14/11/2017 Breakfast


14/11/2017

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LineFromTo

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

0:00:040:00:10

A major milestone on the road

to Brexit, as MPs begin debating

0:00:100:00:13

the EU Withdrawal Bill.

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It will convert European

laws into British ones,

0:00:160:00:18

but it's unlikely to pass

smoothly, with more than 160

0:00:180:00:21

amendments already tabled.

0:00:210:00:25

Good morning.

0:00:380:00:39

It's Tuesday, 14 November.

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Also this morning: A call

for compulsory eye tests

0:00:410:00:43

for motorists, as new figures show

many ignore warnings

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that they shouldn't be driving.

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Thousands of survivors of a powerful

earthquake that struck Iran and Iraq

0:00:520:00:55

are spending a second

night without shelter.

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It's more difficult to get another

job if you're laid off or have

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to leave the workplace

in your 50s and 60s.

0:01:040:01:07

This morning, I'm speaking

to campaigners about

0:01:070:01:09

the impact that's having.

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Good morning.

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In sport, it's going to be

a World Cup without Italy

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after the four-time champions fail

to qualify for the tournament

0:01:140:01:16

for the first time in 60 years.

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I think it is time to drop the C

bomb, Christmas with Carol.

Good

0:01:240:01:33

morning. Look at this gorgeous

Christmas tree. It will be lit up

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this evening and we have a sneak

preview in all its glory. The

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weather is not glorious for England,

Wales and Northern Ireland. It will

0:01:410:01:45

be fairly cloudy with some patchy

rain, limited brightness. For the

0:01:450:01:48

north of Northern Ireland and

Scotland it is much more bright with

0:01:480:01:52

some sunshine. I will have much more

details on all of that in 15

0:01:520:01:56

minutes.

Thank you, Carol. See you

later this morning.

0:01:560:01:59

Good morning.

0:01:590:02:01

First, our main story.

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MPs will today begin debating a key

piece of Brexit legislation,

0:02:020:02:05

the EU Withdrawal Bill.

0:02:050:02:06

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

0:02:060:02:10

Tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

0:02:100:02:12

Our political correspondent

Leila Nathoo reports.

0:02:120:02:22

The Prime Minister.

Still the one in

charge, Theresa May last night the

0:02:220:02:30

glittering -- at the glittering Lord

Mayor's banquet in London, a break

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from Brexit and potential trouble

ahead. A key piece of the

0:02:360:02:40

government's Brexit legislation

returns to the Commons today and MPs

0:02:400:02:43

are trying to tinker with it. They

are proposing hundreds of changes to

0:02:430:02:48

try to influence ministers' approach

and so yesterday an apparent

0:02:480:02:51

concession to one of their key

demands.

I can now confirm that once

0:02:510:02:55

we have reached an agreement we will

bring forward a specific piece of

0:02:550:02:59

primary legislation to implement

that agreement. Parliament will be

0:02:590:03:03

given time to debate, scrutinise and

vote on the final agreement with

0:03:030:03:07

strike with the European Union. This

agreement will only hold if

0:03:070:03:10

parliament approves it.

But with

such a fragile majority just a

0:03:100:03:14

handful of Tory backbenchers siding

with the opposition would lead to a

0:03:140:03:18

government defeat and those minded

to rebel seem unsatisfied with the

0:03:180:03:23

take it or leave it vote the

government has offered.

I have to

0:03:230:03:27

say, a lot of us were insulted by

this, I mean, because it sounded so

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good and then when you dug into the

detail you realise this so-called

0:03:320:03:37

meaningful vote was completely

meaningless.

There will be more

0:03:370:03:40

contentious votes here in the coming

weeks as MPs test the government's

0:03:400:03:44

fragile working majority.

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Our political correspondent

Alex Forsyth joins us from

0:03:460:03:48

Westminster.

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Good morning. A concession, yes, but

will it be enough?

This is a really

0:03:520:04:01

significant piece of legislation,

bringing every EU law into UK law

0:04:010:04:04

ready for the day we leave, and most

MPs agree with the idea behind that,

0:04:040:04:09

so there is not some sort of legal

black hole when we finally X at the

0:04:090:04:13

European Union. But there are

details they disagree with.

0:04:130:04:16

Everything from the fact they think

it gives too much power to

0:04:160:04:20

ministers. They are worried about

the impact on Scotland, Northern

0:04:200:04:23

Ireland and Wales. That is why the

government came up with the idea of

0:04:230:04:27

having a vote on the final Brexit

deal to try to stop MPs voting

0:04:270:04:31

against it on one part of this bill.

But as you heard that hasn't gone

0:04:310:04:35

far enough. MPs say it comes to late

in the process. We can't send this

0:04:350:04:41

back to Brussels to negotiate it. It

is a take it or leave it vote and

0:04:410:04:46

that is not good enough. There was a

meeting yesterday between the Chief

0:04:460:04:49

Whip for the Tory party in charge of

discipline and Tory MPs and that was

0:04:490:04:54

set to get pretty stormy. So far I

don't think the government has

0:04:540:04:57

stopped its critics. There are

plenty of battles still to come on

0:04:570:05:01

this bill and today is just the

first day MPs start to go through it

0:05:010:05:05

line by line.

Exactly. It looks like

it is going to take some time. And

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we will speak with Anna Soubry at

8:10am this morning. Yes.

0:05:090:05:17

Earlier we saw Theresa May

at the Lord Mayor's

0:05:170:05:19

banquet in London.

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She used the occasion

to make her strongest attack yet

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on Russia, in which she accused

the Putin government of threatening

0:05:230:05:26

the international order.

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It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

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media organisations to plant fake

stories and photos shopped images in

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an attempt to so discord in the west

and undermine our institutions --

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sow. So I have a very simple message

for Russia, we know what you are

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doing and you will not succeed.

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The television producer and writer,

Daisy Goodwin, who created the ITV

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drama, Victoria, has claimed

she was groped by a government

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official during a visit

to Number Ten.

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She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

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after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

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Cameron was Prime Minister.

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She said she wasn't traumatised,

but was cross, adding she didn't

0:06:030:06:06

report it at the time.

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Thousands of people are spending

a second night without shelter

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in near-freezing conditions

after an earthquake caused

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devastation in parts

of Iran and Iraq.

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More than 450 people were killed

and around 7,000 injured.

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Our correspondent Rami Ruhayem

reports from Sulaimaniya,

0:06:210:06:23

the town nearest

the epicentre in Iraq.

0:06:230:06:25

Rami what's the latest?

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This is the deadliest earthquake

in the world this year.

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The border town of Pol-e Zahab

here in western Iran bore

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the brunt of it.

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Homes were flattened in seconds,

crushing everyone inside.

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The search for survivors

has been frantic.

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Early this morning, Iranian

officials called off

0:06:460:06:48

the rescue operation.

0:06:480:06:53

At this local hospital,

many of the injured had stories

0:06:530:06:55

of narrow escapes.

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TRANSLATION:

I fell

from the balcony down.

0:06:580:07:00

The earthquake was very strong.

0:07:000:07:05

This mountainous area

is prone to earthquakes.

0:07:050:07:07

Power cuts and landslides have made

it difficult for rescue teams

0:07:070:07:10

to get in.

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The most severely hurt

have been airlifted out,

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some taken to hospital

in the Iranian capital,

0:07:130:07:15

Tehran.

0:07:150:07:20

But overwhelmed by the sheer number

of injured, the authorities

0:07:200:07:22

are appealing for people

to donate blood.

0:07:220:07:25

And this is the moment this

7.3-magnitude quake hit

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in neighbouring Iraq.

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A man runs for his life

from the control room of this dam.

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Boulders were tossed

around like pebbles.

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And, with cracks appearing

in the structure, there are now

0:07:360:07:39

concerns about the

safety of the dam.

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A picture of widespread

devastation is emerging -

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hundreds dead, thousands

injured, many missing.

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Turkey has sent a convoy

of aid trucks, medication,

0:07:500:07:53

tents and blankets, and many have

spent a second night outdoors,

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terrified by the after-shocks.

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So far, there have been

more than 190 of them.

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A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

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who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

0:08:070:08:12

19-year-old Gaia, Pope

who has severe epilepsy,

0:08:120:08:14

was last seen

on the seventh November.

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Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

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were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

0:08:220:08:25

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

0:08:250:08:29

A 25-year-old man has been convicted

of throwing acid across a crowded

0:08:290:08:33

London nightclub,

injuring 22 people.

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CCTV shown in court showed clubbers

clutching their faces and running

0:08:340:08:37

off the dancefloor

when Arthur Collins,

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the ex-boyfriend of reality

TV star Ferne McCann,

0:08:390:08:41

carried out the attack in April.

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He was convicted of five counts

of grievous bodily harm and nine

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of actual bodily harm

against 14 people.

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He will be sentenced in December.

0:08:530:09:00

Later this morning we'll be speaking

to one of the people injured

0:09:000:09:03

in the attack and a lawyer

who represents some of the victims.

0:09:030:09:07

That's just after 7am.

0:09:070:09:10

Head teachers representing more

than five-thousand schools

0:09:100:09:12

across England have sent a joint

letter to the Chancellor,

0:09:120:09:15

Philip Hammond, warning

of inadequate funding.

0:09:150:09:17

They say they are increasingly

having to ask parents for donations.

0:09:170:09:27

The government has already promised

to move £1.3 billion of education

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funding into schools,

but heads say they need another £1.7

0:09:300:09:32

billion of new money.

0:09:320:09:33

Now, how about a story to lighten

up the winter gloom?

0:09:330:09:36

Some of the world's rarest gemstones

are up for sale in Geneva this week.

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To buy them you'll need

a few spare million,

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but looking is free,

so we sent Imogen Foulkes

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for a sneak peak.

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There is more than a little sparkle

in Geneva this dull November. Every

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year the jewellery houses compete to

show that one special stone, the

0:09:560:10:02

rarest, the purist, the most vivid.

But this year there is one

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extraordinary showstopper. At 163

carats, this is the largest diamond

0:10:080:10:17

ever to be put up for auction. Now,

to show it at its best, or maybe to

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make sure a potential buyer doesn't

mistake it for an ice cube, it has

0:10:220:10:26

been set into a string of emeralds,

5949 of them.

We are expecting in

0:10:260:10:36

the region of $30 million for it,

and it is the largest deflawless

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diamond ever to come to the market

and it is the finest colour, finest

0:10:410:10:46

clarity and extraordinary

proportions. And there is always a

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temptation with a diamond crystal to

cut the largest possible and end up

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with a stone that maybe is a little

lopsided or lumpy or thick just to

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keep the weight. Not here. This is

perfection in every way.

Pink,

0:10:570:11:03

yellow, Nicholas Kommer ring or --

necklace, ring or brooch, jewellery

0:11:030:11:09

lovers are spoilt for choice. But

many the look, with these multi-

0:11:090:11:17

million-dollar pricetags, only a few

will be able to buy.

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That's what we will be doing - just

having a little look.

Yeah, having

0:11:210:11:26

anything like that in my possession,

I would feel far too responsible.

0:11:260:11:30

You'd have to be followed by

security.

I don't want that life.

0:11:300:11:36

LAUGHTER What's going on in the

world this morning?

0:11:360:11:44

Pain on the look of his face, isn't

it.

0:11:440:11:48

To end in failure to reach the World

Cup, now we have to think about the

0:11:480:11:53

World Cup without Italy.

The first

time it's happened in 60 years.

0:11:530:11:56

Which, if you are, you know, from an

English and possibly Republic of

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Ireland perspective, isn't it good

news?

Some major names missing. The

0:12:010:12:07

Netherlands, the USA. I don't think

they should have their own zero in

0:12:070:12:11

the tournament tournament. The

losers' tournament. Yes.

0:12:110:12:16

Italy have failed to qualify

for the World Cup for the first

0:12:160:12:20

time since 1958.

0:12:200:12:21

They lost their play-off

against Sweden, after a goal-less

0:12:210:12:23

draw in the second leg in Milan.

0:12:230:12:25

One Italian newspaper says

the result is 'the apocalypse'.

0:12:250:12:27

The match ends the career

of goalkeeper Gianluigi Buffon

0:12:270:12:30

after 175 caps.

0:12:300:12:31

England manager Gareth Southgate

says he "will not hesitate"

0:12:310:12:33

to use his young stars in tonight's

friendly against Brazil.

0:12:330:12:36

Three players from the Under-21 side

have been drafted into the senior

0:12:360:12:39

side and could be in line

to make their debuts.

0:12:390:12:42

Rafael Nadal has pulled out

of the World Tour Finals in London

0:12:420:12:45

with a knee injury, after losing

in three sets to David Goffin.

0:12:450:12:49

The world number one is still yet

to win the end-of-season event.

0:12:490:12:58

And Dan Keating says that there is a

culture of fear in British

0:12:580:13:02

gymnastics and he says he

experienced bullying and

0:13:020:13:05

manipulation during his time as an

athlete. It was a relief during his

0:13:050:13:09

time in January. British gymnastics

say that there are safeguards that

0:13:090:13:14

are robust and they say anyone with

a concerned should come forward.

0:13:140:13:18

Thank you very much for that. You

will come back with the back papers

0:13:180:13:23

in a moment.

In the meantime. It is

over 50 football, covered in lights,

0:13:230:13:28

something to brighten a dark

morning, it isn't Carol, because she

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isn't that tall.

She is about five

foot eight.

Look at that, gorgeous.

0:13:330:13:36

Morning.

Good morning.

0:13:360:13:40

foot eight.

Look at that, gorgeous.

Morning.

Good morning. It is

0:13:400:13:41

gorgeous. It is a lovely way to

describe it. Look at that Christmas

0:13:410:13:44

tree. It is a daunting sparkly

lights with silver bobbles on it as

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well. -- it is adorned in in. As

soon as this is over, the lights

0:13:480:13:55

will be smack -- will be stripped.

The tree will be lit at around 6pm

0:13:550:14:09

to begin the Christmas spirit. The

weather is not very Christmas

0:14:090:14:13

lights. We had snow in Scotland

yesterday. Today it is much more

0:14:130:14:16

miles. For some parts of the UK the

temperature at the moment is 14

0:14:160:14:20

degrees higher than it was this time

yesterday morning, so quite a

0:14:200:14:25

change. And generally the forecast

for all of us today is a cloudy one

0:14:250:14:29

and also a mild one with some

exceptions. The exceptions will be

0:14:290:14:35

across Scotland. We start the

forecast at 9am across Scotland with

0:14:350:14:39

showers in the north-west. For much

of the rest of Scotland it is a dry

0:14:390:14:43

start, the cloud will not and we

will see some sunshine. As we move

0:14:430:14:47

south into England, there is a lot

more cloud across England today and

0:14:470:14:51

we're looking at some patchy rain,

it is a bit heavy at the moment, it

0:14:510:14:57

will ease and ten to be mainly in

the west by first thing it is in the

0:14:570:15:02

midwest, the Midlands, and it is

grey and murky to start the day, but

0:15:020:15:06

much more mild than it was

yesterday. To the south-west of

0:15:060:15:09

England it is a similar story and

the same for Wales as well with a

0:15:090:15:13

weather front in the south, so it is

cloudy with patchy rain around,

0:15:130:15:17

murky conditions. Northern Ireland

has something a little bit brighter

0:15:170:15:20

in the north and that will carry on

through the course of the day. So in

0:15:200:15:25

Scotland and the far north of

Northern Ireland we will see some

0:15:250:15:28

sunshine today. It will be pleasant

with temperatures in double figures.

0:15:280:15:31

It will be windy in the north of

Scotland with prolific showers later

0:15:310:15:35

that are likely to be heavy.

England, Wales and the rest of

0:15:350:15:39

Northern Ireland will have a cloudy

day with some brightness. That will

0:15:390:15:42

be limited. And some spots of rain

which will be largely in the west on

0:15:420:15:46

the coasts and the hills. As we had

on into the evening and overnight

0:15:460:15:53

period, once again it is going to be

a cold night in Scotland with some

0:15:530:15:57

frost and patchy fog around but for

England, Wales and Northern Ireland,

0:15:570:16:01

Northern Ireland to an lesser

extent, seeing some fog, some of

0:16:010:16:04

which will be dense, likely to be in

the Midlands, around Lincolnshire,

0:16:040:16:09

for example, north Wales, some of it

will be slow to clear first thing

0:16:090:16:13

tomorrow morning. As a result, where

we have the cloud and fog, it won't

0:16:130:16:17

be very cold, but where we have the

clear skies it is. And then heading

0:16:170:16:21

through the course of tomorrow,

where we start with clear skies we

0:16:210:16:24

will have some sunshine. It will be

bright tomorrow. Fairly cloudy. Some

0:16:240:16:28

brightness and spots of rain coming

out of the cloud, particularly so

0:16:280:16:33

across England and Wales. Still

windy in the north with some showers

0:16:330:16:36

and later we will see some rain

coming in. And as we head into

0:16:360:16:40

Thursday well the rain will be

across the north-west of the country

0:16:400:16:44

sinking steadily southwards. They

will be a fair bit of cloud around,

0:16:440:16:47

some brightness and we are still

going to be in double figures. So in

0:16:470:16:52

essence there is not a lot going on

with the weather. Some of us will

0:16:520:16:56

see some rain. It will be cold for

some. It will be mild for some.

0:16:560:17:00

Don't forget the fog tomorrow

morning which could be dense and may

0:17:000:17:04

be problematic. OK, we have been

warned. Thank you. We will see you

0:17:040:17:07

through the morning. It looks rather

lovely because it is dark. Thank

0:17:070:17:11

you.

0:17:110:17:15

lovely because it is dark. Thank

you. That tree is wonderfully

0:17:150:17:16

colour-coordinated. Do you think she

planned that?

Probably.

She's

0:17:160:17:19

wonderful!

0:17:190:17:21

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:17:210:17:22

The main stories this morning:

0:17:220:17:24

Ministers are bracing themselves

for a parliamentary battle as the EU

0:17:240:17:27

withdrawal bill, the key piece

of Brexit legislation,

0:17:270:17:29

returns to the Commons.

0:17:290:17:30

Theresa May has launched her

strongest attack on Russia yet,

0:17:300:17:33

accusing Moscow of meddling

0:17:330:17:34

in elections and spreading fake

news.

0:17:340:17:37

Let's take a look at today's papers.

0:17:390:17:45

You mention Theresa May and Russia,

the story on the front page of the

0:17:450:17:53

Daily Mail. The story on the

right-hand side, Daisy Goodwin, one

0:17:530:17:58

of the stories we mentioned earlier,

she was groped in Number 10, the

0:17:580:18:03

writer of ITV's Victoria programme.

Couldn't remember the word for it

0:18:030:18:09

then, programme! The Times talking

about Theresa May, we saw her making

0:18:090:18:14

that speech earlier on Breakfast,

making an outspoken attack on Russia

0:18:140:18:19

for using fake news to sow discord

in Britain and other Western

0:18:190:18:23

nations. You can see some of the

pictures they have used inside and

0:18:230:18:27

made up stories about particular

pictures, and it is snowy and cold,

0:18:270:18:32

Carol has been talking about that,

this is from Aberdeenshire. And this

0:18:320:18:36

story, a handful of nuts five days a

week makes you much more healthy.

0:18:360:18:41

Any nuts, Brazil nuts, cashew nuts.

What is your topknot?

Dry roasted

0:18:410:18:46

peanuts.

Probably not that -- top

nut.

Honey roasted cashews, they are

0:18:460:18:55

magnificent.

I don't think it

includes being roasted but there you

0:18:550:18:59

go!

Two Johnsons on the front page

of the Daily Mirror this morning,

0:18:590:19:08

And househunting down under. Stanley

Johnson is going to be one of the

0:19:080:19:13

celebrities in the jungle -- And.

0:19:130:19:17

This is Richard Ratcliffe, who was

on the programme yesterday.

David

0:19:210:19:24

Davis has said there will be a vote

in parliament on the final Brexit

0:19:240:19:29

deal, the Daily Telegraph talking

about it and Theresa May talking

0:19:290:19:32

about Putin. And good news, talking

about climate change, it could be

0:19:320:19:37

that fewer dive from winter cold in

the UK. What have you got?

Budget or

0:19:370:19:41

toys?

Budget first -- fewer dive

from.

Let's go with budget. In the

0:19:410:19:51

Financial Times front page,

first-time buyers hope for budget

0:19:510:19:55

stamp duty cut. This may be

something... We've got the budget

0:19:550:19:58

next week, loads of people, business

lobby groups, shops, retailers

0:19:580:20:03

asking for stuff from the budget.

The Financial Times is saying Philip

0:20:030:20:07

Hammond planning a stamp duty cut

for first-time buyers next week,

0:20:070:20:11

that could be one to keep an eye out

for. A big decision.

Next Wednesday?

0:20:110:20:16

It is. Let's do the Tory one. Hasbro

toying with Matel megamerger -- toy

0:20:160:20:26

one. It has been a while! Could end

up being My Little Pony and bar

0:20:260:20:34

being under the same brand, that

would be a huge merger locally --

0:20:340:20:38

and Barbie. That could impact the

price of toys and the kind of toys

0:20:380:20:45

you get.

Thanks, good toy news.

Certainly giving them a bit of

0:20:450:20:49

publicity! Italy crashing out of the

World Cup in all of the sports

0:20:490:20:56

pages. All the headlines are a bit

like this. There's also a man Amir

0:20:560:21:07

in one of the papers. -- Mama Mia.

The apocalypse was one of the lines

0:21:070:21:16

in the Italian papers. Some thinking

about what they should be doing

0:21:160:21:20

instead of watching Sweden at the

World Cup, suggesting cinema trips

0:21:200:21:24

and going to their local village and

concerts and things like that.

0:21:240:21:28

England's cricketers doing their

teambuilding ahead of the Ashes,

0:21:280:21:33

Moeen Ali cuddling a koala and then

they get down to business and they

0:21:330:21:37

do a bit of paint falling to look

that already. You're not afraid of

0:21:370:21:42

injuries, Stuart Broad showing off a

bruise on his arm quite proudly. --

0:21:420:21:54

pain bawling to look ready. -- paint

bawling.

There's a conversation here

0:21:540:22:04

about cats being put on a diet. Pet

owners underestimate how much

0:22:040:22:09

exercise they need with more than 1

million staying indoors. Around one

0:22:090:22:15

in ten of Britain's 11 million cats

are house cats who never go outdoors

0:22:150:22:21

unsupervised.

Do you know it's

official, working 9-to-5 isn't a way

0:22:210:22:25

to make a living? Two thirds of

workers would prefer to start and

0:22:250:22:29

finished the day earlier with eight

to four being chosen by 25% of

0:22:290:22:35

people.

I would agree with that.

It's probably a lot of parents.

0:22:350:22:40

There's a big parental issue

involved. For the same survey, they

0:22:400:22:44

discovered we actually work 0.6 of

an hour less than 20 years ago, so

0:22:440:22:50

how are you spending your extra 36

minutes?

I know how you are spending

0:22:500:22:54

yours!

What's that?

I was looking at

his phone and getting crucial news

0:22:540:23:02

insights.

Thanks very much for that!

Thank you very much, both of you.

