30/11/2017 Breakfast


30/11/2017

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Hello.

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This is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty

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and Charlie Stayt.

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Donald Trump lashes out

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at Theresa May in a row

over anti-Muslim videos.

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The Prime Minister

criticised the US President

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for sharing a series of posts

by the far-right group

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Britain First.

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But last night, Mr Trump tweeted

that she should instead be focussd

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on tackling terrorism.

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Good morning.

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It's Thursday 30 November.

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Also this morning:

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A warning that children with special

educational needs aren't getting

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the support they need

once they hit 18.

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We'll hear from parents desperately

concerned about what the future

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holds for their families.

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I once said many years to go --

years ago to the social worker when

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I was small, if something happens to

me, put in the grave with me and I

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still feel that way.

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A breakthrough in

migraine prevention.

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Doctors say a new treatment

could significantly cut the number

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and severity of attacks.

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Kelloggs will be cutting the sugar

in some of its sweeter cereals,

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but not all of them.

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So later on, I'll be talking

to company's boss about why they've

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taken this decision now.

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How about this?

Wayne Rooney with a

hat-trick capped with a wonder goal

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for Everton in front of Sam Allott

Ayce who will be appointed manager

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later.

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-- Allardyce.

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And Matt has the weather.

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A bit of snow in Scotland the

Andrews Day. More details coming up.

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--4 St Andrews Day.

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Good morning.

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First, our main story.

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President Trump has told Theresa May

that she should pay more attention

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to tackling terrorism in the UK,

rather than criticising him.

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The message was delivered

in a tweet last night

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after Downing Street criticised

the US President for sharing

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anti-Muslim videos posted

by a British far-right group

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on social media.

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The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister to cancel

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Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

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Our North America Correspondent

Laura Bicker has more.

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They may have held hands once

but this so-called special

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relationship is now being tested

by a series of presidential tweets.

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First, from the account of a far

right anti-Muslim group called

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Britain First, Donald Trump

retweeted three inflammatory

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videos to his 43 million followers.

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The first claimed incorrectly

to show a Muslim migrant attacking

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a man on crutches.

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When challenged, the White House

said the videos might not be

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real but the threat was.

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Both Theresa May and a lot of other

world leaders across this country,

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I mean, across the world,

know that these are real threats

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that we have to talk about.

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I think Europe has seen that a lot

firsthand and something

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the President wants to continue

to talk about and continue to make

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sure that we're dealing with.

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Theresa May is on a tour

of the Middle East but her official

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spokesman said the President had

been wrong to share the posts.

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It was that condemnation

which prompted a Twitter outburst

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from Donald Trump's account.

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He told Theresa May not

to focus on him but to focus

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on the destructive

radical Islamic terrorism taking

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place within big United Kingdom.

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"We are doing just fine," he said.

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The President has caused diplomatic

headaches for the UK several times

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already this year.

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From backing Nigel Farage

as an ambassador to Washington,

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to attacking the London Mayor Sadiq

Khan,

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all from his favourite

social media platform.

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It may be a show of strength

for his supporters but it may also

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weaken his position abroad.

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Laura Bicker, BBC News, Washington.

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We will be talking shortly to Alex

Forsyth who is travelling with

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Theresa May.

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Plans to get an extra one million

disabled people into work will be

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published by the government today.

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Probably a new banana. Hannah is

testing face recognition gadgets

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which could help at work. She lost

her sight five years ago and is now

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registered blind. During that time,

she found it hard to get a job.

I

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left uni with a first-class degree

in law and its pink turned down the

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basic admen rolls and I had

significant experience. Some of

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them, I might not have got the job

anyway but sum it is clear from the

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questions they are asking, it was

because of a disability.

The

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employment gap between disabled and

nondisabled people has not

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significantly changed for years

despite a pledge back in 2015 to

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halve it. Today the government has

published a plan to see 1 million

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more disabled people in work over

the next ten years.

We are making

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progress. We have 600,000 more

people in work than we did four

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years ago but what we want to do is

continue to work with employers to

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continue to exploit the

opportunities of new technology and

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to keep testing and learning to find

out what works, what are the things

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that can actually make a difference?

So that more disabled people can

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fulfil their potential and get a

good job.

Today's announcement also

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includes measures to allow access to

personalised support for those with

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mental health issues and an increase

in a variety of healthcare

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professionals who are able to issue

fitness to work notices but with

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employment rates for those with

learning to do -- disabilities at

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around 6%, the process could be said

to be too slow.

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We'll be talking to the Work

and Pensions Secretary David Gauke

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about this just after 0800.

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Investigations are underway

following the death

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of a Bosnian Croat war criminal,

who drank poison in court

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after he was convicted

of crimes against humanity.

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Just moments after

United Nations judges

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upheld his 20-year sentence at

the International Criminal Tribunal

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in the Hague, Slobodan

Praljak said he rejected

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the verdict and drank

what he said was poison.

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The 72-year old died in hospital

and the UN announced the courtroom

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was now "a crime scene".

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Two clinical trials have shown

a new approach to preventing

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migraine can reduce the number

of attacks, and their severity.

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Both trials used antibodies that

shield the nervous system

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from the headaches.

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Here's more from our health

and science correspondent James

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Gallagher.

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Imogen Smiths about it -- images

started Haddin migrans two years

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ago. She was having a tax every week

and forced to take a year out of

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college.

It was really scary

certainly, when they happened, I

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didn't know what they were because I

thought a migraine was just a

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headache so we had to keep looking

into more serious things.

One in

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seven people in the UK live with the

agony of migraine. Scientists have

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now developed new treatments which

target a chemical in the nervous

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system which develop -- which stop a

migraine developing. Two trials

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published. One, 955 patients a

monthly injection of antibodies.

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Before the trial, they were having

migraines eight days a month on

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average. Around 50% of patients were

able to cut their migraines and

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harp. For drug companies are

developing similar treatments and

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scientists say a new therapy could

give patients their life back.

These

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treatments are the first migraine

specific preventive is ever. For the

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most substantial neurological cause

of disability on the planet. It has

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a huge advance for all of us.

-- it

is. Imogen's migraines are under

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control and she is now studying to

be a nurse but currently available

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drugs don't work for everyone and

can cause side-effects. New options

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for people living with migraine are

desperately needed.

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Litter levels recorded on the UK's

beaches this year are 10 per cent

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higher than they were a year ago,

and 20 per cent of everything found

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came from food and drink rubbish.

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The Marine Conservation

Society is now calling

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on the Government to put a levy

on single-use items that are handed

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over over for free in their millions

when we're eating and drinking out.

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This would mean taxing

items such as straws,

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cups, lids, stirrers and cutlery.

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Those are the main stories this

morning. John Isner adjusting its

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leaves. We got a golfer you? I love

a good goal. It gets the thumbs up

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from the potential new Everton

manager, Sam Allardyce. His third to

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the hat-trick. That is the peak. I

will show you.

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The Sam Allardyce era

will begin at Everton later

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and it

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got off to the perfect start

with what Wayne Rooney scored

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the best goal of his career,

rounded off a hattrick in a four nil

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win over West Ham, in front

of the man who will be named Everton

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manager today.

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-- 4-0.

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96 minutes on the clock,

being held to a 1-all draw

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with Southampton, Raheem Sterling

scored this winning goal.

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As top of the table Manchester City

made it a club-record

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12th-successive Premier League win.

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Fair to say he and his

manager enjoyed it.

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After arriving in New Zealand,

Ben Stokes has signed to play

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domestic cricket for Canterbury,

but is unlikely to play

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in the Ashes.

