02:07.:02:09.

No one expected an easy ride but from the start

:02:10.:02:16.

it was clear that this would be a testing evening.

:02:17.:02:20.

Theresa May was accused of being untrustworthy,

:02:21.:02:24.

of changing her mind on calling an election and on policies

:02:25.:02:27.

Others were angry about funding for schools and hospitals.

:02:28.:02:31.

My wage slips from 2009 reflect exactly what I am earning today

:02:32.:02:34.

We have had to take some hard choice across the public sector in relation

:02:35.:02:41.

We did that because of the decisions we had to take to bring public

:02:42.:02:45.

spending under control because it wasn't under control under

:02:46.:02:47.

Brexit is why Theresa May says she called this election.

:02:48.:02:57.

She said she was determined to deliver.

:02:58.:02:59.

We take this opportunity of Brexit, new trade deals around

:03:00.:03:02.

the rest of the world, actually seeing how we can

:03:03.:03:05.

build a more prosperous, stronger and fairer Britain.

:03:06.:03:07.

I think we can do that and I think we can do that because I believe

:03:08.:03:11.

in Britain and I believe in the British people.

:03:12.:03:13.

For Jeremy Corbyn, this was a chance to prove he's ready to take

:03:14.:03:16.

He was unapologetic about plans to raise taxes for companies

:03:17.:03:20.

Where are the skilled workers going to come from tomorrow?

:03:21.:03:26.

Where are going to be the consumers of tomorrow?

:03:27.:03:29.

I think it's time that we looked at inequality in our society

:03:30.:03:34.

and used public investment in order to improve services and give real

:03:35.:03:37.

But Mr Corbyn had his most difficult moment when he was pressed to say

:03:38.:03:43.

whether he'd ever use nuclear weapons to defend Britain?

:03:44.:03:46.

Would you allow North Korea or some idiot in Iran

:03:47.:03:48.

to bomb us and then say, oh, we better start talking?

:03:49.:03:52.

The general election is less than a week away

:03:53.:04:08.

The general election is less than a week away and this

:04:09.:04:10.

was a great opportunity for voters to see both the people

:04:11.:04:13.

Yes, setting out their vision, but also coming under real pressure

:04:14.:04:17.

over policies and both hope that this will be the moment

:04:18.:04:20.

One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

:04:21.:04:27.

Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:04:28.:04:29.

even for high earners. The Defence Secretary,

:04:30.:04:31.

Sir Michael Fallon, told the Daily Telegraph that the party

:04:32.:04:33.

was not in the business of punishing people for getting on.

:04:34.:04:36.

Our political correspondent Leila Nathoo is in Westminster

:04:37.:04:38.

Is this a deliberate change of policy or clarification of policy or

:04:39.:04:51.

signal, what do we read into it? I think it's a clarification. There

:04:52.:04:54.

was no mention of this in the Conservative manifesto. The only

:04:55.:04:59.

thing mentioned on tax in the Tory manifesto was not raising VAT so

:05:00.:05:04.

that left room, left the door open for rises in national insurance and

:05:05.:05:08.

income tax. You will remember David Cameron under the Conservatives

:05:09.:05:11.

under him had promised not to raise any of them, VAT, income tax or

:05:12.:05:16.

national insurance. But Theresa May had left that out from her

:05:17.:05:20.

manifesto, perhaps to give the Conservatives some flexibility on

:05:21.:05:23.

taxation as the Chancellor Philip Hammond had suggested but obviously

:05:24.:05:26.

the uncertainty about whether income tax would be raised for higher

:05:27.:05:31.

earners, the core Tory support base, was troubling for the Conservative

:05:32.:05:34.

Party and they've now decided to put out a signal, I think it is a

:05:35.:05:37.

signal, not a pledge or promise, but a signal which is why it's not there

:05:38.:05:41.

in plaque and white in the manifesto, not to raise income tax

:05:42.:05:44.

for higher earners. They are also trying to say they're not planning

:05:45.:05:49.

to put up income tax for any wage bracket but Labour are seizing on

:05:50.:05:53.

this saying this shows that lower and middle income earners will only

:05:54.:05:57.

be protected under Labour. I think from the Conservatives today

:05:58.:06:00.

certainly a signal to their core support base to try and make sure

:06:01.:06:05.

they turn out. What other signals can we expect this weekend, five

:06:06.:06:11.

days to go. Absolutely, there will be a frantic race this weekend to

:06:12.:06:18.

try and tour key constituencies and capitalise on the other parties'

:06:19.:06:23.

weak spots to maximise this weekend as the last one of the campaign.

:06:24.:06:24.

Thank you very much. The singer Ariana Grande has visited

:06:25.:06:30.

fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack

:06:31.:06:33.

at her Manchester concert. The star spent time with youngsters

:06:34.:06:35.

at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in a surprise appearance

:06:36.:06:38.

ahead of a benefit concert In about five minutes, we will be

:06:39.:06:40.

speaking to Lily Harrison's dad Adam An early and small scale trial

:06:41.:06:56.

of a new drug to combat ovarian cancer has shown promising results

:06:57.:07:04.

according to researchers. Charities have called it

:07:05.:07:05.

an important step in treating Developed by the Institute of Cancer

:07:06.:07:07.

Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust,

:07:08.:07:12.

the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced

:07:13.:07:15.

stages of the disease who took part Statins - which are usually

:07:16.:07:18.

prescribed to lower cholesterol - could help reduce the risk of dying

:07:19.:07:33.

from breast cancer by 27%, according to a new study.

:07:34.:07:36.

Scientists in China who analysed research involving 200,000 women,

:07:37.:07:40.

found patients who took the drug were less likely

:07:41.:07:42.

to see their cancer return. Charities have welcomed

:07:43.:07:44.

the news but say more The consumer group Which is calling

:07:45.:07:46.

on British Airways to create an automatic compensation system

:07:47.:07:52.

for passengers affected by serious It comes a week after a major IT

:07:53.:07:56.

failure caused hundreds of the airline's flights

:07:57.:08:01.

to be grounded. The company says it has already

:08:02.:08:02.

taken steps to process claims Meanwhile, British Airways cabin

:08:03.:08:05.

crew have voted for four more days of strike action starting

:08:06.:08:11.

on June 16th. A huge police and security operation

:08:12.:08:19.

is being deployed across Cardiff as the city prepares

:08:20.:08:21.

for the Champions League final. More than 170,000 football fans

:08:22.:08:23.

are due to visit the Welsh capital this weekend for the match

:08:24.:08:26.

between Real Madrid and Juventus. South Wales Police say 6,000

:08:27.:08:29.

police officers will be Increased security at high profile

:08:30.:08:52.

events ash way of life at the moment particularly after the terrorist

:08:53.:08:52.

attack at the concert in Manchester. Children being treated in hospital

:08:53.:08:59.

after the terrorist attack at an Ariana Grande concert

:09:00.:09:01.

in Manchester got a surprise yesterday when the singer

:09:02.:09:03.

popped in for a visit. She's back in the city for a benefit

:09:04.:09:05.

gig tomorrow to raise money for the victims' families,

:09:06.:09:09.

and spent a few hours last night chatting and posing for photographs

:09:10.:09:11.

with youngsters who'd been injured One of them was 8-year-old Lily

:09:12.:09:14.

Harrison. Good morning. Thank you for coming

:09:15.:09:24.

in. No problem. How is Lily to start with? If you asked me last Tuesday

:09:25.:09:31.

probably not so good. But since last night she's just on cloud nine.

:09:32.:09:34.

Really chomping at the bit for tomorrow, really excited. Look at

:09:35.:09:38.

that picture. That's why, is it, that's the best medicine she could

:09:39.:09:43.

have hoped for? Yeah, she was so nervous, she said I think I might

:09:44.:09:47.

need to go to the toilet, she was that excited. We were the last room

:09:48.:09:51.

on the ward she came to visit, so the excitement was building. Then

:09:52.:09:55.

she came skipping in and as you can see, she's made up. One of the best

:09:56.:10:00.

things that we are able to talk to you about is the fact that Lily's

:10:01.:10:05.

recovering and is cheerful and is on the road to recovery. I notice when

:10:06.:10:10.

you were coming in to the studio you were limping. How are you? We are

:10:11.:10:14.

doing well. Could you tell us what happened? Yeah, obviously after the

:10:15.:10:22.

explosion, my injuries have come in the aftermath of that, Lily was

:10:23.:10:26.

blown to the floor, she had a wound to her back. As I saw her on the

:10:27.:10:31.

floor, I picked her up like a rugby ball and made a run for it,

:10:32.:10:37.

obviously being 16 stone myself and carrying Lily's weight and running

:10:38.:10:40.

at speed downstairs, I met a Guy's foot at the bottom and gone over on

:10:41.:10:48.

my ankle. I am a bit immobile. Tell me what happened in terms of your

:10:49.:10:53.

proximity to the blast. You had hurried out, I understand, after the

:10:54.:10:57.

concert. Yes, usually I am quite polite and as we are leaving the

:10:58.:11:00.

seating area I will say you go first. But Lily was tired and hungry

:11:01.:11:06.

so I wanted to get home and get her to sleep. I snaked my way through a

:11:07.:11:11.

gap, got on to the concourse and the last thing my partner said you are

:11:12.:11:15.

walking too fast and then that's when the explosion went. I was

:11:16.:11:18.

saying, you know, had it not been for me trying to make a hasty exit

:11:19.:11:23.

it could have been a lot worse. So we are very lucky. I probably say we

:11:24.:11:28.

were maybe, ten, fetch teen yards away, we were quite close. It pushed

:11:29.:11:34.

me forward. But, yeah, it's still... Very surreal. We talked about the

:11:35.:11:39.

physical effect and how you and Lily have been dealing with that. Nearly

:11:40.:11:44.

two weeks on, what's it been like the last fortnight emotionally,

:11:45.:11:46.

coming to terms with what you have been through and what so many other

:11:47.:11:51.

families have been through? Yeah, it was tough. Lily went unconscious and

:11:52.:11:59.

in the car park she was almost like jelly, it was a tough realisation

:12:00.:12:04.

that we thought we may have lost her. She came around 30 seconds

:12:05.:12:10.

later. I was Patting her legs to see if she had a sense of feeling, she

:12:11.:12:16.

did, so from rock bottom, I wouldn't say euphoria but it was uplifting

:12:17.:12:19.

she was OK. Since then the first three, four days afterwards she

:12:20.:12:24.

didn't really talk much. It was yes and no. But then she's really come

:12:25.:12:30.

round. Obviously culminating last night, like I say she's ready to go,

:12:31.:12:36.

wants to get home now and feels like she's a rock star now. As well as

:12:37.:12:42.

meeting Ariana she's going to the concert tomorrow and you are as

:12:43.:12:49.

well? Yes, Ticketmaster were brilliant with us, we did leave it

:12:50.:12:54.

up to Lily, we will try to get tickets, if you decide you want to

:12:55.:13:00.

go: This is the issue, tell us how Lily has been reacting to the idea

:13:01.:13:03.

of a big event. It isn't what children expect to happen. Not at

:13:04.:13:08.

all, my partner and I took videos during the concert of Lily singing

:13:09.:13:13.

along and to remind her she had a good time, do you want to watch back

:13:14.:13:18.

that you had a good time, she wasn't sure at first. But then as the

:13:19.:13:24.

week's gone on she's been listening to her playlist and again she's

:13:25.:13:29.

expressed wishes to go. After last night's visit I think she would

:13:30.:13:35.

disown me if I didn't take her on Sunday. I think Aran's team were

:13:36.:13:46.

brilliant. How is it going to work, because she is in hospital at the

:13:47.:13:50.

moment? She's looking like she can be discharged tomorrow or possibly

:13:51.:13:55.

today. My partner still has a wound but we are waiting for confirmation

:13:56.:14:00.

this morning whether they can put a dressing around it and they said she

:14:01.:14:04.

should be there until Tuesday. Lily needs to tick all the boxes, the

:14:05.:14:11.

final one is the psychological, physical issues looks well. She's

:14:12.:14:17.

running down the corridors of the hospital and, our heart is in our

:14:18.:14:21.

mouths, but who are we to tell her not to do that. Tomorrow is what she

:14:22.:14:26.

needs at this point. Exactly. She's really excited, after last night, to

:14:27.:14:31.

see her face last night and to see it tomorrow will be things where you

:14:32.:14:33.

think we are coming full circle again. Looking forward to it. And

:14:34.:14:40.

she met Prince William. She did, it was secretive. We were told it was

:14:41.:14:44.

confidential. I understand. It wasn't a photo, it was just a visit

:14:45.:14:50.

to meet with the families. Yeah, she was a lucky girl. She's been in an

:14:51.:14:56.

environment and her life has been turned completely on its head, and

:14:57.:15:00.

as you explained how she's coming to terms with this, what does it mean

:15:01.:15:06.

meeting someone like Ariana Grande and Prince William and knowing she's

:15:07.:15:10.

going back into the real world so to speak after? We were worried at

:15:11.:15:14.

first, she's only eight, I think she's one of one -- one of the

:15:15.:15:22.

youngest on the ward. We were being delicate with her. We are proud as

:15:23.:15:27.

parents she's shown the amount of courage, not to be biased, she's

:15:28.:15:33.

carried us through this week. She's come on so strong. We have not

:15:34.:15:37.

doubted her since. Not one person is going to judge you for being proud

:15:38.:15:41.

of your little girl. Not at all. Absolutely you should be. We are

:15:42.:15:44.

delighted she's recovering and we wish you a great time tomorrow. Hope

:15:45.:15:48.

her discharge goes ahead as planned. Fingers crossed. Thank you so much.

:15:49.:15:54.