0:23:020:23:11

Drivers who are told their eyesight

isn't good enough for them to be

0:23:110:23:15

behind the wheel are

carrying on driving.

0:23:150:23:16

That's according to research

by the Association of Optometrists.

0:23:160:23:19

They want compulsory eye

tests to be introduced,

0:23:190:23:21

a campaign backed by the family

of Natalie Wade, who was killed

0:23:210:23:24

by a partially sighted driver.

0:23:240:23:26

Our reporter Ali Fortescue has more.

0:23:260:23:33

If she walked into a room, as the

saying goes, she lit it up. She

0:23:330:23:38

enjoyed every moment and was so

looking forward to getting married.

0:23:380:23:43

28-year-old Natalie Wade died on her

weight to buy a dressing down my

0:23:430:23:48

wedding dress. She was hit by a

driver with poor eyesight.

There's

0:23:480:23:53

always an empty chair and Christmas,

birthday, the day she would have

0:23:530:23:57

been married, they are still very

painful.

The driver who killed

0:23:570:24:01

Natalie was blinded in one eye and

partially sighted in the other but

0:24:010:24:04

he died before being tried for

dangerous driving. But Natalie is

0:24:040:24:07

just one of 70 people who are killed

or seriously injured in serious

0:24:070:24:12

incidents involving bad eyesight

last year. The legal standard for

0:24:120:24:16

eyesight involves being able to read

a number plate from 20 metres but

0:24:160:24:20

that's something that's only tested

when you first take your test. At

0:24:200:24:23

the moment people just need to fill

out a form like this every ten years

0:24:230:24:27

and that involves answering a

question about your eyesight and if

0:24:270:24:30

you're over 70 you have to fill out

a slightly more comprehensive form

0:24:300:24:34

every three years, but it's still a

question of a tick in a box, there

0:24:340:24:39

is no requirement to take a natural

I test.

The mechanism of self

0:24:390:24:47

reporting isn't always reliable. We

know that vision can change

0:24:470:24:49

gradually over time so drivers might

not be aware of their deterioration

0:24:490:24:53

to their vision.

The Association of

optometrists don't have a legal

0:24:530:24:56

requirement to do anything if

they're concerned about a patient's

0:24:560:24:59

driving, it's down to the driver

stopping more than one in three of

0:24:590:25:03

their optometrist surveyed has seen

a driver in the last three months he

0:25:030:25:07

continues to drive despite being

Colbert vision is below the legal

0:25:070:25:10

standard. Nine in ten believe the

current tests are insufficient and

0:25:100:25:14

they want to see a change in the

law.

What we're calling for his

0:25:140:25:18

vision screening to be carried out

for all drivers when they first

0:25:180:25:22

apply for the driving licence and

then the requirement to prove that

0:25:220:25:26

they continue to meet that standard

every ten years.

But the concern is

0:25:260:25:30

it's not just eyesight that needs

testing.

This is an enormous

0:25:300:25:34

worried. We that surely got

something we can point at and you

0:25:340:25:37

can measure it and say I health is a

big thing but there's all sorts of

0:25:370:25:41

other medical issues which are

simply not being taken into account

0:25:410:25:44

as to whether people are fit to

drive, and I think there should be.

0:25:440:25:48

The department of Transport say that

all drivers are required by law to

0:25:480:25:55

make sure their eyesight is good

enough to drive. They also say if a

0:25:550:25:59

driver experiences any changes to

their eyesight or has a condition

0:25:590:26:02

that could affect their driving they

must notify the DVLA and speak to an

0:26:020:26:06

optician. Ali Fortescue, BBC News.

0:26:060:26:08

We will be talking about that later

in the programme, will be

0:26:080:26:11

interesting to see what you think

about that.

0:26:110:26:13

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:26:130:26:15

Still to come this morning:

0:26:150:26:16

It's the number one chronic disease

in the UK but not much

0:26:160:26:20

attention is focused on the risks

of diabetes during pregnancy.

0:26:200:26:22

We'll be finding out

about the latest research

0:26:220:26:25

just after 6:30am.

0:26:250:26:25

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

0:26:250:26:26

Something else we want to know from

you this morning, Carol is in Covent

0:26:290:26:33

Garden with a big Christmas tree.

It's Christmas light season. In your

0:26:330:26:38

house, when do you officially go

full Christmas?

Not until around the

0:26:380:26:43

seventh or eighth of December. Is

that a bit early?

So a three-week

0:26:430:26:49

buildup.

You have to go and get the

treat.

What if you go on December

0:26:490:26:54

the first?

No. What about you -- get

the treat.

We are two weeks, around

0:26:540:27:01

the 15th -- get the tree. Let us

know if you go super early. Would be

0:27:010:27:07

interesting to see. Maybe some

people have gone already.

You never

0:27:070:27:11

know! Really?

0:27:110:27:12

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

0:27:120:27:14

in half an hour.

0:30:370:30:38

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:30:380:30:41

Now, though, it's back

to Louise and Dan.

0:30:410:30:43

Bye for now.

0:30:430:30:44

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

0:30:450:30:51

It's 6:30am.

0:30:510:30:52

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment,

0:30:520:30:55

but also on Breakfast this morning:

As the former-boyfriend of reality

0:30:550:30:58

TV star Ferne McCann is found guilty

of carrying out an acid attack

0:30:580:31:02

at a London nightclub,

we'll hear from one of his victims.

0:31:020:31:05

Also this morning: Are you a bit

of a language buff or is it all,

0:31:050:31:09

well, double Dutch?

0:31:090:31:10

We'll hear why learning

a foreign language is more

0:31:100:31:13

important than ever.

0:31:130:31:19

# Heart ache on the dance floor. #

moving through my mind.

0:31:190:31:26

And he's given up the mean streets

of Walford for the lure of country.

0:31:260:31:30

And he's given up the mean streets

of Walford for the lure of country.

0:31:300:31:30

Shane Ritchie will be here to tell

us about his new album.

0:31:300:31:33

Good morning.

0:31:330:31:34

Here's a summary of this morning's

main stories from BBC News.

0:31:340:31:42

MPs will today begin debating a key

piece of Brexit legislation,

0:31:420:31:45

the EU Withdrawal Bill.

0:31:450:31:46

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

0:31:460:31:49

Tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

0:31:490:31:54

Yesterday the Brexit Secretary

Davies -- David Davis promised

0:31:540:32:02

parliament would get a vote on the

final Brexit deal.

0:32:020:32:11

Theresa May spent the evening

at the Lord Mayor's

0:32:110:32:14

banquet in London.

0:32:140:32:15

Aside from Brexit, she used

the occasion to make her strongest

0:32:150:32:18

attack yet on Russia,

in which she accused the Putin

0:32:180:32:20

government of threatening

the international order.

0:32:200:32:22

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

0:32:220:32:24

media organisations to plant fake

stories and photoshopped images

0:32:240:32:27

in an attempt to sow

discord in the west

0:32:270:32:29

and undermine our institutions.

0:32:290:32:30

So I have a very simple

message for Russia, we know

0:32:300:32:33

what you are doing and

you will not succeed.

0:32:330:32:40

The television producer and writer,

Daisy Goodwin, who created the ITV

0:32:400:32:44

drama, Victoria, has claimed

she was groped by a government

0:32:440:32:47

official during a visit

to Number Ten.

0:32:470:32:53

She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

0:32:530:32:57

after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

0:32:570:33:00

Cameron was Prime Minister.

0:33:000:33:01

She said she wasn't

traumatised, but was cross,

0:33:010:33:03

adding she didn't

report it at the time.

0:33:030:33:05

Downing Street said they take

all allegations very seriously

0:33:050:33:08

and would look into any formal

complaint, should one be made.

0:33:080:33:12

Thousands of people are spending

a second night without shelter

0:33:120:33:15

in near-freezing conditions

after an earthquake caused

0:33:150:33:17

devastation in parts

of Iran and Iraq.

0:33:170:33:19

More than 450 people were killed

and around 7,000 injured.

0:33:190:33:23

Officials in Iran say the rescue

operation after the earthquake

0:33:230:33:26

on Sunday has largely

been completed.

0:33:260:33:29

A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

0:33:290:33:33

who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

0:33:330:33:35

19-year-old Gaia Pope,

who has severe epilepsy,

0:33:350:33:37

was last seen on the

seventh November.

0:33:370:33:39

Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

0:33:390:33:42

were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

0:33:420:33:45

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

0:33:450:33:56

A 25-year-old man has been convicted

of throwing acid across a crowded

0:33:560:33:59

London nightclub,

injuring 22 people.

0:33:590:34:00

CCTV shown in court showed clubbers

clutching their faces and running

0:34:000:34:03

off the dancefloor

when Arthur Collins,

0:34:030:34:05

the ex-boyfriend of reality

TV star Ferne McCann,

0:34:050:34:07

carried out the attack in April.

0:34:070:34:09

He was convicted of five counts

of grievous bodily harm and nine

0:34:090:34:12

of actual bodily harm

against 14 people.

0:34:120:34:14

He will be sentenced in December.

0:34:140:34:20

Head teachers representing more

than 5,000 schools across England

0:34:200:34:22

have sent a joint letter

to the Chancellor, Philip Hammond,

0:34:220:34:25

warning of inadequate funding.

They say they are increasingly

0:34:250:34:28

having to ask parents for donations.

0:34:280:34:29

The government has already promised

to move £1.3 billion of education

0:34:290:34:33

funding into schools,

but heads say they need another £1.7

0:34:330:34:35

billion of new money.

0:34:350:34:47

And the very best headline in the

newspaper today is spaghetti oops.

0:34:470:34:51

That is because.

Sad story for

Italians everywhere because there is

0:34:510:34:57

no Italian team in the World Cup.

For some people it is unthinkable.

0:34:570:35:01

But it is going to happen. So many

people follow the team. They have

0:35:010:35:07

won the tournament four times. Look

at the paint on the goalkeeper's

0:35:070:35:10

face, Bufon. That sums it up, his

last game for Italy. The manager

0:35:100:35:17

hasn't resigned yet. It is the

papers, the Italian papers...

You

0:35:170:35:22

know. Well done, Sweden.

Congratulations, Sweden.

0:35:220:35:26

Italy have failed to qualify

for the World Cup for the first

0:35:260:35:29

time since 1958.

0:35:290:35:30

They lost their play-off

against Sweden, running out

0:35:300:35:32

of ideas against

determined opposition.

0:35:320:35:35

Even veteran keeper Gianluigi Buffon

was sent into the attack in injury

0:35:350:35:38

time, but it finished

goal-less in Milan.

0:35:380:35:41

So Sweden are off to Russia,

while Italy's manager

0:35:410:35:44

Giampiero Ventura has

resigned and Buffon has

0:35:440:35:46

quit international football.

0:35:460:35:47

One Italian newspaper described

the result as 'the apocalypse'.

0:35:470:35:52

Another suggested candidates to

replace the manager, who has not

0:35:520:35:56

actually officially resigned yet.

0:35:560:35:58

The Republic of Ireland could join

England at next summer's World Cup

0:35:580:36:02

if they can beat Denmark

in Dublin this evening.

0:36:020:36:04

The first leg in Copenhagen ended

0-0 and Ireland manager

0:36:040:36:07

Martin O'Neill knows his side

will have to do a lot more

0:36:070:36:10

going forward to beat the Danes.

0:36:100:36:12

I think that we will try to be a bit

more expensive if we can, try and

0:36:120:36:16

deal with the ball a wee bit better

and if that's the case, well, we

0:36:160:36:20

want to try to win the game, we have

to find a way to win a match. And

0:36:200:36:25

these players have been unable to do

that in the last couple of years.

0:36:250:36:29

England versus Brazil has produced

some classic moments

0:36:290:36:31

from the past.

0:36:310:36:41

Gordon Banks' save

from Pele in 1970s,

0:36:410:36:48

in the Maracana in '84.

0:36:480:36:49

Tonight England manager

Gareth Southgate

0:36:490:36:51

says he "will not hesitate"

to use his young stars in tonight's

0:36:510:36:54

friendly against Brazil.

0:36:540:36:55

Three players have been drafted

into the senior side

0:36:550:36:57

from the Under-21's

and could receive debuts.

0:36:570:36:59

This follows five players

earning their first caps in the draw

0:36:590:37:02

against Germany, including

Man-of-the-Match Reuben

0:37:020:37:03

Loftus-Cheek.

0:37:030:37:04

It is incredible really that he has

had so few in the Premier League

0:37:040:37:08

that we are putting him in that

environment, but we believe in him,

0:37:080:37:11

he did really well, but now, you

know, sometimes the first game is

0:37:110:37:15

easier because nobody is aware of

you.

0:37:150:37:17

The boss of the professional

footballers' association has called

0:37:170:37:19

for under 11s to be banned

from heading balls until further

0:37:190:37:22

research has been done

into the possible impact

0:37:220:37:24

on players' brains.

0:37:240:37:25

Gordon Taylor has also

defended his organisation

0:37:250:37:27

against accusations they've been

slow to deal with the issue

0:37:270:37:30

of a potential link

between heading and dementia.

0:37:300:37:32

The issue was highlighted

in Alan Shearer's BBC documentary

0:37:320:37:34

on Sunday.

0:37:340:37:39

All I can say is when we see request

for help we don't turn anybody down

0:37:390:37:44

and anybody who wishes to know what

we are doing in this area is very

0:37:440:37:48

welcome to come and go through all

our files, not just for the moment,

0:37:480:37:53

but I would say since the '90s.

0:37:530:38:00

Moeen will play for his first game

of the tour after getting to know

0:38:000:38:05

some of the wildlife in Townsville.

He will play the Cricket Australia

0:38:050:38:10

11, which begins tomorrow. They look

close to finalising the team with

0:38:100:38:15

Gary Ballance left out again.

I just

love that picture of a koala.

It is

0:38:150:38:20

quite cute.

0:38:200:38:22

Commonwealth champion

Dan Keatings says there is a very

0:38:220:38:24

real "culture of fear"

within British Gymnastics,

0:38:240:38:26

after claims of appalling leadership

by a group of coaches.

0:38:260:38:29

Keatings says he experienced

bullying and manipulation

0:38:290:38:31

during his career as an athlete

but he wasn't able to speak out

0:38:310:38:34

for fear of losing his funding.

0:38:340:38:36

British Gymnastics say

their safeguarding processes

0:38:360:38:38

are robust and they encourage anyone

with a concern to come forward.

0:38:380:38:41

Rafael Nadal's season

is over after he pulled out

0:38:410:38:44

of the World Tour Finals

in London with injury.

0:38:440:38:46

The world number one

lost his opening match

0:38:460:38:48

despite saving four match

points in the second set

0:38:480:38:51

against David Goffin

to force a decider.

0:38:510:38:53

The Belgian seventh seed came

through 6-4 in the third set

0:38:530:38:56

and less than an hour later Nadal

pulled out of the tournament

0:38:560:38:59

with a knee injury.

0:38:590:39:00

He hasn't ever won this event.

0:39:000:39:02

Now, when was the last time

you were told off by your mum.

0:39:020:39:05

For England head coach

Eddie Jones it was on Saturday.

0:39:050:39:08

He's apologised for swearing on TV,

after receiving a telling off

0:39:080:39:11

from his 93-year-old mother.

0:39:110:39:12

Jones admitted to being frustrated

by his side's lacklustre performance

0:39:120:39:15

at Twickenham, and was caught

on camera losing his cool

0:39:150:39:17

during Saturday's 21-8

win over Argentina.

0:39:170:39:24

Usually I am pretty good, you know.

And I have apologised for the

0:39:240:39:28

language I use. I got a phone call

from my mother this morning, 93,

0:39:280:39:34

wrapping me over the knuckles. She

still tells me not to swear. So I am

0:39:340:39:38

in trouble with my mother. So that

is a big enough punishment for me. I

0:39:380:39:42

am in the dog house and I certainly

won't do it again.

0:39:420:39:45

And because he has been told off I

believe it won't happen again.

Once

0:39:450:39:50

your mum speaks, you just have to

listen.

It happens to me all the

0:39:500:39:54

time.

What happened last time?

Whingeing about my kids. She is a

0:39:540:40:00

stern 1970s midwife, so it is

official advice as well as motherly

0:40:000:40:05

advice.

Oh, so honest. Thank you.

See you later.

Good morning.

0:40:050:40:09

Stories about diabetes are never far

from the news but less attention

0:40:090:40:13

is focused on the risks

of the disease during pregnancy.

0:40:130:40:15

Every year thousands of women

in the UK develop the condition.

0:40:150:40:18

It can have an impact on the health

of both the mums-to-be,

0:40:180:40:22

and their unborn babies.

0:40:220:40:23

Now a new study suggests the risks

can be reduced through a new way

0:40:230:40:26

of monitoring the disease.

0:40:260:40:28

Dr Eleanor Scott is from

the University of Leeds,

0:40:280:40:30

which led the research.

0:40:300:40:31

Morning to you. Let's just talk

about this type of diabetes, because

0:40:310:40:35

it can happen when people - when

women are pregnant.

Yes, it can.

0:40:350:40:41

Diabetes is very common, one in

seven otherwise healthy women will

0:40:410:40:46

have diabetes in pregnancy. The most

common form is gestation or

0:40:460:40:50

diabetes. The woman develops it in

pregnancy. We also see it with women

0:40:500:40:55

with type one and two diabetes

before they get pregnant --

0:40:550:41:00

gestational.

How is it helpful going

forward, how will it impact on the

0:41:000:41:04

NHS and other organisations?

The

biggest risk of any woman with

0:41:040:41:08

diabetes in pregnancy is her baby is

going to be exposed to too much

0:41:080:41:12

extra glucose and grow too big. That

can lead to problems with delivery

0:41:120:41:16

and a problem for the baby

long-term. And in order to get the

0:41:160:41:21

blood sugar back down to normal we

normally get them to monitor the

0:41:210:41:24

blood sugar using a finger prick

checker. But what we've now got

0:41:240:41:29

available is continuous glucose

monitoring. That is able to monitor

0:41:290:41:32

the blood sugar every five minutes

across a 24-hour day for up to two

0:41:320:41:37

weeks at a time. And we have been

looking at using that to try to

0:41:370:41:42

establish what the glucose patterns

are across the 24-hour date that are

0:41:420:41:47

associated with women getting these

convocations in pregnancy -- day.

0:41:470:41:50

And you found it fluctuates a lot.

Yes, very much. The period that we

0:41:500:41:56

particularly see it is overnight. We

wouldn't normally detect it if we

0:41:560:42:00

did the finger prick checker.

So in

terms of the fact that having

0:42:000:42:04

diabetes can have when you are

pregnant. In terms of the mother and

0:42:040:42:08

child as well, what should we be

looking for?

So, for the babies,

0:42:080:42:14

particularly, it is that the extra

sugar in the mum's bloodstream goes

0:42:140:42:18

to the baby and is extra calories

for the baby and it grows too big.

0:42:180:42:22

That can lead to problems during

labour and delivery, increase the

0:42:220:42:27

chance of Caesarean section and risk

to the babies, and the chance of a

0:42:270:42:32

baby needing to go to neonatal

intensive care.

What about the

0:42:320:42:35

long-term impact?

We know that

babies exposed to mum having

0:42:350:42:40

diabetes, if it is not controlled,

they are at increased risk of

0:42:400:42:45

diabetes.

So what is the chance and

could it be rolled out and hell

0:42:450:42:52

helpful would it be?

A study we

participated in that was led by

0:42:520:42:56

Canada and the UK which has only

recently been published has shown

0:42:560:43:01

that if you give women continuous

glucose monitors during pregnancy

0:43:010:43:05

that it substantially improves the

amount of time they spend in glucose

0:43:050:43:09

targets and also has an impact on

the baby's outcomes. So the babies

0:43:090:43:13

are smaller and are less likely to

need neonatal care.

What should

0:43:130:43:20

these mums be doing and what should

they be checked out for?

Yes, so,

0:43:200:43:25

women who already have diabetes have

to seek advice before they think

0:43:250:43:29

about getting pregnant because there

is a lot we can do to improve things

0:43:290:43:33

beforehand. Women who are

potentially at risk of type 2

0:43:330:43:36

diabetes are the same women at risk

of gestational diabetes

0:43:360:43:41

diabetes are the same women at risk

of gestational diabetes. That is

0:43:410:43:43

women who are overweight or have a

history of diabetes, come from south

0:43:430:43:47

Asian family origin or previously

have had a big baby. They should be

0:43:470:43:51

tested in pregnancy so we can do

something about it.

Thank you very

0:43:510:43:55

much indeed.

0:43:550:43:58

Carol is out and about this morning.

She is in Covent Garden with a

0:43:580:44:03

rather big Christmas tree behind

her. We have been asking you about

0:44:030:44:06

getting into the festive mood. One

viewer, look at this, definitely is.

0:44:060:44:12

This is from quest, who says he has

gone very early. This was over the

0:44:120:44:16

weekend.

It November. Really?

You

are genuinely upset.

I was shocked

0:44:160:44:22

when I went into the supermarket and

they are playing merry Christmas. It

0:44:220:44:27

is November.

I went surprisingly

early on mince pies, mid September I

0:44:270:44:37

was mince pieing it.

Carol is not very impressed with

0:44:370:44:41

this. The tree looks beautiful.

0:44:410:44:46

Carol is not very impressed with

this. The tree looks beautiful.

It

0:44:460:44:46

does look beautiful and we are in

Covent Garden and that tree stands

0:44:460:44:50

55 feet tall, it has between 25000

and 30,000 lightbulbs and it's

0:44:500:44:56

gorgeous. Tonight it will be lit for

real, we've seen a sneak preview

0:44:560:45:00

this morning and after the programme

the lights will be switched off.

0:45:000:45:06

Festivities kick-off at Covent

Garden at 5:30 p.m., the cast of

0:45:060:45:11

42nd Street coming down and they

will be performing, Pudsey Bear will

0:45:110:45:15

switch on the lights as well. He's

going to dance and he has some

0:45:150:45:19

special guests. I've been trying to

drag out from the Covent Garden

0:45:190:45:24

chaps who they are but they are

saying nothing, other than they are

0:45:240:45:29

very special. Something to see in

London this evening. Cloudier for

0:45:290:45:33

most of us compared to yesterday,

and milder, but some exceptions, as

0:45:330:45:42

ever, especially across Scotland.

9am across Scotland, showers across

0:45:420:45:46

the north-west but most of Scotland

at this stage is dry with variable

0:45:460:45:50

cloud and also some brightness. That

cloud will thin and melt through the

0:45:500:45:55

days. Across England, it is cloudier

and again we have a couple of

0:45:550:45:59

weather fronts sinking south with

some rain on them at the moment,

0:45:590:46:03

that rain will turn more patchy as

we head through the day. That same

0:46:030:46:07

band of rain affecting parts of

Wales as well this morning. Quite a

0:46:070:46:11

murky, grey start to the day with a

lot of cloud across Wales. In

0:46:110:46:15

Northern Ireland, some brighter

breaks but the best of the

0:46:150:46:18

brightness today will be in the

north of Northern Ireland. For the

0:46:180:46:22

rest of Northern Ireland it's going

to be fairly cloudy. If we look at

0:46:220:46:26

the weather for the rest of the day

across the UK, you can see for

0:46:260:46:34

England and Wales it will remain

fairly cloudy. A bit of brightness

0:46:340:46:37

developing but not a lot. We'll

still have some patchy light rain,

0:46:370:46:40

most of which will be in parts of

the west on the hills and coasts. In

0:46:400:46:44

Scotland and the north of Northern

Ireland, we're looking at a bright

0:46:440:46:48

day with some sunshine and it will

feel pleasant in the sunshine. For

0:46:480:46:51

most today we will see temperatures

peaking in double figures, as

0:46:510:46:54

opposed to single figures like

yesterday. As we head through the

0:46:540:46:58

evening and overnight, the showers,

which will be heavier in the

0:46:580:47:02

afternoon and more prolific in

Scotland, will ease. Here it will be

0:47:020:47:06

windy. Under clear skies, a

widespread frost with patchy fog.