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A decision on whether to charge him

following an incident outside

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a Bristol nightclub isn't expected

for several weeks with his case

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now

in the hands of the Crown

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Prosecution Service.

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Chris Froome says he's targetting

victory in next year's Giro d'Italia

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to complete a hattrick

of cycling's biggest events.

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He'd become only the third

rider to win the Giro,

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the Vuelta d'Espana

and the Tour de France.

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He keeps a sort of setting is girls

and I think that's the thing, he

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wants to break new boundaries and

where he to win, it would be

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historic achievement if he did when

the Giro d'Italia. That is what is

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setting its sights on. Just

remarkable. Superhuman.

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Back to our main story this morning,

Donald Trump has hit back

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at Theresa May after she criticised

him for sharing far-right

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videos on Twitter.

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The US President told

the Prime Minister that she should

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be focusing on what he called

destructive Radical Islamic

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terrorism in the UK

rather than on him.

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Alex Forsyth is with us now. Good to

see you, you are win the Prime

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Minister in Jordan. Any sense of how

the Prime Minister is reacting to

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Donald Trump's reaction?

There is

some irony that this tour of the

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Middle East that Theresa May is

undertaking is to build new global

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relationships and we have an

argument brewing with the President

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of the United States. Yesterday,

Downing Street issued a bit to the

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President saying he was wrong to

tweak what he did but we haven't

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heard from the Prime Minister. She

is giving a speech here in Jordan to

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members of the Cabinet and business

community and during that they will

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be an opportunity to journalists to

ask questions and you can bet what

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is going to come up and at this

stage, it's inevitable she will have

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to address the situation directly

particularly given Donald Trump's

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latest tweet and senior members of

her party have had a lot to this --

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to say about this.

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He was backed by the leader of the

Scottish Conservatives, the Labour

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Party later Jeremy Corbyn stating

the government must condemn this.

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All eyes on Theresa May to seek how

will react.

We will be catching up

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with you later in the programme.

Alex Forsyth travelling with the

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Prime Minister in Jordan.

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Michael Johns, a former speechwriter

for President George HW Bush,

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joins us now.

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Thank you the time this morning,

Michael. If you could give your

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analysis of where this sort of

argument sits right now.

I think you

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start with an understanding that has

appreciated in Washington and London

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that the relationship between our

countries is so vital and shared

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interests are so abundant that you

don't want to see even an inch of

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space between us. What is

unfortunate is that what has entered

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the public domain could have been

handled more privately but I

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understand the terms -- the concerns

on both parts. Spend a bit of time

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in United Kingdom, I have, and I

have engaged with a lot of people

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and the perception on the President

was a little fast and loose on some

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facts, maybe. The group is not

recognised in the United States are

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not well respected in the UK. On the

US perspective, what he's trying to

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across is really understanding that

we are engaged in this global War on

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terror. It requires a real degree of

commitment and Alliance and no room

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for being light on it. Immigration

has been the means through which

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Islamic terrorists have entered

these countries predominantly, not

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exclusively. If we are not looking

at immigration, there is a lot of

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concern that it is not taken

seriously enough. We are not

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seriously engaged in trying to walk

when the war on terrorism.

One of

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the problems you are of course and

you will realise, the problems with

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some of the material that Donald

Trump posted. Not representing what

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he thought it represented. A lot of

people like saying here that he

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should have known this material was

potentially not what he thought it

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was even if he was choosing to re-

tweet that kind of material. You

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should have known that it didn't

have harassed city, on top of which

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we now have the language in which he

is telling the Prime Minister,

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Theresa May, our Prime Minister,

don't focus on me, focus on Islamic

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terrorism. We are doing just fine.

It almost feels like a put down to

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the British prime.

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Right, and I think it was a pretty

direct response to that condemnation

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by Number Ten. I am sure it will be

quickly and easily resolved. I am

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not at all concerned. I think the

broader message is the important

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one. What the President, maybe

inartfully, was trying to express at

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that time and what is hopefully a

growing recognition after

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Manchester, after Westminster,

after, you know, I think over 100

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civilian deaths from Islamic

terrorism in the UK, what a

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significant threat this is.

But

Michael, can I just put to you, in

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the wider sense, a lot of people...

Of course there is no argument about

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whether this is an important battle,

over terrorism more generally. That

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is an established fact. But one of

the issues for a lot of people here

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is that right at the core of trying

to win some kind of battle over

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Islamic terrorism, for example, is

that you get your facts right. That

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you don't disseminate things

incorrectly, because that just adds

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to the confusion, and possibly gives

the wrong people the right kind of

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impetus. I mean, you talk about

trying to get the big message right.

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Well, that starts with a small

message. So if President Trump

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retweet things that are not true,

that are linked to issues around

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religious hatred, that is really bad

in terms of the bigger debate you

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are talking about.

Right, you know,

I started my career in a sort of

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academic think-tank, in journalism,

and one of the things that I preach

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when I make it a minor error on

matters of fact, you are engaged in

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this on a daily basis, especially at

an international level and at the

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White House, where nothing escapes

scrutiny, you are going to make

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mistakes. We elected as president

Dick as he was not a product of that

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world. He is a product of corporate

America -- we elected this President

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because he was not a product of that

world. A year he spent basically

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rebelling against the conventions of

modern politics. We believe the

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problems are so severe that these

periodic misstatements, or minor

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issues that might occur as it

relates to someone not following

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these traditional protocols, is a

very small sacrifice to make in

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terms of what he is going to

contribute to the broader defence

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and advancement of the United

States, and I believe the West in

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general.

Thank you very much for

your time this morning. Very

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interesting hearing the respect of.

-- hearing your perspective.

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Here is Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

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You

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You said it is big coat time. Mine

has been out for ages.

You're a big

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coat comes out in the first of

September. Very big coat day to day.

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The coldest day of the week, the

last day of autumn. A light frost

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across the UK. Temperatures close to

if not freezing. Minus six degrees

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in Worcestershire. The risk of ice

in parts of Northern Ireland,

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England and northern Scotland, where

some of you are waking up to a bit

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of St Andrew's day snow. A slight

coating in Aberdeen city centre in

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the past day, and the snow flurries

will continue. Some snow in East

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Yorkshire and North Yorkshire. In

the west, showers. On the far west,

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Wales, Devon and Cornwall. Some of

those easing through the day. In

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between, for a vast majority of the

country it will be dry but the

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showers in the east will push a bit

further inland through the day. And

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it is eastern areas where the wind

chill will be most noticeable.

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Either timely to the afternoon,

school pick-up in the evening rush

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hour, snow flurries across the north

and east of Scotland. In the wind,

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feeling more like -3 and minus four.

A better afternoon in Northern

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Ireland, with some sunshine. Should

stay dry to the west of the Pennines

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but east of the Pennines the showers

will become more abundant later on.

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Rain on the coast, rain, sleet and

snow inland, giving a coating on the

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hills. A few showers in East

Midlands, further west many will be

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dry. Showers easing a little bit in

eastern England and Wales, shower

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starting to push offshore again. But

the showers keep going in the

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eastern part of England during the

night. The risk of some sleet and

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snow around, and there will be some

ice. Temperatures only just above

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freezing for many as we go into

tomorrow morning, but further west a

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cold night and for some, but Italy

across Scotland, colder night than

0:19:530:19:56

last night. Where we have snow

lying, we could see temperatures

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down around minus ten. So a cold

start to Friday morning again. The

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breeze becoming less abundant

although showers continuing to feed

0:20:040:20:07

into the far south-east corner of

the country. Some of those pretty

0:20:070:20:11

heavy, with rain. Crowding over a

bit for Scotland and Northern

0:20:110:20:14

Ireland with some rain and that will

eventually bring in some slightly

0:20:140:20:17

less cold as we go into the weekend.