Ben has Good morning. It's not looking too

:15:55.:16:05.

bad this morning, many places have seen sunrises like that. It's not

:16:06.:16:09.

all sunshine today, good spells of sunshine but also some showers

:16:10.:16:12.

beginning to pop up especially in northern and western areas. We still

:16:13.:16:15.

have cloud to clear from eastern parts of England, the odd spot of

:16:16.:16:18.

rain here, that will scoot off to the North Sea. Things will brighten

:16:19.:16:22.

up and spells of sunshine but showers pushing in from the west,

:16:23.:16:24.

especially for Northern Ireland and Scotland some of the showers will be

:16:25.:16:29.

heavy and slow moving. Rain in a short space of time with lightning

:16:30.:16:34.

and thunder. A cooler, fresher feel, as well. This evening the showers

:16:35.:16:37.

will continue for a time across Northern Ireland and Scotland. They

:16:38.:16:40.

will tend to ease then and for about all parts it will be a dry night

:16:41.:16:45.

with clear spells. A fairly cool night, nothing exceptional. Towns

:16:46.:16:49.

and cities around 9-11. Tomorrow we do it all again essentially.

:16:50.:16:53.

Sunshine and showers, more showers than today across northern England.

:16:54.:16:56.

Northern Ireland and Scotland having a few heavy showers and clouding

:16:57.:17:00.

over with rain across the south-west of England, Wales and parts of the

:17:01.:17:06.

Midlands later. Again a cooler feel but get into sunshine, 16-20 won't

:17:07.:17:12.

feel too bad. A change into Monday, looks like we will see wet weather

:17:13.:17:15.

pushing in from the west, potentially heavy rain and strong

:17:16.:17:18.

winds. Highs of 14-20. Back to you two.

:17:19.:17:20.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn faced a series of hostile

:17:21.:17:29.

questions last night as part of a Question Time special.

:17:30.:17:34.

With just five days until polling, let's get a progress

:17:35.:17:43.

report from Katy Balls, political correspondent

:17:44.:17:46.

for The Spectator and Daily Mirror associate editor Kevin Maguire.

:17:47.:17:51.

Morning to both of you. Katy, let's start with you, who won? I think

:17:52.:17:56.

Theresa May put in a solid performance and probably one of her

:17:57.:18:00.

best of the campaign so far. After a difficult week or so she managed to

:18:01.:18:04.

find a positive message finally and I think a lot of Conservatives who

:18:05.:18:07.

were worried about her will feel more assured. Kevin, I suspect you

:18:08.:18:13.

were not say she won? I agree the audience was terrific asking the

:18:14.:18:21.

right questions. She may have steadied the Tory ship but she was

:18:22.:18:25.

defensive on the record when questioned about cuts and mental

:18:26.:18:29.

health too. She didn't look the commanding figure she started the

:18:30.:18:33.

campaign as. The story of this campaign, we don't know where it

:18:34.:18:35.

will end, we will find out next Friday when we wake up, but the

:18:36.:18:40.

story is she's gone down and Jeremy Corbyn's gone up. Did you see in

:18:41.:18:45.

Jeremy Corbyn last night a Prime Minister to be, somebody is who

:18:46.:18:48.

could be in Downing Street in a week's time, has he convinced people

:18:49.:18:53.

of that? I think he has convinced some, yes. He has changed opinions.

:18:54.:19:01.

They're seeing Corbyn uncut rather than a distorted view. Where he had

:19:02.:19:05.

problems was on triedent. He was under sustained fire and questioning

:19:06.:19:10.

on that. Nobody believes he would ever press a button, a nuclear. I

:19:11.:19:14.

think that's a good thing and I am worried about leaders who would do

:19:15.:19:18.

that. Nevertheless, he lost the argument in his own party which is

:19:19.:19:24.

why Labour's committed to renewing Trident. Will that issue, a fact he

:19:25.:19:30.

wouldn't press the button, will that crystallise fears in the minds of

:19:31.:19:35.

some voters? A lot of people on social media have been saying

:19:36.:19:38.

Theresa May might have done all the right things, said the right policy

:19:39.:19:44.

things, but was lacking emotional intelligence, a lack of empathy with

:19:45.:19:50.

people in the audience, she doesn't connect? I think I don't think it

:19:51.:19:56.

was... We heard a lot about the repeated lines, she seemed to have

:19:57.:20:00.

fire in her belly for a change. When a woman asked about work allowance

:20:01.:20:06.

and was visibly upset I think Theresa May was very, managed to

:20:07.:20:10.

reach out with her, reach out to her feelings and say she was sorry about

:20:11.:20:14.

what happened and that was an emotional response that we hadn't

:20:15.:20:17.

seen before. Do you think Jeremy Corbyn has done much better than you

:20:18.:20:21.

expected him to do? Yeah, I think so, definitely. He started off with

:20:22.:20:26.

low expectations, though, that he's kept surprising us. But he was very

:20:27.:20:31.

strong on Monday in the Channel 4-Sky interview and last night he

:20:32.:20:37.

struggled a lot more. I thought the format would work in his favour

:20:38.:20:41.

because the crowd seemed pro him but actually he struggled and couldn't

:20:42.:20:45.

avoid questions so when he was asked about Trident, the audience didn't

:20:46.:20:48.

like the first answer and kept going for him and it meant he was hammered

:20:49.:20:52.

on defence. What did last night teach us overall, let's keep the

:20:53.:20:56.

personalities and your own politics out of this, but what did we learn,

:20:57.:21:03.

what did it reveal for both of them? ? If you had been following the

:21:04.:21:07.

campaign you wouldn't learn anything new, people are tuning in now and

:21:08.:21:12.

elections aren't won or lost by the party faithful, they're won or lost

:21:13.:21:16.

with floating voters, can you attract the people who might be

:21:17.:21:20.

sympathetic to you but have concerns? With Theresa May and I

:21:21.:21:27.

don't think she's particularly empath thetic, I think she has the

:21:28.:21:32.

personality of a tin of paint. Jeremy Corbyn is offering change,

:21:33.:21:36.

it's whether it is change you want and change that reassures you. Did

:21:37.:21:40.

you feel we learned anything new, Katy? I don't think we learned that

:21:41.:21:46.

much new. We saw both the leaders going back to the subjects they're

:21:47.:21:49.

most comfortable on and Theresa May returning to Brexit which is what

:21:50.:21:52.

she said she called this election for and the topic she's still

:21:53.:21:56.

comfortable on. We heard talk about the economy and Labour's magic money

:21:57.:22:00.

tree. One of the most cutting questions is when a member asked

:22:01.:22:03.

Jeremy Corbyn if Labour's manifesto is really a letter to Santa? I don't

:22:04.:22:07.

think it solved Labour's credible issue. That magic money tree I am

:22:08.:22:13.

upset, because I used that phrase for my family when I have lectured

:22:14.:22:17.

them at home. But the reason she doesn't go on about the deficit any

:22:18.:22:24.

more is they borrowed ?52 billion last year, they piled up more

:22:25.:22:27.

national debt than every Labour Government. It won't be cleared

:22:28.:22:32.

until 2025. It's interesting, the debt hasn't really been an issue the

:22:33.:22:36.

way migration has been an issue because the Conservative record on

:22:37.:22:39.

both is pretty poor. Five days to go. Quickly, what do you each expect

:22:40.:22:45.

we are going to see them concentrating on? I think Brexit

:22:46.:22:53.

again. We know the strategist has taken more control after some

:22:54.:22:56.

wobbles, now it's going to be a disciplined message and we will hear

:22:57.:23:00.

about Brexit and defence. Kevin? Brexit, yes, because it's a card

:23:01.:23:06.

they have to play but they'll also go full-on attack on Jeremy Corbyn.

:23:07.:23:09.

Jeremy Corbyn will say, look, he will use that slogan for the many,

:23:10.:23:13.

not the few. Are you doing well or could Britain do better, let's be

:23:14.:23:16.

ambitious for Britain, he will push the change. She will push the fear.

:23:17.:23:24.

Thank you very much. Looking behind you, maybe that's it, maybe that's

:23:25.:23:28.

the magic money tree behind you! I am going to give it a shake then!

:23:29.:23:30.

Thank you both very much indeed. You're watching

:23:31.:23:39.

Breakfast from BBC News. Time now for a look

:23:40.:23:41.

at the newspapers. The Guardian's northern editor

:23:42.:23:43.

Helen Pidd is here to tell us Interesting to pick up on this

:23:44.:23:55.

conversation as well. We were talking about how the audience was

:23:56.:24:02.

really engaged and fiery. Punchy. What was interesting afterwards on

:24:03.:24:05.

BBC News channel was the coverage with some of of the politicians and

:24:06.:24:10.

that fire was reflected a little bit. There was a particular exchange

:24:11.:24:18.

with Labour and the Conservatives. It was about food banks I think.

:24:19.:24:24.

Let's have a look. 40% pay cut since 2010 and are using food banks. He

:24:25.:24:31.

has never used a food bank. Actually... Take that back. Let's

:24:32.:24:39.

sort this out. Take that back. I want to hear You just pointed in my

:24:40.:24:43.

face. Let's hear from Jeremy Corbyn. This is what he had to say about

:24:44.:24:54.

that nuclear deterrent. Poor Simon there, half-journalist,

:24:55.:24:56.

half-referee, I think that was his role! What was your feeling coming

:24:57.:25:01.

away from the debate, it didn't feel anyone was saying there was an

:25:02.:25:05.

outright winner or someone has proven themselves to be a strong and

:25:06.:25:10.

worthy leader? No, but Jeremy Corbyn seemed very confident and calm and

:25:11.:25:14.

didn't get rattled. Theresa May, her eyes were kind of, bulging, she was

:25:15.:25:18.

definitely under pressure. There was a nurse who asked a question and she

:25:19.:25:24.

said that her wage packet was the same now as it was in 2009. Theresa

:25:25.:25:29.

May gave an answer about how the public accept that in these times we

:25:30.:25:34.

have to make hard decisions but I think you ask a average person do

:25:35.:25:38.

you think they think nurses should be properly paid and the average

:25:39.:25:41.

person would say of course, they shouldn't be earning the same amount

:25:42.:25:45.

as eight years ago. We will talk to Iain Duncan Smith later. We have

:25:46.:25:48.

spoken to a representative from the Labour Party. We will keep talking

:25:49.:25:52.

about that debate. Let's move on from politics for now. This piece in

:25:53.:25:59.

The Mirror today, we were talking about the concert with Ariana

:26:00.:26:07.

Grande. People applying for tickets when they weren't even there. It

:26:08.:26:12.

beggars belief. There is always one or two wrong-uns as we would say in

:26:13.:26:15.

Manchester who might chance it. But for 10,000 people who weren't at

:26:16.:26:19.

that concert to claim they were so they don't have to pay ?50, all of

:26:20.:26:24.

which the profits are going to family family and victims of the

:26:25.:26:28.

bomb attack, it's staggering. The Mirror reports that the police are

:26:29.:26:33.

looking into whether any criminal offences have been committed by

:26:34.:26:37.

those fraudulently applying for free tickets and they've vowed to crack

:26:38.:26:41.

down on those who do not deserve the free tickets. I certainly support

:26:42.:26:45.

that. If little girls like Adam's daughter who was on before, if she's

:26:46.:26:52.

brave enough, Lily, yeah, to go back to a concert to watch her idol,

:26:53.:26:58.

these are the people who should be getting tickets and not chancers off

:26:59.:27:03.

the internet. The police might prosecute people who wrongly tried

:27:04.:27:07.

to claim tickets. Too right. Why have you picked this story about a

:27:08.:27:10.

young girl, a schoolgirl who ran away with her teacher? I remember

:27:11.:27:14.

this story and I think a lot of viewers probably will. It was a

:27:15.:27:21.

15-year-old girl and her 30-year-old teacher, and in September 2012 they

:27:22.:27:28.

tried to elone from their homes in Sussex and went to France and it was

:27:29.:27:31.

front pages of all the newspapers the search to find them, they were

:27:32.:27:34.

found by French police, he was put on trial and sent to jail. What's

:27:35.:27:40.

interesting about this interview which originally comes from

:27:41.:27:42.

Cosmopolitan magazine, it's told from the viewpoint of the former

:27:43.:27:47.

schoolgirl. She's 19 now. She says she doesn't regret the affair. She

:27:48.:27:50.

knows it was dangerous and damaged them both. She also acknowledges in

:27:51.:27:56.

this is that she started it. With a lot of people that's not going to

:27:57.:28:00.

wash, they will say she was 15, he was in a position of responsibility.

:28:01.:28:04.

She says she approached him on Twitter and I know there is a lot of

:28:05.:28:08.

schools that don't allow teachers to have public social media profiles

:28:09.:28:14.

because it makes it easier for teenagers who might have some

:28:15.:28:22.

infatuation to get in touch and this is how this started. Survival of the

:28:23.:28:28.

fittest as dating sites evolve. Yes, this is an interview with the owner

:28:29.:28:36.

of a dating website E Harmony, talking about how they fine tune how

:28:37.:28:43.

to watch people. Tlaer talking about fitness trackers to see if they're

:28:44.:28:46.

the sporting fanatics they claim to be and also to find people with a

:28:47.:28:49.

compatible level of activity on the weekend. A lot of people lie on

:28:50.:28:56.

dating profiles, they have pictures of themselves looking extremely

:28:57.:28:58.

sporty and athletic and what they really do is watch football on a

:28:59.:29:03.

Sunday afternoon. Find out if your pulse rate is compatible? Exactly. I

:29:04.:29:08.

wish we both had one. Our pulse rates are very compatible, I am

:29:09.:29:11.

sure. Equally fit. That's scary, that kind of intrusion really. Yes.

:29:12.:29:16.

Or level of scrutiny. Helen, thank you very much for now.

:29:17.:29:20.

Headlines are coming up. See you shortly.

:29:21.:30:08.

Hello, this is Breakfast with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:30:09.:30:11.

Coming up before nine, Ben's got the weather.

:30:12.:30:14.