0:47:060:47:10

For Northern Ireland, England and

Wales, a lot of cloud and spots of

0:47:100:47:15

rain but also fog developing. We see

it in many areas but it will be

0:47:150:47:20

especially so across Lincolnshire,

the Midlands and East Anglia and

0:47:200:47:23

some of that could be dense and slow

to clear tomorrow. Through the

0:47:230:47:28

course of tomorrow, again fairly

cloudy for England, Wales and

0:47:280:47:31

Northern Ireland to start with. The

fog slow to lift. Still some spots

0:47:310:47:36

of rain, especially so in the

Western. Whereas for Scotland,

0:47:360:47:40

you're in for a brighter day once

again with some sunshine but we

0:47:400:47:48

should see some of the brightness

extending into northern England

0:47:480:47:51

through the day but by the end of

the day we'll have a weather front

0:47:510:47:55

coming into the north-west,

introducing wet and windy weather,

0:47:550:47:57

and during Thursday that will sink

steadily south, leaving us with a

0:47:570:48:00

fairly cloudy day on Thursday but

not particularly cold. Temperatures

0:48:000:48:03

around where they should be at this

stage in November.

0:48:030:48:06

Thanks

0:48:080:48:08

Thanks very much. I love everything

about the Christmas tree but the

0:48:080:48:12

decorations up a little bit too

early, nothing to do with you!

Good

0:48:120:48:16

clarification there!

0:48:160:48:17

Almost a third of people aged 50

to 64 are not in work

0:48:170:48:21

and many of those feel

like they're trapped,

0:48:210:48:23

according to research

from a charity out today.

0:48:230:48:25

Sean's taking a look.

0:48:250:48:27

Good morning. A lot of these issues

will be familiar to a lot of people.

0:48:270:48:33

This is research from

the Centre for Ageing Better,

0:48:330:48:35

looking at those aged

between 50 and 65.

0:48:350:48:42

And a million of them,

almost a third of that age group,

0:48:420:48:46

are out of work

0:48:460:48:47

not because they want to be

but because of issues such as ill

0:48:470:48:50

health, caring responsibilities

or redundancy.

0:48:500:48:52

That can really take it's toll

on someone's confidence

0:48:520:48:54

and of course finances.

0:48:540:49:00

Qurab Ahmed is 55

and tod us her story.

0:49:000:49:04

When my daughter became ill and we

learned what the circumstances were

0:49:040:49:07

going to be, I had sort of given up

and thought, this is my life now,

0:49:070:49:13

I'm going to be a full-time carer,

I'm not going to be able to go back

0:49:130:49:17

to work and I need to think about

letting my employers know that that

0:49:170:49:21

would be the position. I was always

encouraged not to make a decision

0:49:210:49:26

just then and let things pan out.

I'm so grateful that my employer was

0:49:260:49:34

encouraging and supported me through

this difficult time, and we kept in

0:49:340:49:38

touch. Also that feeling that I'm

still wanted, that they needed me at

0:49:380:49:43

work. Not many employers provide

that flexibility. Some people will

0:49:430:49:48

just stop and they'll never be able

to get back into work.

0:49:480:49:55

Sympathetic employer for Qurab but

that isn't necessarily the case for

0:49:550:49:59

everyone.

0:49:590:49:59

Jemma Mouland is Senior Programme

Manager at the Centre

0:49:590:50:02

for Ageing Better,

which carried out this research.

0:50:020:50:04

When we look at Qurab's situation,

she had carer responsibilities that

0:50:040:50:09

weren't there before hand. If you're

in a similar situation and you're in

0:50:090:50:14

work, what can you do to aid any

going back to work in the future?

0:50:140:50:18

Absolutely, if you're in work

already you have the right to

0:50:180:50:21

request books about working but it's

up to your employer to determine

0:50:210:50:25

whether they accept the request --

flexible working. It's interesting

0:50:250:50:31

for this age group, they are the

prime age for caring, and employers

0:50:310:50:35

need to make sure they offer that

flexibility that enables those

0:50:350:50:39

carers to retain their work as well

as managing caring responsibilities.

0:50:390:50:43

If you've ended up out of work

because of that and you're looking

0:50:430:50:47

to get back into the workplace, how

do employers look at the fact your

0:50:470:50:51

CV says or five years you've been

caring for a family member, how do

0:50:510:50:55

they treat it?

It varies by employer

but something we found in our

0:50:550:51:01

research was there's a perception

that employers are less willing to

0:51:010:51:05

employ older workers, especially if

they've been out of the labour

0:51:050:51:08

market for a while, and potentially

favouring younger employees instead.

0:51:080:51:14

That's a shame because we're talking

around 1 million people between

0:51:140:51:19

50-64 who are ready and willing to

be in the workplace, and these

0:51:190:51:25

individuals have a lifetime of

skills and experience they can bring

0:51:250:51:28

to work and employers aren't taking

full advantage of that at the

0:51:280:51:31

moment.

Is there a reason why it

might hit people harder after 50 if

0:51:310:51:35

they lose their job than younger

people? There's pressure is on all

0:51:350:51:39

age groups, as we often talk about.

What we're finding is they are often

0:51:390:51:46

forced out of work due to issues

like ill health and caring

0:51:460:51:51

responsibilities or in voluntary

redundancy but they are finding it

0:51:510:51:53

difficult to get back into work.

They're more likely to be out of

0:51:530:51:57

work for longer than younger age

groups and least likely to get a

0:51:570:52:01

job. In our research we found there

was a whole host of different issues

0:52:010:52:06

for this age group, to highlight a

few that were coming up, issues with

0:52:060:52:11

ill health and caring

responsibilities were a significant

0:52:110:52:13

barrier for people getting back into

work because they really needed that

0:52:130:52:17

flexibility at work which wasn't on

offer. Another issue that was quite

0:52:170:52:22

common was the sense employers were

perhaps less willing to recruit

0:52:220:52:25

older workers for various different

reasons, and that had a negative

0:52:250:52:29

impact on people's self-confidence.

Individuals started to see

0:52:290:52:33

themselves as too old to be at work

and almost gave up on the idea of

0:52:330:52:40

ever working against quite if you're

having those thoughts, what's the

0:52:400:52:43

first step you should take? There's

lots of employment support available

0:52:430:52:48

and it's about engaging with the

support and not feeling it's not

0:52:480:52:51

there for you and you're not able to

access it. Don't be shy of putting

0:52:510:52:56

yourself forward for these

opportunities. It's really important

0:52:560:53:01

to have that first conversation

about your needs for flexibility at

0:53:010:53:05

work with potential employers.

There's the possibility that

0:53:050:53:09

flexibility will be offered if it's

asked for, but we know that's not an

0:53:090:53:12

easy thing for this work group to

do. Both national and local

0:53:120:53:16

government need to do more to

provide better support for this age

0:53:160:53:20

group, to support them to have those

conversations and to get back into

0:53:200:53:23

work.

Gemma, thanks very much.

0:53:230:53:27

If you're familiar with these

stories.

0:53:270:53:29

And if you're over 50

and struggling to find work

0:53:290:53:32

let us know.

0:53:320:53:36

Tweet us @bbcbreakfast

or drop us an e-mail,

0:53:360:53:42

bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk.

0:53:420:53:46

They are the actors breaking down

barriers in Scottish theatre.

0:53:460:53:49

The first group of students

from the UK's only degree course

0:53:490:53:52

for deaf performers is taking

to the stage with a new production

0:53:520:53:55

that blends British Sign

Language and English.

0:53:550:53:57

It's hoped the adaptation

of Caryl Churchill's play Love

0:53:570:53:59

and Information will challenge

perceptions and make sign

0:53:590:54:02

language more visible.

0:54:020:54:03

Our Scotland correspondent

Lorna Gordon went to meet them.

0:54:030:54:05

It is a play with big themes that

affect us all. Love and how we make

0:54:050:54:11

sense of things in an increasingly

frenetic world. The 50 short scenes,

0:54:110:54:17

each with a different set of

characters, are all performed by ten

0:54:170:54:21

actors who happened to be deaf.

I think the play's very, very

0:54:210:54:27

powerful because it is able to show

different perspectives in that deaf

0:54:270:54:32

people are similar to hearing people

in that environment and that we're

0:54:320:54:36

all similar, we're all the same and

I think that play really

0:54:360:54:40

demonstrates that.

Mr Rushmore, if

you could just open the door...

0:54:400:54:45

Their performance in a mixture of

English, captioning and British sign

0:54:450:54:50

language a chance to showcase the

actors' talents. And British sign

0:54:500:54:56

language itself.

It's a wonderful

opportunity and we've really enjoyed

0:54:560:54:59

it.

Absolutely because sign language

can be so big, so rich, so

0:54:590:55:05

expressive and in a theatre setting

means we can show also solve levels

0:55:050:55:08

of emotion.

The actors, all students at

0:55:080:55:14

Glasgow's Royal conservator, are on

the country's only degree course for

0:55:140:55:18

deaf performers. Embracing deafness

as part of their identity and hoping

0:55:180:55:22

their performance will help others

do the same.

It's a great way for me

0:55:220:55:26

to carry on and show people that

it's OK to be who you are, because I

0:55:260:55:31

kind of old before I was being

shuffled off into the background

0:55:310:55:35

like I was a liability or I was just

a burden to someone else, I thought

0:55:350:55:39

I'll say nothing and back off, now

I'm thinking, you know what, I'm

0:55:390:55:47

going to step forward and let them

see me for who I am.

0:55:470:55:51

The Scottish government recently

announced plans to integrate the use

0:55:510:55:53

of sign language into everyday life

and the play's director believes

0:55:530:55:56

this performance will help with

challenging perceptions in the

0:55:560:55:59

theatre and the arts.

I think it's

about British sign language being

0:55:590:56:04

more visible, being more out in the

open and recognised as a language.

0:56:040:56:08

So I think this production and the

degree programme here at the

0:56:080:56:12

conservator are is part of that

movement.

Another step in showing

0:56:120:56:16

that British sign language should be

celebrated as a language in its own

0:56:160:56:21

right. Lorna Gordon, BBC News,

Glasgow.

0:56:210:56:26

That looks fantastic. Carol is in

Covent Garden this morning, she's

0:56:260:56:30

got a big Christmas tree with her,

doing the weather from their. People

0:56:300:56:34

have got in contact after we showed

a picture of someone with their

0:56:340:56:38

decorations up over the weekend.

Claire said it never stops, carols

0:56:380:56:43

all year long, I leave decorations

up all year round in strategic

0:56:430:56:47

places that nobody can reach!

Claire! I leave them up by mistake!

0:56:470:56:52

John said it starts on the third of

December this year once I am home

0:56:520:56:56

run the banter Dash. I suspect we

all have our own traditions, is

0:56:560:57:02

November to early?

Mike says

Christmas Eve is when it's starts,

0:57:020:57:07

Boxing Day is

0:57:071:00:27

Now, though, it's back

to Louise and Dan.

1:00:271:00:29

Bye for now.

1:00:291:00:30

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

1:00:541:00:57

A major milestone on the road

to Brexit as MPs begin debating

1:00:571:01:00

the EU withdrawal bill.

1:01:001:01:05

It will convert European

laws into British ones,

1:01:051:01:07

but it's unlikely to pass

smoothly with more than 160

1:01:071:01:09

amendments already tabled.

1:01:091:01:26

Good morning.

1:01:261:01:28

It's Tuesday, November 14.

1:01:281:01:32

Also this morning: After a man

is convicted of an acid attack

1:01:321:01:36

in a packed nightclub,

one of his victims tells us how it's

1:01:361:01:39

changed her life.

1:01:391:01:40

A call for compulsory eye tests

for motorists as new figures show

1:01:401:01:44

many ignore warnings

that they shouldnt be driving.

1:01:441:01:51

Good morning.

1:01:511:01:56

Living costs are on the up and I am

going to look at how prices are

1:01:561:02:01

rising and that will affect

decisions in next week's budget.

1:02:011:02:03

Good morning.

1:02:031:02:05

In sport, it's going to be

a World Cup without Italy

1:02:051:02:08

after the four-time champions fail

to qualify for the tournament

1:02:081:02:10

for the first time in 60 years.

1:02:101:02:12

And Carol is getting

into the Christmas spirit already.

1:02:121:02:16

Good morning from Covent Garden. You

can see the beautiful Christmas tree

1:02:161:02:20

behind me. It has been lit

especially for us. Straight after

1:02:201:02:24

Breakfast this morning it will go

off. Then it will be lit again this

1:02:241:02:28

evening. The first time Covent

Garden and children in need have

1:02:281:02:32

worked together. Scotland and

Northern

1:02:321:02:34

worked together. Scotland and

Northern Ireland in with some bright

1:02:341:02:37

and sunny weather. For England,

Wales and the rest of Northern

1:02:371:02:41

Ireland it is fairly mild with spots

of rain. I will have more in 15

1:02:411:02:45

minutes.

Thanks, Carol. We will have

more at 7:15am.

1:02:451:02:49

Good morning.

1:02:491:02:50

First, our main story.

1:02:501:02:51

MPs will today begin debating a key

piece of Brexit legislation,

1:02:511:02:54

the EU Withdrawal Bill.

1:02:541:02:55

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

1:02:551:02:58

Tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

1:02:581:03:00

Our political correspondent

Leila Nathoo reports.

1:03:001:03:11

The Prime Minister.

1:03:111:03:14

Still the one in charge,

Theresa May last night

1:03:141:03:17

at the glittering Lord

Mayor's Banquet in London,

1:03:171:03:20

a break from Brexit

and potential trouble ahead.

1:03:201:03:22

A key piece of the government's

Brexit legislation returns

1:03:221:03:25

to the Commons today, and MPs

are trying to tinker with it.

1:03:251:03:33

They are proposing hundreds

of changes to try to influence

1:03:331:03:36

ministers' approach,

and so yesterday an apparent

1:03:361:03:38

concession to one

of their key demands.

1:03:381:03:44

I can now confirm that once we have

reached an agreement we will bring

1:03:441:03:48

forward a specific piece

of primary legislation

1:03:481:03:50

to implement that agreement.

1:03:501:03:51

Parliament will be given time

to debate, scrutinise and vote

1:03:511:03:54

on the final agreement we strike

with the European Union.

1:03:541:03:56

This agreement will only hold

if parliament approves it.

1:03:561:04:00

But with such a fragile majority,

just a handful of Tory backbenchers

1:04:001:04:05

siding with the opposition

would lead to a government defeat.

1:04:051:04:09

And those minded to rebel seem

unsatisfied with the take it

1:04:091:04:12

or leave it vote the

government has offered.

1:04:121:04:15

I have to say, a lot of us

were insulted by this.

1:04:151:04:18

I mean, because it sounded so good

and then when you dug

1:04:181:04:22

into the detail you realise this

so-called meaningful vote

1:04:221:04:24

was completely meaningless.

1:04:241:04:25

There will be more contentious votes

here in the coming weeks as MPs test

1:04:251:04:29

the government's fragile

working majority.

1:04:291:04:38

Our political correspondent

Alex Forsyth joins us from

1:04:381:04:40

Westminster.

1:04:401:04:42

We heard from David Davis yesterday,

1:04:431:04:46

parliament will get a vote on the

final offer, the final bill. Is it

1:04:461:04:50

enough to stave off any rebellion?

Many MPs agree with the broad idea

1:04:501:04:56

behind this Withdrawal Bill and they

recognise that there has to be

1:04:561:04:59

something in place when we leave the

EU to fill the hole left by the

1:04:591:05:04

regulations and laws that we

currently abide by. It is lots of

1:05:041:05:07

the detail of this pill that they

are not happy with. Everything from

1:05:071:05:11

the fact that some think it gives

uncheck power to ministers. Others

1:05:111:05:14

concerned about the impact on Wales,

Northern Ireland and Scotland. There

1:05:141:05:19

was a threat that Tory MPs from the

backbenches and Labour MPs would

1:05:191:05:23

come together to vote against the

government. That is why the

1:05:231:05:26

government has said that they will

have an act of parliament with a

1:05:261:05:30

final Brexit deal to try to stop the

rebellion. As you heard from Leila,

1:05:301:05:35

that hasn't gone far enough. Many

MPs say they haven't got the chance

1:05:351:05:40

to send to read is a mate to

Brussels to negotiate. It is a take

1:05:401:05:44

it or leave it vote. So it hasn't so

far pierced those threatening to

1:05:441:05:48

rebel. The passage of the bill

starting today is still looking very

1:05:481:05:52

tricky.

OK. I know it is going to be

a long process. Thank you very much.

1:05:521:05:59

Earlier we saw Theresa May

at the Lord Mayor's

1:05:591:06:01

banquet in London.

1:06:011:06:02

She used the occasion

to make her strongest attack yet

1:06:021:06:05

on Russia, in which she accused

the Putin government of threatening

1:06:051:06:08

the international order.

1:06:081:06:08

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

1:06:081:06:11

media organisations to plant fake

stories and photoshopped images

1:06:111:06:13

in an attempt to sow

discord in the west

1:06:131:06:16

and undermine our institutions.

1:06:161:06:17

So I have a very simple

message for Russia, we know

1:06:171:06:20

what you are doing and

you will not succeed.

1:06:201:06:34

The television producer and writer,

Daisy Goodwin, who created the ITV

1:06:341:06:37

drama, Victoria, has claimed

she was groped by a government

1:06:371:06:40

official during a visit

to Number Ten.

1:06:401:06:42

She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

1:06:421:06:45

after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

1:06:451:06:48

Cameron was Prime Minister.

1:06:481:06:49

She said she wasn't traumatised,

but was cross, adding she didn't

1:06:491:06:52

report it at the time.

1:06:521:06:54

Downing Street said they take

all allegations very seriously

1:06:541:06:56

and would look into any formal

complaint, should one be made.

1:06:561:07:06

Thousands of people are spending

a second night without shelter

1:07:061:07:09

in near-freezing conditions

after an earthquake caused

1:07:091:07:11

devastation in parts

of Iran and Iraq.

1:07:111:07:13

More than 450 people were killed

and around 7,000 injured.

1:07:131:07:15

Sarah Corker reports.

1:07:151:07:21

This is the deadliest earthquake

in the world this year.

1:07:211:07:24

The border town of Pol-e Zahab

here in western Iran bore

1:07:241:07:27

the brunt of it.

1:07:271:07:29

Homes were flattened in seconds,

crushing everyone inside.

1:07:291:07:32

The search for survivors

has been frantic.

1:07:321:07:34

But early this morning,

Iranian officials called off

1:07:341:07:36

the rescue operation.

1:07:361:07:37

At this local hospital,

many of the injured had stories

1:07:371:07:40

of narrow escapes.

1:07:401:07:45

TRANSLATION:

I fell

from the balcony down.

1:07:451:07:47

The earthquake was very strong.

1:07:471:07:58

This mountainous area

is prone to earthquakes.

1:07:581:08:00

Power cuts and landslides have made

it difficult for rescue teams

1:08:001:08:03

to get in.

1:08:031:08:04

The most severely hurt

have been airlifted out,

1:08:041:08:06

some taken to hospital

in the Iranian capital,

1:08:061:08:08

Tehran.

1:08:081:08:10

But, overwhelmed by the sheer number

of injured, the authorities

1:08:101:08:13

are appealing for people

to donate blood.

1:08:131:08:14

And this is the moment this

7.3-magnitude quake hit

1:08:141:08:17

in neighbouring Iraq.

1:08:171:08:24

A man runs for his life

from the control room of this dam.

1:08:241:08:28

Boulders were tossed

around like pebbles.

1:08:281:08:34

A picture of widespread

devastation is emerging -

1:08:341:08:37

hundreds dead, thousands

injured, many missing.

1:08:371:08:38

Turkey has sent a convoy

of aid trucks, medication,

1:08:381:08:41

tents and blankets, and many have

spent a second night outdoors,

1:08:411:08:44

terrified by the after-shocks.

1:08:441:08:45

So far, there have been

more than 190 of them.

1:08:451:09:00

A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

1:09:001:09:03

who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

1:09:031:09:06

19-year-old Gaia Pope,

who has severe epilepsy,

1:09:061:09:07

was last seen on the

seventh November.

1:09:071:09:09

Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

1:09:091:09:12

were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

1:09:121:09:15

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

1:09:151:09:26

In the last few minutes we've had an

update from our biggest supermarket,

1:09:261:09:32

Tesco.

A huge deal that we've talked

about a couple of times as the

1:09:321:09:37

Competition and Markets Authority

the regulator have looked at whether

1:09:371:09:41

Tesco would buy Booker, one of the

biggest wholesaler, whether it was a

1:09:411:09:47

good deal for customers, nearly £4

billion, and the issues people

1:09:471:09:52

raised were Booker actually have the

smaller convenience stores you might

1:09:521:09:55

see like Premier.

They are owned by

Booker.

If Tesco by these as well,

1:09:551:10:03

will they be able to put prices up?

There may not be as much

1:10:031:10:07

competition. They have looked at it

and they don't think it will be an

1:10:071:10:11

issue. In any towns where there is a

Premier and a Tesco Express, they

1:10:111:10:17

think that there will be enough

competition in the market generally

1:10:171:10:21

to keep prices competitive. That was

one issue. Also, wholesalers in the

1:10:211:10:26

wholesale market. They thought, if

Tesco is buying a wholesaler they

1:10:261:10:30

might be able to get a way better

deal with Booker than others might

1:10:301:10:36

get because other people supply

Tesco as well. And again the

1:10:361:10:40

regulator thinks it will be OK. So

they have given the merger the all

1:10:401:10:44

clear which is a huge move for the

retail industry, one of the biggest

1:10:441:10:49

supermarket buying the biggest

wholesaler. It could be set to go

1:10:491:10:53

ahead.

Thank you very much. The

largest diamond of its kind will be

1:10:531:11:02

put up for auction in Geneva today.

This was discovered in Angola last

1:11:021:11:09

year. It is set into a necklace of

6000 and rules with 800 smaller

1:11:091:11:14

diamonds.

It is expected to fetch

around $30 million, which is almost

1:11:141:11:22

£23 million - quite extraordinary.

7:11am. You're watching Breakfast.

1:11:221:11:32

Acid attacks can cause brutal,

life-long injuries and police

1:11:321:11:35

are warning they are on the rise.

1:11:351:11:37

In London alone, over the last year

there were almost 400 victims.