The weekend ahead will bring less

0:20:170:20:22

cold air, gradually, of the

Atlantic. The air coming from the

0:20:220:20:25

west instead of the Arctic. So

through this weekend, a little less

0:20:250:20:29

cold. It will be a slow progress

process to get to that milder air,

0:20:290:20:33

and some patchy rain around at times

as well.

More updates throughout the

0:20:330:20:37

morning.

0:20:370:20:37

as well.

More updates throughout the

morning. It is cold.

0:20:370:20:43

All this week, we have been looking

at the issues facing families

0:20:430:20:47

of children with special educational

needs and disabilities.

0:20:470:20:49

But what support is on offer

when those children become adults?

0:20:490:20:52

The education watchdog, Ofsted,

has told Breakfast there has been

0:20:520:20:55

little progress in providing

things like education,

0:20:550:20:57

health, and care for young people

once they get to 19,

0:20:570:21:00

with parents often describing

the system as a cliff edge.

0:21:000:21:02

Our disability affairs correspondent

Nikki Fox has been finding out more.

0:21:020:21:08

Did you have something to say?

Ruth

loves being at this specialist

0:21:080:21:13

college.

What colour is this, Ruth?

But it has been tough getting to

0:21:130:21:20

this point. Her dad had to fight to

get her and education, health and

0:21:200:21:28

care plan. Introduced three years

ago as part of major reforms, they

0:21:280:21:32

were designed to help children and

young people like roof, up to the

0:21:320:21:36

age of 25. It took tribunal 's and

around two years to get one. During

0:21:360:21:41

that time, Ruth missed a vital part

in her course in speech and language

0:21:410:21:46

therapy. She is 24 now, so she has

only got one year left.

Hello.

Life

0:21:460:21:51

with disabilities is a fight.

The

parents find it very hard. Mum is

0:21:510:22:00

extremely worried. I once said many

years ago to the social worker, when

0:22:000:22:04

she was small, if something happens

to me, put her in the grave with me.

0:22:040:22:09

And I still feel that way. Because I

do not actually feel that, in the

0:22:090:22:15

past 15 years, we have actually made

much of an improvement as far as

0:22:150:22:20

services are concerned, for these

vulnerable kids.

After recent

0:22:200:22:27

inspections, Ofsted has raised

concerns about lack of help and

0:22:270:22:30

resources for students once they

reach the age of 19. Report also

0:22:300:22:34

says the transfer to EHC plans has

had a negative impact on many young

0:22:340:22:41

people's lives. Wildlife expert

Chris Packham wasn't diagnosed with

0:22:410:22:45

Asperger's until he was in his 40s.

He has had a a successful career and

0:22:450:22:51

he is convinced that access to

education is key.

The highly gifted

0:22:510:22:55

and people at finding is we can't

ignore them. They are worth the

0:22:550:23:00

investment. Everyone deserves a

fair, proper education. That is what

0:23:000:23:04

should be underlying the principle

of our society, and at the moment

0:23:040:23:09

they are not getting it.

It is

karaoke afternoon at this specialist

0:23:090:23:14

training centre for people with

learning disabilities. Its aim is to

0:23:140:23:18

get talented young people like Ben

Hanson a diploma and a job. He is on

0:23:180:23:23

a placement which he hopes will lead

to paid work.

So you are working at

0:23:230:23:27

a hotel.

Yes.

What are you doing at

the hotel? Do you have a dream?

Yes.

0:23:270:23:40

What is your dream?

I want to work

in a posh hotel.

You want to work in

0:23:400:23:46

a posh hotel?

Yes.

, with only

around 6% of people with learning

0:23:460:23:52

disabilities in employment, despite

his energy and enthusiasm, the odds

0:23:520:23:55

are against him.

I think the whole

thing is difficult. Post-18, one

0:23:550:24:00

father described it to me as jumping

off a cliff. There is no

0:24:000:24:05

understanding that lifelong learning

disability is there, that it is with

0:24:050:24:08

you, and the education, health and

care plan, that finishes at 25. Then

0:24:080:24:13

what?

Is college fund? Council say

there isn't enough money or

0:24:130:24:18

facilities to offer support up to

the age of 25, but the government

0:24:180:24:23

says it has recently put in an extra

£45 million to help families of

0:24:230:24:27

young people with special

educational needs. All Ruth's

0:24:270:24:31

parents want is for her education to

continue for as long as possible, to

0:24:310:24:35

give her the best shot at living are

fulfilled, happy life.

0:24:350:24:41

Our disability correspondent

Nikki Fox joins us now.

0:24:410:24:45

Good morning.

Good morning. Ruth, I

mean, it is such an interesting

0:24:450:24:52

story, looking at Ruth and how her

parents were concerned about the

0:24:520:24:56

future. What does the future hold

for her?

The thing with Ruth, it is

0:24:560:25:00

unlikely she will get a job. Her

disability is profound and affects

0:25:000:25:04

her speech and language. She needed

that education setting for as long

0:25:040:25:08

as possible. In the time she is

spending there, she is improving her

0:25:080:25:11

communication and that will then set

her up for a safe and happy life.

0:25:110:25:16

She can express how she feels.

Ruth's parents have got a lot to

0:25:160:25:20

worry about, because when she leaves

that place, what is going to happen?

0:25:200:25:24

You know, is she going to move back

in with them? They are obviously

0:25:240:25:28

getting a bit older. Will she be

able to live independently or in

0:25:280:25:34

support of living? And they are

typical of so many parents of

0:25:340:25:37

children and young people who have

got profound, complex disabilities,

0:25:370:25:40

is that we all get stressed out,

don't we? For the parents of kids

0:25:400:25:44

with profound disabilities, it is

constant, relentless, and doesn't

0:25:440:25:48

let up. She is not going to move the

university, move out. It is what is

0:25:480:25:53

going to happen when I am no longer

here, is the biggest concern for so

0:25:530:25:57

many parents. It is stressful.

We

also met Ben, we heard about his

0:25:570:26:07

dreams of working in a posh hotel.

What happens now?

He is in a

0:26:070:26:12

placement, not paid work party

desperate Lee wants to. The figures

0:26:120:26:16

for people like Ben in employment

have been shockingly low for a long

0:26:160:26:20

time. It is 6% at the moment and

that has decreased overtime. So the

0:26:200:26:25

chances of Ben finding work, the

odds are stacked against him. With

0:26:250:26:29

an overall employment gap between

nondisabled people and disabled

0:26:290:26:32

people of around 30%, and that has

not budged in around a decade. It

0:26:320:26:38

has wavered, but it has not gone far

from 30% and that means that 50% of

0:26:380:26:42

disabled people are in work on

compared to around 80% of

0:26:420:26:46

nondisabled people. So for people

like Ben it is a constant struggle.

0:26:460:26:51

And you sort Rosa -- saw Rosa

Monckton, she set up a charity to

0:26:510:27:04

try and get them employment, but it

is tough.

And we have been talking

0:27:040:27:09

about this all week, and we will

talk more about it later in the

0:27:090:27:13

programme. And you have been in

touch with us all week. Please keep

0:27:130:27:17

doing so.

0:27:170:27:18

If you would like to get in touch

with us about your stories,

0:27:180:27:21

e-mail bbcb[email protected],

or tweet us using the hashtag

0:27:210:27:24

#BBCSend.

0:27:240:27:24

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

0:27:240:30:44

time you to Sunday, we are up to 10

degrees.

0:30:440:30:45

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London newsroom

0:30:450:30:48

in half an hour.