And we have the Champions League preview. It isn't entirely positive,

:30:15.:30:21.

the weather. But there is some sunshine...

:30:22.:30:23.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:30:24.:30:29.

audience, just days before the general election.

:30:30.:30:31.

They were challenged separately in a special edition

:30:32.:30:33.

Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:30:34.:30:36.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:30:37.:30:39.

More from that debate has the programme goes on.

:30:40.:30:45.

One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

:30:46.:30:48.

Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:30:49.:30:50.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:30:51.:30:53.

the Daily Telegraph the party was "not in the business

:30:54.:30:55.

Labour has already said it would increase income tax rates

:30:56.:31:01.

to 45 pence in the pound for those earning more than

:31:02.:31:05.

The pop star Ariana Grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital

:31:06.:31:10.

who were injured in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

:31:11.:31:13.

The singer spent time chatting to patients

:31:14.:31:16.

and posing for photographs at the Royal Manchester Children's

:31:17.:31:18.

Hospital ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid

:31:19.:31:21.

A new drug to treat ovarian cancer has been described as very promising

:31:22.:31:27.

Charities have called it an important step in treating

:31:28.:31:31.

Developed by the Institute of Cancer Research and the Royal Marsden

:31:32.:31:34.

NHS Foundation Trust, the drug shrank tumours in almost

:31:35.:31:36.

half of the 15 women in the advanced stages of the disease who took part

:31:37.:31:40.

Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

:31:41.:31:51.

could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%,

:31:52.:31:54.

Scientists in China who analysed research involving 200,000

:31:55.:32:01.

women, found patients who took the drug were less likely

:32:02.:32:04.

Charities have welcomed the news but say more

:32:05.:32:07.

The consumer group Which is calling on British Airways to create

:32:08.:32:20.

an automatic compensation system for passengers affected by serious

:32:21.:32:23.

It comes a week after a major IT failure caused hundreds

:32:24.:32:26.

of the airline's flights to be grounded.

:32:27.:32:28.

The company says it has already taken steps to process claims

:32:29.:32:31.

Meanwhile British Airways cabin crew have voted for four more days

:32:32.:32:34.

of strike action starting on June 16th.

:32:35.:32:36.

Those are the main stories this morning.

:32:37.:32:48.

Mike has all of the sport... Good morning. Good morning. In a few

:32:49.:32:54.

minutes it all begins for the British and Irish Lions. They signed

:32:55.:33:00.

the autographs, there has been rain. One of the most difficult place

:33:01.:33:05.

names I've had to spell and then pronounce. It

:33:06.:33:14.

is the most northern city in New Zealand which is where the Lions

:33:15.:33:23.

will take off -- kick off in a few moments time. Here we have some

:33:24.:33:27.

pictures of them in their huddle on the pitch. It's a very volcanic city

:33:28.:33:35.

there. Up against the Provincial Barbarians. Nine new caps, the first

:33:36.:33:43.

of six warm up matches ahead of the first test in three weeks' time. A

:33:44.:33:46.

chance for the team to send out a warning and for players to book a

:33:47.:33:50.

place in the test team. Sam Warburton is captaining the side.

:33:51.:33:57.

Cardiff is hosting European club football's, biggest night,

:33:58.:34:07.

of the season - the Champions League final.

:34:08.:34:08.

on whether welsh star Gareth Bales will get to play for Real Madrid

:34:09.:34:13.

against Juventus.Olly Foster looks ahead.

:34:14.:34:14.

Real Madrid and Juventus fans have travelled here

:34:15.:34:15.

Cardiff has welcomed two giants of European football

:34:16.:34:19.

If we win it is going to be the best experience in my life.

:34:20.:34:24.

We have a balanced team, we are confident

:34:25.:34:26.

If we win it is going to be the best experience in my life.

:34:27.:34:31.

We have a balanced team, we are confident

:34:32.:34:33.

To win, Real have to get past the goalkeeper. He has never won the

:34:34.:34:43.

trophy. At 39, the goalkeeper knows it

:34:44.:34:44.

may be his last chance. In a season when British teams again

:34:45.:34:47.

fell short in Europe, at least one British player

:34:48.:34:49.

has reached the final. The trouble is he is unlikely

:34:50.:34:52.

to start for Real Madrid. He's at the heart of the marketing,

:34:53.:34:55.

he is plastered all over town. But he has not actually been

:34:56.:34:59.

in the Madrid team for about six It is disappointing,

:35:00.:35:02.

especially in his hometown but I think he would

:35:03.:35:11.

probably get his head around it. If he doesn't start,

:35:12.:35:14.

he will come on and make an impact on what he does

:35:15.:35:16.

and that 20 minutes or half an hour, He is a special player who can

:35:17.:35:19.

score all types of goals. He won the Champions League

:35:20.:35:34.

in 2008 and the FA A teenage scoring star then,

:35:35.:35:40.

he has developed into an icon A brand that is still

:35:41.:35:43.

a serial winner. The President of the football's

:35:44.:35:46.

European Governing body has told the BBC that Britain

:35:47.:36:02.

deserves to host a World Cup Aleksander Seferin says he hopes

:36:03.:36:04.

the tournament will be They are absolutely capable of

:36:05.:36:14.

organising it from an organisational point of view, from an

:36:15.:36:17.

infrastructure point of view but it is a decision not only from the FA

:36:18.:36:23.

but the government. But you know everything about British football.

:36:24.:36:33.

So they deserve to have a World Cup in the near future.

:36:34.:36:35.

It was a positive evening for Northern Ireland

:36:36.:36:40.

as they beat New Zealand 1-0 in Belfast last night.

:36:41.:36:42.

The friendly had been organised as Michael O'Neill's side warm up

:36:43.:36:45.

for next week's World Cup qualifier in Azerbaijan.

:36:46.:36:47.

The only goal of the game, was the first international goal,

:36:48.:36:49.

for Ross County's Liam Boyce...the Scottish Premiership's

:36:50.:36:51.

I am pleased with what we got from the game. We won the game. That's

:36:52.:37:00.

important, great folly to get his excellent goal. Slightly

:37:01.:37:06.

disappointed we only added to the 1-0. Physically it was a challenge,

:37:07.:37:09.

a demanding game which is what we wanted. As I said, it leaves us in a

:37:10.:37:15.

good place in terms of what we have and one week of preparation to go

:37:16.:37:17.

and play in Baku. England all rounder Chris Woakes has

:37:18.:37:19.

been ruled out of the rest of the Champions Trophy,

:37:20.:37:22.

due to a side strain, he picked it up early

:37:23.:37:30.

on in the opening match England are unlikely

:37:31.:37:33.

to name his replacement, until this afternoon,

:37:34.:37:35.

after the England Lions match, that's the cricket match,

:37:36.:37:37.

which involves two of the possible candidates: Steve Finn

:37:38.:37:40.

and Tom Curran. At the French Open,

:37:41.:37:41.

Britain's Andy Murray and Kyle Edmund are in

:37:42.:37:43.

action later today... While defending mens

:37:44.:37:45.

champion Novak Djokovic is through to the fourth round,

:37:46.:37:46.

but he had to fight for it. Argentine Diego Schwartzman,

:37:47.:37:49.

the world number 41, took Djokovic, The world number two though had

:37:50.:37:51.

enough, to see out the victory... The nine-time champion

:37:52.:37:55.

at Roland Garros through in straight sets against his opponent

:37:56.:38:12.

dropping only one The defending women's champion,

:38:13.:38:14.

Garbine Muguruza, is safely She beat Yulia Putinseva,

:38:15.:38:18.

in straight sets. Just one game in rugby league's

:38:19.:38:21.

Super League last night. Two tries from Adam Cuthbertson

:38:22.:38:27.

helped Leeds Rhinos beat strugglers Leigh Centurions,

:38:28.:38:29.

by 22 points to 14. It grew up in the bomb sites

:38:30.:38:31.

of Britain, after the second world war, and is once again now proving

:38:32.:38:36.

to be, one of the fastest growing It is cycle speedway

:38:37.:38:39.

and as the British team, arrive in Poland

:38:40.:38:42.

today, as they build up to the World Championship later this

:38:43.:38:45.

year, I've been to train at Coventry And cycle speedway is accessible

:38:46.:38:48.

to all ages, even if you are five. It took off in the rubble

:38:49.:38:59.

of bombsites after the Second Only a bomb site, a bunch

:39:00.:39:19.

of kids having fun. But here is where stars

:39:20.:39:25.

of speed are born. Sit back and see if you can spot

:39:26.:39:27.

a champion of tomorrow. One day the crowd will roar

:39:28.:39:37.

so the children who learnt it all the hard way

:39:38.:39:39.

on a cycle Speedway. It started after the war

:39:40.:39:41.

on the bombsites and, you know, a load of kids

:39:42.:39:44.

with nothing to do. As cities were rebuilt

:39:45.:39:46.

in the post-war years, the cycle speedway

:39:47.:39:52.

tracks disappeared. But now purpose-built ones like this

:39:53.:39:53.

one in Coventry have brought it back as a cheaper and safer

:39:54.:39:57.

alternative to There are leagues again

:39:58.:39:59.

and the World Championships We are trying to reinvent

:40:00.:40:12.

it a little bit Really trying to get people involved

:40:13.:40:16.

from all age groups. It is far more accessible and not

:40:17.:40:22.

so worrying about being on the back It also makes it easier to turn up

:40:23.:40:25.

and pay a couple of quid, This is the position you need

:40:26.:40:29.

to adopt for the maximum It is fast and explosive with four

:40:30.:40:35.

riders competing over four laps. They say in this sport it is first

:40:36.:40:57.

or dirt and most races are won It is a little

:40:58.:41:01.

frightening because you You just want to get

:41:02.:41:10.

the inside of people And you either come out on the right

:41:11.:41:14.

side or the wrong side. Indeed, the whole British

:41:15.:41:25.

championship was won on the very I was ten yards away

:41:26.:41:27.

from being a champion. It can certainly hurt

:41:28.:41:33.

when your dreams end I can definitely recommend it, it is

:41:34.:41:49.

great fun racing around in the dirt. Slippy, spiky Rod Lucy was saying.

:41:50.:41:56.

Did you get scabs on your knees? I managed to stay on! Speedway club

:41:57.:41:57.

Zaha across the country . The favourites was in the race

:41:58.:42:13.

this afternoon is Naggers. Put your money on Naggers. What are the odds?

:42:14.:42:18.

4-1. That isn't bad, I will take that. Thank you, Mike. Let's move

:42:19.:42:24.

on! Good luck later. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn took

:42:25.:42:31.

part in a Question Time special last night, but with most pundits scoring

:42:32.:42:34.

the contest as a draw, maybe the real winners

:42:35.:42:37.

were the studio audience who certainly gave

:42:38.:42:39.

the leaders a rough ride. With just five days until polling,

:42:40.:42:41.

let's talk to Iain Duncan Smith, the former Work and Pensions

:42:42.:42:44.

Secretary, he's in our Thank you very much for talking to

:42:45.:42:59.

us this morning. Pleasure. Let's get straight into it, we interviewed Jon

:43:00.:43:04.

Trickett, Shadow Cabinet office minister this morning.

:43:05.:43:07.

Unsurprisingly, he thought Jeremy Corbyn came out on top. What he did

:43:08.:43:11.

say was that he was talking about Theresa May's personality and how

:43:12.:43:16.

she came across. There has been a lot of criticism and analysis of

:43:17.:43:20.

this. He said that she is someone who is remote, cold and wooden. And

:43:21.:43:25.

unclear about what our policies are. How concerned are you that this is

:43:26.:43:28.

an image people are taking from the debate? I don't figure they did. I,

:43:29.:43:34.

and many others, watched or listened. I listened to it last

:43:35.:43:38.

night more than I washed it as I was on the radio at the time but others

:43:39.:43:42.

watched it. I do not agree -- I watched it. Theresa May tries to

:43:43.:43:49.

give you straight answers which is important but the whole debate

:43:50.:43:53.

yesterday, the most important point, both faced tough questioning and you

:43:54.:43:58.

are right, these things are better because actually you get proper

:43:59.:44:01.

questions from the audience and the audience don't like it if you evade

:44:02.:44:05.

them. The biggest issue at the election will be the choice between

:44:06.:44:08.

the two said people had to decide who they think is actually competent

:44:09.:44:14.

to do the job. That is what it boils down to. Last night he said that he

:44:15.:44:19.

thought his man did well, actually I thought his man faced the biggest

:44:20.:44:23.

moment in the campaign when he was specifically asked on three or four

:44:24.:44:26.

occasions if you have a nuclear deterrent, and you spend all of that

:44:27.:44:33.

money on it, will you ever use it in any circumstance? It became

:44:34.:44:35.

absolutely apparent as he tried to evade the all Agricola answer that

:44:36.:44:41.

he is not going to use it -- he tried to abate the answer. Why have

:44:42.:44:45.

it and spend billions on it, you yourself will never use it, Corbyn,

:44:46.:44:53.

everybody knows that, so it is not a deterrent but an expensive white

:44:54.:44:56.

elephant. Only if they believe you will use it, made clear by the

:44:57.:45:01.

Defence Secretary days ago... That is the critical issue. It's about

:45:02.:45:05.

assembling in front of the audience which was a critical moment, it gets

:45:06.:45:11.

to the character of the individual. Let's talk about some of the

:45:12.:45:15.

policies with five days away, people want to know about this.

:45:16.:45:19.

In the Sunday Telegraph, Sir Michael Fallon is quoted as saying that

:45:20.:45:24.

there will be no rises in tax, if you vote Conservative. People can be

:45:25.:45:27.

assured if they vote Conservative, there will be no rise in tax for

:45:28.:45:32.

higher tax payers. Can you confirm that? I am not in government but my

:45:33.:45:36.

view is that is correct. He states what I think is obvious. The

:45:37.:45:42.