1:11:371:11:40

Yesterday the perpetrator of one

of the worst incidents was found

1:11:401:11:43

guilty of an attack he carried out

in a London nightclub.

1:11:431:11:46

Arthur Collins, the ex-boyfriend

of reality TV star Ferne McCann,

1:11:461:11:49

sprayed acid over people

during a night out in April.

1:11:491:11:57

In total, 22 people were injured,

with one man suffering third-degree

1:11:571:12:00

chemical burns to his face,

which required a skin graft.

1:12:001:12:02

Lauren Trent was another victim

of the attack and is in our London

1:12:021:12:06

newsroom, and Ayesha Nayyar

is a solicitor representing some

1:12:061:12:08

of the other people who were injured

and is with us in the studio.

1:12:081:12:17

Morning, both. Thank you for joining

us. Lauren, first of all, just tell

1:12:171:12:22

us, you were celebrating a birthday

- what happened, when did you know

1:12:221:12:26

something serious happened?

Yes, so,

I was celebrating my 22nd birthday

1:12:261:12:31

with my best friend and other

friends. To be honest, the moment

1:12:311:12:36

everyone fell to the floor, you

know, the acid hit me when I went

1:12:361:12:41

down to pick up my back as we were

about to leave. I remember everyone

1:12:411:12:45

was standing and suddenly the

dancefloor, it looked like a swamp

1:12:451:12:50

all, you know, like a hole opened in

the middle and people were running.

1:12:501:12:55

Steam was coming off the floor. You

knew straightaway, even the smell,

1:12:551:12:59

it wasn't something normal and your

skin blistered within seconds, you

1:12:591:13:06

know, it is the smell, the steam,

everything. I knew straightaway that

1:13:061:13:10

this wasn't something normal and you

just knew it was acid.

Lauren, I am

1:13:101:13:16

so sorry. Etihad friends as well who

were injured. What kind of effect

1:13:161:13:20

has it had on you and your friends?

Obviously there was nothing to

1:13:201:13:26

indicate that night to ask, you

know, what was going to happen, so

1:13:261:13:30

to be in this place, you know, I am

extremely anxious. If I can't see

1:13:301:13:36

what's going on, if they fight

breaks out, the first thing that

1:13:361:13:40

goes through my head is what are

they going to do, what will they

1:13:401:13:44

pull out. You know, all sorts of

things. You know, it is one of those

1:13:441:13:49

situations that you don't expect,

you know, to see coming. You know,

1:13:491:13:55

moving forward, you know, you try to

deal with, you know, the best of the

1:13:551:13:59

situation and, you know, I am less

outgoing than I used to be and I am

1:13:591:14:03

more selective about where I go and

obviously, you know, it is usually

1:14:031:14:08

places, you know, where drinks are

not being thrown around or it is not

1:14:081:14:13

busy.

And we have just seen a

picture of your injuries. We will

1:14:131:14:16

come back in a moment. Thank you.

Ayesha, you represent other victims

1:14:161:14:21

caught up in the attack. In terms of

the law in this country at the

1:14:211:14:26

moment, is it fit for purpose,

should it be changed?

At present,

1:14:261:14:31

carrying acid, and Collins was

charged with causing grievous bodily

1:14:311:14:36

harm, there is a sentence of maximum

life imprisonment. We hope justice

1:14:361:14:40

will be done. Moving forward there

are proposals to ban the sale of

1:14:401:14:44

acid under the age of 18. There is

also proposals at present carrying

1:14:441:14:50

acid on its own doesn't have -

doesn't carry a charge. To be guilty

1:14:501:14:55

of the offence, the proposals are

that anybody carrying acid without

1:14:551:15:01

lawful reason. At present, you have

to show intent to injure. The

1:15:011:15:07

changes will be carrying acid

without lawful reason. Hopefully the

1:15:071:15:12

changes proposed come about and will

introduce tougher sentences.

1:15:121:15:19

He's going to be sentenced next

month, how have the people

1:15:261:15:29

you represent reacted?

1:15:291:15:30

He denied guilt, they had to give

evidence, some people broke down,

1:15:301:15:34

others gave evidence behind a screen

so they were relieved. He put his

1:15:341:15:38

victims, not just what happened on

the night of the attack, but

1:15:381:15:42

throughout the five weeks where

evidence was given, he put them

1:15:421:15:46

through an horrific ordeal.

Lauren,

you met with others injured in the

1:15:461:15:52

attack last night, what was the

general tone of the conversation?

1:15:521:15:55

From the moment the verdict came

out, it still hasn't sunk in. At one

1:15:551:16:04

point for us we didn't think we were

going to get justice in terms of

1:16:041:16:12

that sentence, but it was a big

sense of relief. It's only up until

1:16:121:16:16

now that we can talk about things

and hear the trial and things like

1:16:161:16:21

that. It's a massive sense of

relief, doesn't change what

1:16:211:16:26

happened, but it is more of, OK,

something has been done and this is

1:16:261:16:31

setting the standard for anyone

thinking about doing something like

1:16:311:16:34

this. It is putting them off doing

something like that.

Lauren, we

1:16:341:16:39

heard from Ayesha that a number of

victims gave evidence from behind a

1:16:391:16:43

screen but you chose to look Arthur

Collins in the face. He didn't look

1:16:431:16:47

back at you, though, what was that

like and why did you make that

1:16:471:16:51

decision in the court room?

It's not

a natural environment. Your name is

1:16:511:16:55

across newspapers and things like

that, your name is read out on a

1:16:551:16:59

charge sheet. For me it is your own

preference. I wanted to look him in

1:16:591:17:04

the face. I was there for my 22nd

birthday, imagine if that was a

1:17:041:17:09

member of my family or a close

friend of his? -- his family. I'm

1:17:091:17:14

young, I didn't deserve to be

involved in something like that and

1:17:141:17:18

neither did anyone else. At some

point people have to face people in

1:17:181:17:22

the face and said, this is what

you've done.

Lauren Trent, thanks

1:17:221:17:27

very much, and Ayesha Nayyar, thanks

for coming in to talk to us.

1:17:271:17:31

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

1:17:311:17:33

The main stories this morning:

1:17:331:17:33

Carol is getting into the festive

swing of things in Covent Garden

1:17:381:17:42

this morning.

1:17:421:17:43

Good morning. Look at the Christmas

tree behind me, it is 55 feet tall

1:17:441:17:50

and it is the largest hand-picked

Christmas tree in London. There's

1:17:501:17:54

about 25 to 30,000 lights on it,

lots of bubbles. Pudsey Bear put the

1:17:541:18:01

last one on this tree. -- baubles.

He will be back here tonight because

1:18:011:18:07

this Christmas tree has been lit up

the specially for us this morning as

1:18:071:18:12

a preview of what will happen later

today. It will be switched off when

1:18:121:18:16

we come off air at 9:15am and then

this evening it will be switched

1:18:161:18:20

back on again. Lots happening this

evening. Festivities start at around

1:18:201:18:25

5:30pm and go on for some time. The

stage will be set alight by the cast

1:18:251:18:30

of 42nd Street, who will be doing

dancing and they're very famous

1:18:301:18:35

songs, and Pudsey Bear will be doing

aged with some of this own special

1:18:351:18:40

guests and lots of other activities

tonight as well. The weather should

1:18:401:18:44

be fine for that. The weather for

most is milder than yesterday but

1:18:441:18:49

it's also cloudier for a large chunk

of the country. The exception is

1:18:491:18:53

across Scotland and the north coast

of Northern Ireland, although you've

1:18:531:18:57

got cloud this morning, it will

brighten up nicely. Across the

1:18:571:19:00

north-west of Scotland this morning,

a few showers, many more before the

1:19:001:19:04

end of the day in the north and the

wind will strengthen but a lot of

1:19:041:19:08

dry weather first thing. In northern

England, in fact all of England, a

1:19:081:19:12

cloudier start, two weather fronts

going sour, both producing patchy

1:19:121:19:16

light rain as they do but

increasingly during the day that

1:19:161:19:20

will become confined to the west --

going south. In the south-west a

1:19:201:19:24

cloudy start, as in Wales, one

weather front draped across central

1:19:241:19:29

and southern parts of Wales so that

is producing rain this morning. As

1:19:291:19:33

we go across the Irish Sea into

Northern Ireland, quite a bit of

1:19:331:19:37

cloud around but the north coast

will see the best of the brightness

1:19:371:19:40

today. For Northern Ireland, the

north coast, and Scotland, expect

1:19:401:19:44

sunshine. A lot of showers in the

north, some will be heavy and windy

1:19:441:19:49

in the north of Scotland,

temperatures in double figures. For

1:19:491:19:52

England and Wales, you're going to

hang on a lot of cloud today, patchy

1:19:521:19:57

rain mostly confined to Westwood

coasts and hills in the west today

1:19:571:20:01

-- inland. Limited brightness but

for many we're looking at

1:20:011:20:05

temperatures in double figures,

yesterday we only got to single

1:20:051:20:08

figures as the maximum temperatures.

As we head on into the evening and

1:20:081:20:12

overnight, many showers in the north

of Scotland will fade. Where we've

1:20:121:20:16

had the clear skies it will be cold,

frost across Scotland and patchy fog

1:20:161:20:20

forming, some will be freezing fog.

For Northern Ireland, England and

1:20:201:20:24

Wales, a lot of cloud, patchy fog

and also dense fog patches forming

1:20:241:20:30

across East Anglia, Lincolnshire and

the Midlands in the tick hello. This

1:20:301:20:33

will be slow to clear tomorrow -- in

particular. Keep an eye on that.

1:20:331:20:40

Keep aware of it if you're

travelling. For England, Wales and

1:20:401:20:45

Northern Ireland tomorrow, cloudy,

spots of rain here and there, not

1:20:451:20:49

everywhere, and fairly light. In

Scotland, another bright day with

1:20:491:20:52

sunshine. Still windy, still with

showers in the north and later that

1:20:521:20:57

will be replaced by rain. On

Thursday, the rain that's been

1:20:571:21:00

coming into the north-west of

Scotland by the end of Wednesday

1:21:001:21:04

will be careering steadily south,

into northern England, Northern

1:21:041:21:08

Ireland, Wales. A lot of cloud

around on Thursday with some

1:21:081:21:14

brighter breaks, temperatures

roughly where they should be at this

1:21:141:21:17

stage in November. All in all the

weather is fairly quiet, not much

1:21:171:21:20

going on I'm glad to say! Really

looking lovely at the moment there,

1:21:201:21:25

I shall go and have a look before

Christmas.

Do you think the tree is

1:21:251:21:30

leaning a bit to the left?

It is

ever so slightly.

No. It is

1:21:301:21:36

absolutely straight!

Is it, it must

be our camera angle? Hankie very

1:21:361:21:43

much.

Carol can go and give it a

pushover -- thank you very much.

1:21:431:21:50

Drivers who are told their eyesight

isn't good enough for them to be

1:21:501:21:54

behind the wheel are

carrying on driving.

1:21:541:21:55

That's according to research

by the Association of Optometrists.

1:21:551:21:58

They want compulsory eye

tests to be introduced,

1:21:581:22:00

a campaign backed by the family

of Natalie Wade, who was killed

1:22:001:22:03

by a partially sighted driver.

1:22:031:22:05

Our reporter Ali Fortescue has more.

1:22:051:22:08

If she walked into a room,

as the saying goes, she lit it up.

1:22:081:22:12

She enjoyed every moment

and was so looking forward

1:22:121:22:14

to getting married.

1:22:141:22:15

28-year-old Natalie Wade died

on her way to buy a wedding dress.

1:22:151:22:19

She was hit by a 78-year-old

driver with poor eyesight.

1:22:191:22:21

There's always an empty

chair at Christmas,

1:22:211:22:23

birthdays, the day she

would have been married,

1:22:231:22:25

they are still very painful.

1:22:251:22:32

The driver who killed Natalie

was blind in one eye and partially

1:22:321:22:35

sighted in the other,

but he died before being tried

1:22:351:22:38

for dangerous driving.

1:22:381:22:39

But Natalie is just one of 70 people

who are killed or seriously injured

1:22:391:22:42

in similar incidents involving

bad eyesight last year.

1:22:421:22:46

The legal standard for eyesight

involves being able to read a number

1:22:461:22:49

plate from 20 metres,

but that's something that's only

1:22:491:22:52

tested when you first

take your test.

1:22:521:22:54

At the moment, everyone needs

to fill out a form like this every

1:22:541:22:57

ten years to renew their driving

license, and that involves answering

1:22:571:23:00

a question about their eyesight.

1:23:001:23:01

And if you're over the age 70

you have to fill out a slightly more

1:23:011:23:06

comprehensive form every three

years, but it's still a question

1:23:061:23:08

of putting a tick in a box,

there is no requirement to take

1:23:081:23:12

an actual eye test.

1:23:121:23:13

The mechanism of self reporting

isn't always reliable.

1:23:131:23:15

We know that vision can change

gradually over time so drivers

1:23:151:23:18

might not be aware of their

deterioration to their vision.

1:23:181:23:24

The Association of Optometrists

don't have a legal requirement to do

1:23:241:23:27

anything if they're concerned

about a patient's driving,

1:23:271:23:29

it's down to the driver.

1:23:291:23:31

More than one in three

of their optometrists surveyed has

1:23:311:23:34

seen a driver in the last three

months he continues to drive

1:23:341:23:37

despite being told their vision

is below the legal standard.

1:23:371:23:40

Nine in ten believe the current

tests are insufficient

1:23:401:23:42

and they want to see

a change in the law.

1:23:421:23:48

What we're calling for is vision

screening to be carried out

1:23:481:23:51

for all drivers when they first

apply for the driving licence,

1:23:511:23:54

and then the requirement to prove

that they continue to meet that

1:23:541:23:57

standard every ten years.

1:23:571:24:02

But the concern is it's not just

eyesight that needs testing.

1:24:021:24:05

This is an enormous worry.

1:24:051:24:07

Thank gosh we've got something

we can point at and you can measure

1:24:071:24:10

it and say I health is a big thing

but there's all sorts of other

1:24:101:24:15

medical issues, bundles of them,

which are simply not being taken

1:24:151:24:17

into account as to whether people

are fit to drive, and I think

1:24:171:24:21

there should be.

1:24:211:24:22

The Department of Transport say that

all drivers are required by law

1:24:221:24:25

to make sure their eyesight

is good enough to drive.

1:24:251:24:28

They also say if a driver

experiences any changes

1:24:281:24:30

to their eyesight or has a condition

that could affect their driving

1:24:301:24:33

they must notify the DVLA

and speak to an optician.

1:24:331:24:36

Ali Fortescue, BBC News.

1:24:361:24:41

And Ali joins us on the sofa now.

1:24:411:24:43

The Department for Transport say

anyone with concerns should report

1:24:431:24:47

to the DVLA.

1:24:471:24:50

Do they give details of what counts

1:24:501:24:52

as concerning and

should be reported?

1:24:521:24:55

What

1:24:551:24:55

What more do we know about that?

The

information is there if you look for

1:24:551:25:00

it. In the appendix of the form you

fill out when you renew your

1:25:001:25:03

license, it says if your eyesight is

worse than 6/12, you can't read a

1:25:031:25:07

number plate from 20 metres, you

should tell them and you should tell

1:25:071:25:11

them if you've got other concerns,

if you are partially sighted or

1:25:111:25:15

can't see out of one eye. As far as

other medical conditions go, it

1:25:151:25:21

lists several, some form of

diabetes, epilepsy, severe learning

1:25:211:25:25

difficulties. Having those

conditions weren't necessarily mean

1:25:251:25:28

you can't drive but it will mean you

need to let the DVLA no.

What about

1:25:281:25:34

healthcare professionals, do they

have a duty of care to tell the DVLA

1:25:341:25:38

if they have concerns?

It's really

interesting, it's a careful balance

1:25:381:25:42

between what's in the wider public

interest and their duty of patient

1:25:421:25:47

confidentiality. In extreme

circumstances they can let the DVLA

1:25:471:25:51

know if they think someone is of

serious risk to themselves or the

1:25:511:25:55

public and breach patient doctor

confidentiality but they don't have

1:25:551:26:00

to do that, it's a situation the

Association of optometrists don't

1:26:001:26:04

feel cut double with, so the onus is

on the driver to make sure they are

1:26:041:26:08

fit to drive -- comfortable with.

I'm feeling like I have learned

1:26:081:26:12

something, I didn't know you had to

renew your license every ten years.

1:26:121:26:17

Neither did I until a couple of days

ago!

1:26:171:26:21

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

1:26:211:29:43

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

1:29:471:29:57

It is just coming up to 7:30am.

1:29:571:30:00

Here's a summary of this morning's

main stories from BBC News.

1:30:001:30:04

MPs begin debating a key piece of

Brexit legislation for the EU

1:30:041:30:08

Withdrawal Bill.

1:30:081:30:11

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

1:30:111:30:14

Tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

1:30:141:30:17

Yesterday the Brexit Secretary David

Davis promised parliament would get

1:30:171:30:20

a vote on the final deal.

1:30:201:30:27

Earlier we saw Theresa May

at the Lord Mayor's

1:30:271:30:29

banquet in London.

1:30:291:30:30

She used the occasion

to make her strongest attack yet

1:30:301:30:33

on Russia, in which she accused

the Putin government of threatening

1:30:331:30:36

the international order.

1:30:361:30:37

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

1:30:371:30:39

media organisations to plant fake

stories and photoshopped images

1:30:391:30:42

in an attempt to sow

discord in the west

1:30:421:30:44

and undermine our institutions.

1:30:441:30:45

So I have a very simple

message for Russia, we know

1:30:451:30:48

what you are doing and

you will not succeed.

1:30:481:31:05

The television producer and writer,

Daisy Goodwin, who created the ITV

1:31:051:31:08

drama, Victoria, has claimed

she was groped by a government

1:31:081:31:10

official during a visit

to Number Ten.

1:31:101:31:12

She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

1:31:121:31:16

after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

1:31:161:31:19

Cameron was Prime Minister.

1:31:191:31:20

She said she wasn't traumatised,

but was cross, adding she didn't

1:31:201:31:23

report it at the time.

1:31:231:31:32

Thousands of people are spending

a second night without shelter

1:31:321:31:35

in near-freezing conditions

after an earthquake caused

1:31:351:31:36

devastation in parts

of Iran and Iraq.

1:31:361:31:38

More than 450 people were killed

and around 7,000 injured.

1:31:381:31:40

Officials say the rescue operation

after the earthquake on Sunday has

1:31:471:31:52

been largely completed.

1:31:521:31:52

A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

1:31:521:31:56

who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

1:31:561:31:58

19-year-old Gaia Pope,

who has severe epilepsy,

1:31:581:32:00

was last seen on the

seventh November.

1:32:001:32:02

Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

1:32:021:32:05

were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

1:32:051:32:08

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

1:32:081:32:13

A 25-year-old man has been convicted

of throwing acid across a crowded

1:32:131:32:16

London nightclub,

injuring 22 people.

1:32:161:32:17

CCTV shown in court showed clubbers

clutching their faces and running

1:32:171:32:20

off the dancefloor

when Arthur Collins,

1:32:201:32:22

the ex-boyfriend of reality

TV star Ferne McCann,

1:32:221:32:24

carried out the attack in April.

1:32:241:32:26

He was convicted of five counts

of grievous bodily harm and nine

1:32:261:32:29

of actual bodily harm

against 14 people.

1:32:291:32:31

He will be sentenced in December.

1:32:311:32:38

Earlier one of the victims of the

attack told us how she felt after

1:32:381:32:42

the verdict.

A massive sense of

relief, you know. But it doesn't

1:32:421:32:47

change what happened whatsoever. I

think it is more, OK, something has

1:32:471:32:51

been done, this is setting the

standard for anyone thinking about

1:32:511:32:54

doing something like this, you know.

It is putting them off doing

1:32:541:32:58

something like that.

Britain's

biggest supermarket Tesco has the

1:32:581:33:03

green light to buy the biggest food

wholesaler Booker. The Competition

1:33:031:33:08

and Markets Authority says it does

not raise pricing concerns. Booker

1:33:081:33:12

has a retail brand and also makes

money in the catering industry.

1:33:121:33:19

Tesco said it would bring benefits

for smaller retailers and consumers

1:33:191:33:23

and staff.

1:33:231:33:28

Let's have a look at a little bit

blink. It is an a little bit, is it?

1:33:281:33:34

The largest diamond will go under

the hammer in Geneva. It is 163

1:33:341:33:40

carats, if you wanted to know. It

was discovered in Angola and is set

1:33:401:33:44

into a necklace of 6000 emeralds and

over 800 slightly smaller diamonds.

1:33:441:33:50

It took ten months to cut and is

expected to fetch $30 million, or

1:33:501:33:54

£23 million.

That is proper blink,

wasn't it? I was at an awards

1:33:541:34:01

ceremony and I had to look after the

under 17 World Cup trophy for a --

1:34:011:34:08

around one hour. I was so nervous. I

couldn't look after that. It is too

1:34:081:34:15

expensive.

Did it go OK?

And I was

desperate for the toilet as well!

1:34:151:34:21

Too much information!

I was giving

it to Phil Foden. I had to give him

1:34:211:34:30

that as well. I said, look after

that.

Well, that is all OK.

That

1:34:301:34:35

diamond is so big that it just looks

fake.

You can't say it is fake.

It

1:34:351:34:40

looks fake.

It is so big. You got me

in trouble with Seal yesterday when

1:34:401:34:45

he came on yesterday and asked, who

had said that in actual seal is

1:34:451:34:49

coming on?

It wasn't a joke, it

happened in the office.

You have to

1:34:491:34:54

be careful with these things.

I

know, I am really sorry. You would

1:34:541:34:59

be glad to know I am going home

tomorrow.

Talking about the under 17

1:34:591:35:04

World Cup.

No Italians. Can you

imagine a World Cup with no Italy?

1:35:041:35:09

First time in 60 years. Look at the

pain on Buffon's face. He said sorry

1:35:091:35:16

to all of Italian football and the

blame has to be shared. Now, talk

1:35:161:35:20

for rebuilding the team.

1:35:201:35:26

Italy have failed to qualify

for the World Cup for the first

1:35:261:35:29

time since 1958.

1:35:291:35:30

They lost their play-off

against Sweden, running out

1:35:301:35:32

of ideas against

determined opposition.

1:35:321:35:33

Even veteran keeper Gianluigi Buffon

was sent into the attack in injury

1:35:331:35:36

time, but it finished

goal-less in Milan.

1:35:361:35:38

One Italian newspaper described

the result as 'the apocalypse'.

1:35:381:35:41

Another suggested candidates

to replace the manager,

1:35:411:35:44

who has not actually

officially resigned yet.

1:35:441:35:58

Sweden are in for the first time

since 2006.

1:35:581:36:06

SINGING.

1:36:091:36:16

2-0 Italy.

And still Baggio. He is

taking them all on. That is a

1:36:251:36:38

fantastic goal! That is the goal

they've all been waiting for.

Not so

1:36:381:36:43

much part of -- Cannavaro, more so

can you believe it? Italy are world

1:36:431:36:54

champions for the fourth time. The

most successful European nation ever

1:36:541:36:57

and now just one behind Brazil.

Germany, 2006.