0:30:480:30:49

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:30:490:30:51

Now, though, it is back

to Charlie and Naga.

0:30:510:30:54

Bye for now.

0:30:540:30:59

Hello - this is Breakfast

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

0:30:590:31:02

Munchetty.

0:31:020:31:04

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment,

0:31:040:31:07

But also

on Breakfast this morning.

0:31:070:31:09

there's hope for migraine sufferers

as tests show a new drug reduces

0:31:090:31:12

attacks in some people by half

and could be available

0:31:120:31:15

on the NHS next year.

0:31:150:31:16

We'll be speaking to former

Olympic swimming champion

0:31:160:31:18

Mark Foster in his first broadcast

interview since confirming

0:31:180:31:21

he is gay.

0:31:210:31:22

Over 10 million people

hear him sing every week

0:31:220:31:24

but you'd be forgiven for not

even knowing his name.

0:31:240:31:27

We'll be talking to Strictly singer

Tommy Blaize before the end

0:31:270:31:30

of the programme.

0:31:300:31:32

Here's a summary of this morning's

main stories from BBC News:

0:31:320:31:39

President Trump has told Theresa May

that she should pay more attention

0:31:390:31:42

to tackling terrorism in the UK,

rather than criticising him.

0:31:420:31:45

(TX OOV) The message was delivered

in a tweet last night

0:31:450:31:49

-- The message was delivered

in a tweet last night

0:31:490:31:52

after Downing Street criticised

the US President for sharing

0:31:520:31:55

anti-Muslim videos posted

by a British far-right group

0:31:550:31:57

on social media.

0:31:570:31:58

The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister to cancel

0:31:580:32:01

Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

0:32:010:32:04

The United States has called

on the international community

0:32:040:32:06

to sever ties with North Korea -

it follows the country's latest

0:32:060:32:09

ballistic missile test.

0:32:090:32:10

(TX OOV) North Korean state media

claimed that Wednesday's missile

0:32:100:32:11

-- North Korean state media claimed

that Wednesday's missile

0:32:140:32:16

launch was the most powerful

in the country's history.

0:32:160:32:19

At an emergency meeting

of the UN Security Council,

0:32:190:32:21

Washington's Ambassador to the UN,

Nikki Haley warned of dire

0:32:210:32:24

consequences if war were to break

out on the Korean peninsula.

0:32:240:32:27

The dictator of North Korea made a

choice yesterday that brings the

0:32:270:32:30

world closer to war, not farther

from it. We have never sought war

0:32:300:32:34

with North Korea and still today, we

do not seek it. If war does come, it

0:32:340:32:40

will be because of continued acts of

aggression like we witnessed

0:32:400:32:43

yesterday and if war comes, make no

mistake, the North Korean regime

0:32:430:32:51

will be utterly destroyed.

0:32:510:32:53

The government is setting out plans

to get a million more disabled

0:32:530:32:56

people into work over

the next 10 years.

0:32:560:32:58

(OOV) Less than half of the UK's

disabled population is currently

0:32:580:33:00

-- Less than half of the UK's

disabled population is currently

0:33:030:33:06

in work and last year only eight

per cent of businesses employed

0:33:060:33:09

a person with a disability.

0:33:090:33:10

Charities say progress

from previous, similar schemes has

0:33:100:33:12

been too slow.

0:33:120:33:13

Scientists say they have made

an "incredibly important" advance

0:33:130:33:16

in the prevention of migraine.

0:33:160:33:17

The results of two clinical trials

0:33:170:33:19

showed that injections of antibodies

can be used to neutralise a chemical

0:33:190:33:22

which is believed to

trigger severe headaches.

0:33:220:33:24

Around half of patients

reported a 50% reduction

0:33:240:33:26

in the number of attacks

they had each month.

0:33:260:33:30

American Airlines says it has

suffered a computer glitch,

0:33:300:33:32

which has allowed too many staff

to take time off over Christmas,

0:33:320:33:36

leaving 15,000 flights

without a pilot.

0:33:360:33:37

Earlier this year, Ryanair

was forced to cancel

0:33:370:33:40

thousands of flights

because of a similar mistake

0:33:400:33:42

with the scheduling of leave.

0:33:420:33:43

American Airlines is offering staff

extra money to tempt them

0:33:430:33:46

back to work.

0:33:460:33:47

Those are the main stories this

morning. It is 6:33am which means it

0:33:470:33:54

is time the sport. An absolute

cracker of a goal from Wayne

0:33:540:33:57

is time the sport. An absolute

cracker of a goal from Wayne Rooney.

0:33:570:34:00

They have buried then deep thumbs.

Like, double jointed thumbs.

Is it

0:34:000:34:04

the -- very bendy thumbs. You have

very bendy thumbs. That is weird.

0:34:040:34:19

I'm talking about a Wayne Rooney

Perla.

Oh, that thumb.

Tell us the

0:34:190:34:27

story.

He scored a great goal and

Sam Allardyce is very pleased about

0:34:270:34:34

it.

0:34:340:34:35

Everton impressed their new manager

but the night belonged

0:34:350:34:38

to one man, Wayne Rooney

scoring his first Everton hat trick,

0:34:380:34:41

his third, he says, one of the best

goals he's ever scored.

0:34:410:34:44

Hard to disagree.

0:34:440:34:47

Especially when you're popping them

in from the halfway line.

0:34:470:34:53

That will give Sam Allardyce's team

a great lift when he takes over.

0:34:530:34:59

A great hat-trick, a great display

from Wayne. He is captain and

0:34:590:35:03

captain for a reason, going from a

top environment after a top spell,

0:35:030:35:09

tonight, we spoke about the bad run

having to come to an end, it doesn't

0:35:090:35:13

last forever and being a real man

does if you can stand up there and

0:35:130:35:17

fight in times of trouble.

0:35:170:35:20

From great goals to important ones,

Raheem Sterling's 96th-minute winner

0:35:200:35:23

against Southampton extending

manchester City's winning run.

0:35:230:35:24

1-1 going into stoppage time,

he curled this effort

0:35:240:35:27

into the top corner.

0:35:270:35:28

And you might have thought he'd

scored from the halfway line,

0:35:280:35:32

wheelinga way ind elight.

0:35:320:35:33

It's a club-record 12th-successive

Premier League win..

0:35:330:35:37

-- win.

0:35:370:35:40

And Pep Guardiola was pleased.

0:35:400:35:43

Fourth-placed Arsenal scored five

against Huddersfield -

0:35:430:35:49

neat play for Olivier Giroud

to hammer home one of his two goals.

0:35:490:35:53

And Mo Salah matched him,

the Premier League's leading

0:35:530:35:58

goalscorer running on to this one

as Liverpool beat Stoke 3-0.

0:35:580:36:07

It's now 65 domes In in Scotland,

Celtic managed to keep their 65 game

0:36:070:36:11

unbeaten run in domestic fixtures

going but only just -

0:36:110:36:13

a controversial Scott Sinclair

penalty in the final minutes

0:36:130:36:16

of the game rescued a point for

the champions against Motherwell.

0:36:160:36:19

-- in.

0:36:190:36:30

Two months after Ben Stokes

was arrested on suspicion of causing

0:36:300:36:33

Actual Bodily Harm, the Police

investigation has concluded

0:36:330:36:35

and the file passed on to the crown

prosecution service to decide

0:36:350:36:38

if charges will be brought.

0:36:380:36:39

Well following their victory

in the 1st Test, Australia batsman

0:36:390:36:42

Peter Hanscombe says his side

will continue to target the minds

0:36:420:36:45

of England's batsmen on the pitch

with their sledging.