Conservative Party lovers tax. We have taken 31 million people out of

:45:43.:45:49.

tax -- lowers tax. And we raised the threshold on

:45:50.:45:54.

higher rate owners, so you do not enter the upper rate tax band until

:45:55.:45:58.

you earn ?50,000. Labour wants to reduce that so

:45:59.:46:03.

middle earners pay more in terms of tax later on. The Conservatives want

:46:04.:46:08.

to lower taxation and corporation tax has been lowered to 17% by this

:46:09.:46:13.

government. And we want to see a lower. You said it was taken out the

:46:14.:46:18.

manifesto, Theresa May dropped the triple tax lock. Why would you take

:46:19.:46:23.

it out only to come back in and say there would be no tax rises? We are

:46:24.:46:28.

trying to get away with the manifesto, getting away from rather,

:46:29.:46:32.

the idea you set out every single thing in detail, saying we will not

:46:33.:46:36.

do this or that, then you get a large shopping list. The principles

:46:37.:46:42.

were the Conservative Party seeks to lobby your taxes and the

:46:43.:46:44.

Conservative Party ends up with lower tax than anyone else. We will

:46:45.:46:49.

stick to that principle and the Defence Secretary said, as I

:46:50.:46:52.

understand in his interview, that the Conservative Party is not going

:46:53.:46:55.

to be raising taxes in the next Parliament. The last thing small

:46:56.:47:01.

business owners need, which they are facing under the Jeremy Corbyn

:47:02.:47:04.

manifesto, they do not need extra costs on them as we raise the

:47:05.:47:08.

minimum wage. You need to bring down taxes to give them the flexibility

:47:09.:47:12.

to pay the minimum wages and generate business. Raising

:47:13.:47:17.

corporation tax, which is the real debate here, Labour's manifesto

:47:18.:47:21.

wants to raise it to 26%, which will get rid of jobs and lower wages and

:47:22.:47:30.

we want to keep it low. Do you want higher corporation tax or lower,

:47:31.:47:36.

which would help more businesses? Theresa May put out the line "Strong

:47:37.:47:40.

and stable leadership". If the economy, as well as Brexit, people

:47:41.:47:43.

focus on that. You said a shopping list of things,

:47:44.:47:48.

many would put tax high up on the list but also economic stability.

:47:49.:47:52.

There is a lot of talk that the Chancellor Philip Hammond will not

:47:53.:47:56.

be the Chancellor if Theresa May winds the election and Amber Rudd

:47:57.:48:01.

would be the Chancellor. If Theresa May and the Conservatives are asking

:48:02.:48:05.

for strength and stability, surely there should be some guarantees or

:48:06.:48:09.

responds to say, we will stay with the status quo as it works, this is

:48:10.:48:16.

the team we have offered you? To be frank, shuffles happen again and

:48:17.:48:19.

again in government, and a Labour or the Conservatives, you move people

:48:20.:48:22.

around, you think some people are better than others. I don't know

:48:23.:48:27.

what will happen after the election, it is in the hands of the Prime

:48:28.:48:32.

Minister. Gordon Brown, David Cameron and Tony Blair all did

:48:33.:48:35.

reshuffles. Theresa May has not had a reshuffle since she came in, she

:48:36.:48:42.

is the Prime Minister will have the agenda which is being set out and

:48:43.:48:47.

the key point made by the Defence Secretary last night is no matter

:48:48.:48:51.

who is sitting, I have no issue about whether Philip Hammond sits

:48:52.:48:55.

there or not, the issue is the principal. The principle is the

:48:56.:48:58.

Conservative Party does not want to see taxes going up on those people

:48:59.:49:03.

who are not on higher earnings, and not really in a position to pay

:49:04.:49:07.

them. What we are seeing is a real debate in the next four days between

:49:08.:49:09.

what the Labour Party wants to do, which

:49:10.:49:24.

is to spend and borrow more which will cost you an taxes, or the

:49:25.:49:27.

Conservative Party who says we need to see through the plan, keeping

:49:28.:49:29.

taxes low so businesses set up here and it means your jobs are secure.

:49:30.:49:32.

That is a big and critical debate with the black hole that sits in the

:49:33.:49:35.

Labour manifesto of over 50 billion, which the IFS made clear, needs to

:49:36.:49:37.

be paid for. Iain Duncan Smith, thank you for talking to us on BBC

:49:38.:49:39.

breakfast. If you are heading out to do

:49:40.:49:44.

something active, Ben has the weather forecast...

:49:45.:49:48.

Good morning. It is one of those days where you look outside and

:49:49.:49:51.

think you will do something but bear in mind, that could change with a

:49:52.:49:55.

big downpour that comes overhead. It will turn into a day, and a weekend,

:49:56.:50:01.

sunny spells and showers. Looking at recent satellite pictures, fair

:50:02.:50:05.

amounts of cloud in East Anglia and the south-east, this is an old

:50:06.:50:10.

weather from moving its way through and will continue to move through as

:50:11.:50:15.

we go through the morning. Cool and fresh conditions but bright, good

:50:16.:50:18.

spells of sunshine but these showers are already on the march, pushing in

:50:19.:50:22.

across Northern Ireland, Scotland, and western fringes of England and

:50:23.:50:28.

Wales as well. This afternoon, Northern Ireland sees some heavy

:50:29.:50:31.

showers, the heaviest here probably around lunchtime. At this stage, by

:50:32.:50:36.

mid-afternoon, they are likely to be across Scotland where they are

:50:37.:50:41.

slow-moving, with some thunder and lightning as well. Some showers

:50:42.:50:44.

trickling into northern England, many places dry with sunshine. In

:50:45.:50:48.

East Anglia and the south-east, it will be fine with sunny spells. 21

:50:49.:50:53.

or 22 degrees, not as warm as yesterday. Pleasant enough, showers

:50:54.:50:59.

across Wales and Southwest but they should be clear from Cardiff by the

:51:00.:51:04.

evening. For the Champions League final, that big match in Cardiff, it

:51:05.:51:08.

will be dry with late sunshine, it will turn cool as the match goes on.

:51:09.:51:13.

A fairly cool night for many of us but mainly dry. Showers fade away in

:51:14.:51:18.

Northern Ireland and Scotland, although it may take a while to do

:51:19.:51:24.

so. Temperatures of 9-11d, cool but not desperately called. Tomorrow, we

:51:25.:51:29.

do it all again. More showers then today across northern England, and a

:51:30.:51:34.

lot of showers in Northern Ireland and Scotland. Clouding over in the

:51:35.:51:37.

South West and Wales with the rain here late in the day. Cool and fresh

:51:38.:51:43.

at 16 to 20 degrees here. But next, the start of the new week bring

:51:44.:51:48.

something a little different, low-pressure gathering and swarming

:51:49.:51:51.

out westwards, threatening to throw a band of rain across the country on

:51:52.:51:57.

Monday. Potentially wet and windy weather, not great considering we

:51:58.:52:00.

are now into June, heavy rain with strong winds, temperatures of

:52:01.:52:05.

40-20d. We will look forward to that one, you two! STUDIO: That's great,

:52:06.:52:11.

thank you so much(!) Thank you. It has been a week British Airways

:52:12.:52:17.

would like to forget after tens of thousands of its passengers

:52:18.:52:20.

had their travel plans disrupted Anyone whose flight was cancelled

:52:21.:52:22.

is entitled to a fixed amount of compensation under

:52:23.:52:26.

European Commission rules, but the airline has been criticised

:52:27.:52:28.

for saying customers must submit a claim before any

:52:29.:52:31.

money is paid out. Paul Lewis is from BBC Radio 4's

:52:32.:52:32.

Money Box programme. Lets get down to the basics. If you

:52:33.:52:42.

are in that position or while waiting at Heathrow last weekend and

:52:43.:52:46.

had to rebut, what are you entitled to, what are the basics? You are

:52:47.:52:52.

entitled to reimbursement if all reasonable expenses like hotels and

:52:53.:52:56.

taxes, anything like that, food, you get it all back which is right. It

:52:57.:53:01.

isn't your fault that you had to spend it. On top of that, you get

:53:02.:53:06.

fixed rates of compensation. They vary compared to the time that you

:53:07.:53:12.

are delayed and where you are going but those delayed for hours in many

:53:13.:53:17.

cases, it is in Euros so it is 400 euros, about ?350, or 600 euros

:53:18.:53:25.

which is about ?525. That is per passenger. If there is a family of

:53:26.:53:29.

four, it is a considerable amount of money. That is a legal entitlement.

:53:30.:53:35.

But, you have to claim it. That is what is criticised at the moment,

:53:36.:53:40.

there are 75,000 passengers. Some may have flown home and don't know

:53:41.:53:44.

about it, others will be tempted by claims management companies. You

:53:45.:53:49.

don't need one, it can be done easily yourself. Isn't there

:53:50.:53:52.

confusion about where you go to claim it? There were suggestions on

:53:53.:54:01.

the British Airways website that you get it for your insurance company? I

:54:02.:54:08.

think that PA confused expenses and extra compensation on top. Even if

:54:09.:54:13.

they give you another flight three or four hours late, you get

:54:14.:54:17.

compensation -- BA. On the website is first to go to your insurer or

:54:18.:54:21.

travel agent. European law is absolutely clear that it is the

:54:22.:54:25.

airline, the carrier, who reimburses you and that is where you go for it.

:54:26.:54:30.

Insurance only comes in in a very last resort, if you want

:54:31.:54:36.

reimbursement for staying in the Savoy, and BA says no, we will pay

:54:37.:54:41.

for a holiday Inn. Your insurer may meet the gap, it may not in that

:54:42.:54:46.

case, but insurance isn't an issue. The airline must pay. That's good

:54:47.:54:49.

advice, thank you. You can hear more on 'Moneybox'

:54:50.:54:51.

from midday on BBC Radio 4. It took all of Britain's

:54:52.:54:57.

ingenuity and bravery to win the Second World War -

:54:58.:55:03.

but a new book has revealed there were also a few more unusual

:55:04.:55:06.

things that helped us to victory. You will not find these in the GCSE

:55:07.:55:08.

textbook! Garlic flavoured chocolate

:55:09.:55:12.

and exploding animal droppings were amongst some of the bizarre

:55:13.:55:14.

inventions deployed to hoodwink Peter Taylor is a historian

:55:15.:55:17.

and author of Weird War Two This was so amusing. I was getting

:55:18.:55:30.

some of the stories, some of the things that were being used. Some of

:55:31.:55:36.

the things I heard off, like cows being painted...? During the

:55:37.:55:42.

blackout, some farmers painted stripes on their cows to make sure

:55:43.:55:46.

motorists did not drive into them. There were a lot of people having

:55:47.:55:49.

accidents in the cities, there were weird gadgets to help with that. And

:55:50.:55:55.

garlic flavoured chocolate? When we sent secret agents abroad it was

:55:56.:55:59.

essential that they blended imperfectly, meaning looking and

:56:00.:56:02.

sounding right, and acting right. The story was that there were

:56:03.:56:05.

concerns some agent sent to Spain did not spell right because they

:56:06.:56:09.

were not eating garlic and the British attitude at the time was

:56:10.:56:13.

that it was a noxious substance, people could not just eat it. What

:56:14.:56:18.

about we put it didn't chocolate? Make it nicer for the agents to eat

:56:19.:56:23.

it! So you smell like the locals? That was the idea! One of those

:56:24.:56:28.

misplaced kinds of ingenuity! Did it work? I don't know! And exploding

:56:29.:56:36.

animal droppings? There were donkey droppings, mule droppings, they were

:56:37.:56:40.

sent out to resistant groups around occupied Europe and you could blow

:56:41.:56:43.

up enemy vehicles with these things, they would not see them. The

:56:44.:56:49.

original droppings were actually taken from London zoo and copied,

:56:50.:56:54.

then they were sent out. Different droppings depending on the area of

:56:55.:56:58.

Europe. No garlic involved in those! We need to ask how you discover

:56:59.:57:04.

these. There were so many things like putting something into Hitler's

:57:05.:57:08.

food to make him less aggressive? I thought if they could put female

:57:09.:57:12.

hormones into his food it might make him less aggressive that there is a

:57:13.:57:17.

lot of misplaced ingenuity. Where did you find all of these? A vast

:57:18.:57:22.

majority from the immense archives of the Imperial War Museum, I was

:57:23.:57:26.

lucky that they commissioned me to go and five what I could find. It

:57:27.:57:30.

was a combination of proper research and speaking to their historians and

:57:31.:57:35.

curators. And, some silly research which was just typing funny words

:57:36.:57:39.

into the database and seeing if anything came up. Sausage, socks...

:57:40.:57:44.

Sometimes something would come up and lead you somewhere. Intriguing.

:57:45.:57:49.

It puts a smile on your face. What does this ingenuity tell us about

:57:50.:57:52.

the way that the war was fought, and the situation at the time? When you

:57:53.:58:01.

are in a such dark am all situation, this incredible ingenuity is

:58:02.:58:04.

something that comes to before. I think we like to think of it as

:58:05.:58:09.

being particularly British. It is incredible. Some of this

:58:10.:58:13.

inventiveness and ingenuity was misplaced, these gadgets that never

:58:14.:58:20.

work, but I was always in awe of people's abilities. Can you explain

:58:21.:58:32.

to me a parachuting dog? Paradogs? Is that a real picture? Yes. And

:58:33.:58:38.

they were given two months of training... Basically being thrown

:58:39.:58:40.

out of things at various heights? They had to learn the right position

:58:41.:58:46.

in the air, front paws up, back paws down. For the Normandy landings they

:58:47.:58:53.

were parachuted in with troops to help detect mines and traps and so

:58:54.:58:58.

forth, yes. Did the dogs survive that? I think many of them did. It

:58:59.:59:05.

was a risky mission, certainly. And what more can you tell us? What is

:59:06.:59:12.

your favourite oddity? I think it has to be the super-strength itching

:59:13.:59:16.

powder. It sounds like something from a joke shop! You could not make

:59:17.:59:22.

it up. It was sent to resistant grips with the idea they would put

:59:23.:59:26.

it in German soldiers and where to put them out of action but

:59:27.:59:28.

apparently it worked. At least one you -- U-boat was forced to go back

:59:29.:59:38.

to Port as it was thought they had a strange skin disease. It sounds like

:59:39.:59:39.

it was a lot of fun to research. Peter's book is called

:59:40.:59:44.