1:36:571:37:01

The Republic of Ireland could join

England at next summer's World Cup

1:37:011:37:04

if they can beat Denmark

in Dublin this evening.

1:37:041:37:07

The first leg in Copenhagen ended

0-0 and Ireland manager

1:37:071:37:10

Martin O'Neill knows his side

will have to do a lot more

1:37:101:37:13

going forward to beat the Danes.

1:37:131:37:14

I think that we will try to be a bit

more expensive if we can,

1:37:141:37:19

try and deal with the

ball a wee bit better

1:37:191:37:21

and if that's the case, well,

we want to try to win the game,

1:37:211:37:25

we have to find a way

to win a match.

1:37:251:37:28

And these players have

been unable to do

1:37:281:37:30

that in the last couple of years.

1:37:301:37:33

After the success of English youth

team, Gareth Southgate when hesitate

1:37:331:37:37

to use the young stars in the

friendly against Brazil at Wembley

1:37:371:37:40

tonight with three players drafted

in from the under 21s after five

1:37:401:37:44

players and their first against

Germany.

1:37:441:37:47

It is incredible really that he has

had so few in the Premier League

1:37:471:37:51

that we are putting him

in that environment,

1:37:511:37:53

but we believe in him,

he did really well, but now,

1:37:531:37:56

you know, sometimes

the first game is

1:37:561:37:58

easier because nobody

is aware of you.

1:37:581:38:16

Moeen Ali will play for his first

game of the tour after getting

1:38:161:38:19

to know

some of the wildlife in Townsville.

1:38:191:38:22

He will play the Cricket Australia

11, which begins tomorrow.

1:38:221:38:27

They look close to finalising

the team with Gary Ballance

1:38:271:38:30

left out again.

1:38:301:38:36

Now, when was the last time

you were told off by your mum.

1:38:361:38:40

For England head coach

Eddie Jones it was on Saturday.

1:38:401:38:43

He's apologised for swearing on TV,

after receiving a telling off

1:38:431:38:46

from his 93-year-old mother.

1:38:461:38:47

Jones admitted to being frustrated

by his side's lacklustre performance

1:38:471:38:50

at Twickenham, and was caught

on camera losing his cool

1:38:501:38:52

during Saturday's 21-8

win over Argentina.

1:38:521:38:54

Usually I am pretty good, you know.

1:38:541:38:56

And I have apologised

for the language I use.

1:38:561:38:58

I got a phone call from my

mother this morning,

1:38:581:39:01

93, wrapping me over the knuckles.

1:39:011:39:02

She still tells me not to swear.

1:39:021:39:04

So I am in trouble with my mother.

1:39:041:39:07

So that is a big enough

punishment for me.

1:39:071:39:09

I am in the dog house

and I certainly

1:39:091:39:11

won't do it again.

1:39:111:39:20

And I believe him, I think.

Punishment enough to be told off by

1:39:201:39:25

his mum.

You said earlier that you

were told off by your mom.

All of

1:39:251:39:29

the time.

Do you speak any other

languages?

English is my second

1:39:291:39:32

language. I was the kid at school

who couldn't speak English at the

1:39:321:39:37

age of three, so I learnt to read

instead. I think and stream in

1:39:371:39:42

everything in English.

I speak

Spanish... I have a degree in

1:39:421:39:48

Spanish and I can speak and little

bit of French and understand Italian

1:39:481:39:52

as well. I think once you have one

language, to languages, it is easier

1:39:521:39:57

to understand others?

I did Latin in

GCSE because I wanted to be a

1:39:571:40:02

doctor, not useful any more.

It is

made to be good for grammar.

1:40:021:40:07

Understanding other languages.

We

are talking about languages.

1:40:071:40:11

When it comes to languages, are you

a polyglot, conversing in a number

1:40:111:40:15

of foreign tongues, or a Basil

faulty?

We have meet here in the

1:40:151:40:22

building, remember that? The British

council says we will lose out

1:40:221:40:29

economically if we don't update

these skills.

And upgrade them as

1:40:291:40:32

well. With the uptake of languages

for A-levels falling, are we missing

1:40:321:40:36

out?

1:40:361:40:39

French, I'm afraid, I didn't really

try very hard in when I was a little

1:40:471:40:51

boy because we didn't travel, we

didn't meet French people, so it was

1:40:511:40:54

a strange thing that happened over

on the continent.

1:40:541:40:58

I wish I had paid attention now, and

learnt it better, basically. I

1:41:041:41:09

didn't pay attention at school. It

didn't seem necessary.

It seems very

1:41:091:41:14

rude almost when you go on holiday

and you are ordering just simple

1:41:141:41:19

food and drinks and you even say

simple words to the waiter or talk

1:41:191:41:23

to people around you.

1:41:231:41:25

The fact that we can only speak one

and most other people can speak two

1:41:301:41:36

puts us at a disadvantage in

business.

And language is a gateway

1:41:361:41:40

to learn value systems and with that

everyone can learn better on both

1:41:401:41:44

sides.

Thank you for taking part in

that. We are joined by the head

1:41:441:41:49

teacher Ian Fenn and Lily Beng,

Mandarin teacher. What of the

1:41:491:41:55

importance of a second language,

more important than ever?

It is more

1:41:551:41:59

important than ever and I was once a

languages teacher. Having the

1:41:591:42:03

facility of another language opens

your horizons, it makes you much

1:42:031:42:08

more aware of what's going on in the

world, it makes you a more

1:42:081:42:12

interesting person. There are a lot

of benefits to a second language.

1:42:121:42:15

You teach Mandarin. What is the

uptake, and is there a fear of

1:42:151:42:19

languages in this country?

At the

moment I am teaching year to two

1:42:191:42:25

years six and they have a real fear.

-- year two to year six. I start

1:42:251:42:35

with an informal way of speaking and

different songs and different

1:42:351:42:38

culture. So they are really

fascinated by it. And then they

1:42:381:42:41

progress until Year 6.

If you think

beyond that, around job prospects

1:42:411:42:47

going forward in a global market,

Mandarin is one of those languages

1:42:471:42:51

which is essential. I remember

speaking to someone who was an

1:42:511:42:54

expert in the future generations and

make them as good at computers as

1:42:541:43:02

possible and they are armed for the

next generation.

Yes. Lots of people

1:43:021:43:06

across the world in every country

now have Mandarin.

Is the pressure

1:43:061:43:15

on schools so much now that they

just are having to concentrate on

1:43:151:43:20

English, maths, science, rather than

languages. What is going on?

It

1:43:201:43:23

depends on the needs of the school

and we have to have literate, new

1:43:231:43:28

rich or in. So in my school we have

a huge amount of effort put into

1:43:281:43:32

that because it is the passport to

jobs. And the vast majority of

1:43:321:43:37

people coming out of schools won't

be using a second language in their

1:43:371:43:40

work. But they will need to be

numerate and they will have to be

1:43:401:43:44

literate. So you can see in terms of

priorities, that is where resources

1:43:441:43:48

are going to go rather than language

teaching which is... I was once a

1:43:481:43:53

languages teacher myself. However it

is the basics that we have to focus

1:43:531:43:57

on with many children.

What is the

key thing, if you are a parent, lots

1:43:571:44:03

of parents watching the programme,

what is important for parents as

1:44:031:44:06

they are learning languages at

school?

Talking about different

1:44:061:44:12

groups, one, probably, who put focus

on numerous sea and literacy, they

1:44:121:44:17

are probably struggling, but others

have ability to work additional

1:44:171:44:23

languages or arts -- numeracy. So we

should give them the option to do

1:44:231:44:29

so.

Leigh we should provide them

with the opportunities.

We need to

1:44:291:44:37

focus on literacy and numerous sea

and we lose the opportunity for

1:44:371:44:40

others.

And what happens with the

impact if you don't focus on

1:44:401:44:44

languages?

I think we are losing out

already because other countries who

1:44:441:44:50

speak English learning different

languages, like US and Australia.

1:44:501:44:53

They already have to learn

languages. And then people who are

1:44:531:44:58

learning English now have their own

language and in the world English

1:44:581:45:04

people, they are more lingual, so

they are the only people left with

1:45:041:45:09

one language.

We had a situation, it

is embarrassing when you go abroad

1:45:091:45:18

as a Brit, and many of us struggle

to conversing any language other

1:45:181:45:22

than English.

We suffer from the

fact that English is the

1:45:221:45:26

international language, and because

of that many cannot see the need to

1:45:261:45:30

learn another language.

What about,

looking at, for example, Brexit,

1:45:301:45:34

will it be more important, do you

think, to learn the language is?

I

1:45:341:45:38

really don't know and I can't

foresee what the Brexit affect will

1:45:381:45:41

be.

1:45:411:45:45

Once people realise they have to

learn Alaba language, that's how

1:45:451:45:49

they're going to get on, they will

be much more amenable to it --

1:45:491:45:54

another language. We've been trying

for many years to force people into

1:45:541:45:58

learning a second language, it

became a requirement but it just

1:45:581:46:02

didn't work. You need a perceived

need and then you'll learn it.

I

1:46:021:46:06

have a Spanish degree, it is so much

fun being able to convert in a

1:46:061:46:11

different language. Did we lose that

somewhere along the way as well?

--

1:46:111:46:16

conversed. Absolutely. When we came

in you were trying to speak

1:46:161:46:21

Mandarin, or trying to, and that

enriches the conversation, makes us

1:46:211:46:26

feel more close.

When you say

speaking Mandarin, you said hello

1:46:261:46:29

and I said thank you. That's about

it! Thank you very much indeed and

1:46:291:46:35

good to talk to you. Let us know

your thoughts on that.

1:46:351:46:38

I did learn to say hungry like AWOL

in Polish a few years ago. In a

1:46:381:46:43

restaurant in Poland you get an

extra bit of meat and potatoes if

1:46:431:46:49

you say that -- like a wolf. Very

important!

1:46:491:46:53

Carol's getting into the festive

spirit in Covent Garden

1:46:531:46:56

with the weather.

1:46:561:46:57

I think you've got some explanations

about the tree?

1:46:571:47:00

Yes, you thought the tree was wonky,

it isn't at all, it might look wonky

1:47:011:47:07

but Nigel, our cameraman, is going

to show you it's actually straight.

1:47:071:47:11

This is what is called spherical

aberration. We are using a

1:47:111:47:16

wide-angle lens which makes

everything around the edges looked

1:47:161:47:19

like it is curving inwards, but as

you can see, it is straight as a

1:47:191:47:24

pole and that would be good news for

the hundreds of people that took 126

1:47:241:47:28

hours to put it up. It has been lit

especially for us this morning, it

1:47:281:47:33

will be switched off after the

programme, and it will be switched

1:47:331:47:36

on again this evening by Pudsey

Bear. The festivities at Covent

1:47:361:47:40

Garden start around 5:30 p.m., the

cast of 42nd Street will be here

1:47:401:47:46

singing and dancing some of their

best-known numbers and Pudsey Bear

1:47:461:47:49

might be doing a jig himself with

some special guests. Covent Garden

1:47:491:47:53

aren't telling us yet who this

special guests are but Pudsey Bear

1:47:531:47:57

was the person that put the last

bauble on the tree and he will be

1:47:571:48:01

the one lighting it up again in all

its glory efficiently. The weather

1:48:011:48:08

today, fairly cloudy for most of the

UK with one or two exceptions and it

1:48:081:48:12

is certainly milder than yesterday.

For some, a good 14 degrees milder

1:48:121:48:16

and this time yesterday. Let's start

in Scotland, we do have is showers

1:48:161:48:21

in the north-west, this is at 9am,

and a lot of dry weather. Some

1:48:211:48:25

brightness around as well. As we

move across England, this is the

1:48:251:48:30

forecast for all of England, we have

two weather fronts sinking south,

1:48:301:48:34

they are both fairly weak but

they're producing some rain and some

1:48:341:48:40

grey and murky conditions. Today

there will be a lot of cloud across

1:48:401:48:44

all of England and still some spots

of rain. In Wales, you have a

1:48:441:48:48

weather front crossing southwards so

you also have some rain. Quite a

1:48:481:48:51

murky start. As we move across the

Irish Sea into Northern Ireland,

1:48:511:48:54

here too there is quite a bit of

cloud first thing but the north of

1:48:541:48:59

Northern Ireland will brighten up

and we'll see some sunshine. As we

1:48:591:49:02

go through the course of the day,

Scotland will also see a fair bit of

1:49:021:49:06

sunshine, a beautiful day for you,

as it will be in the north of

1:49:061:49:10

Northern Ireland, but showers

turning heavier through the day in

1:49:101:49:13

the north of Scotland and here it

will be windy. Fall of England and

1:49:131:49:17

Wales it will be fairly cloudy, some

brightness as we head into the

1:49:171:49:24

afternoon but it will be limited and

by then most of the rain will be in

1:49:241:49:28

the west in Coast and hills.

Temperature wise, higher than

1:49:281:49:31

yesterday, everyone will see double

figures today. Through the evening

1:49:311:49:34

and overnight, where we've had the

sunshine is where we will have the

1:49:341:49:37

clear skies so we're looking at

frost especially in Scotland and

1:49:371:49:40

patches of fog, some will be

freezing. In England, Wales and most

1:49:401:49:45

of Northern Ireland, it will stay

cloudy, spots of light rain and

1:49:451:49:48

drizzle but fog forming, patchy fog.

The densest and probably in parts of

1:49:481:49:54

the Midlands, Lincolnshire and East

Anglia. That could be problematic

1:49:541:49:58

first thing. If you're travelling

early, keep in touch with the

1:49:581:50:02

forecast. I say early but it will

take some time tomorrow before it

1:50:021:50:07

eventually clears. Tomorrow again it

will be cloudy for many, some

1:50:071:50:11

brightness, especially in the north,

some showers here as well and later

1:50:111:50:15

in the day the wind will strengthen

and we will see rain coming in

1:50:151:50:19

across north-west Scotland. During

Thursday, that will sink southwards,

1:50:191:50:23

taking the rain with it, it's a

narrow band and once again a fair

1:50:231:50:27

bit of cloud around, some brightness

and ten is still in double figures,

1:50:271:50:31

where they should be at this stage

in November.

Thanks very much,

1:50:311:50:36

Carol, and thank you for explaining

to Dan about the tree.

Well, wow!

1:50:361:50:44

Lots of our viewers were wondering

about your spiritual aberration,

1:50:441:50:48

thanks for clearing that up for us!

You're very welcome!

1:50:481:50:51

If you are just joining us, the tree

isn't wonky, it is because of a

1:50:521:50:58

wide-angle lens, if you go in the

middle it looks straight, but as you

1:50:581:51:01

move away because of the spherical

aberration it looks wonky but it's

1:51:011:51:05

not!

I'm glad you took notice of

that!

She actually sent a text

1:51:051:51:11

saying I will explain later, we have

been told off by Carol so thanks for

1:51:111:51:16

plugging us straight on that one.

1:51:161:51:19

-- putting.

1:51:191:51:20

Later this morning we'll find out

just how much the prices we pay

1:51:201:51:24

for some of lifes basics

have been changing.

1:51:241:51:26

It's a big theme in the economy

at the moment, and has a knock

1:51:261:51:30

on effect on our wages,

jobs and future.

1:51:301:51:32

Sean is taking an in-depth look.

1:51:321:51:34

It could affect the budget for the

Chancellor as well next week.

1:51:341:51:37

Morning, all.

1:51:371:51:37

Now, as you'll know, from weekly

trips to the supermarket,

1:51:371:51:40

or filling up your car,

the price we pay for lifes

1:51:401:51:43

essentials can fluctuate.

1:51:431:51:44

Back in September,

the average price of a range

1:51:441:51:46

of goods we all buy regularly,

something called the Consumer Price

1:51:461:51:49

Index, was up 3% on last year,

and that is the steepest increase

1:51:491:51:53

in prices since 2012.

1:51:531:51:54

So why is it happening?

1:51:541:51:58

Since the vote to leave the EU

the value of the pound has dropped,

1:51:581:52:02

meaning buying Danish bacon,

Italian wine is more expensive.

1:52:021:52:04

Fuel costs were also up.

1:52:041:52:05

On the whole, shops and restaurants

had been trying to protect us

1:52:051:52:17

consumers from rises,

but lots of big names,

1:52:171:52:19

like M&S and Sainsbury's,

have said that is

1:52:191:52:21

becoming increasingly difficult.

1:52:211:52:24

It pushes up the cost of imports,

lots of our business imports of

1:52:241:52:30

stuff and they choose to pass that

on in prices and. It didn't happen

1:52:301:52:33

immediately and we wouldn't have

expected it to. It's about now we

1:52:331:52:37

would have expected it to feed

through and it is and we're seeing

1:52:371:52:41

it especially in things like food

and clothing, they happen to be

1:52:411:52:44

things low income households spend

more of their money on.

1:52:441:52:49

You may not

1:52:491:52:50

notice your weekly shop getting more

expensive IF you had more

1:52:501:52:53

money coming in.

1:52:531:52:54

But average take home pay

for British workers has increased

1:52:541:52:57

at just over 2% over the last year.

1:52:571:52:59

Now, one reason

1:52:591:53:00

for that is because Public Sector

pay rises have been capped at 1%,

1:53:001:53:03

something which may well change

in next week's budget,

1:53:031:53:06

while many benefits

payments have been frozen.

1:53:061:53:07

On the flipside,

1:53:071:53:10

pensioners, because of

the Triple Lock have seen the state

1:53:101:53:13

pension increase at

the same rate as prices.

1:53:131:53:15

But there's still a real

sense of a squeeze.

1:53:151:53:25

As prices rise faster, the impact of

the public sector pay cap on workers

1:53:251:53:29

in that sector gets all the harsher.

But perhaps even more importantly

1:53:291:53:34

for lower income households who are

particularly feeling the effects at

1:53:341:53:37

the moment is the freeze on nearly

all working age benefits. That gets

1:53:371:53:42

harsher the faster inflation rises

and the Chancellor could definitely

1:53:421:53:46

do something about that when he

stands up for the budget in nine

1:53:461:53:49

days' time.

1:53:491:53:50

So the Chancellor Philip Hammond

will again be paying close attention

1:53:501:53:53

to the latest inflation

figure later this morning

1:53:531:53:55

ahead of next week's Budget.

1:53:551:53:56

That national debt

still looms very large

1:53:561:53:58

and the loans the government take

on to pay for things

1:53:581:54:01

from our schools to our hospitals

are often linked to inflation.

1:54:011:54:04

So as prices rise,

1:54:041:54:05

so can how much we owe,

with one regulator warning it

1:54:051:54:09

could add another £26

billion to our repayments.

1:54:091:54:11

Just over a fifth of

what we spend on the NHS.

1:54:111:54:15

So keep an eye out

1:54:151:54:20

at 9:30am this morning

for the latest figures,

1:54:201:54:22

and see if prices are rising faster

or slower than they were last time

1:54:221:54:26

round, when it came in at 3%.

1:54:261:54:28

We'll see how quickly they might be

rising this time around.

Thank you

1:54:281:54:31

very much.

1:54:311:54:32

The first group of students

from the UK's only degree course

1:54:321:54:35

for deaf performers is taking

to the stage with a new production

1:54:351:54:38

that blends British Sign

Language and English.

1:54:381:54:40

It's hoped the adaptation

of Caryl Churchill's play Love

1:54:401:54:42

and Information will challenge

perceptions and make sign

1:54:421:54:45

language more visible.

1:54:451:54:46

Our Scotland correspondent

Lorna Gordon went to meet them.

1:54:461:54:56

It is a play with big

themes that affect us all.

1:54:561:54:58

Love and how we make sense of things

in an increasingly frenetic world.

1:54:581:55:02

The 50 short scenes,

each with a different set

1:55:021:55:04

of characters, are all performed

by ten actors who happened

1:55:041:55:07

to be deaf.

1:55:071:55:14

I think the play's very,

very powerful because it is able

1:55:141:55:17

to show different perspectives

in that deaf people are similar

1:55:171:55:20

to hearing people in that

environment and that we're

1:55:201:55:22

all similar, we're all the same

and I think that play

1:55:221:55:25

really demonstrates that.

1:55:251:55:30

Mr Rushmore, if you could

just open the door...

1:55:301:55:32

Their performance in a mixture

of English, captioning and British

1:55:321:55:35

sign language a chance to showcase

the actors' talents.

1:55:351:55:37

And British sign language itself.

1:55:371:55:38

It's a wonderful opportunity

and we've really enjoyed it.

1:55:381:55:47

Absolutely because sign

language can be so big,

1:55:471:55:49

so rich, so expressive

and in a theatre setting means

1:55:491:55:51

we can show also solve

levels of emotion.

1:55:511:55:54

The actors, all students

at Glasgow's Royal Conservatoire,

1:55:541:55:56

are on the country's only degree

course for deaf performers.

1:55:561:55:58

Embracing deafness as part

of their identity and hoping

1:55:581:56:01

their performance will help

others do the same.

1:56:011:56:09

It's a great way for me to carry

on and show people that it's OK

1:56:091:56:13

to be who you are, because I kind

of old before I was being shuffled

1:56:131:56:18

off into the background

like I was a liability or I was just

1:56:181:56:21

a burden to someone else,

I thought I'll say nothing and back

1:56:211:56:24

off, now I'm thinking,

you know what, I'm going to step

1:56:241:56:27

forward and let them

see me for who I am.

1:56:271:56:38

The Scottish government recently

announced plans to integrate the use

1:56:381:56:40

of sign language into everyday life

and the play's director believes

1:56:401:56:43

this performance will help

with challenging perceptions

1:56:431:56:45

in the theatre and the arts.

1:56:451:56:47

I think it's about British sign

language being more visible,

1:56:471:56:50

being more out in the open

and recognised as a language.

1:56:501:56:53

So I think this production

and the degree programme

1:56:531:56:55

here at the Conservatoire

are is part of that movement.

1:56:551:57:02

Another step in showing that British

sign language should be celebrated

1:57:021:57:05

as a language in its own right.

1:57:051:57:07

Lorna Gordon, BBC News, Glasgow.

1:57:071:57:17

I know some of you do watch us using

sign, interpreted version of our

1:57:171:57:22

programme. You can find that on the

news channel from 6:45am.

1:57:221:57:26

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

1:57:261:57:29

Hello this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

2:00:542:00:57

A major milestone on the road

to Brexit as MPs begin debating

2:00:572:01:00

the EU withdrawal bill.

2:01:002:01:05

It will convert European

laws into British ones

2:01:052:01:08

but it's unlikely to pass

smoothly with more than 160

2:01:082:01:11

amendments already tabled.

2:01:112:01:14

Good morning.

2:01:242:01:26

It's Tuesday, 14th November.

2:01:262:01:33

Also for you on the programme this

morning...

2:01:332:01:38

A call for compulsory eye tests

for motorists as new figures show

2:01:382:01:43

many ignore warnings

that they shouldn't be driving.

2:01:432:01:45

Good morning.

2:01:452:01:46

Living costs are on the up,

we'll find out by how much, later,

2:01:462:01:49

so I'm going to take a look at why

prices are rising and how that

2:01:492:01:53

will shape the big decisions

in next week's Budget.

2:01:532:01:55

Good morning.