0:36:450:36:48

Well, England bowler James Anderson

has his own message for the Aussies

0:36:480:36:55

Something always enjoyed, excuse me.

When someone is trying to get under

0:36:550:36:59

my skin, but just in cricket but in

all walks of life, it makes me more

0:36:590:37:04

determined to succeed 70 something

from a personal point of view

0:37:040:37:07

excites me and will drive me on to

try and do the best I can with bat

0:37:070:37:12

and ball.

0:37:120:37:13

Chris Froome will target victory

at May's Giro d'Italia where he'll

0:37:130:37:16

attempt to seal a hat-trick

of successive Grand Tour wins.

0:37:160:37:19

The 4-time Tour de France winner

won the Vuelta a Espana

0:37:190:37:22

for the first time this year

as well as Le Tour again

0:37:220:37:25

and will attempt to become only

the third rider in history to hold

0:37:250:37:29

all three Grand Tour

titles at the same time.

0:37:290:37:31

In netball, England came

from behind to beat Malawi

0:37:310:37:34

and complete a 3-0 series win.

0:37:340:37:35

The Roses were eight goals adrift

after the first quarter

0:37:350:37:38

in Birmingham but came back

to complete a 62-60 victory.

0:37:380:37:41

England, who are ranked third

in the world, are building up

0:37:410:37:44

to the Commonwealth Games

in Australia next year.

0:37:440:37:46

By the looks of it, they are in good

form as well. A big win for them.

0:37:460:37:52

Like the look of those goals. We

will be showing it again later and

0:37:520:37:57

again at 8:30 a.m..

Will we be able

to see your thumb later?

I don't

0:37:570:38:03

know what is weird about my thumb.

When you did that with your thumb,

0:38:030:38:08

we have the voices in our heads, the

other voices in our heads, they all

0:38:080:38:14

went, ooh! Look. That is a straight

thumb and C's is even straighter and

0:38:140:38:22

yours is bent.

You are double

jointed. It's all right.

I don't

0:38:220:38:29

know if there is any advantages to

that.

There will be. Thanks, John.

0:38:290:38:37

Litter levels recorded on the UK's

beaches this year are 10%

0:38:370:38:40

higher than they were a year ago,

and 20% of everything found

0:38:400:38:43

came from food and drink rubbish.

0:38:430:38:45

So is it time to tax

the worst offenders -

0:38:450:38:48

coffee cups, plastic cutlery,

and takeaway trays?

0:38:480:38:50

That's what the Marine Conservation

Society is calling for today.

0:38:500:38:56

Lauren Eyles is from the charity's

0:38:560:38:57

Beachwatch Programme,

and joins us now.

0:38:570:39:02

First floor, gives a sense of the

scale the problem.

Litter on UK

0:39:020:39:09

beaches is a massive problem. The

levels increased by 10% from last

0:39:090:39:13

year which is huge and it highlights

that we urgently need something, and

0:39:130:39:19

more charges or refunds to reduce

all the levels in the UK.

What do

0:39:190:39:25

they look like?

We are calling for a

charge or a levy on items such as

0:39:250:39:32

copy cups, lives, stirrers and

straws. The kind of items that we

0:39:320:39:36

use on the go when we are out and

about doing everyday things.

A levy,

0:39:360:39:41

tax?

We up -- we are calling for a

levy on these items, similar to the

0:39:410:39:48

plastic bag charge. At the checkout,

at shops, to encourage people to

0:39:480:39:54

really think about why they are

buying them. Do they really need

0:39:540:39:59

that plastic bag, do they need that

straw? It encourages that behaviour

0:39:590:40:04

change that we really need to seek

to reduce litter levels in the UK.

0:40:040:40:08

It is one thing putting a levy or

attacks but ultimately, the reason

0:40:080:40:13

those things and about in the ocean

in this case is because someone has

0:40:130:40:17

dumped them. The responsibility for

what people do with things, is that

0:40:170:40:23

more important than the purchase of

them in the first place? We were

0:40:230:40:27

looking at those pictures, the

plastic bottle. Why is it in the

0:40:270:40:32

ocean? Somebody has just dumped it.

That comes from a variety of

0:40:320:40:38

different places. The public

accounts were over 60%. We all have

0:40:380:40:44

a responsibility to stop it getting

there in the first place. Awareness

0:40:440:40:48

is really increased across the UK

over the last few years in terms of

0:40:480:40:52

different campaigns and projects

that are being run. But there needs

0:40:520:40:56

to be a motivation to really stop

people from using these items in the

0:40:560:41:02

first place and we believe a levy

would create that behaviour change

0:41:020:41:07

as with plastic bags.

Why is there

still this problem? As Charlie said,

0:41:070:41:12

that is what it comes down to.

Whatever you buy, there are people

0:41:120:41:17

who will go to the beach and dump

their stuff or throw it out of cars.

0:41:170:41:21

Why is that not changing

significantly enough?

It all boils

0:41:210:41:26

down to awareness. That is the key

to some of these issues. If we try

0:41:260:41:31

and raise awareness, which, as I

say, the issue of plastics has been

0:41:310:41:36

massively raised, the profile of it

in the last year I think we really

0:41:360:41:42

need to really raise that awareness

but like I said, really create that

0:41:420:41:47

motivation and start placing more

charges and refunds on these items.

0:41:470:41:51

I was talking to someone this

morning who said they stopped using

0:41:510:41:56

plastic bags completely and 80% of

the UK public have stopped buying

0:41:560:42:01

plastic bags but they were saying it

took a year to make that behaviour

0:42:010:42:05

change.

I am not quite following

you. The plastic bags has been a

0:42:050:42:10

success story in terms of the

numbers that are going over the

0:42:100:42:14

counter but I am sure on the beach

is that we are seeing behind us, you

0:42:140:42:18

are seeing plastic bags on the

beaches because you are ending up

0:42:180:42:21

with a hard core of people who are

buying the bags in the first place

0:42:210:42:26

but I still not behaving responsibly

in relation to the stuff they do

0:42:260:42:30

have.

We have seen over a 20%

reduction in plastic bag figures on

0:42:300:42:34

UK beaches.

The items discovered?

Yes. There is a tangible link.

That

0:42:340:42:42

is why our data has showed that

massive reduction we believe a levy

0:42:420:42:46

is the right way to go on these

other single use plastic items that

0:42:460:42:50

are just unnecessary. You don't need

to use them and if we place a levy

0:42:500:42:55

on these items, we will hopefully

see the reductions in those items

0:42:550:42:59

like we did with the plastic bags.

Interesting in the attitudes. When

0:42:590:43:04

we had plastic cutlery, my mum would

wash it and use it again. We just

0:43:040:43:08

don't do that, we dispose of it.

We

have become a throwaway society and

0:43:080:43:14

we want to see that change.

Had he

got a number on takeaway packaging?

0:43:140:43:20

What is the price you are putting on

that?

It will vary. There is not one

0:43:200:43:26

rule that would fit everything. We

would want to see a similar price,

0:43:260:43:31

like the plastic bags. Just a couple

of pence to make people think about

0:43:310:43:35

whether they really need that and to

create that behaviour change and to

0:43:350:43:39

stop those items being bought in the

first place. Using a reusable

0:43:390:43:43

alternative which makes a huge

difference to us and the amazing

0:43:430:43:47

wildlife that we get the UK.

Thank

you very much. Lauren miles from the

0:43:470:43:54

Marine Conservation Society. If you

did want to walk along the beach

0:43:540:43:57

today, big coats are in order.