Weird War Two. We have the headlines in just a

:59:45.:59:47.

moment... Hello, this is Breakfast,

:59:48.:00:19.

with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty. Tough questions for both

:00:20.:00:22.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn, as they face a television

:00:23.:00:25.

audience of voters. My wage slips from 2009 reflect

:00:26.:00:29.

exactly what I am earning today, We will put more money into the NHS

:00:30.:00:33.

but there isn't a magic money tree. Would you allow North Korea or some

:00:34.:00:39.

idiot in Iran to bomb us and say The idea of anyone ever using a

:00:40.:00:52.

nuclear weapon in the world is utterly appalling and terrible.

:00:53.:01:07.

Good morning, it's Saturday 3rd June.

:01:08.:01:11.

Ariana Grande returns to Manchester and visits children

:01:12.:01:14.

in hospital who were injured in the arena bombing.

:01:15.:01:20.

Hope for ovarian cancer patients, as the early trial of a new drug

:01:21.:01:23.

In sport, the British and Irish Lions' tour

:01:24.:01:27.

Would you have known how to spell "marocain".

:01:28.:01:42.

We'll be joined by some spelling bees, and put a man

:01:43.:01:45.

from the Oxford English Dictionary to the test.

:01:46.:01:50.

A cooler fresher weekend, with spells of sunshine and a few passing

:01:51.:02:02.

showers, all the details coming up. Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have

:02:03.:02:10.

faced tough questions from a TV audience, just days before

:02:11.:02:14.

the general election. They were challenged separately

:02:15.:02:16.

in a special edition Mrs May faced uncomfortable

:02:17.:02:18.

questions about NHS funding. While Mr Corbyn faced a robust

:02:19.:02:23.

exchange over whether he would use Our political correspondent

:02:24.:02:26.

Vicky Young was there. They came here hoping to persuade

:02:27.:02:35.

people that they have what it takes No one expected an easy

:02:36.:02:39.

ride but from the start it was clear that this would be

:02:40.:02:42.

a testing evening. Theresa May was accused

:02:43.:02:45.

of being untrustworthy, of changing her mind on calling

:02:46.:02:48.

an election and on policies Others were angry about funding

:02:49.:02:51.

for schools and hospitals. My wage slips from 2009 reflect

:02:52.:02:57.

exactly what I am earning today We have had to take some hard choice

:02:58.:03:00.

across the public sector in relation We did that because of the decisions

:03:01.:03:06.

we had to take to bring public spending under control because it

:03:07.:03:15.

wasn't under control under Brexit is why Theresa May says

:03:16.:03:18.

she called this election. She said she was

:03:19.:03:22.

determined to deliver. We take this opportunity of Brexit,

:03:23.:03:25.

new trade deals around the rest of the world,

:03:26.:03:28.

actually seeing how we can build a more prosperous,

:03:29.:03:31.

stronger and fairer Britain. I think we can do that and I think

:03:32.:03:35.

we can do that because I believe in Britain and I believe

:03:36.:03:38.

in the British people. For Jeremy Corbyn, this was a chance

:03:39.:03:41.

to prove he's ready to take He was unapologetic about plans

:03:42.:03:44.

to raise taxes for companies Where are the skilled workers

:03:45.:03:48.

going to come from tomorrow? Where are going to be

:03:49.:03:52.

the consumers of tomorrow? I think it's time that we looked

:03:53.:03:55.

at inequality in our society and used public investment in order

:03:56.:03:59.

to improve services and give real But Mr Corbyn had his most difficult

:04:00.:04:03.

moment when he was pressed to say whether he'd ever use nuclear

:04:04.:04:13.

weapons to defend Britain? Would you allow North Korea

:04:14.:04:15.

or some idiot in Iran to bomb us and then say,

:04:16.:04:19.

oh, we better start talking? The general election is less

:04:20.:04:22.

than a week away and this was a great opportunity for voters

:04:23.:04:30.

to see both the people Yes, setting out their vision,

:04:31.:04:33.

but also coming under real pressure over policies and both hope

:04:34.:04:37.

that this will be the moment One of Theresa May's most senior

:04:38.:04:39.

ministers has said a future Conservative government would not

:04:40.:04:54.

raise income tax - even for high earners.

:04:55.:04:56.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:04:57.:04:59.

the Daily Telegraph that the party was not in the business of punishing

:05:00.:05:02.

people for getting on. Our political correspondent

:05:03.:05:05.

Leila Nathoo is in Westminster Let's talk about tax first, is this

:05:06.:05:15.

a change in policy from the manifesto for the Tories? I think

:05:16.:05:23.

it's more of an appendix, but not a firm promise, pledge, commitment,

:05:24.:05:27.

not there in black and white. Theresa May had scrapped David

:05:28.:05:31.

Cameron's previous promise not to raise income tax, VAT, or national

:05:32.:05:34.

insurance, the only mention of tax in the Conservative manifesto was a

:05:35.:05:38.

promise to try to keep taxes low and not to raise VAT. So that left the

:05:39.:05:44.

door open for rises in income tax and national insurance. Now I think

:05:45.:05:47.

these comments from Sir Michael Falline and from Boris Johnson last

:05:48.:05:52.

night saying there are no plans to raise income tax, this is a signal

:05:53.:05:56.

really to the core Tory support base to try to shore up the vote in these

:05:57.:06:01.

final days. Labour are saying there's still no guarantees of no

:06:02.:06:06.

income tax rises for lower and middle income earners, but I think

:06:07.:06:10.

that with recent wobble in the polls for the Tories this is a signal out

:06:11.:06:15.

there to their support base they should get behind the party and turn

:06:16.:06:20.

out. Five full days of campaigning left, it's going to be a frantic

:06:21.:06:23.

weekend, what do you think we can expect from all sides? I think we

:06:24.:06:27.

can expect a dash around the country really. A dash around key

:06:28.:06:31.

constituencies, Nicola Sturgeon is going to be in a helicopter this

:06:32.:06:35.

weekend touring Scotland. We have Labour and the Liberal Democrats

:06:36.:06:39.

going on the attack over the Conservatives social care policy,

:06:40.:06:42.

all the parties will be out on the campaign trail this weekend. I think

:06:43.:06:46.

it's their final chance to get their key messages across and to

:06:47.:06:49.

capitalise on the perceived weaknesses of the other parties.

:06:50.:06:50.

Thank you. The singer Ariana Grande has visited

:06:51.:06:56.

fans in hospital who were injured in the terror attack

:06:57.:06:59.

at her Manchester concert. The star spent time with youngsters

:07:00.:07:01.

at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in a surprise appearance

:07:02.:07:04.

ahead of a benefit concert Fans like this eight-year-old

:07:05.:07:06.

Lily Harrison who was still recovering from her injuries

:07:07.:07:19.

in hospital, meeting the singer The children had been getting ready

:07:20.:07:21.

for bed when the star arrived unexpectedly,

:07:22.:07:25.

bringing gifts and We were the last room on the ward

:07:26.:07:32.

she came to visit so the excitement was building and heap came skipping

:07:33.:07:35.

in and as you can see, she's made up.

:07:36.:07:40.

And tomorrow she will perform at a concert to raise funds

:07:41.:07:42.

The 22 lives lost have been remembered at Saint Ann's Square

:07:43.:07:48.

which has become the focal point for those wish to pay tribute,

:07:49.:07:50.

Manchester City council says that this may be the last weekend

:07:51.:07:59.

the flowers remain in place as it needs to look at relocating

:08:00.:08:02.

It will now consider setting up a permanent memorial in the city.

:08:03.:08:07.

Just have to have something that is a testament to what happened.

:08:08.:08:23.

I think people will want to come forever, just

:08:24.:08:25.

to pay their respects, really because, as I say,

:08:26.:08:33.

it should not have happened and they were babies, weren't they?

:08:34.:08:36.

And should have been the night of their life and it wasn't.

:08:37.:08:39.

A big heart with all of the names on the date of birth of all of them

:08:40.:08:44.

Alongside the remembrance, the police operation goes on.

:08:45.:08:47.

Last night a car was taken away which they say could be significant

:08:48.:08:50.

Police will be out again in force for tomorrow's concert.

:08:51.:09:00.

Statins - which are usually prescribed to lower cholesterol -

:09:01.:09:02.

could help reduce the risk of dying from breast cancer by 27%,

:09:03.:09:07.

according to a new study. Scientists in China who analysed

:09:08.:09:09.

research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took the drug

:09:10.:09:11.

were less likely to see their cancer return.

:09:12.:09:14.

Charities have welcomed the news but say more

:09:15.:09:15.

A huge police and security operation is being deployed across Cardiff

:09:16.:09:24.

as the city prepares for the Champions League final.

:09:25.:09:26.

More than 170,000 football fans are due to visit the Welsh capital

:09:27.:09:29.

this weekend for the match between Real Madrid and Juventus.

:09:30.:09:31.

South Wales Police say 6,000 police officers will be

:09:32.:09:34.

Our Wales correspondent is there for us. Sun shining, but security is

:09:35.:09:45.

what is at the forefront of many people's minds. Yes, significant

:09:46.:09:50.

police presence across the Welsh capital this morning as we have been

:09:51.:09:54.

walking around here, you can see armed police on every corner of the

:09:55.:09:59.

blocked off streets of the centre of Cardiff. There's a ring of fence

:10:00.:10:06.

around the Millennium Stadium and the main street that encircles two

:10:07.:10:11.

or three of the main gates of the stadium to help segregate fans as

:10:12.:10:14.

they go into the stadium later this evening. They've advised fans to get

:10:15.:10:20.

in at least two hours before as there will be additional security

:10:21.:10:24.

checks to get into the national stadium of Wales. Around 1500 police

:10:25.:10:29.

officers are on the ground this morning to help out in this

:10:30.:10:32.

operation. It was already always going to be a huge security

:10:33.:10:37.

operation, even before the tragedy that happened in Manchester over a

:10:38.:10:42.

week ago now but it's now been confirmed by the Football

:10:43.:10:45.

Association of Wales on Thursday that this is now the largest

:10:46.:10:49.

security operation in any sporting event in the UK. Thank you very

:10:50.:10:53.

much. If you think that's a major

:10:54.:11:09.

competition forget football, look at this.

:11:10.:11:15.

A 12-year-old girl from California has won the US National Spelling Bee

:11:16.:11:20.

Ananya Vinay correctly spelled the word marocain -

:11:21.:11:24.

a type of dress fabric - to win over ?30,000.

:11:25.:11:30.

She says she will split the money with her younger brother.

:11:31.:11:34.

If I had known there was that kind of money in spelling I might have

:11:35.:11:46.

tried better at my spelling. We will try some spelling later.

:11:47.:11:51.

Ovarian cancer affects more than 7,000 women

:11:52.:11:53.

Survival rates are lower than other forms of the disease and only

:11:54.:11:57.

a third of patients live beyond ten years.

:11:58.:11:59.

Now a new drug could offer fresh hope for some patients who have

:12:00.:12:02.

stopped responding to standard treatment, as our health

:12:03.:12:04.

correspondent Sophie Hutchinson reports.

:12:05.:12:05.

Marianne Heath has advanced ovarian cancer.

:12:06.:12:07.

There are very few drugs to treat this type of cancer and the ones

:12:08.:12:10.

So she says when she was asked to take part in a trial

:12:11.:12:15.

for a new drug she jumped at the chance.

:12:16.:12:21.

Well, I decided to go on the trial because there were no

:12:22.:12:25.

other way out for me, there were no options presented

:12:26.:12:30.

so it was the trial or just radiotherapy so I decided to do

:12:31.:12:33.

The trial, run by the Institute of Cancer Research and The Royal

:12:34.:12:42.

Marsden, aims to test the safety of the new drug known as ONX-0801.

:12:43.:12:52.

It involved just 15 women all with advanced ovarian cancer.

:12:53.:12:54.

The result, tumours shrank significantly in almost half

:12:55.:12:56.

of the women over the course of five weeks.

:12:57.:12:58.

One of the fantastic things about this new drug that's

:12:59.:13:02.

being developed here is that it has so few side-effects, compared

:13:03.:13:05.

And that's because it specifically targets cancer cells,

:13:06.:13:09.

This drug attacks the tumour and you see very encouraging tumour

:13:10.:13:15.

responses but you don't see the common side-effects like hair

:13:16.:13:25.

loss or sore mouth or diarrhoea or susceptible to infections as seen

:13:26.:13:28.

But the scientists are urging caution.

:13:29.:13:32.

They say it was a very small study and it's too early to know

:13:33.:13:35.

whether the success could be replicated in a larger

:13:36.:13:37.

They now want to plan the next phase of the trial.

:13:38.:13:42.

We're joined now by Florence Wilks, who was diagnosed with

:13:43.:13:51.

ovarian cancer in 2010, and Professor Stanley Kaye

:13:52.:13:53.

from the Institute of Cancer research who carried out the trial.

:13:54.:13:58.