2:01:552:02:00

In sport, it's going to be

a World Cup without Italy

2:02:002:02:03

after the four-time champions fail

to qualify for the tournament

2:02:032:02:05

for the first time in 60 years.

2:02:052:02:09

Good morning, Carol.

It will be busy

tonight when the Christmas tree

2:02:092:02:15

lights are switched on. They will be

switched off at the end of our

2:02:152:02:21

programme. You can expect some

sunshine in Scotland, but for

2:02:212:02:29

England and Wales a bit more clout

with limited brightness this

2:02:292:02:32

afternoon. I will have more details

in 15 minutes.

Thank you, Carol.

2:02:322:02:42

Good morning.

2:02:422:02:43

First, our main story.

2:02:432:02:45

MPs will today begin debating a key

piece of Brexit legislation -

2:02:452:02:47

the EU withdrawal bill.

2:02:472:02:48

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

2:02:482:02:51

Tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

2:02:512:02:53

Yesterday, the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, made a surprise

2:02:532:02:55

concession, promising Parliament

would get a vote on

2:02:552:02:57

the final Brexit deal.

2:02:572:02:58

Our political correspondent

Leila Nathoo reports.

2:02:582:03:04

The Prime Minister.

2:03:042:03:05

Still the one in charge, Theresa May

last night at the glittering

2:03:052:03:08

Lord Mayor's Banquet in London,

a break from Brexit

2:03:082:03:10

and potential trouble ahead.

2:03:102:03:11

A key piece of the government's

Brexit legislation returns

2:03:112:03:13

to the Commons today,

and MPs are trying

2:03:132:03:15

to tinker with it.

2:03:152:03:18

They are proposing hundreds

of changes to try to influence

2:03:182:03:21

ministers' approach,

and so yesterday an apparent

2:03:212:03:23

concession to one

of their key demands.

2:03:232:03:32

I can now confirm that once we have

reached an agreement, we will bring

2:03:322:03:35

forward a specific piece of primary

legislation to implement

2:03:352:03:38

that agreement.

2:03:382:03:39

Parliament will be given time

to debate, scrutinise and vote

2:03:392:03:41

on the final agreement we strike

with the European Union.

2:03:412:03:44

This agreement will only hold

if parliament approves it.

2:03:442:03:46

But with such a fragile majority,

just a handful of Tory backbenchers

2:03:462:03:49

siding with the opposition

would lead to a government defeat.

2:03:492:03:55

And those minded to rebel seem

unsatisfied with the take

2:03:552:03:57

it or leave it vote

the government has offered.

2:03:572:04:00

I have to say, a lot of us

were insulted by this.

2:04:002:04:05

I mean, because it sounded so good

and then when you dug

2:04:052:04:10

into the detail, you realise this

so-called meaningful vote

2:04:102:04:12

was completely meaningless.

2:04:122:04:13

There will be more contentious votes

here in the coming weeks as MPs

2:04:132:04:16

test the government's

fragile working majority.

2:04:162:04:23

Our political correspondent Alex

Forsyth joins us from Westminster.

2:04:232:04:33

Alex, good morning. Is this likely

to get through? I think many MPs

2:04:352:04:41

support the idea behind this EU

withdrawal bill because it's trying

2:04:412:04:44

to bring EU law into UK law so there

will not be a big black hole in our

2:04:442:04:51

laws and regulations. Then the

government and parliament can go

2:04:512:04:56

through and change any they want to

and ditch the ones they don't like.

2:04:562:04:59

The problem is some of the details

in this bill. Some people think it

2:04:592:05:04

gives too much power to ministers,

some think it would have a negative

2:05:042:05:09

impact on Scotland and Northern

Ireland, the Administration 's

2:05:092:05:17

there. The government have said we

will put through Parliament the

2:05:172:05:21

final Brexit deal but some are

saying the vote on that comes too

2:05:212:05:26

late in the process. Yesterday David

Davis said if you don't vote for it,

2:05:262:05:32

we will leave the European Union

anyway so there's a lot of

2:05:322:05:36

unhappiness on the backbenches.

Today the first day MPs start

2:05:362:05:41

scrutinising this chunky legislation

line by line. This will go on for

2:05:412:05:45

some time and I think we will see

some parliamentary fights yet to

2:05:452:05:48

come.

Thank you, and we will be

speaking to Anna Soubry in a few

2:05:482:05:56

moments.

2:05:562:06:00

Theresa May, as we saw

in that report, spent

2:06:002:06:02

the evening at the Lord Mayor's

banquet in London.

2:06:022:06:04

Aside from Brexit, she used

the occasion to make her strongest

2:06:042:06:07

attack yet on Russia,

in which she accused the Putin

2:06:072:06:09

government of threatening

the international order.

2:06:092:06:11

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

2:06:112:06:13

media organisations to plant fake

stories and photoshopped

2:06:132:06:15

images in an attempt

to sow discord in the west

2:06:152:06:17

and undermine our institutions.

2:06:172:06:19

So I have a very simple

message for Russia,

2:06:192:06:22

we know what you are doing

and you will not succeed.

2:06:222:06:32

The television producer

and writer, Daisy Goodwin -

2:06:332:06:35

who created the ITV drama,

"Victoria" - has claimed

2:06:352:06:38

she was groped by a government

official during a visit

2:06:382:06:40

to Number Ten.

2:06:402:06:41

She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

2:06:412:06:45

after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

2:06:452:06:47

Cameron was Prime Minister.

2:06:472:06:49

She said she wasn't

traumatised, but was cross,

2:06:492:06:51

adding she didn't report it

at the time.

2:06:512:06:53

Downing Street said they take

all allegations very seriously

2:06:532:06:55

and would look into any formal

complaint, should one be made.

2:06:552:07:05

One of the victims of an acid attack

in a London nightclub has told BBC

2:07:052:07:15

Breakfast that she felt...

2:07:182:07:20

Arthur Collins -

2:07:202:07:21

the ex-boyfriend of reality TV star

Ferne McCann was convicted

2:07:212:07:23

of throwing acid across

a crowded London nightclub,

2:07:232:07:25

injuring 22 people.

2:07:252:07:26

He will be sentenced in December.

2:07:262:07:27

His victim said she still struggles

with anxiety more than six months

2:07:272:07:32

after the attack.

Being in busy

places, I'm extremely anxious. If I

2:07:322:07:37

cannot see what's going on or a

fight breaks out, the first thing

2:07:372:07:41

that goes through my head these days

is what are they going to do. It's

2:07:412:07:46

only now I can talk about things. A

massive sense of relief but it

2:07:462:07:53

doesn't change what happened

whatsoever. I think it is more, OK,

2:07:532:07:59

something is being done, this is

setting for the -- setting the

2:07:592:08:06

standard for anyone thinking of

doing something like this.

2:08:062:08:17

A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

2:08:242:08:27

who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

2:08:272:08:29

Nineteen year old Gaia Pope who has

severe epilepsy was last seen

2:08:292:08:32

on the seventh November.

2:08:322:08:33

Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

2:08:332:08:35

were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

2:08:352:08:43

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

2:08:432:08:52

Head teachers representing

more than 5,000 schools

2:08:522:08:54

across England have sent a joint

letter to the Chancellor,

2:08:542:08:56

Philip Hammond, warning

of inadequate funding.

2:08:562:08:58

They say they are increasingly

having to ask parents for donations.

2:08:582:09:00

The government has already promised

to move 1.3 billion pounds

2:09:002:09:03

of education funding into schools,

but heads say they need another

2:09:032:09:05

£1.7 billion of new money.

2:09:052:09:10

Here is the story of a very large

expensive gemstone, the world's

2:09:102:09:17

Rovers gemstones are up for sale in

Geneva this week but you will need

2:09:172:09:22

some serious amounts of money. The

good news is you can look at them

2:09:222:09:30

for free so Imogen went to look for

a sneak peak.

2:09:302:09:42

There is more than a little sparkle

in Geneva this dull November.

2:09:422:09:45

Every year the jewellery

houses compete to show

2:09:452:09:47

There is more than a little sparkle

in Geneva this dull November.

2:09:472:09:50

Every year the jewellery

houses compete to show

2:09:502:09:54

that one special stone,

the rarest, the purist,

2:09:542:09:56

the most vivid.

2:09:562:09:57

But this year there is one

extraordinary show stopper.

2:09:572:09:59

At 163 carats, this

is the largest diamond ever

2:09:592:10:01

to be put up for auction.

2:10:012:10:03

Now, to show it at its best,

or maybe to make sure a potential

2:10:032:10:06

buyer doesn't mistake it for an ice

cube, it has been set into a string

2:10:062:10:09

of emeralds, 5,949 of them.

2:10:092:10:13

We are expecting in the region

of $30 million for it,

2:10:132:10:17

and it is the largest deflawless

diamond ever to come to the market

2:10:172:10:20

and it is the finest

colour, finest clarity

2:10:202:10:23

and extraordinary proportions.

2:10:232:10:26

And there is always a temptation

with a diamond crystal to cut

2:10:262:10:30

the largest possible and end up

with a stone that maybe is a little

2:10:302:10:33

lopsided or lumpy or thick

just to keep the weight.

2:10:332:10:36

Not here.

2:10:362:10:38

This is perfection in every way.

2:10:382:10:39

Pink, yellow, necklace,

ring or brooch, jewellery lovers

2:10:392:10:41

are spoilt for choice.

2:10:412:10:47

But while many will look, with these

multi-million-dollar price tags,

2:10:472:10:49

only a few will be able to buy.

2:10:492:10:59

You are watching BBC Breakfast.

Let's get more on our main story

2:11:042:11:08

now.

2:11:082:11:09

Theresa May has promised

to make a success of Brexit

2:11:092:11:11

but her government could face defeat

on its flagship bill this week.

2:11:112:11:14

The European Union Withdrawal Bill,

sometimes referred to

2:11:142:11:16

as the Great Repeal Bill,

will be debated in the House

2:11:162:11:18

of Commons from today.

2:11:182:11:20

It's the piece of legislation that

will convert EU laws into UK ones

2:11:202:11:23

and it has proved divisive.

2:11:232:11:26

Over 180 pages of amendments

to the bill have been proposed

2:11:262:11:29

by MPs, covering everything

from the single market to the role

2:11:292:11:31

of the European Court of Justice.

2:11:312:11:36

And as the government only has

a working majority of nine it

2:11:362:11:39

would only take a handful of Tory

rebels to derail

2:11:392:11:41

Theresa May's plans.

2:11:412:11:43

Conservative MP Anna Soubry is one

of the most vocal critics

2:11:432:11:46

of the government's approach.

2:11:462:11:47

She joins us now from Westminster.

2:11:472:11:53

Ahead of what will be a really busy

week in Westminster, you are one of

2:11:532:11:59

the most outspoken Tory rebels. We

have heard from David Davies that

2:11:592:12:03

Parliament will now get a final say.

Have you got what you wanted?

2:12:032:12:10

Unfortunately not. This so-called

meaningful vote is meaningless

2:12:102:12:14

because he couldn't guarantee you

would have the vote before we left

2:12:142:12:18

and of course if there is no deal,

and unfortunately it is not

2:12:182:12:22

impossible there will be no deal,

then Parliament has no say so it

2:12:222:12:26

means your viewers, through their

elected representatives, will have

2:12:262:12:38

no say, no part in finally

determining frankly our country's

2:12:382:12:40

future. This is serious stuff and we

need to get it right. It's important

2:12:402:12:43

this place behind, after all people

voted to take back control, and

2:12:432:12:47

unfortunately control is into the

hands of a very small number of

2:12:472:12:51

ministers and I'm afraid to say I

think Theresa May is really

2:12:512:12:56

pandering to 35 hard Brexit --

Brexiteers in my party.

Let me put

2:12:562:13:05

to you what David Davies said, he

said Parliament will have time to

2:13:052:13:09

scrutinise and vote on the final

agreement, he has been clear.

But he

2:13:092:13:14

couldn't say that wouldn't happen

until after we left, completely

2:13:142:13:18

meaningless. We need to be sure we

can discuss, debate and have a vote

2:13:182:13:24

on any deal the government gets and

also in the event of no deal. He

2:13:242:13:28

made it clear that if there is no

deal it will not come back to

2:13:282:13:40

Parliament, we will crash out of the

EU without further discussion and

2:13:402:13:43

that would beat it and that would be

disastrous for our country. They

2:13:432:13:45

think your viewers want us to have a

competent country that gets on with

2:13:452:13:48

Brexit and I agree with that but we

have got to do it right.

Are you

2:13:482:13:52

getting on with it? We know there

are hundreds of amendments, will

2:13:522:13:58

that be delaying the process?

Not at

all, that's another big miss.

2:13:582:14:03

There's probably half a dozen

serious amendments. A lot of that is

2:14:032:14:09

technical and constitutional, which

is important because the government

2:14:092:14:13

has this power grab and we don't

want that. There's probably only

2:14:132:14:17

five or six amendments with eight

Parliamentary days to discuss it but

2:14:172:14:22

so we should. This is the most

important thing our country has done

2:14:222:14:26

since the Second World War so we

need to get this right. We need to

2:14:262:14:31

build a consensus, get everyone

backing the Prime Minister and at

2:14:312:14:34

the moment unfortunately every time

we make progress we get a great

2:14:342:14:39

speech in Florence, it's like we

then take ten steps backwards and

2:14:392:14:42

the division comes back in again and

that is bad.

Are you backing the

2:14:422:14:50

Prime Minister?

Absolutely, I back

her Florence speech 100%, the tone

2:14:502:14:55

and content spot on so we need to

have more of that and less of this

2:14:552:15:00

division and less pandering to

probably at the most 35 hard

2:15:002:15:05

Brexiteer I -- ideological driven

Brexiteers in the party. The

2:15:052:15:14

Parliament has accepted the result,

we now want to get on and get the

2:15:142:15:17

best deal for our country and I

think she should be listening to the

2:15:172:15:22

majority, not pandering to some

hardliners in my party.

I want to

2:15:222:15:26

talk to you about a meeting last

night, I understand you were at a

2:15:262:15:29

meeting with the whips which was

described as stormy, what would you

2:15:292:15:34

say the atmosphere was like?

It was

stormy because you have people at

2:15:342:15:38

that meeting who have never spoken

out. They have gone along with the

2:15:382:15:45

government. The dates going into the

bill has really upset a lot of

2:15:452:15:48

really top-quality backbench

Conservative MPs. I know the Labour

2:15:482:15:52

Party also, a lot of their

backbenchers also upset about this.

2:15:522:15:57

I'm talking about what some people

would call the grandees and those

2:15:572:16:01

peculiar terms but these are

ex-ministers, highly respected, and

2:16:012:16:07

genuinely crossed about this. The

government must listen to those

2:16:072:16:11

people. I'd like them to listen to

me as well but everybody knows my

2:16:112:16:15

views and I get these labels

attached to me. There are some

2:16:152:16:19

people there who have never rebelled

and are now talking about rebelling.

2:16:192:16:27

How serious is for the Government,

for Theresa May?

Well, what I want

2:16:272:16:33

Theresa to do is not to keep

pandering to knees people who do not

2:16:332:16:37

represent the Conservative Party.

They certainly don't represent

2:16:372:16:39

Conservative voters. They want a

hard Brexit. Jump off the cliff.

2:16:392:16:43

This is the one thing that business

doesn't want and the majority of

2:16:432:16:48

members of Parliament don't want and

I think the majority of your viewers

2:16:482:16:52

don't want it either. She should be

building a consensus with the

2:16:522:16:56

sensible people in the Conservative

and generally and listening to

2:16:562:16:59

business. Business does not want

this hard Brexit. That's what

2:16:592:17:03

Theresa should be doing.

Can I ask

you something on a different subject

2:17:032:17:07

about harassment and we have heard

there are now allegations from a TV

2:17:072:17:11

writer and producer saying she was

groped whilst she was at ten Downing

2:17:112:17:14

Street sometime ago. What's your

reaction to that?

That's appalling.

2:17:142:17:18

That's a criminal offence. I am a

criminal barrister. It sounds to me

2:17:182:17:23

like sexual assault. If she wants

to, she should report it to the

2:17:232:17:26

police. If she wants to, she should

report it to Number Ten. I know that

2:17:262:17:32

Theresa's closest aide takes these

matters extremely seriously and if

2:17:322:17:35

she needs support, there are support

groups that are out there, because

2:17:352:17:39

for a lot of women, it doesn't

matter who you are, it doesn't

2:17:392:17:43

matter how much bravado people think

you have, this sort of assault and

2:17:432:17:46

it is an assault, is often deeply

traumatic and we need to wake up to

2:17:462:17:51

what it really is. And we need it

take action when it's required so we

2:17:512:17:55

take these things seriously and what

we want is what the PM wants and

2:17:552:17:59

Theresa has led on this. We want an

Independent mechanism where anybody

2:17:592:18:03

who comes into this place and

politics here in Westminster and in

2:18:032:18:08

other constituency offices has

exactly the same protections and

2:18:082:18:11

rights as any worker in any other

workplace and we have got to change

2:18:112:18:15

the culture as well and men should

keep their hands to themselves.

Anna

2:18:152:18:20

Soubry, thank you.

2:18:202:18:30

Carol IS in Covent Garden

with the weather.

2:18:332:18:36

Good morning. The Christmas tree is

55-feet tall. It has got between

2:18:372:18:44

25,000 and 30,000 lights on it. It

is spectacular! Now it has been lit

2:18:442:18:49

for BBC Breakfast this morning. We

have got a lovely sneak pre-view of

2:18:492:18:53

it. After the programme it is being

switched off and it will be lit this

2:18:532:18:58

evening by Pudsey Bear. It is the

first time that Children in Need and

2:18:582:19:03

Covent Garden worked together. There

will be the cast of 42nd Street

2:19:032:19:07

performing and it promises to be a

good evening. The weather shouldn't

2:19:072:19:10

be too bad. It will be cloudy in

London. The forecast for most of us

2:19:102:19:14

today is a cloudy one and also a

milder one than it was yesterday.

2:19:142:19:20

There is an exception and that's

across Scotland and also northern

2:19:202:19:24

parts of Northern Ireland. So if you

start off at 9am in Scotland, there

2:19:242:19:28

is showers in the north-west, but

much of the rest of Scotland is dry.

2:19:282:19:32

Cloud around this morning will thin

and break and you will see sunshine.

2:19:322:19:36

For all of England and Wales, it's a

cloudy start. We have got two

2:19:362:19:41

weather fronts heading south and

both are producing patchy rain. So

2:19:412:19:47

it's quite grey across England and

Wales. But through the day, most of

2:19:472:19:51

that rain will become confined to

western areas where it will be light

2:19:512:19:55

and patchy on the coasts and also

the hills. For Northern Ireland, you

2:19:552:19:59

have got a fair bit of cloud around

this morning, but it will brighten

2:19:592:20:02

up nicely from the north and here

too, we should see some sunshine as

2:20:022:20:05

we go through the day. So talking

about through the day, you can see

2:20:052:20:09

how across Scotland and the north of

Northern Ireland, sees the sunshine.

2:20:092:20:13

Across the north of Scotland there

will be showers. They will be

2:20:132:20:16

turning heavier through the day and

more prolific and the wind will

2:20:162:20:19

strengthen. For England and Wales,

we hang on to a lot of cloud. Still

2:20:192:20:23

spots of rain in the west. But we

will see some brightness, but the

2:20:232:20:28

brightness today will be limited,

but really wherever you are, it's

2:20:282:20:30

going to be milder than it was

yesterday. Yesterday's top

2:20:302:20:33

temperatures were in single figures.

Today, we're into the low double

2:20:332:20:37

figures. Overnight, clear skies. So

we will start off with some frost

2:20:372:20:45

and it will be a frosty night across

parts of Scotland. The showers

2:20:452:20:49

tending to fade, but it will be

fairly windy. For Northern Ireland,

2:20:492:20:53

for England and for Wales, it's

going to be another cloudy night. As

2:20:532:20:56

well as that, there will be patchy

light rain and we will see patchy

2:20:562:21:02

fog forming. It might prove to be

problematic. It will lift tomorrow.

2:21:022:21:11

And then again for much of England

and Wales, it's going to be cloudy.

2:21:112:21:15

There will be some brightness

developing particularly later in the

2:21:152:21:17

day across the north. For Northern

Ireland and Scotland, again some

2:21:172:21:21

brightness, but the brightest skies

will be in Scotland. However, later

2:21:212:21:24

in the day, we will see another

weather front coming into the

2:21:242:21:27

north-west introducing wet and windy

weather. On Thursday, that's going

2:21:272:21:30

to be pushing southwards, taking a

narrow band of rain with it, into

2:21:302:21:34

northern England and Northern

Ireland. On either side of it, some

2:21:342:21:37

bright skies, still a fair bit of

cloud and just one or two showers.

2:21:372:21:41

But temperatures roughly where they

should be at this stage in November,

2:21:412:21:44

Dan and Lou.

It is really wonderful

that tree. It's just guy another

2:21:442:21:52

mus, isn't it Carol.

55-feet tall.

If you stand under the bow, it is

2:21:522:21:58

much taller than me and I'm 5'7".

I

have been watching people walk past.

2:21:582:22:06

It's twinkling beautifully.

2:22:062:22:09

Drivers who are told their eyesight

isn't good enough for them

2:22:112:22:14

to be behind the wheel

are carrying on driving.

2:22:142:22:16

That's according to research

by the Association of Optometrists.

2:22:162:22:18

They want compulsory eye

tests to be introduced -

2:22:182:22:20

a campaign backed by the family

of Natalie Wade, who was killed

2:22:202:22:23

by a partially sighted driver.

2:22:232:22:24

Our reporter Ali Fortescue has more.

2:22:242:22:26

If she walked into a room,

as the saying goes, she lit it up.

2:22:262:22:29

She enjoyed every moment

and was so looking forward

2:22:292:22:32

to getting married.

2:22:322:22:36

28-year-old Natalie Wade died

on her way to buy a wedding dress.

2:22:362:22:39

She was hit by a 78-year-old

driver with poor eyesight.

2:22:392:22:42

There's always an empty chair

at Christmas, birthdays,

2:22:422:22:44

the day she would have been married,

they are still very painful.

2:22:442:22:51

The driver who killed Natalie

was blind in one eye and partially

2:22:512:22:54

sighted in the other,

but he died before being tried

2:22:542:22:57

for dangerous driving.

2:22:572:22:58

But Natalie is just one of 70 people

who are killed or seriously injured

2:22:582:23:01

in similar incidents involving bad

eyesight last year.

2:23:012:23:05

The legal standard for eyesight

involves being able to read a number

2:23:052:23:08

plate from 20 metres,

but that's something that's

2:23:082:23:10

only tested when you

first take your test.

2:23:102:23:13

At the moment, everyone needs

to fill out a form like this every

2:23:132:23:17

ten years to renew their driving

license and that involves answering

2:23:172:23:19

a question about their eyesight

And if you're over the age 70

2:23:192:23:22

a question about their eyesight

and if you're over the age 70

2:23:222:23:25

you have to fill out

a slightly more comprehensive

2:23:252:23:27

form every three years,

but it's still a question of just

2:23:272:23:30

putting a tick in a box,

there is no requirement to take

2:23:302:23:33

an actual eye test.