Definitely the case, especially in

0:43:570:44:04

eastern coastal counties. Pretty

windy as well. A noticeable

0:44:040:44:06

windchill. How is this for a scene

in Scarborough this morning? A good

0:44:060:44:13

covering of snow here and

Scarborough is not alone. Some parts

0:44:130:44:16

of northern Scotland, the outskirts

of Aberdeen. Another coating as well

0:44:160:44:25

to get St Andrew's Day up and

running. Down all the way into

0:44:250:44:29

Norfolk, a mixture of rain and sleet

in land. Devon, Cornwall, to the

0:44:290:44:35

west of Wales. An ice risk. The

showers becoming confined further

0:44:350:44:40

west during the day and in between

those two areas of showers, most

0:44:400:44:44

will have a dry and bright day. Take

a look at what is happening three

0:44:440:44:49

o'clock as we head towards the

school run. Lots of sunshine in the

0:44:490:44:53

west and south-west of Scotland.

Still snow flurries to the north and

0:44:530:44:58

east of Scotland. Two degrees, the

thermometer will feel more like -3,

0:44:580:45:02

minus four. The showers move a bit

further inland. You can see the

0:45:020:45:08

drain of sleet or snow. A bit more

cloud towards the south-east. Lots

0:45:080:45:14

of sunshine across western parts of

England and Wales. Becoming confined

0:45:140:45:20

out towards the far, far west as we

go through this evening and into the

0:45:200:45:24

night. Snow showers in northern

Scotland. An ice riskier. Even with

0:45:240:45:30

temperatures around the freezing

market is not above. With clear

0:45:300:45:36

skies, widespread -- widespread

frost. It could get as low as -10

0:45:360:45:39

through some parts of Scotland.

Another cold start tomorrow. Still a

0:45:390:45:45

breezy start an icy wind across the

eastern parts of England. Showers

0:45:450:45:48

becoming less abundant through the

day. Further rain showers through

0:45:480:45:52

the far south-east corner. Failure

to Scotland and Northern Ireland.

0:45:520:45:58

Still quite cold. Patchy rain

developing. Something changing

0:45:580:46:02

towards the north-west later. High

pressure to the west of others. We

0:46:020:46:08

are dragging the of the Atlantic. An

indication this weekend we will see

0:46:080:46:13

something a little less cheery. It

will take a while. Saturday will

0:46:130:46:17

still be cold. Notice that

temperatures, temperatures lifting

0:46:170:46:25

up. And by Sunday, after a spell of

patchy rain and drizzle, clearing

0:46:250:46:30

away from the south-east corner.

Some brighter skies on Sunday. Lots

0:46:300:46:33

of cloud but nowhere near as cold.

0:46:330:46:40

That is a positive. Back to double

digits.

Only a brief one, though!

0:46:400:46:48

Back to double digits.

Happy happy.

0:46:480:46:50

You heard from Nikki earlier that

only a staggeringly small number,

0:46:500:46:53

just 6%, of people who have

a learning disability

0:46:530:46:55

are in full-time paid work.

0:46:550:46:56

So should employers be doing more?

0:46:560:46:58

Sean is taking a look for us.

0:46:580:47:01

Good morning. I have Craig and made

to have a chat with me. -- Meg.

0:47:010:47:15

Nikki was saying, wasn't she,

the employment rate for people

0:47:150:47:18

living with a disability

is around 50%.

0:47:180:47:20

That could be anything from needing

a wheelchair to conditions such

0:47:200:47:23

as autism, whereas the rate

is about 80% for those without,

0:47:230:47:26

a gap of 30%.

0:47:260:47:27

And that gap has hardly moved

for years, in spite of Government

0:47:270:47:30

and business plans and proposals

to get more people into work.

0:47:300:47:36

We have talked about the issue on

Breakfast before.

0:47:360:47:39

I've got a couple of people with me

who will know more about what can

0:47:390:47:43

help, Craig and Meg.

0:47:430:47:44

Craig, you represent a lot of small

businesses, Meg, you are from

0:47:440:47:49

Sodexo.

We provide services to a

range of organisations like schools,

0:47:490:47:55

hospitals, and also corporate

environments. And our services are

0:47:550:47:59

things like catering, cleaning,

Grounds, facilities management, as

0:47:590:48:03

well as reception services.

So we

will get onto a few of those in a

0:48:030:48:07

moment. Craig, when you hear that

employment rate gap, 30%, why do you

0:48:070:48:11

think it is so big?

Well, if you

start off with small businesses, who

0:48:110:48:18

I represent, we find that the route

back to work for many people comes

0:48:180:48:22

through small business. So about 30%

of that group you mentioned, more

0:48:220:48:27

than 50% of those are through small

businesses. So what we actually need

0:48:270:48:31

to do is see what is working and

make that bigger. There are lots of

0:48:310:48:35

things we can do. If you are a small

business owner, you tend to run your

0:48:350:48:40

business like a family unit. What we

would love to see is people feeling

0:48:400:48:43

confident enough and knowing what

they are doing in order to employ

0:48:430:48:47

more people.

And that rate must come

from somewhere. Is it big business

0:48:470:48:51

is not having enough of a focus and

a within them for all the managers

0:48:510:48:56

and all the recruiters within that

this is to feel confident in

0:48:560:49:00

recruiting everybody?

I think it is

an interesting point. Many large

0:49:000:49:04

organisations like ours, where we

employ 30,000 people, our local

0:49:040:49:08

sites can still have that very

family feel. So our experience is

0:49:080:49:13

that while there is a large

organisation which will have

0:49:130:49:18

programmes in place and commitments

to bring in people with

0:49:180:49:21

disabilities, where that works well

is when we have the commitment of

0:49:210:49:25

the on-site teams who are really

wanting to add to someone's

0:49:250:49:29

quality-of-life I providing them

with the opportunity to gain those

0:49:290:49:32

employability skills. We know it is

difficult for those people to gain

0:49:320:49:36

them, especially early in their

careers.

Yes, and that first step on

0:49:360:49:40

the ladder of employment can be the

hardest, especially when you are

0:49:400:49:44

trying to send CV 's to many

businesses. Do you think as an

0:49:440:49:48

employer that people who are looking

at those TVs, if they see that

0:49:480:49:51

someone on those living with a

disability, compared to somebody

0:49:510:49:54

else who isn't, but that may affect

their way of thinking a little bit?

0:49:540:50:00

There is lots of research showing

that people really do have bias is

0:50:000:50:04

against people with disabilities,

and I think the key thing for

0:50:040:50:07

organisations to do is to break down

those barriers. So from a Sodexo

0:50:070:50:14

perspective, we do organisation wide

campaigns featuring people with

0:50:140:50:17

successful jobs in our organisation

who perhaps have invisible

0:50:170:50:21

disabilities, so people who have

started as chefs or general managers

0:50:210:50:24

and become much more senior within

our organisation and had that

0:50:240:50:27

successful career progression.

And

Craig, just very briefly, we will

0:50:270:50:34

speak to the government a little

later, is there anything they can do

0:50:340:50:37

to help small businesses?

Yes, one

thought was a national insurers

0:50:370:50:44

holiday, so someone has autism or

other guests, I have seen some of

0:50:440:50:51

the promotions you have done over

the last few days where there are

0:50:510:50:54

people with real talent, and we have

to find those people and get them

0:50:540:50:58

real jobs. One way is for a small

business owner, that is the person

0:50:580:51:02

we need to convince to do this kind

of good work as soon as we have done

0:51:020:51:07

that, that small business will do

that forever more. You mentioned

0:51:070:51:10

your company, but I found another

company who produced educational

0:51:100:51:13

materials for autistic kids, and

that is from a mother who had an

0:51:130:51:18

idea, created a business, created

apprenticeships with autistic

0:51:180:51:22

children. You can see it work. And

if there was a financial incentive,

0:51:220:51:29

that first year of employment, to

look after someone with a

0:51:290:51:32

disability, that would be a real

plus.