Morning to both of you. Florence, tell us, it's going back seven years

:13:59.:14:06.

ago you were first diagnosed. Yeah, 2010, although I was ill for

:14:07.:14:10.

probably two years before that. When I was diagnosed it was advanced t

:14:11.:14:15.

spread to the abdomen which meant it wasn't curable, it was just

:14:16.:14:18.

treatable. I think 43% of women get to five years and I am seven years

:14:19.:14:23.

on, I have had four lines of chemotherapy, two major surgeries

:14:24.:14:26.

and I am currently under a drug considered end of life care which

:14:27.:14:31.

has great results, but I had a lot of treatment and my prognosis now is

:14:32.:14:37.

poor really I would say. To hear this news this morning about this

:14:38.:14:41.

trial and possible new links? It's amazing news. I know it's a small

:14:42.:14:46.

study and only 15 women but a drug that can treat women with advanced

:14:47.:14:51.

cancer may be in the situation I am in is always welcome. It sounds

:14:52.:14:55.

amazing. Could make a difference to a lot of women because the majority

:14:56.:15:00.

of women diagnosed with ovarian cancer are diagnosed when it's

:15:01.:15:03.

advanced. Therefore, it's much more difficult to treat, you can't cure

:15:04.:15:08.

it, it's more difficult to treat. Inspirational drug potentially, a

:15:09.:15:13.

life-changing drug potentially. Professor, tell us what you know

:15:14.:15:16.

about this drug and the likelihood, when we talk to people like Florence

:15:17.:15:20.

and there will be other women watching who are concerned or may

:15:21.:15:23.

have been diagnosed thinking what can this drug do for them and how

:15:24.:15:28.

quickly can it get to market? Well, thanks, what we have been looking

:15:29.:15:33.

for, for many years, are treatments that will target the ovarian cancer

:15:34.:15:38.

cells specifically. Chemotherapy does work well but the effect does

:15:39.:15:42.

wear off. What we are learning more about ovarian cancer is it's a

:15:43.:15:45.

series of different sorts of cancer. Florence actually sounds as if she

:15:46.:15:52.

has a particular kind of ovarian cancer where the drug mentioned is

:15:53.:15:56.

effective, I am pleased to hear she is on that. The drug we are

:15:57.:16:08.

discussing targets something different and it offers the

:16:09.:16:11.

possibility of selective targeting which is a real clue to improving

:16:12.:16:17.

cancer treatments. What we found is this drug works best of all in those

:16:18.:16:25.

women that have high levels of this thing called receptor, it takes into

:16:26.:16:31.

folic acid into cancer cells but it mimics it, and although it's early,

:16:32.:16:34.

the fact we are seeing the best results in those women with high

:16:35.:16:40.

selves of the receptor gives us hope we are beginning to see what we are

:16:41.:16:44.

looking for, which is a truly targeted treatment. How long before

:16:45.:16:48.

this drug is approved or deemed OK to come to the market and for women

:16:49.:16:54.

to be treated? Well, that's a good question. We have to do next, the

:16:55.:17:00.

trials that compare this with standard treatment, and that might

:17:01.:17:04.

take six months, 12 months, the process of getting a drug that would

:17:05.:17:07.

have to be a positive trial and if that is positive and that could get

:17:08.:17:11.

to the regulatory stage, that might be within the next couple of years,

:17:12.:17:15.

it obviously depends on a number of factors, the drug has to be tested

:17:16.:17:22.

in other sites and we have to get the targeting testing done but I am

:17:23.:17:25.

hopeful that this could be within a couple of years that we might see a

:17:26.:17:30.

drug getting towards the stage of being put forward for regulatory

:17:31.:17:34.

approval. Florence, in the meantime, you were saying we have to get

:17:35.:17:40.

better at dying knowing ovarian cancer -- dying Part of my role is

:17:41.:17:49.

to get the symptoms out to the general public and health

:17:50.:17:52.

professionals. The symptoms are persistent, severe and out of the

:17:53.:17:57.

ordinary, could be bloating, could be stomach and pelvic pain, needing

:17:58.:18:03.

to wee more frequently and when you eat you feel full. Extreme

:18:04.:18:07.

tiredness, which is what I had. You said you were ill for a couple of

:18:08.:18:11.

years before. Yeah and everything I went to the doctor with was treated

:18:12.:18:14.

on an individual basis, it wasn't put together as a whole. Symptoms

:18:15.:18:18.

can be vague and diagnosis can be difficult. Eventually I had a scan

:18:19.:18:28.

and it showed one of the ovaries, and a scan weeks later looked like

:18:29.:18:35.

cysts on both ovaries. They found they did other scans and a specific

:18:36.:18:39.

blood test which was above what it should have been and then I had a

:18:40.:18:43.

diagnosis. By that stage it had spread from the abdomen and that's

:18:44.:18:48.

not curable, it's treatable. We need early diagnosis. If you had early

:18:49.:18:52.

diagnosis, do you think it could be different? My situation could be

:18:53.:18:58.

completely different. 95% of women with an early diagnosis, can get to

:18:59.:19:03.

five years-plus. Whereas with a late diagnosis, 43% of women get to five

:19:04.:19:08.

years. It's the most common - this cancer kills more women than any

:19:09.:19:12.

other cancer. Women's cancer. We wish you well with the treatment.

:19:13.:19:16.

Thank you so much. Thank you for talking to us. Professor, thank you

:19:17.:19:19.

very much for your time. A pleasure, thank you.

:19:20.:19:25.

Ben has the weekend weather. Good morning. A cooler fresher feel

:19:26.:19:30.

to our weather for this weekend. Despite that we will see some

:19:31.:19:37.

sunshine. However, shower clouds already beginning to build across

:19:38.:19:40.

Northern Ireland and that really is the story. Yes, sunshine but there

:19:41.:19:44.

will also be some showers. Some of those on the heavy side. A bit of

:19:45.:19:48.

cloud still to get rid of across parts of eastern and south-east of

:19:49.:19:51.

England, that's starting to clear now. A nice slice of sunshine. Out

:19:52.:19:57.

west the showers already starting to work in towards Northern Ireland and

:19:58.:20:01.

then will spread across Scotland. Some showers across northern and

:20:02.:20:04.

western parts of England and Wales as well. Let's take a closer look,

:20:05.:20:09.

this afternoon there will be hefty showers across Northern Ireland. The

:20:10.:20:12.

heavier showers will probably be around lunchtime. By this stage the

:20:13.:20:16.

showers might ease a little bit but the middle of the afternoon will

:20:17.:20:20.

bring very heavy thundery showers across Scotland, slow-moving, they

:20:21.:20:24.

could give a lot of rain in a short space of time. One or two showers

:20:25.:20:28.

into northern England. It should be fine with sunny spells across the

:20:29.:20:33.

south-east. Cooler and fresher than yesterday. A few showers creeping

:20:34.:20:39.

into Wales and the south-west. They will tend to work eastwards. Into

:20:40.:20:44.

the evening Cardiff should be dry. Spells of sunshine, a big match of

:20:45.:20:46.

course tonight, the Champions League final. Sunny skies to start the

:20:47.:20:50.

match. As the match goes on, I suspect it will turn rather cool. A

:20:51.:20:54.

cool night in prospect for just about all of us. The showers will

:20:55.:20:57.

fade from Northern Ireland and Scotland. The vast majority will be

:20:58.:21:01.

dry with clear spells and temperatures in towns and cities

:21:02.:21:05.

around 9-11. Tomorrow, essentially we do it all again. A day of

:21:06.:21:10.

sunshine and showers. Probably more showers across northern England than

:21:11.:21:13.

today. Northern Ireland and Scotland seeing lots of showers, again they

:21:14.:21:18.

will be heavy, tending to cloud over across the south-west, Wales, parts

:21:19.:21:20.

of the Midlands with showery rain here. Away from these areas a lot of

:21:21.:21:26.

dry weather and sunshine, again that fresher feel. But a change as we

:21:27.:21:31.

head into the start of the new week. Areas of low pressure swarming and

:21:32.:21:35.

gathering out west ready to throw bands of rain towards us. Monday

:21:36.:21:39.

could bring pretty wet weather from west to east across the country and

:21:40.:21:43.

with that the potential for strong winds. Not the weather chart you

:21:44.:21:48.

expect to see in June. Those temperatures around 14-20. Before we

:21:49.:21:53.

get there, we have a weekend of sunshine and showers.

:21:54.:21:56.

You are watching Breakfast. It's time to look at the papers.

:21:57.:22:18.

The Guardian's northern editor Helen Pidd is her. You picked a story from

:22:19.:22:27.

The Times. Muslims are offered a cause to die for, I'd give them

:22:28.:22:32.

something to live for. This is a regular and paper reviewer here for

:22:33.:22:37.

us, what is he saying? So, he was forced to resign this week as the

:22:38.:22:41.

chief executive of the association of police and crime commissioners.

:22:42.:22:46.

His crime was to appear on BBC Question Time talking about the

:22:47.:22:51.

Manchester bomb attacks and the aftermath. In this interview he is

:22:52.:22:56.

defending his decision to go on TV saying what was needed at that point

:22:57.:23:00.

was a Muslim voice from Manchester, he lives in north Manchester,

:23:01.:23:03.

talking about these quite difficult issues. In the aftermath of the

:23:04.:23:08.

attacks there's been a lot of discussion about Prevent, the

:23:09.:23:12.

Government's sort of grass roots anti-extremism policy, and it's come

:23:13.:23:17.

under criticism, it emerged that the bomber was not known to Prevent and

:23:18.:23:21.

the new mayor for Greater Manchester has come out and said Prevent

:23:22.:23:27.

doesn't work. But what Nasir is saying, it does, he says it stopped

:23:28.:23:33.

at least 150 people going to Syria and 50 of them children. And says

:23:34.:23:39.

what's needed is to offer a positive alternative, rather than the sort of

:23:40.:23:44.

death, the glamour and death peddled, particularly on the

:23:45.:23:52.

internet by fundamentalists and Nasir rose to fame I suppose, he

:23:53.:24:01.

prosecuted the mainly Muslim Pakistani grooming gangs. The reason

:24:02.:24:05.

he resigned I understand is that in his role he wasn't supposed to be

:24:06.:24:09.

political and he thought I have to speak out. He thought it transsended

:24:10.:24:14.

politics and it was about getting that voice out to a wide audience.

:24:15.:24:18.

Let's look at a very different story. The Guardian. Handbags. Yes,

:24:19.:24:29.

I have never spent more than ?100 on a handbag. Yet, it's talking about

:24:30.:24:35.

handbags as the new gold, a great investment. There was an auction in

:24:36.:24:45.

Hong Kong this week and a handbag, Hermes went for ?293,000.

:24:46.:24:48.

Apparently... What? It's the most difficult handbag to make. They make

:24:49.:24:53.

two of them a year. It's got 18,000 white and gold diamonds. Imagine if

:24:54.:24:57.

you bought it and turned up at a party and the other one that existed

:24:58.:25:01.

was also at the party? I am always spilling things in my handbag. I was

:25:02.:25:11.

shocked by your ?100. ?293,000! It's the hot investment Birkin, a famous

:25:12.:25:17.

handbag has beaten the stock market and gold as an investment over the

:25:18.:25:22.

past 33 years and it's gone up an average of 14. 2% every year. But

:25:23.:25:26.

you have to look after it. Instead of putting money into property or

:25:27.:25:29.

shares, put it... You wouldn't want to leave that on a train. No, you

:25:30.:25:33.

wouldn't. Talking of waste of money, that's my view on those expensive

:25:34.:25:47.

handbags, the landlocked Swiss write off millions on ships. I did not

:25:48.:25:55.

know that they had a fleet, a deep sea fleet, the reason that they have

:25:56.:26:01.

this is not that they can fight because they're neutral, it's more

:26:02.:26:04.

that they can maintain trade links so they want to be able to ensure

:26:05.:26:10.

they can still get food and other essential supplies. It was an

:26:11.:26:14.

embarrassment for the Swiss this week in parliament because the

:26:15.:26:17.

Government had to ask for a write-off on the sale of 13 of these

:26:18.:26:23.

ships worth ?173 million. It's basically the ramifications of the

:26:24.:26:26.

global downturn in international shipping. It's one of those fancy

:26:27.:26:31.

facts. I am trying to work out how many handbags you could get for

:26:32.:26:38.

that. No ship in the fleet has been deployed on the Government's behalf

:26:39.:26:43.

since 1959 and yet they're always on stand-by. Who knew? All life is

:26:44.:26:50.

here. We are with you until 10 am. Then we will hand you over to Matt

:26:51.:26:56.

and Saturday Kitchen. It's that moment again. What have you got for

:26:57.:27:02.

us this morning? Our special guest today is a brilliant actress,

:27:03.:27:07.

currently starring in Jamestown. Sophie, good to have you here. Thank

:27:08.:27:11.

you for getting up so early. Food heaven or hell, what is heaven?

:27:12.:27:16.

Anything with chocolate, melting puddings, love it. Girls and

:27:17.:27:19.

chocolate, that's unusual! What about hell? Food hell anything

:27:20.:27:25.

creamy, fish pies. Too much cheese, that kind of thing. Got the memo.

:27:26.:27:33.

Two great chefs are also here. What's on the menu. Tony, newly

:27:34.:27:45.

appointed MBE, no less. I would ask what are you cooking but I would

:27:46.:27:52.

rather know how you got the Mbe? That's another show entirely. I am

:27:53.:28:01.

doing langoustines. Lime juice. No chillies. And Jane our wine expert,

:28:02.:28:08.

all sounding good? Lots of summery dishes today, so zingy whites. The

:28:09.:28:13.

decision of heaven or hell is in your hands. Go to the website to see

:28:14.:28:18.

how to vote. All that and we are talking expensive handbags. Can I

:28:19.:28:22.

put you on-the-spot, how do you spell chocolate? I can't spell!

:28:23.:28:28.

Please don't. Spelling and dancing, two things I don't do. You do now,

:28:29.:28:35.

chocolate? Chocolate. Well done, you can. I was going to give you

:28:36.:28:44.

pappiote... Let's not do that, that's French. We are leaving Matt

:28:45.:28:45.

to it. You have taken so long I can't

:28:46.:29:06.

remember where you started. Coming up later this is why we are talking

:29:07.:29:15.

about it. Congratulations. It's a whole new league, 12 hours of

:29:16.:29:19.

spelling they do competing against 11 million other entrants and it

:29:20.:29:22.

came down to one word. It's the spelling bee in America and there is

:29:23.:29:26.

big money on it. We are going to find out before ten how she won.