2:23:332:23:34

The mechanism of self reporting

isn't always reliable.

2:23:342:23:36

We know that vision can

change gradually over time

2:23:362:23:38

so drivers might not be aware

of a deterioration to their vision.

2:23:382:23:45

The Association of Optometrists

don't have a legal requirement to do

2:23:452:23:47

anything if they're concerned

about a patient's driving,

2:23:472:23:49

it's down to the driver.

2:23:492:23:53

More than one in three

of their optometrists surveyed have

2:23:532:23:55

seen a driver in the last month

who continues to drive

2:23:552:23:58

despite being told their vision

is below the legal standard.

2:23:582:24:01

Nine in ten of them believe

the current tests are insufficient

2:24:012:24:03

and they want to see a change

in the law.

2:24:032:24:09

What we're calling for is vision

screening to be carried out

2:24:092:24:12

for all drivers when they first

apply for the driving licence

2:24:122:24:15

and then the requirement to prove

that they continue to meet that

2:24:152:24:18

standard every ten years.

2:24:182:24:22

But the concern is it's not just

eyesight that needs testing.

2:24:222:24:26

This is an enormous worry.

2:24:262:24:27

Thank gosh we've got something

we can point at and you can

2:24:272:24:30

measure it and say yes,

eye health is a big thing

2:24:302:24:33

but there's all sorts

of other medical issues,

2:24:332:24:34

bundles of them, which are simply

not being taken into account

2:24:342:24:37

as to whether people are fit

to drive and I think

2:24:372:24:40

there should be.

2:24:402:24:41

The Department for Transport say

that all drivers are required by law

2:24:412:24:44

to make sure their eyesight is good

enough to drive.

2:24:442:24:46

They also say that if a driver

experiences any changes

2:24:462:24:49

to their eyesight or has a condition

that could affect their driving

2:24:492:24:52

they must notify the DVLA

and speak to an optician.

2:24:522:24:58

Ali joins us on the sofa now.

2:25:012:25:06

Do they give details about what

might be a concern that you should

2:25:062:25:10

alert the DVLA about?

Yes, the

information is there if you look for

2:25:102:25:14

it, in the appendix of the form you

need to renew your photo licence. If

2:25:142:25:18

you have a paper licence it is

recommended you renew that every ten

2:25:182:25:21

years as well. It tells you if your

eyesight is any worse than six over

2:25:212:25:27

12, you can't read a numberplate

from 20 meters away, you will need

2:25:272:25:32

to let the DVLA know. It lists

several conditions including some

2:25:322:25:39

form of Diabetes, epilepsy, having

those conditions won't mean you

2:25:392:25:42

can't drive, but it will mean you

need to let the DVLA know so they

2:25:422:25:46

can ask you some more questions.

Some interesting comments. Jean

2:25:462:25:50

says, "I had a neighbour whose

eyesight was so bad, he couldn't

2:25:502:25:55

recognise me at six feet. His wife

sat next to him and she told him

2:25:552:26:00

when to turn. The onus maybe on the

drivers to give up, but it is a

2:26:002:26:04

matter of independence and pride

which is hard to let go." Keith

2:26:042:26:07

raises a point which I wanted to ask

you about, "I was diagnosed with

2:26:072:26:12

dementia and my consultant had a

duty of care to report my illness to

2:26:122:26:17

the DVLA. I lost all my employment.

Keith says I don't know why

2:26:172:26:23

opticians aren't obliged to report

eyesight."

It is a careful balance

2:26:232:26:27

between patient confidentiality and

what's in the wider public interest.

2:26:272:26:30

So in extreme circumstances GPs are

and optometrists can let the DVLA

2:26:302:26:38

know if someone's eyesight is so bad

that they shouldn't be on the road

2:26:382:26:42

and they are putting people's lives

in danger. It is something that the

2:26:422:26:48

Association of Optometrists don't

feel comfortable with. The onus is

2:26:482:26:50

on the driver and the DVLA says if

anyone experiences any change to

2:26:502:26:57

their medical that could affect

their driving, they need to let them

2:26:572:26:59

know.

Thank you.

2:26:592:27:02

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

2:27:022:27:03

Join me in around half an hour.

Goodbye.

2:30:272:30:34

Join me in around half an hour.

Goodbye.

2:30:342:30:34

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Louise Minchin and Dan Walker.

2:30:342:30:38

MPs will today begin debating a key

piece of Brexit legislation -

2:30:382:30:41

the EU Withdrawal Bill.

2:30:412:30:43

It will help turn European laws

into UK ones but opponents including

2:30:432:30:46

tory rebels have tabled

scores of amendments.

2:30:462:30:50

Yesterday, the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, made a surprise

2:30:502:30:52

concession, promising Parliament

would get a vote on

2:30:522:30:54

the final Brexit deal.

2:30:542:31:02

Last night there were signs that the

author may have failed to quell a

2:31:022:31:07

possible backbench rebellion.

Earlier Conservative MP Anna Soubry

2:31:072:31:10

told as the Government plasma

decision to put a deadline for

2:31:102:31:13

Brexit in the bill had caused deep

divisions.

2:31:132:31:15

You have people at that meeting who

have never spoken out, who have sat

2:31:152:31:21

and gone along with the Government

and then the date going into the

2:31:212:31:26

bill has really upset a lot of

really top-quality backbench

2:31:262:31:31

Conservative MPs. I know the Labour

Party also, lots of their

2:31:312:31:35

backbenchers also, but I'm talking

about what some people would call

2:31:352:31:39

the grandees in all of those

peculiar terms, these are people,

2:31:392:31:43

many of them former ministers,

highly respected, they are genuinely

2:31:432:31:47

cross about this. The Government

must listen to them.

2:31:472:31:51

Theresa May has made her strongest

attack yet on Russia -

2:31:512:31:54

accusing it of threatening

the international order.

2:31:542:31:55

Speaking at the Lord Mayor's banquet

in London last night,

2:31:552:31:58

the Prime Minister said Moscow

was meddling in elections and using

2:31:582:32:00

fake news to undermine societies.

2:32:002:32:03

It is seeking to weaponise

information, deploying its state-run

2:32:032:32:06

media organisations to plant fake

stories and photoshopped

2:32:062:32:10

images in an attempt

to sow discord in the west

2:32:102:32:13

and undermine our institutions.

2:32:132:32:18

So I have a very simple

message for Russia,

2:32:182:32:20

we know what you are doing

and you will not succeed.

2:32:202:32:27

The television producer

and writer Daisy Goodwin -

2:32:272:32:29

who created the ITV drama,

Victoria - has claimed

2:32:292:32:32

she was groped by a Government

official during a visit to Number

2:32:322:32:34

Ten.

2:32:342:32:35

She told the Radio Times the man

put his hand on her breast

2:32:352:32:39

after a meeting to discuss

a proposed TV show when David

2:32:392:32:41

Cameron was Prime Minister.

2:32:412:32:43

She said she wasn't

traumatised, but was cross -

2:32:432:32:45

adding she didn't report it

at the time.

2:32:452:32:48

Downing Street said they take

all allegations very seriously

2:32:482:32:50

and would look into any formal

complaint, should one be made.

2:32:502:32:56

One of the victims of an acid attack

in a London nightclub has told BBC

2:32:562:33:00

Breakfast that she hopes

the conviction of the man

2:33:002:33:02

who assalted her will put others off

committing similar crimes.

2:33:022:33:06

Arthur Collins - the ex-boyfriend

of reality TV star Ferne McCann -

2:33:062:33:09

was found guilty of throwing acid

across a crowded nightclub,

2:33:092:33:11

injuring 22 people.

2:33:112:33:13

He will be sentenced in December.

2:33:132:33:15

Lauren Trent told us

she still struggles with anxiety

2:33:152:33:17

more than six months

after the attack.

2:33:172:33:26

Being in busy places, you know, I'm

extremely anxious. If I can't see

2:33:262:33:30

the middle of the dance floor, if I

can see what is going on or a fight

2:33:302:33:34

breaks out, the first thing that

goes to my head nowadays is what are

2:33:342:33:38

they going to do, what are they

going to pull out? It is only now

2:33:382:33:42

that I can talk about things and

hear about the trial, things like

2:33:422:33:46

that. A massive sense of relief but

it does not change what has happened

2:33:462:33:51

whatsoever. I think it is more, OK,

something is being done and it is

2:33:512:33:56

setting the standard for anyone

thinking of doing something like

2:33:562:33:59

this, it is putting them off doing

something like that.

A day of

2:33:592:34:11

national mourning is taking place in

Iran after an earthquake killed more

2:34:112:34:14

than 100 people.

2:34:142:34:15

Officials say the rescue operation

has largely been completed,

2:34:152:34:17

and they are now focusing

on providing aid and

2:34:172:34:19

shelter to survivors.

2:34:192:34:20

A man and woman have been arrested

on suspicion of murdering a teenager

2:34:202:34:23

who has not been seen

for nearly a week.

2:34:232:34:25

Nineteen year old Gaia Pope, who has

severe epilepsy, was last seen

2:34:252:34:28

on the seventh of November.

2:34:282:34:30

Dorset Police say a 19-year-old man

and a 71-year-old woman

2:34:302:34:32

were arrested after searches took

place at two addresses in Swanage.

2:34:322:34:35

Officers say they were

both known to Gaia.

2:34:352:34:44

In the last hour or so there has

been a big update on a big deal for

2:34:452:34:49

Tesco?

Yes, the big food wholesaler,

Booker, Tesco wants to buy it for

2:34:492:34:57

around £4 billion. There are

questions on how good that will be

2:34:572:35:00

for consumers because Booker owned

the likes of Londoners, Budgens,

2:35:002:35:07

convenience stores on big high

streets. There is a question that if

2:35:072:35:11

Tesco owns those stores as well as

their own, is it healthy? The

2:35:112:35:15

Competition and Markets Authority

have decided it is OK, there are

2:35:152:35:18

plenty of other shops out there to

keep prices competitive. And sinews

2:35:182:35:23

on the old £10 note, the actual old

£10 note, that can speed spent...

2:35:232:35:30

That has to be spent before March

one, after that date, it is like

2:35:302:35:35

what we talked about with the Pound

and the fibre, you can take it to

2:35:352:35:38

the Bank of England or maybe your

bank, get your old ten spent before

2:35:382:35:42

March the 1st.

We had to get used to

it.

In theory that be it for awhile.

2:35:422:35:49

I was behind somebody trying to use

an old fiver in a queue and had no

2:35:492:35:53

idea it had gone out of circulation,

and was furious.

2:35:532:35:57

So we need to start preparing.

We

think we talk about it a lot, but

2:35:572:36:03

clearly not enough.

Everyday, Sean!

Thank you very much.

2:36:032:36:08

And coming up here

on Breakfast this morning...

2:36:082:36:12

So when Madeline did 'A day

in the life of Madeline' with me,

2:36:122:36:15

and we thought of all big events

that I'm probably not going to be

2:36:152:36:18

able to be here for.

2:36:182:36:19

So we started with her

sweet 16 prom dress.

2:36:192:36:22

Every day more than 100 young people

face the death of their mum or dad.

2:36:222:36:25

As part of Children in Need,

we'll hear some of their stories.

2:36:252:36:29

And author, blogger and YouTube star

Giovanna Fletcher will be

2:36:292:36:31

here to talk about balancing

writing with motherhood.

2:36:312:36:41

# Heartache on the dance floor, hard

take on the dance floor.

2:36:432:36:47

He's given up the mean streets

of Walford for the lure of country.

2:36:472:36:50

Shane Richie will be here to tell us

about his new album.

2:36:502:36:59

Sonali is here to talk about sad

news for Italian fans.

2:36:592:37:03

For many football fans the

unthinkable has happened, Italy has

2:37:032:37:07

not qualified for a World Cup for

the first time in 60 years. There

2:37:072:37:12

were tears all around, look at the

pane on the face of Gigi Buffon, his

2:37:122:37:18

last official match, unfortunately

failing to qualify.

2:37:182:37:22

I love watching them. There are a

few names like the Netherlands and

2:37:222:37:27

Chile, the Copa America champions,

the USA did not make it. Some people

2:37:272:37:32

are suggesting like they do with

college sports in America, they

2:37:322:37:36

could have not invited tournament.

Or just actually do anything but

2:37:362:37:40

watch the World Cup!

2:37:402:37:41

And it all happened on home soil -

Italy lost their play-off

2:37:412:37:44

against Sweden at the San Siro last

night, running out of ideas

2:37:442:37:47

against determined opposition.

2:37:472:37:48

Even keeper GiGi Buffon was sent

into the attack in injury time,

2:37:482:37:51

but the match finished goalless.

2:37:512:37:53

Buffon is among a few

players who'll now retire

2:37:532:37:55

from international football.

2:37:552:37:59

Moeen Ali has recovered from a side

strain, so he'll play his first game

2:37:592:38:02

on England's Ashes tour,

against a Cricket Australia 11.

2:38:022:38:06

After getting to know some

of the local wildlife in Townsville,

2:38:062:38:08

Ali was named in the team

for their final warm-up match,

2:38:082:38:11

which starts tomorrow.

2:38:112:38:13

Commonwealth champion Dan Keatings

says there is a very real "culture

2:38:132:38:16

of fear" within British Gymnastics,

after some coaches claimed

2:38:162:38:18

there was appalling leadership

at the governing body.

2:38:182:38:24

Keatings says he experienced

bullying and manipulation

2:38:242:38:26

during his career as an athlete.

2:38:262:38:28

British Gymnastics have

encouraged anyone with

2:38:282:38:30

concerns to come forward.

2:38:302:38:34

World number one Rafael Nadal has

pulled out of the World Tour Finals

2:38:342:38:37

in London with a knee injury,

after losing in three

2:38:372:38:39

sets to David Goffin.

2:38:392:38:41

He says his focus now is to be fit

for the Australian Open in January.

2:38:412:38:47

And before I go, I just wanted

to leave with you some memories

2:38:472:38:50

of Italy at the World Cup.

2:38:502:38:52

MUSIC: "Nessun Dorma"

by Luciano Pavarotti

2:38:522:39:02

COMMENTATOR:

Marco Tardelli!

2:39:082:39:12

2-0 to Italy.

2:39:122:39:17

Tardelli, the scorer.

2:39:172:39:20

Still Baggio.

2:39:202:39:22

He's taking them all on.

2:39:222:39:23

It's a fantastic goal.

2:39:232:39:26

That's the goal they've

all been waiting for.

2:39:262:39:30

Not so much Cannavaro, more,

"can you believe it?"

2:39:302:39:33

He lifts the World Cup on the night

he wins his 100th cap.

2:39:332:39:37

Italy are world champions

for the fourth time.

2:39:372:39:41

The most successful European nation

ever and now just one behind Brazil.

2:39:412:39:51

Even though we knew Italy were not

what they used to be, it will be

2:39:542:39:58

strange next summer.

From an England perspective, you

2:39:582:40:02

have to think one of the big dogs is

gone. I mean, Iceland are still

2:40:022:40:07

there, obviously!

I think you have hit the nail on the

2:40:072:40:10

head, you never really know!

Looking forward to the World Cup

2:40:102:40:13

next summer, with or without the

Italians. Thank you. Every day more

2:40:132:40:24

than 100 children across the UK lose

a parent, a shocking statistic.

2:40:242:40:28

Now a special documentary

for Children in Need follows a group

2:40:282:40:30

of young people dealing

with the terminal illness or death

2:40:302:40:33

of their mum or dad.

2:40:332:40:34

It's called Saying Goodbye.

2:40:342:40:35

Let's take a look.

2:40:352:40:36

I'm just like...

2:40:362:40:37

It's actually making me

laugh because I'm just

2:40:372:40:39

thinking about him laughing,

which is making me laugh.

2:40:392:40:41

Because I'm thinking about him

laughing, because that's the only

2:40:412:40:44

thing that I can remember,

properly remember about Dad.

2:40:442:40:49

Was him laughing.

2:40:492:40:51

Sorry, the only reason I'm looking

over here is because that's

2:40:512:40:54

where he used to sit.

2:40:542:40:56

That is where he sat.

2:40:562:40:58

Oh, God, yeah.

2:40:582:41:00

That's weird.

2:41:002:41:01

I've never done that

before, actually.

2:41:012:41:02

Properly, like, imagine

him sitting there.

2:41:022:41:07

That's...

2:41:072:41:08

Hmm.

2:41:082:41:12

So I've started to collect little

things that I think will help...

2:41:122:41:16

Of memories.

2:41:162:41:25

Both girls want to spend as much

time with their mother as possible.

2:41:252:41:28

Imagon gets especially

anxious when they're apart.

2:41:282:41:29

If she's not there I call her,

like, every night.

2:41:292:41:32

She says you need to kind of stop

doing that, so you're

2:41:322:41:35

ready for the future,

because you know that you can't just

2:41:352:41:37

call me up once she's passed, so...

2:41:372:41:41

Sometimes I just want

to smack her in the face

2:41:412:41:44

and tell her to shut up, but...

2:41:442:41:46

Pretending to drink champagne...

2:41:462:41:47

Do you think you're

ready for that day?

2:41:472:41:48

Nope.

2:41:482:41:51

Every day, I dread that day

and I never want it to come.

2:41:512:42:01

It is quite a watch, it is an

amazing programme. The documentary

2:42:032:42:08

is called Saying Goodbye.

2:42:082:42:13

We're joined now by some

of the people involved -

2:42:132:42:15

Nick Read, the film's director,

and Shayna and Dawn.

2:42:152:42:17

Good morning.

2:42:172:42:19

Dawn, You Saw Your Daughters

Talking, It Is Something That Most

2:42:192:42:23

Of Us Don't Like To Think About That

I Could Talk About, It Is A

2:42:232:42:27

Conversation You Had To Have With

Your Children, How Are You Choosing

2:42:272:42:31

To Go About It? I have been told

from day one that honesty is the

2:42:312:42:35

best way of approaching this, so

they are not using their own

2:42:352:42:39

imaginations to fill the gaps. The

moment I found out my cancer

2:42:392:42:43

returned and was incurable, it was

important to explain what that

2:42:432:42:47

meant.

They had heard for almost

three years that I was going to beat

2:42:472:42:53

it, then suddenly the dialogue had

to change considerably. It was

2:42:532:42:59

making them aware of the outcome.

Not making them the frightful, you

2:42:592:43:04

know, about it, I'm just helping

them deal with it and come to terms

2:43:042:43:09

with the prognosis.

That is Madeline

and Imogen. You say you have

2:43:092:43:17

explained carefully but while their

mum, they love you and you love

2:43:172:43:20

them, so how have they dealt with at

diagnosis and that conversation? --

2:43:202:43:25

you have explained carefully but you

are them.

I explained from day one

2:43:252:43:29

that the cancer was very aggressive,

they always knew there was a

2:43:292:43:33

potential for it to return. By

explaining we will make every second

2:43:332:43:37

counts together now and we are one

of the fortunate people, plenty of

2:43:372:43:42

children experienced bereavement

with no warning, whether it be an

2:43:422:43:45

accident or some sort of tragedy. We

have had three years of making every

2:43:452:43:50

second count, we are privileged.

Thank you for coming to talk to us.

2:43:502:44:01

You are in the documentary. How did

you cope when your dad passed away?

2:44:012:44:05

What were the most difficult things?

Everything, really. Just getting up.

2:44:052:44:11

He used to make me a hot chocolate

every morning, just not having that,

2:44:112:44:16

I would kind of just break down. It

was really hard. Without sounding

2:44:162:44:23

Cringely, he was my best friend.

You

are not sending cringey, it is

2:44:232:44:32

beautiful.

He was my best friend, I

didn't have lots of girlfriends. So

2:44:322:44:37

when he left... He was diagnosed on

the 12th of November 2012 passed

2:44:372:44:41

away on the 8th of December.

So

quick.

And the thing with cancer,

2:44:412:44:47

when I was 12 I thought that at

least then you have that to prepare,

2:44:472:44:52

and you can do whatever they want to

do. With them, to make sure their

2:44:522:44:57

life is the best it can be. But he

came home one night from work, and

2:44:572:45:03

then just went straight to hospital

because he thought something was

2:45:032:45:06

wrong, and he did not come home

until just for a week, then he was

2:45:062:45:11

back in hospital.

So tragic. Talking

about it, has it helped you? Do you

2:45:112:45:16

feel better that you have shared it?

2:45:162:45:25

Definitely. Obviously, I don't know

if a lot of my friends even know, my

2:45:252:45:32

dad has passed away and for me, just

to tell my story, my little sister,

2:45:322:45:39

big sister story, my mum's story,

just keep going in life. That is the

2:45:392:45:45

best you can do, to make them proud.

Doing this documentary has helped

2:45:452:45:51

people realise there is a platform

of young people that are struggling

2:45:512:45:56

with this so they can get the help

they need.

This is done ahead of BBC

2:45:562:46:02

children in need because lots people

are given help and there are various

2:46:022:46:07

places. In some ways it is taboo

subject, why did you want to make a

2:46:072:46:15

documentary about it?

It is

precisely the sort of thing people

2:46:152:46:21

keep behind a veil and we are very

English about it, we shouldn't talk

2:46:212:46:26

about that, children and death in

the same sentence. I was drawn to it

2:46:262:46:32

because people needed to talk about

it. When I started researching it,

2:46:322:46:36

we found hundreds of young people

who are very keen to talk about it,

2:46:362:46:42

pass on their experiences and

memories and advise other young

2:46:422:46:46

people who might be facing the same

eventuality.

It is amazing to hear

2:46:462:46:53

about the conversation you have had

with your daughters. How is it

2:46:532:46:57

listening to this young lady talking

about processing how her dad died,

2:46:572:47:03

your daughters will have to go

through that at some stage?

When you

2:47:032:47:10

see the film, the children are

inspiring. They have taken the worst

2:47:102:47:16

situation, embraced it, dealt with

it and instead of using it as an

2:47:162:47:20

excuse for not fulfilling their full

potential, using it to make their

2:47:202:47:25

parents proud. If my children end up

half as brave, I would be the

2:47:252:47:32

proudest mum on the planet.

You two

have a special bond and it is great

2:47:322:47:39

to see that. You had a particular

chair that was important, tell us

2:47:392:47:44

about that?

Every Saturday, you know

how families come together and they

2:47:442:47:51

have dinner. We would sit down and

watch Saturday night TV. My dad

2:47:512:47:59

would have his spot and everyone

would have this set around him.

2:47:592:48:04

Dad's chair.

He always said it was

because of his back, but it was the

2:48:042:48:11

perfect view of the TV. That is dad

all over. In the documentary, I find

2:48:112:48:18

myself looking at that space and it

just kind of like recalled the

2:48:182:48:24

memories I had with him. I found a

photo the other day of me and him

2:48:242:48:30

and he is in that spot. It is

something that is quite important to

2:48:302:48:34

us, five years later.

Of course it

is.

All the children have special

2:48:342:48:45

memories. They have real insights

that everybody can learn and gain

2:48:452:48:50

something from, what ever age. What

blew me away was how eloquent and

2:48:502:48:56

brave the young people were in the

film, in terms of opening up with

2:48:562:49:01

what a lot of other people might

regard as very private memories.