That is one thing to May be

0:51:320:51:38

put to the government a little later

in the programme.

0:51:380:51:40

The Northern Ireland Secretary has

told Breakfast that the Government

0:51:400:51:43

recognises that the final Brexit

deal will have to recognise

0:51:430:51:46

the unique challenges posed

by the Irish border.

0:51:460:51:48

The Irish Government and the EU have

been pushing for Northern Ireland

0:51:480:51:51

to remain inside the customs

union and single market,

0:51:510:51:54

even if the rest of the UK leaves.

0:51:540:51:56

That is now the main sticking point

stopping Brexit negotiations

0:51:560:51:59

from moving on to trade.

0:51:590:52:00

Chris Buckler has been

looking at the challenges.

0:52:000:52:05

For many months now,

politicians have been huddled

0:52:050:52:07

in Brexit negotiations.

0:52:070:52:16

The UK and the EU both

pushing their priorities.

0:52:160:52:19

And what is decided on one

of the key issues will have quite

0:52:190:52:22

an impact here.

0:52:220:52:31

The Derry Donegal Vipers

are an Irish-American football team,

0:52:310:52:37

and their players come from both

Northern Ireland and the Republic.

0:52:370:52:40

Our whole team is split

almost down the middle,

0:52:400:52:42

from either side

of the border, which is great.

0:52:420:52:45

A key question is, what will happen

to that border after Brexit?

0:52:450:52:49

In the future, is it possible

that people will have

0:52:490:52:51

to negotiate their way

through customs posts as they once

0:52:510:52:54

did in the past?

0:52:540:52:55

A hard border would make it

difficult, because you pretty much

0:52:550:52:58

have to go

through customs checks to go

0:52:580:53:00

to training a couple

of times a week.

0:53:000:53:03

They'll think you're suspicious

carrying these big bags

0:53:030:53:05

and helmets across.

0:53:050:53:09

That is a journey many

take on a daily basis.

0:53:090:53:12

Some are wondering what their

morning commute will be

0:53:120:53:14

like in the future.

0:53:140:53:21

They're saying they do not want

a hard border, but the detail of not

0:53:210:53:26

having a hard border,

it has never been clearly defined

0:53:260:53:29

for me.

0:53:290:53:34

She lives in County Donegal,

and every day crosses

0:53:340:53:38

the border

to go to a job as a

0:53:380:53:41

principal in Londonderry.

0:53:410:53:44

This is an old customs

post right here.

0:53:440:53:47

That was the place

where you were stopped.

0:53:470:53:55

Her concerns about a hard border go

beyond potential traffic delays.

0:53:550:53:58

The community is quite seamless.

0:53:580:53:59

A lot of talk about the economy,

and the impact on the economy,

0:53:590:54:03

much less the social fabric

of the Society of a border people,

0:54:030:54:10

which we are.

0:54:100:54:11

Many cross the border regularly

to go to school, even hospital.

0:54:110:54:16

They said that the British

Government has been too late

0:54:160:54:19

in recognising the true

impact of Brexiteer.

0:54:190:54:20

They're not thinking

about the consequences of Brexit.

0:54:200:54:23

The consequences for people

who have become used,

0:54:230:54:26

and have mortgages

and people in college,

0:54:260:54:28

based upon a livelihood

which appreciates the fact that

0:54:280:54:33

you can move across without tariffs.

0:54:330:54:39

The biggest obstacle to ensuring

there are no obstacles

0:54:390:54:44

on the many border bridges and roads

are to do with customs.

0:54:440:54:47

The EU says it Northern Ireland

was to stick to the same economic

0:54:470:54:51

rules, the issue would be sold.

0:54:510:54:52

The Prime Minister has been very

clear in saying that,

0:54:520:54:55

as we leave the

European Union, we leave

0:54:550:54:57

the single market is

and we leave the customs union.

0:54:570:55:05

But we know there need

to be specific outcomes,

0:55:050:55:08

to meet the unique

circumstances of Northern Ireland

0:55:080:55:12

and the island of Ireland

as a whole.

0:55:120:55:20

That sounds like a desire to deal.

0:55:200:55:22

They want guarantees

about the border.

0:55:220:55:24

That means there will be

more clashes to come.

0:55:240:55:26

Chris is in Londonderry this

morning, and we can talk to him now.

0:55:260:55:30

I know you have been speaking to

either side of the border.

Yes, I

0:55:300:55:33

mean, the thing is, it is just that

question of uncertainty. I am

0:55:330:55:37

standing on the Peace Bridge in

Derry, Londonderry. Even what you

0:55:370:55:42

call the city is something that

divides people. But the thing is the

0:55:420:55:46

peace process, and we are standing

on the Peace Bridge, has had a

0:55:460:55:50

really clear impact on people's

lives. There are two that have been

0:55:500:55:54

brought together, and the border in

the past, people talk about the

0:55:540:55:58

security border, and that is what is

foremost in their minds. Whenever

0:55:580:56:03

they had to be a security presence

at that point where Northern Ireland

0:56:030:56:06

met the Republic of Ireland. There

is nobody suggesting that that is

0:56:060:56:10

going to return, but there is a real

issue about what will happen there.

0:56:100:56:14

When people talk about a hard

border, they mean protest

0:56:140:56:16

potentially customs posts, that

people might have to go through some

0:56:160:56:19

kind of physical presence again, and

people don't want that. They live

0:56:190:56:23

their lives on either side of the

border. They go to see friends, they

0:56:230:56:27

do shopping, they do all sorts of

things. So we will be travelling the

0:56:270:56:31

entire length of the 300 mile

border, talking to people all day.

0:56:310:56:35

We will begin that journey right

now, and a little later on Breakfast

0:56:350:56:39

I will join you from right but that

order, and we will find out what

0:56:390:56:43

people there think.

300 miles in a

day.

0:56:431:00:05

By the time we get to Sunday,

we're up to 10 degrees.

1:00:051:00:08

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London newsroom

1:00:081:00:11

in half an hour.

1:00:111:00:12

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:00:121:00:15

Now, though, it is back

to Charlie and Naga.

1:00:151:00:17

Bye for now.

1:00:171:00:19

This is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty

1:00:201:00:21

and Charlie Stayt.

1:00:211:00:22

Donald Trump lashes out

1:00:221:00:23

at Theresa May in a row

over anti-Muslim videos.

1:00:231:00:26

The Prime Minister

criticised the US President

1:00:261:00:28

for sharing a series of posts

by the far-right group

1:00:281:00:30

Britain First.

1:00:301:00:31

But last night, Mr Trump tweeted

that she should instead be focussd

1:00:311:00:33

Good morning.

1:00:421:00:43

It's Thursday 30 November.

1:00:431:00:47

Also this morning:

1:00:471:00:49

A warning that children with special

educational needs aren't getting

1:00:491:00:52

the support they need

once they hit 18.

1:00:521:00:57

We'll hear from parents desperately

concerned about what the future

1:00:571:01:00

holds for their families.

1:01:001:01:01

I once said many years ago

to the social worker

1:01:011:01:05

when I was small, if something

happens to me, put in the grave

1:01:051:01:11

with me and I still feel that way.

1:01:111:01:13

A breakthrough in

migraine prevention.

1:01:131:01:14

Doctors say a new treatment

could significantly cut the number

1:01:141:01:17

and severity of attacks.

1:01:171:01:19

Good morning.