:29:27.:29:33.

Coming up the headlines. See you soon.

:29:34.:29:57.

Hello this is Breakfast, with Jon Kay and Naga Munchetty.

:29:58.:30:00.

Coming up before ten, Ben's got the weather.

:30:01.:30:02.

Theresa May and Jeremy Corbyn have faced tough questions from a TV

:30:03.:30:14.

audience, just days before the general election.

:30:15.:30:16.

They were challenged separately in a special edition

:30:17.:30:18.

Mrs May faced uncomfortable questions about NHS funding.

:30:19.:30:21.

While Mr Corbyn faced a robust exchange over whether he would use

:30:22.:30:24.

One of Theresa May's most senior ministers has said a future

:30:25.:30:31.

Conservative government would not raise income tax -

:30:32.:30:33.

The Defence Secretary, Sir Michael Fallon, told

:30:34.:30:37.

the Daily Telegraph the party was "not in the business

:30:38.:30:40.

Labour has already said it would increase income tax rates

:30:41.:30:44.

to 45 pence in the pound for those earning more than

:30:45.:30:47.

The pop star Ariana Grande has made a surprise visit to fans in hospital

:30:48.:30:53.

who were injured in the terror attack at her Manchester concert.

:30:54.:30:59.

The singer spent time chatting to patients

:31:00.:31:01.

and posing for photographs at the Royal Manchester Children's

:31:02.:31:02.

Hospital ahead of a benefit concert in the city tomorrow in aid

:31:03.:31:06.

We were the last room on the ward that she came to visit. The

:31:07.:31:21.

excitement was building and building. She came skipping in and

:31:22.:31:23.

as you can see, she is made up! Meanwhile, police investigating

:31:24.:31:32.

the attack have arrested a 24-year-old man in the Rusholme

:31:33.:31:34.

area of Manchester. 17 people have so far been

:31:35.:31:36.

arrested in connection with the investigation,

:31:37.:31:38.

of which six have been A new drug to treat ovarian cancer

:31:39.:31:40.

has been described as very promising Charities have called it

:31:41.:31:45.

an important step in treating Developed by the Institute of Cancer

:31:46.:31:49.

Research and the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust,

:31:50.:31:55.

the drug shrank tumours in almost half of the 15 women in the advanced

:31:56.:32:01.

stages of the disease who took part Statins - which are usually

:32:02.:32:04.

prescribed to lower cholesterol - could help reduce the risk of dying

:32:05.:32:10.

from breast cancer by 27%, Scientists in China who analysed

:32:11.:32:13.

research involving 200,000 women, found patients who took

:32:14.:32:16.

the drug were less likely Charities have welcomed

:32:17.:32:18.

the news but say more Those are the main

:32:19.:32:25.

stories this morning. Mike is here with the sport. You

:32:26.:32:38.

have been having spelling issues of your own! Yes, the place where the

:32:39.:32:44.

British and Irish Lions are playing, it is spelt as "?Whangarei.

:32:45.:32:58.

It is half-time in Whangarei. And an early wake-up call for the British

:32:59.:33:02.

and Irish Lions. Losing 7-3. It was a guy who works

:33:03.:33:08.

as a maintenance engineer, who's scored the first try

:33:09.:33:12.

against the British and Irish Lions, The Lions had been leading 3-0

:33:13.:33:14.

thanks to Johnny Sexton's penalty, he had missed an earlier one,

:33:15.:33:20.

but then it was part time player Sam Anderson Heather,

:33:21.:33:24.

who had the tools to engineer a way through the Lions defence -

:33:25.:33:30.

he's the captain of the Provincial Barbarians today and has recently

:33:31.:33:33.

been playing club rugby in Dunedin. The try was converted

:33:34.:33:36.

by Bryn Gatland, and if the name sounds familiar...he

:33:37.:33:39.

is the son of the Lions head The boot of his son making it 7-3

:33:40.:33:41.

to the Barbarians side Cardiff is hosting European club

:33:42.:33:45.

football's biggest night of the season -

:33:46.:33:50.

the Champions League final. It is a great stadium in the middle

:33:51.:34:11.

of the city. It is good for Cardiff to host a Champions League final and

:34:12.:34:15.

with such a good one with Juventus and real Madrid, it is great. When

:34:16.:34:20.

Wembley was being rebuilt, so many big games and FA Cup finals, and

:34:21.:34:25.

League Cup finals as well. It is tremendous, to hold a final.

:34:26.:34:28.

It was a positive evening for Northern Ireland

:34:29.:34:30.

as they beat New Zealand 1-0 in Belfast last night.

:34:31.:34:33.

The friendly had been organised as Michael O'Neill's side warm up

:34:34.:34:35.

for next week's World Cup qualifier in Azerbaijan.

:34:36.:34:37.

The only goal of the game, was the first international goal,

:34:38.:34:40.

for Ross County's Liam Boyce...the Scottish Premiership's

:34:41.:34:42.

I am pleased with what we got from the game.

:34:43.:34:45.

That's important, for Liam to get his excellent goal.

:34:46.:34:51.

Slightly disappointed we only go to 1-0.

:34:52.:34:55.

Physically it was a challenge, a demanding game which

:34:56.:34:58.

As I said, it leaves us in a good place in terms of what we have

:34:59.:35:04.

and one week of preparation to go and play in Baku.

:35:05.:35:09.

England all rounder Chris Woakes has been ruled out of the rest

:35:10.:35:12.

of the Champions Trophy, due to a side strain,

:35:13.:35:14.

he picked it up early on in the opening match

:35:15.:35:17.

England are unlikely to name his replacement,

:35:18.:35:20.

until this afternoon, after the England Lions match,

:35:21.:35:21.

that's the cricket match, which involves two of the possible

:35:22.:35:24.

candidates: Steve Finn and Tom Curran.

:35:25.:35:27.

At the French Open, Britain's Andy Murray

:35:28.:35:29.

and Kyle Edmund are in action later today...

:35:30.:35:31.

While defending mens champion Novak Djokovic

:35:32.:35:32.

is through to the fourth round, but he had to fight for it.

:35:33.:35:35.

Argentine Diego Schwartzman, the world number 41, took Djokovic,

:35:36.:35:39.

Argentine Diego Schwartzman, the world number 41, took Djokovic

:35:40.:35:41.

The world number two though had enough, to see out the victory...

:35:42.:35:45.

The nine-time champion at Roland Garros through in straight

:35:46.:35:49.

sets against his opponent dropping only one

:35:50.:35:51.

The defending women's champion, Garbine Muguruza, is safely

:35:52.:36:01.

She beat Yulia Putinseva, in straight sets.

:36:02.:36:08.

And finally, have a thought for this man tonight.

:36:09.:36:11.

He's walked - and sung - his way to Cardiff for

:36:12.:36:13.

the Champions League final all the way from Madrid.

:36:14.:36:20.

SINGING Well, if you can understand the

:36:21.:36:25.

Spanish there, you will know that he is a Real Madrid fun. He started out

:36:26.:36:31.

from the capital city on the 3rd of May, he walked to Santander before

:36:32.:36:38.

reaching Bristol by foot on Friday. He said that Real Madrid was his

:36:39.:36:40.

life. He was getting hoarse by the end,

:36:41.:36:46.

his feet and his boys would have gone. Walking from Cardiff is

:36:47.:36:51.

enough, but from Madrid? He is between Bristol and Cardiff, they

:36:52.:36:54.

will be in Wales now, given the time that they started. Let's hope he

:36:55.:36:58.

gets there in time, he has all day... But it will take a while to

:36:59.:37:02.

get across the bridge! He does not have to pay the toll! See you soon.

:37:03.:37:20.

Building flood defences can be a complex and expensive task,

:37:21.:37:23.

but scientists say they have found an army of expert engineers

:37:24.:37:25.

from the continent willing to do it for free -

:37:26.:37:28.

They are controversial with farmers who say they damage fields,

:37:29.:37:31.

but as our environment analyst Roger Harrabin reports,

:37:32.:37:33.

their re-introduction could help clean up polluted water.

:37:34.:37:42.

In an ordinary Devon field, signs of the extraordinary.

:37:43.:37:47.

A toilet, and an electrified fence powered by solar.

:37:48.:37:49.

This site is a scientific experiment reintroducing beavers.

:37:50.:37:51.

In six years, a pair of sharp-toothed beavers

:37:52.:37:54.

has re-engineered this woodland into a wetland.

:37:55.:37:57.

They fell the willow trees to lie horizontally

:37:58.:38:00.

because they like to chew the bark off the vertical sprouts.

:38:01.:38:04.

Their stick dams have recreated the sort of

:38:05.:38:07.

landscape that existed before beavers were hunted to extinction.

:38:08.:38:11.

This is another of the ponds created by beavers.

:38:12.:38:16.

This demonstrates how much they can re-engineer the landscape.

:38:17.:38:19.

Here, it looks like there is grass growing

:38:20.:38:21.

This is a beaver stick dam, right underneath

:38:22.:38:27.

The place has been shaped by the teeth of rodents.

:38:28.:38:32.

You can see the teeth marks where they have cut them

:38:33.:38:37.

They use these to create the dams, and the way that they have

:38:38.:38:41.

manipulated the site has been dramatic.

:38:42.:38:42.

We have had a whole range of different species coming in,

:38:43.:38:45.

bats, amphibians, lots of wetland plants.

:38:46.:38:46.

This site used to have 11 clumps of frogspawn.

:38:47.:38:53.

Since the dams appeared, there are 681 clumps.

:38:54.:38:57.

The frogs are food for grass snakes and herons.

:38:58.:39:01.

Then there is the benefit to soil and water quality,

:39:02.:39:03.

What we are looking at here is the quality of the water

:39:04.:39:10.

As we can see from this sample taken at the end of the last heavy

:39:11.:39:14.

rainfall event, there is lots of soil and water.

:39:15.:39:17.

Downstream, with all the beaver dams, we see much cleaner

:39:18.:39:22.

The beaver dams have filtered the water and captured all the soil

:39:23.:39:30.

We see much better water quality downstream.

:39:31.:39:33.

In Scotland, where beavers have brought

:39:34.:39:36.

back, some landowners have angrily complained that they have damaged

:39:37.:39:38.

The NFU fear unintended consequences of beaver reintroduction

:39:39.:39:45.

but they say they are awaiting the formal

:39:46.:39:46.

publication of results from the Devon trial site.

:39:47.:39:48.

A male beaver has come out of hiding.

:39:49.:40:03.

They have not had a sighting like this for 18 months.

:40:04.:40:09.

The scientists working here say the beavers have not just

:40:10.:40:14.

They have also helped to protect downstream areas from flooding

:40:15.:40:17.

by slowing heavy rainfall with their dams.

:40:18.:40:19.

They want creatures like this reintroduced nationwide.

:40:20.:40:20.

Not all are convinced, but the beavers here

:40:21.:40:22.

Do you remember that moment? When you saw your first one? I have never

:40:23.:40:47.

seen one. That is why Roger was so excited. They are rare? Yes. Let's

:40:48.:40:49.

move on... Donald Trump's decision to withdraw

:40:50.:40:53.

the United States from the Paris Climate Change Agreement

:40:54.:40:55.

has been met with widespread The deal was hailed as a major step

:40:56.:40:58.

forward when it was signed two years ago but, by pulling out,

:40:59.:41:02.

President Trump says Joining us from our London newsroom

:41:03.:41:04.

is political commentator and Donald Trump supporter

:41:05.:41:19.

Charlie Wolf and in here in the studio is Alex Their from

:41:20.:41:21.

the Overseas Development Institute All sides have been attacking his

:41:22.:41:27.

decision, shows their leadership and progress? It is the opposite, you

:41:28.:41:33.

have someone with a bad deal and they say no, I am not having it.

:41:34.:41:38.

First duty is for the American people. The treaty has little to do

:41:39.:41:42.

with the climate, to tell the truth. The little bits it does, it cost 6

:41:43.:41:49.

million jobs and billions in economic development and profitably

:41:50.:41:53.

bringing as down to two tenths of a degree. -- possibly. It is a sham,

:41:54.:41:58.

looking at it. Each country makes its own targets, nothing binding to

:41:59.:42:03.

it. Of course the Chinese are bragging about this. They do not

:42:04.:42:07.

have to do anything. The same with India. They don't need to do

:42:08.:42:11.

anything. Why should we be on this unlevel playing field? The first

:42:12.:42:16.

duty is to the American people, isn't the first duty to the world?

:42:17.:42:20.

That means staying in an accord like this? His first duty is for the

:42:21.:42:27.

people of the USA. Frankly, by doing that, we help the world. Meeting our

:42:28.:42:36.

targets in the past, because the free market meets the needs of the

:42:37.:42:41.

people. This is essentially a Soviet style five-year plan for the climate

:42:42.:42:44.

and will do for the climate exactly what the Soviet style bread. Rather

:42:45.:42:52.

than dictating to people how to live their lives, meet their needs, and

:42:53.:42:56.

have the innovation that you find in the USA, and we will probably come

:42:57.:43:00.

up with solutions. Alex is with us. What is your response to what

:43:01.:43:06.

Charlie said? I think pulling out of Paris is fundamentally against

:43:07.:43:11.

America and against the world. What President Trump has done here is

:43:12.:43:15.

save the United States can no longer lead the world in creating new

:43:16.:43:19.

technologies and new and clean energy futures, bringing along

:43:20.:43:23.

hundreds of nations together to confront major challenges affecting

:43:24.:43:27.

the planet today. This is not a far-off consequence but instead, we

:43:28.:43:30.

are better off sticking dirty rocks out the ground and burning them,

:43:31.:43:36.

that is what he sees as the American future. But from around the world,

:43:37.:43:42.

we have seen people saying that is not the future that they envision.