2:49:012:49:06

Thank you for sharing your memories.

We have a lot of things we talk

2:49:062:49:13

about, but I can recommend this

programme to you, it is a brilliant

2:49:132:49:17

watch and thank you for coming on

and talking about it.

2:49:172:49:22

BBC Children in Need

is on BBC One, this Friday -

2:49:222:49:25

the 17th November -

at 7:30pm.

2:49:252:49:30

I think that is shown at about 10:45

p:m.. They will be on the BBC

2:49:302:49:36

iPlayer if you miss it on Friday

night as well.

2:49:362:49:40

Carol's getting into the festive

spirit in Covent Garden

2:49:402:49:42

with the weather.

2:49:422:49:46

I wanted to show you some of the

decorations in Covent Garden. Look

2:49:502:49:56

at these mistletoe chandeliers. The

traders are getting ready to put out

2:49:562:50:04

there where is the later on. The

festivities kicking off later on.

2:50:042:50:09

Let's talk to Michelle, who is

director of Covent Garden. You have

2:50:092:50:14

switched the lights on this morning

just for us. They have been switched

2:50:142:50:18

off again and then switch back on

again tonight?

Covent Garden is

2:50:182:50:24

coming alive, we will put on a

special show. We turned the lights

2:50:242:50:28

on a specially for you, they will be

switched off again shortly, and then

2:50:282:50:33

tonight, the switch on comes to

life. We have an extra special show,

2:50:332:50:39

42nd St, the award-winning musical

will be performing through the

2:50:392:50:42

market building and they will be

joined by Pudsey Bear supporting

2:50:422:50:47

BBC's children in need and two

special guest, I cannot tell you who

2:50:472:50:51

they are.

I will be in trouble. Give

us a clue.

I cannot, I will be in

2:50:512:50:58

trouble.

How long does it take to

plan this and put the decorations

2:50:582:51:04

up?

We like to start a year ahead.

The tree has taken 100 hours just to

2:51:042:51:12

put together and about 100 people

have been involved in putting that

2:51:122:51:17

up. Elsewhere, you will see 150,000

lives which will adorn different

2:51:172:51:21

parts of Covent Garden and that has

been weeks in the making.

This tree

2:51:212:51:29

is hand-picked?

Yes, a member of the

team goes to a British farm,

2:51:292:51:33

hand-picks the tree and this is the

result, this is the one we have got,

2:51:332:51:37

which we think is one of the best so

far.

You take one hundred hours to

2:51:372:51:41

put it, how long does it take to

take it down?

It takes a good few

2:51:412:51:46

days to get it down, we like to do

it in a methodical way.

What else is

2:51:462:51:52

happening tonight because the shops

are getting involved?

Yes, Christmas

2:51:522:51:58

begins from tonight. A lot of the

retailers will be participating,

2:51:582:52:01

they will have their own offers and

experiences. It is more about the

2:52:012:52:06

experience they offer in-store. You

can do wreath making with the

2:52:062:52:11

nursery, you can get involved in the

beauty classes so there is a lot to

2:52:112:52:16

do.

It has been such a pleasure

talking to you. The festivities are

2:52:162:52:21

getting underway here, the weather

is set fair as well. The forecast is

2:52:212:52:25

a cloudy one and a milder one. I say

all of us, I will put a caveat in

2:52:252:52:31

there. If you are in Scotland or the

north of Northern Ireland you will

2:52:312:52:35

see some sunshine. We stop the

forecast at nine o'clock in

2:52:352:52:40

Scotland, showers for the

north-west. The rest of Scotland,

2:52:402:52:43

largely dry and bright and the cloud

tending to melt. We have two weather

2:52:432:52:51

fronts for England and Wales. They

are producing spots of rain here and

2:52:512:52:56

there and also some drizzle. Not

everywhere but if it is a grey

2:52:562:53:00

start, for some it will brighten up,

for others we will see some sunshine

2:53:002:53:03

through the course of the day.

Across Wales, one end of the weather

2:53:032:53:10

front is producing rain. Cloud

across Wales this morning and a fair

2:53:102:53:14

bit of cloud across Northern Ireland

but breaking up in the North in

2:53:142:53:17

particular. The sunshine will be

predominant across Scotland and to

2:53:172:53:22

Northern Ireland throughout the day.

Showers will develop across the

2:53:222:53:24

North of Scotland and some of them

will be heavy and more widespread in

2:53:242:53:27

the north. It will also become

windy. For England, Wales on the

2:53:272:53:34

rest of Northern Ireland, you hang

on to the cloud, still some spots of

2:53:342:53:39

rain but it is more in the West,

particularly over the coasts and

2:53:392:53:46

hills in the West. It will feel

milder than it did yesterday. Today,

2:53:462:53:52

temperatures will be in double

figures. Overnight, under the clear

2:53:522:53:57

skies in the north, a widespread

frost across parts of Scotland.

2:53:572:54:00

There will be patchy fog and

freezing fog. For Northern Ireland,

2:54:002:54:05

England and Wales it will be cloudy.

There will be some patchy rain but

2:54:052:54:09

we will also see fog develop. That

is likely to be across the Midlands,

2:54:092:54:15

Lincolnshire and East Anglia. It

could be problematic, something

2:54:152:54:18

worth keeping an eye on if you are

travelling through the night or

2:54:182:54:22

early tomorrow. Tomorrow it will

take a while before the fog does

2:54:222:54:26

live. Some of it lifting into low

cloud. A cloudy day across England,

2:54:262:54:31

Wales and Northern Ireland. A

brighter day across Scotland with

2:54:312:54:34

showers and windy in the north.

Later we will see brightness push

2:54:342:54:39

further south into northern England,

parts of Wales and Northern England.

2:54:392:54:44

We will have a new weather front

into the north-east of Scotland and

2:54:442:54:48

that will spread southwards during

the course of Thursday and Thursday

2:54:482:54:51

is cloudy with some bright spells,

the brightest of which will be in

2:54:512:54:54

parts of the North. They will be

switched off in a moment, those

2:54:542:55:04

lights and then switched on later?

Absolutely right, they were on for

2:55:042:55:09

us this morning. I liked the way you

just walk around, and people switch

2:55:092:55:14

lights on for you. I love that.

Another piece of evidence of the

2:55:142:55:22

power of Carol Kirkwood. Wherever

she goes, lights turn on.

2:55:222:55:26

Almost a third of people aged 50

to 64 are not in work

2:55:322:55:35

and many of those feel like they're

trapped - according to research

2:55:352:55:38

from a charity out today.

2:55:382:55:39

Sean's taking a look.

2:55:392:55:40

This is research from the Centre

for Ageing Better, looking at those

2:55:402:55:43

aged between 50 and 65.

2:55:432:55:45

And a million people,

almost a third of people that age -

2:55:452:55:48

are out of work, not

because they want to be,

2:55:482:55:51

but because of issues such

as ill health, caring

2:55:512:55:54

responsibilities or redundancy.

2:55:542:55:55

That can really take its toll

on someone's confidence and,

2:55:552:55:59

as we often hear, a knock-on effect

can be on their finances.

2:55:592:56:02

Qurab Ahmed is 55 and told us

what happened to her.

2:56:022:56:07

When my daughter became

ill and we learned what

2:56:072:56:11

the circumstances were going to be,

I had sort of given up and thought,

2:56:112:56:14

this is my life now,

I'm going to be a full-time carer,

2:56:142:56:17

I'm not going to be able to go back

to work and I need to think

2:56:172:56:21

about letting my employers know that

that would be the position.

2:56:212:56:25

I was always encouraged not to make

a decision just then

2:56:252:56:28

and let things pan out.

2:56:282:56:33

I'm so grateful that my employer

was encouraging and supported me

2:56:332:56:37

through this difficult time,

and we kept in touch.

2:56:372:56:41

Also that feeling that I'm still

wanted, that they needed me at work.

2:56:412:56:45

Not many employers

provide that flexibility.

2:56:452:56:48

Some people will just stop

and they'll never be able

2:56:482:56:50

to get back into work.

2:56:502:56:59

That is good news story, but are

lots

2:56:592:57:01

That is good news story, but are

lots of people affected?

She

2:57:012:57:05

obviously had an employer who

engaged with her through the

2:57:052:57:09

process. John has said his wife is

58 and has been out of work for two

2:57:092:57:14

years. Her main barrier is every

application has to be done online.

2:57:142:57:19

Although it is illegal to

discriminate age, she feels

2:57:192:57:23

employers and agencies do set age

limits on most jobs. She has applied

2:57:232:57:28

for hundreds of jobs, been on

courses and cannot find work.

2:57:282:57:33

Dean in Malden has said he was made

redundant at the age of 48. He said

2:57:332:57:39

freelancing is the way to go.

Brilliant, now secured a permanent

2:57:392:57:43

role, they recognise the experience

I had. That is a bit of an

2:57:432:57:48

entrepreneurial spirit but isn't

that easy for everybody.

What did

2:57:482:57:51

people do about it? Is it how people

feel, does it come down to

2:57:512:57:57

employers?

If you have caring

responsibilities that have appeared,

2:57:572:58:01

maybe it can be out of the blue. We

heard from The Centre For Ageing you

2:58:012:58:09

can request flexible working from

your employer, but they don't

2:58:092:58:13

necessarily have to grant it.

Engaging with your employer, you

2:58:132:58:17

know your situation is changing, it

can be a good thing. If you have

2:58:172:58:21

ill-health or you have been made

redundant, they were saying, talk to

2:58:212:58:25

somebody. People don't talk about it

and they find themselves feeling

2:58:252:58:28

worse as the years by.

2:58:282:58:36

Our next guest as won legions of

fans on Facebook, Instagram on

2:58:362:58:40

Twitter for her honest depictions of

life as a mum.

2:58:402:58:48

She has turned home videos into an

art form, along with her husband,

2:58:482:58:52

Tom Fletcher from McFly. Let's have

a look at life inside the Fletcher

2:58:522:58:56

household.

2:58:562:58:59

I'm really pants at doing a "day

in the life" video, simply

2:58:592:59:01

because I forget certain bits.

2:59:012:59:03

Last night before I went

to bed I was like, "Oh,

2:59:032:59:05

left the camera downstairs."

2:59:052:59:06

But, to be honest,

even if the camera was there,

2:59:062:59:09

I think I would have forgotten.

2:59:092:59:10

I only remembered after breakfast

that I wanted to film

2:59:102:59:13

today in its entirety.

2:59:132:59:15

Never trust me with superglue,

I always superglue

2:59:172:59:19

my fingers together.

2:59:192:59:23

No day is the same.

2:59:232:59:24

As with every parent.

2:59:242:59:25

But we have days where Buzz

is at nursery and we're working...

2:59:252:59:28

CHILD CHATTERS.

2:59:282:59:31

Thank you!

2:59:312:59:36

Buzz, who is your best friend?

2:59:392:59:41

Mama.

2:59:412:59:44

That is an almost day

in the life of me.

2:59:442:59:46

All right, I'll speak to you later.

2:59:462:59:48

Lots of love, bye!

2:59:482:59:58

Welcome to the programme. Watching

some of those videos we feel like we

2:59:583:00:01

know a lot about you. Do you ever

worry about letting the world into

3:00:013:00:06

so many aspects of your life?

I

don't, I try not to overthink it,

3:00:063:00:11

because I think if I did it would

really restrict what I do. I never

3:00:113:00:15

put anything out there that would

make me feel uncomfortable and I

3:00:153:00:18

literally go on my intuition, if I

feel anxious then it is a no-go.

3:00:183:00:24

How much of your life is filmed? Are

you doing this every day?

No, not at

3:00:243:00:30

all. Some of the vlogs are literally

as sitting and talking, it is not

3:00:303:00:38

like we have a camera every second

of every day, we're not a TV show

3:00:383:00:41

with cameras or the rent, we do not

have things up in the house or

3:00:413:00:45

anything. We just like to capture

little bits.

People often talk about

3:00:453:00:50

the Facebook life, do you try to

portray your life as it is or do you

3:00:503:00:56

sometimes feel it can't be there

because it needs to look tidy?

Tom

3:00:563:01:01

will say I always tell him off

because he will start filming and I

3:01:013:01:05

am like, there is rubbish right

behind you! But I try to keep things

3:01:053:01:09

as they are.

It is interesting that we live in a

3:01:093:01:15

new age, you have touched a nerve,

people are interested and engaged

3:01:153:01:19

with what you are doing, why? Is it

a way of... Is at a community?

I

3:01:193:01:26

feel there is such a community

online, people are being honest and

3:01:263:01:30

we are not moaning. For a long time

everybody wanted to keep the

3:01:303:01:34

Instagram perfect life, I think it

is refreshing when I see things that

3:01:343:01:37

are not that, when people say it is

difficult, because otherwise you are

3:01:373:01:43

always in a position where you feel

you are doing it wrong because you

3:01:433:01:47

are the only person finding it hard

or failing, we are all winging it

3:01:473:01:50

and failing on a daily basis.

Sounds

familiar. And your new novel, Some

3:01:503:01:57

Kind of Wonderful, I suppose is

about a seemingly perfect life that

3:01:573:01:59

falls apart?

We meet Lucy, we

instantly know she has been in a

3:01:593:02:04

relationship that ten years,

childhood sweethearts, people think

3:02:043:02:08

they will get engaged, every holiday

in a long-term relationship people

3:02:083:02:12

are like, it is now, it will happen.

Right at the start we realise it is

3:02:123:02:16

not happening and it is a failed

proposal and her boyfriend gets down

3:02:163:02:20

on one knee, very drunkenly, puts

out the ring but then says I can't

3:02:203:02:24

do it.

It is appalling for her,

isn't it?

Writing it was so much

3:02:243:02:34

fun! So that is where we start, it

is about her finding out who she is,

3:02:343:02:39

who would she be without Ian in her

life? Is she who she should be? It

3:02:393:02:44

is looking back to who she was at 18

Andrea dressing things at 28.

You

3:02:443:02:49

are childhood sweethearts.

I think I

am who I should be. When you are in

3:02:493:02:54

a long-term relationship your

memories are so congealed, so

3:02:543:03:02

interlinked.

It is interesting and

the book how the character had to

3:03:023:03:04

undertake that and move out of the

flat and get back to herself?

She

3:03:043:03:08

does not want anything that is a

memory of them both together, that

3:03:083:03:11

is really difficult because

everything in the flat that once

3:03:113:03:15

held so many amazing memories, she

does not want any of it. She goes

3:03:153:03:18

back to her mum's, gets out her old

Spice Girls posters and thinks where

3:03:183:03:24

would I have been if he was not in

my life, digging through the old

3:03:243:03:28

memories.

I will not show you this full video,

3:03:283:03:32

but I can show you part of it, it is

from your wedding. 90 million people

3:03:323:03:36

have seen this, your husband Tom

sang you a 15 minute song as part of

3:03:363:03:41

his minute speech. It shames every

other groom...

We don't go to

3:03:413:03:48

weddings without it being mentioned.

It is pretty incredible, I had no

3:03:483:03:53

idea it was happening. The choir

that came out at the end were from

3:03:533:03:57

the school where we met.

You have no

idea he would put it together?

No

3:03:573:04:03

idea. I had a train on my dress and

I went out to the side of the venue

3:04:033:04:08

to pin my dresser before dinner and

I even saw the TV screen, and I did

3:04:083:04:13

not suspect any of it.

There was a standing ovation at the

3:04:133:04:18

end.

All of our friends and family

singing along, it could not have

3:04:183:04:23

been better if it is in a film.

Thank you very much, lovely to see

3:04:233:04:27

you.

3:04:273:04:27

Giovanna's book is called

Some Kind of Wonderful.

3:04:273:04:31

Shane Richie will be

here in a minute to tell us

3:04:313:04:34

about swapping Albert Square

for the recording studio.

3:04:343:04:36

But first a last,brief

look at the headlines

3:04:363:04:38

where you are this morning.

3:04:383:06:18

Welcome back. Our next guest has

bounced into the studio.

I rolled in

3:06:243:06:29

a little bit. Great to be here,

thank you for inviting me.

3:06:293:06:33

I like your brutal honesty, you said

with five children I am happy to get

3:06:333:06:38

out of the house and talk about

anything.

I am happy to do the

3:06:383:06:42

weather. Here is Shane Richie with

the weather!

3:06:423:06:45

We have a game in our house, it is

over to Carol with the weather.

3:06:453:06:53

Normally I am doing the school run,

we do a game, it is Carol with the

3:06:533:06:57

weather, we have to say it before

you guys. Carol with the weather!

3:06:573:07:03

But another bout Carol with the

weather...

The whole programme is

3:07:033:07:06

about Carol with the weather.

We know that. We're here to talk

3:07:063:07:10

about your new venture, country

music. Inspired by your own life

3:07:103:07:15

experiences. Let's have a taste of

the new record.

3:07:153:07:19

# You're the reason I'm still here

3:07:193:07:21

# Am I the one you

were sent to save?

3:07:213:07:24

# You came upon me, wave on wave #

3:07:243:07:28

# She was a heartache

on the dance floor

3:07:283:07:30

# heartache on the dancefloor

3:07:303:07:32

# Yeah, she was movin'

through my mind

3:07:323:07:34

# Moving through my mind

3:07:343:07:36

# I gotta know her name

3:07:363:07:39

# I got to see her again

3:07:393:07:41

# She's got me wondering

3:07:413:07:43

# Yeah, I'm just wondering #

3:07:433:07:47

# There's gonna be

a heartache tonight

3:07:473:07:49

# A heartache tonight, I know

3:07:493:07:54

# There's gonna be

a heartache tonight

3:07:543:07:57

# A heartache tonight, I know

3:07:573:08:01

# Lord, I know

3:08:013:08:03

# There's gonna be

a heartache tonight #

3:08:033:08:10

Sounds good!

Thank you.

The genre is

new country? What happened to old

3:08:103:08:17

country?

There is nothing wrong with

old country, the old country is

3:08:173:08:21

still there if you like country and

western style, the great artists,

3:08:213:08:24

Johnny Cash. At about 12 years ago a

country music started changing in

3:08:243:08:28

the States, lots of the new artists

were listening to soul and R&B, and

3:08:283:08:33

that is where my head was up. I have

been touring with my band for years,

3:08:333:08:38

even when doing EastEnders I would

do gigs in pub car parks, fields, as

3:08:383:08:46

long as I got to play with my band.

I was funding this album about three

3:08:463:08:49

years ago, taking old classics and

trying to give them a new country

3:08:493:08:52

feel, changing a guitar for a fiddle

or a steel pedal guitar, changing

3:08:523:08:56

the field. It came full circle, I

did Children in Need, me and Tony

3:08:563:09:00

Hadley sang together last year. A

couple of record companies said do

3:09:003:09:04

you fancy doing an album? I was

like, OK. When I did originally I'm

3:09:043:09:11

Your Man, I was asked by Simon

Cowell if I wanted to do an album

3:09:113:09:15

but my contract was with EastEnders

and I could not do it. It has come

3:09:153:09:19

full circle, I have been playing

this with my band 48, nine or ten

3:09:193:09:23

years.

You have written a song with

one of your sons?

With Jake, track

3:09:233:09:27

four. It is called Shut Up, All I

Want Is You. It is my tenth

3:09:273:09:36

anniversary, Christie is watching, I

am sorry, we forgot. -- I forgot.

3:09:363:09:41

Jake and his band warehouse sitting,

OK, Rixton...

That sounds dangerous.

3:09:413:09:51

I said to Christie, I am sorry I

missed our anniversary and she said,

3:09:513:09:56

shut up, all I want is you. Jake

thought it would be a great title

3:09:563:10:00

for a song. So after I told him to

shut up and feed the dogs, we

3:10:003:10:05

started collaborating. Barely

enough, that song is gathering

3:10:053:10:09

momentum in the States.

How exciting

is that for you?

Really exciting.

3:10:093:10:14

Did you have a lot of control over

what was on the album? Could you put

3:10:143:10:26

what you like them?

I did, it was

three years in the making. At one

3:10:263:10:29

point they said wouldn't it be great

if we could get Jesse who plays Kat

3:10:293:10:32

to sing Islands In The Stream? I was

like, that is not where I am going.

3:10:323:10:37

I like the idea.

This time next year

it will be you two! I chose all the

3:10:373:10:43

songs on the island and a rearranged

them with a writer/ producer, Nick

3:10:433:10:50

southward.

You have rearranged one

of my favourite songs, I Won't Let

3:10:503:10:54

The Sun Go Down On Me.

Do you like

it?

I have not heard -- not heard

3:10:543:11:03

it.

Nik Kershaw sang at my 40th. I

grew up listening to Irish music, my

3:11:033:11:11

dad ran Irish clubs. I wanted to

take a song I could do live, people

3:11:113:11:15

would recognise it. Bobby Valentino,

who played Young At Heart by The

3:11:153:11:23

Bluebells played it, we may did like

the Pogues, fiddle, Irish feel that

3:11:233:11:27

I grew up listening to you. But

Iceland we said you were coming on,

3:11:273:11:33

you should never read one comment on

social media but one person said

3:11:333:11:37

Nick Knowles last week, Shane Richie

this week, men of a certain age seem

3:11:373:11:41

to be producing albums.

There is a whole bandwagon, I get

3:11:413:11:46

it. I think Bradley Walsh and

Alexandra Armstrong opened at

3:11:463:11:52

Pandora's box. It will be you two

next year, like I said. Eddie will

3:11:523:12:00

be doing It's Raining Men for

Children in Need.

Somebody right

3:12:003:12:04

that down! -- Carol will be doing. I

understand

-- I understand record

3:12:043:12:14

labels jumping on the bandwagon.

People judge you when you have an

3:12:143:12:18

album out, but in life, it is great

you are able to do what you love,

3:12:183:12:23

have control and truly something you

feel passionately about?

What an

3:12:233:12:27

opportunity to do something that I

have played with my band for years.

3:12:273:12:31

When they offered me the deal I was

going to snap it up, as long as I

3:12:313:12:36

was in control.

Are we allowed to

mention on New Year's Eve? Good god

3:12:363:12:41

yes! Am I allowed?

I thought you

were going to set it he was spending

3:12:413:12:46

the weekend with me! New Year's Eve,

radio to have given me my own show.

3:12:463:12:53

That will be on New Year's Eve on

radio two, New Country. I will be

3:12:533:13:00

playing some stuff that people may

not be familiar with, but country

3:13:003:13:04

fans will really like. Bands like

Old Dominion, people like Keith

3:13:043:13:12

urban, maybe a couple of my tracks.

What about 2018?

Benidorm, I have

3:13:123:13:19

filmed Benidorm, which comes out in

January, which is just mad. It is

3:13:193:13:24

the tenth series, it features a

character I played a couple of years

3:13:243:13:28

ago. And hopefully maybe tour with

the band.

Lovely to see you, you are

3:13:283:13:33

a bundle of energy.

3:13:333:13:34

Shane Richie's album

is called A Country Soul.

3:13:343:13:37

Out in time for Christmas excavation

I think we will all be playing here

3:13:373:13:43

is Carol.

3:13:433:13:45

Now it's time for The Housing

Enforcers, with Matt Allwright.

3:13:453:13:47