:43:43.:43:46.

Look at the Antarctic ice crack, which has grown by 70 miles in the

:43:47.:43:51.

last couple of days. I was in Uganda and Kenya, many parts are facing

:43:52.:43:57.

increasing droughts and the impacts of climate change are real and need

:43:58.:44:01.

to be responded to. American leadership will be missed. You save

:44:02.:44:08.

people across the country, this is not what they want. They voted him

:44:09.:44:13.

in. He has not been shy about his views on global warming. He called

:44:14.:44:17.

it a hoax, he has always been clear he does not believe it. He hasn't

:44:18.:44:23.

done anything no one expected him to do? Public opinion in the USA shows

:44:24.:44:27.

that even in the most Republican districts, there is not a single

:44:28.:44:35.

area where people do not support regulating climate change and CO2.

:44:36.:44:40.

70% of Americans overall support action on the climate to reduce

:44:41.:44:44.

global warming. It may be that President Trump managed to get in

:44:45.:44:47.

the White House by a fluke of the electoral college and not even a

:44:48.:44:51.

majority of votes cast that it was not a majority of Americans who

:44:52.:44:56.

wanted him to do this. The response we have seen from cities and states

:44:57.:45:01.

across the country, from business leaders, has been unanimous. This is

:45:02.:45:05.

something the USA needs to do to protect its own jobs and futures.

:45:06.:45:09.

Charlie Wolf, President Trump says this is about jobs and the economy,

:45:10.:45:13.

others say his decision is economically illiterate and it does

:45:14.:45:20.

not make long-term financial says. -- financial sense. I think it does,

:45:21.:45:25.

by limiting CO2 production, they wanted to be dropped by 27%, to 2005

:45:26.:45:33.

levels, which hampers our economy and ability to produce and the

:45:34.:45:37.

ability to lead in the world. I always find it rich when people use

:45:38.:45:41.

these polls, when activists want to sell something they take a complex

:45:42.:45:47.

issue and boil it down to a simplistic and emotive fact, I don't

:45:48.:45:51.

even know if they are facts. Of course people will answer in such a

:45:52.:45:55.

way that they are against climate change per se. Someone last night

:45:56.:46:00.

was arguing against us polluting rivers, confusing pollution with

:46:01.:46:02.

climate. One has nothing to do with the

:46:03.:46:07.

other. I don't go by polls, it is important that we take care of the

:46:08.:46:11.

climate and rivers and streams, America has always led on that. A

:46:12.:46:19.

bad deal is a bad deal. It's not the first time we've heard that phrase

:46:20.:46:23.

in the last few weeks on a different sort of deal.

:46:24.:46:23.

For now, thank you to both of you. Here's Ben's here with a look

:46:24.:46:28.

at this morning's weather. Good morning to you both. It is one

:46:29.:46:36.

of those weekends blue skies overhead may tempt you outdoors and

:46:37.:46:39.

then a big cloud may come along and bring a heavy downpour. Sunshine and

:46:40.:46:44.

showers, that is the story. Heavy showers likely across Northern

:46:45.:46:49.

Ireland initially, they turn heavy through the morning. Also setting in

:46:50.:46:53.

across Scotland whereby the afternoon sun could be slow-moving

:46:54.:46:56.

with thunder and lightning. When the early cloud has cleared away from

:46:57.:47:02.

the south-east, dry with sunshine. Dry in the south-west as well, the

:47:03.:47:06.

odd shower this afternoon and a little cooler and fresher than it

:47:07.:47:11.

has been, 17-22d. Some showers continue from Northern Ireland and

:47:12.:47:15.

Scotland, a dry night with clear spells. A cool night as well and

:47:16.:47:18.

what it means for tomorrow is that we do it all again! Some spells of

:47:19.:47:24.

sunshine but showers as well. More across northern England, especially

:47:25.:47:28.

in the morning. Lots across Northern Ireland and Scotland, with breaks in

:47:29.:47:32.

between, more cloud later in the day, rain here as well. A fresh feel

:47:33.:47:39.

of 16-20d. I was debating whether to show you this... Returning to work

:47:40.:47:45.

on Monday, heavy rain with strong winds, temperatures of 14-20d, not

:47:46.:47:50.

what we want to see in June. Enjoy the sunshine, if you get it, at the

:47:51.:47:51.

weekend! STUDIO: Ben, thank you. Lets talk spelling, how about

:47:52.:47:59.

"Meteorological"? It is a word! You might think it's pretty good

:48:00.:48:10.

but are you as sharp as the top performers in America's

:48:11.:48:14.

spelling bee competition? TV viewers were gripped

:48:15.:48:16.

as youngsters battled with obscure words from the depths

:48:17.:48:18.

of the dictionary as From 11 million entrants,

:48:19.:48:20.

a 12 hour final and it all came down You could be forgiven

:48:21.:48:26.

for thinking it mattered less to the 12-year-old

:48:27.:48:42.

girl and more to her father. Spelling Bee is an institution

:48:43.:48:47.

in the United States This was the 13th time in a row

:48:48.:48:50.

an Indian-American took the trophy. And when this young boy

:48:51.:48:56.

stumbled over this word So the trophy, the kudos

:48:57.:49:14.

and the $40,000 first prize It leaves the rest of us trailing

:49:15.:49:23.

in the wake of junior genius. Inadequate? No! My spelling is

:49:24.:49:28.

inadequate! No, it is quite good! We're joined now by two

:49:29.:49:46.

excellent young spellers. Matilda and Matthew recently came

:49:47.:49:48.

first and second in a spelling bee It is difficult to know where to

:49:49.:49:54.

look, you can see yourselves on the monitors but then you have to talk

:49:55.:49:58.

to us. It is tricky, we haven't yet managed it!

:49:59.:50:00.

They're joined by their headteacher Karen Graham and senior editor

:50:01.:50:02.

of the Oxford English Dictionary, Jonathan Dent.

:50:03.:50:10.

Looking nervous! Tell us about the contest, what was it about and why

:50:11.:50:21.

did you get involved? We got involved because of the spellings.

:50:22.:50:25.

With spelling it is more of a task and you had to learn it. If you can

:50:26.:50:29.

spell, it is good because you can do it in your writing, messages and

:50:30.:50:34.

e-mails. Absolutely. Matilda, what were the

:50:35.:50:38.

trickiest words you remember? The trickiest word I spelt was

:50:39.:50:48.

soliloquy. Soliloquy? I will probably get it wrong... Soliloquy?

:50:49.:51:02.

Correct! One down, 25 to go! Spelling bees, it is very American,

:51:03.:51:06.

we saw the pressure the kids were under, can you see a situation, you

:51:07.:51:10.

have done a local one but will it ever get like that here? It would be

:51:11.:51:14.

good to think that. I know that maybe spelling is about the press,

:51:15.:51:19.

people may think we have such a media -- social media, we need to

:51:20.:51:25.

spell when we have our own codes. Spelling is universal, and we all

:51:26.:51:28.

share that and understand it. Celebrating that is a really good

:51:29.:51:34.

thing. It makes spelling fun. Is it really? Seeing those poor kids, it

:51:35.:51:39.

looked stressful to me! Sometimes it can be fun, but sometimes it is a

:51:40.:51:45.

bit boring! A bit boring? You said about learning for it, can you

:51:46.:51:50.

prepare for it? It depends, if you know which words are coming, if you

:51:51.:51:55.

practice them over and over you remember them. You get them stuck in

:51:56.:51:58.

your brain and can't forget them! They are in there for ever! There

:51:59.:52:02.

must be a way, when I was at school we were told to read the dictionary!

:52:03.:52:09.

You are laughing! Just to be more familiar with words. I don't know if

:52:10.:52:14.

you read the whole dictionary? I have not! 20 volumes, it's quite a

:52:15.:52:23.

lot! How important is it that we can spell? Sometimes we say words

:52:24.:52:27.

correctly. When you are in school, how much writing of essays do you do

:52:28.:52:31.

in real life? It is a common code, something that we all share. It is

:52:32.:52:37.

an important one. When you are writing something, it depends on

:52:38.:52:40.

your audience. You do not want to miss spell an important letter but

:52:41.:52:47.

if you are texting or on Facebook, and you want to use a short cut, as

:52:48.:52:52.

long as your audience knows what you mean and they went think it is an

:52:53.:52:56.

error and peloton is one, it is all the same. We are writing, it is all

:52:57.:53:05.

done on screens. And it is spell checked, will we have to learn to

:53:06.:53:08.

spell in the same way in future? People still need to write by hand

:53:09.:53:15.

in exams and in other situations, like postcards. I think

:53:16.:53:22.

spellcheckers help, but AutoCorrect, I turn it off because it is wrong

:53:23.:53:28.

most of the time. It is helpful.. Shall we do some more tests? You

:53:29.:53:35.

said yes! Let's test your teacher, is that mean? Miscellaneous... Very

:53:36.:53:48.

good! Miscellaneous! And accommodation? That is possibly the

:53:49.:53:53.

top misspelled word, the most lookups A C C O M M O D A T I O N. .

:53:54.:54:09.

It was that double M that was catching people out!

:54:10.:54:13.

Well done. Fifty years after its release,

:54:14.:54:20.

the Beatles' 'Sergeant Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band'

:54:21.:54:22.

is still considered to be one of the most important albums

:54:23.:54:25.

of all time. It turned the group from a touring

:54:26.:54:27.

phenomenon into the world's most Now, the composer Howard Goodall has

:54:28.:54:30.

made a new documentary, featuring rare footage showing how

:54:31.:54:33.

the record was made. Let's start the Sergeant Pepper

:54:34.:54:46.

story at the beginning. A momentous decision taken in August 9066.

:54:47.:54:56.

# I'm going to decide... -- 1966. The Beatles had been touring the

:54:57.:55:00.

world for three years but the fun had drained away, along with the

:55:01.:55:03.

audibility of their music. They had had enough so decided to give up

:55:04.:55:09.

touring altogether. This looked like madness, a pop group Dawes success

:55:10.:55:14.

depended on playing their music live so that the audience would buy the

:55:15.:55:21.

records, made quickly and cheaply. Paul, can I have a brief word with

:55:22.:55:26.

you? Performance has gone downhill, we cannot develop so for us to

:55:27.:55:30.

perform gets more difficult each time. You don't want to do that? We

:55:31.:55:38.

want to but if we are not listen to, and we cannot hear ourselves, we

:55:39.:55:39.

cannot improve all get better. Composer and presenter

:55:40.:55:43.

Howard Goodall joins us now. Good morning. What is it about this

:55:44.:55:51.

album that makes it so revered, so loved still 50 years on? In my view

:55:52.:55:57.

it is still the music, not just how they created at a test song by what

:55:58.:56:02.

they did in the studio. They made the record instrument by instrument,

:56:03.:56:06.

track by track, and created a soundscape for the whole thing. They

:56:07.:56:10.

were in the studio for five months every day for hours and hours,

:56:11.:56:14.

excessively working on this music. Nobody had done this before. This

:56:15.:56:24.

affect that they did, instrument by instrument, is what everybody did.

:56:25.:56:28.

They took the music you already had and went in as quickly as you code.

:56:29.:56:33.

You make a whole album, and get back on the road. Why did they do it that

:56:34.:56:37.

way? One of the things from the documentary is not only the tensions

:56:38.:56:43.

between the band members, but also from record companies or the

:56:44.:56:47.

expectation to create something wonderful? Yes, but being the

:56:48.:56:50.

Beatles at the time, they were given the freedom to be in the studio for

:56:51.:56:58.

months on end. A very expensive for -- a very expensive thing for anyone

:56:59.:57:02.

to be allowed to do. They were so curious. Why don't we tried this?

:57:03.:57:08.

Let's do an Indian song! Their curiosity was enormous. They were

:57:09.:57:13.

erupting musically. They needed to find an outlet which turned into

:57:14.:57:18.

this album. It is extraordinary. Every song is imaginative and

:57:19.:57:22.

inventive, and the ideas coming out left, right and centre, every track

:57:23.:57:28.

is so different from the one before. What they needed to do was have time

:57:29.:57:32.

on their own, shut the doors and leave the world outside. And

:57:33.:57:36.

concentrate on making something extraordinary in their music. Thank

:57:37.:57:39.

goodness it lives up to expectations after all of that time and pressure!

:57:40.:57:43.

I don't think we would be talking about it 50 years later if we had

:57:44.:57:48.

not. I was nine years old and my older brother bought a copy, put it

:57:49.:57:53.

on the turntable and played only that for three or four weeks.

:57:54.:57:57.

It blew people's minds. We need to get back in that world before the

:57:58.:58:03.

huge diversity music we now take for granted, you listen to all stars all

:58:04.:58:07.

the time, and they went, why can't this be what pop music sounds like?

:58:08.:58:11.

50 years on, is it even possible to find anything undiscovered in terms

:58:12.:58:17.

of footage? What we do, we were given access to all of the original

:58:18.:58:22.

recordings with them talking to each other and rehearsing, improving,

:58:23.:58:27.

saying do it like this, not that. We have access to them talking. There

:58:28.:58:31.

is not a lot of footage because people did not from everything then

:58:32.:58:35.

like we do now on our phones. We can hear them talking and working and

:58:36.:58:39.

trying things in different ways. Trying to mind down into the

:58:40.:58:44.

multi-tracks, winding all of those first recordings and instruments,

:58:45.:58:47.

seeing how the collage was put together.

:58:48.:58:51.

'Sergeant Pepper's Musical Revolution with Howard Goodall'

:58:52.:58:53.

Ben and Sian will be here tomorrow from six.

:58:54.:59:08.

Another spelling for you "Committee"? Goodbye!

:59:09.:59:11.

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