1:01:191:01:20

Kelloggs will be cutting the sugar

in some of its sweeter cereals,

1:01:201:01:23

but not all of them.

1:01:231:01:25

So later on, I'll be talking

to company's boss about why they've

1:01:251:01:28

taken this decision now.

1:01:281:01:32

Good morning.

1:01:321:01:32

In sport, how about

this for impressing

1:01:321:01:34

your new manager?

1:01:341:01:36

Wayne Rooney with a hattrick

and one of the best

1:01:361:01:38

gfoals he's ever scored in front

of Sam Allardyce who will be

1:01:381:01:42

appointed Everton manager later.

1:01:421:01:44

-- goals.

1:01:441:01:45

A Breakfast exclusive,

as the Olympic swimmer Mark Foster

1:01:451:01:47

gives his first TV interview

since revealing that he is gay.

1:01:471:01:50

We'll speak to him just after 7:30.

1:01:501:01:52

And Matt has the weather.

1:01:521:01:57

All disturb a week out there today.

The most of us, and bright. That bit

1:01:571:02:01

of snow across parts of eastern

England and Scotland. I will tell

1:02:011:02:06

you if it's going to affect more of

you. See them.

1:02:061:02:10

Good morning.

1:02:101:02:11

First, our main story.

1:02:111:02:12

President Trump has told Theresa May

that she should pay more attention

1:02:121:02:15

to tackling terrorism in the UK,

rather than criticising him.

1:02:151:02:18

The message was delivered

in a tweet last night

1:02:181:02:20

after Downing Street criticised

the US President for sharing

1:02:201:02:23

anti-Muslim videos posted

by a British far-right group

1:02:231:02:25

on social media.

1:02:251:02:26

The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister to cancel

1:02:261:02:29

Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

1:02:291:02:35

Our North America Correspondent

Laura Bicker has more.

1:02:351:02:37

They may have held hands once

but this so-called special

1:02:371:02:39

relationship is now being tested

by a series of presidential tweets.

1:02:391:02:42

First, from the account of a far

right anti-Muslim group called

1:02:421:02:45

Britain First, Donald Trump

retweeted three inflammatory

1:02:451:02:49

videos to his 43 million followers.

1:02:491:02:50

The first claimed incorrectly

to show a Muslim migrant attacking

1:02:501:02:53

a man on crutches.

1:02:531:02:59

When challenged, the White House

said the videos might not be

1:02:591:03:02

real but the threat was.

1:03:021:03:04

Both Theresa May and a lot of other

world leaders across this country,

1:03:041:03:07

I mean, across the world,

know that these are real threats

1:03:071:03:11

that we have to talk about.

1:03:111:03:14

I think Europe has seen that a lot

firsthand and something

1:03:141:03:17

the President wants to continue

to talk about and continue to make

1:03:171:03:20

sure that we're dealing with.

1:03:201:03:21

Theresa May is on a tour

of the Middle East but her official

1:03:211:03:25

spokesman said the President had

been wrong to share the posts.

1:03:251:03:28

It was that condemnation

which prompted a Twitter outburst

1:03:281:03:30

from Donald Trump's account.

1:03:301:03:34

He told Theresa May not

to focus on him but to focus

1:03:341:03:37

on the destructive

radical Islamic terrorism taking

1:03:371:03:42

place within the United Kingdom.

1:03:421:03:43

"We are doing just fine," he said.

1:03:431:03:45

The President has caused diplomatic

headaches for the UK several times

1:03:451:03:48

already this year.

1:03:481:03:51

From backing Nigel Farage

as an ambassador to Washington,

1:03:511:03:54

to attacking the London

Mayor Sadiq Khan,

1:03:541:03:55

all from his favourite

social media platform.

1:03:551:03:57

It may be a show of strength

for his supporters but it may also

1:03:571:04:04

weaken his position abroad.

1:04:041:04:05

Laura Bicker, BBC News, Washington.

1:04:051:04:14

Alex Forsyth is travelling with the

Prime Minister in Jordan this

1:04:141:04:18

morning. There was a bluntness to it

in a way. Don't focus on me, Theresa

1:04:181:04:25

May. Focus on Islamic radical

terrorism. We are doing just fine.

1:04:251:04:32

What he is shearing so far?

It was a

pretty blunt tweet. Some would see

1:04:321:04:41

that is pure criticism of Theresa

May and is a bit of Iranian fact

1:04:411:04:45

that while the Prime Minister is

here doing a very short tour of the

1:04:451:04:50

Middle East to try and forge new

partnerships and make friendships

1:04:501:04:53

around the world, there is this

argument with the President of the

1:04:531:04:56

United States. We did that -- we did

have that rebuke from Downing Street

1:04:561:05:01

but we haven't heard directly from

the Prime Minister. This morning,

1:05:011:05:05

she is due to address the

conference. There will be a Q&A from

1:05:051:05:15

journalists. It seems inevitable she

has to respond to the latest from

1:05:151:05:19

Donald Trump and among senior

figures in her party, there is

1:05:191:05:23

condemnation of the President of the

United States.

1:05:231:05:28

He was backed by the leader of the

Scottish Conservatives, the Labour

1:05:371:05:42

leader, Jeremy Kervin -- Jeremy

Corbyn urging the government to

1:05:421:05:45

condemn this. All eyes on Theresa

May to see how she is going to

1:05:451:05:49

respond.

1:05:491:05:50

The United States has called

on the international community

1:05:501:05:53

to sever ties with North Korea -

it follows the country's latest

1:05:531:05:56

ballistic missile test.

1:05:561:05:57

North Korean state media claimed

that Wednesday's missile

1:05:571:05:59

launch was the most powerful

in the country's history.

1:05:591:06:02

At an emergency meeting

of the UN Security Council,

1:06:021:06:04

Washington's Ambassador to the UN,

Nikki Haley warned of dire

1:06:041:06:07

consequences if war were to break

out on the Korean peninsula.

1:06:071:06:10

The dictator of North Korea made

a choice yesterday that brings

1:06:101:06:13

the world closer to war,

not farther from it.

1:06:131:06:16

We have never sought war

with North Korea and still today,

1:06:161:06:21

we do not seek it.

1:06:211:06:23

If war does come, it will be

because of continued acts

1:06:231:06:26

of aggression like we witnessed

yesterday and if war comes,

1:06:261:06:30

make no mistake, the North Korean

regime will be utterly destroyed.

1:06:301:06:48

A 24-year-old British man, Oliver

Hall, has been killed clearing mines

1:06:481:06:55

in Raqqa. He is the seventh British

man to be killed in Syria for the

1:06:551:07:00

Kurdish- led group, the YPG.

1:07:001:07:16

Probably a yellow banana.

1:07:161:07:25

Trying out new technology...

1:07:251:07:26

Left edge, 5 feet away.

1:07:261:07:27

A child consultant, Hannah

is testing face-recognition gadgets

1:07:271:07:30

which could help her at work.

1:07:301:07:31

She lost her sight five years ago

and is now registered blind.

1:07:311:07:34

During that time, she found

it hard to get a job.

1:07:341:07:37

I left uni with a first-class degree

in law and I've been turned down

1:07:371:07:41

from kind of basic admin roles

when I had quite significant

1:07:411:07:44

experience and that sort of thing.

1:07:441:07:48

Some of them, I might not

have got the job anyway.

1:07:481:07:51

Some of them, it was quite clear

from the questions they are asking,

1:07:511:07:55

it was because of my disability.

1:07:551:07:56

The employment gap between disabled

and non-disabled people hasn't

1:07:561:07:59

significantly changed for some years

1:07:591:08:00

despite a pledge back

in 2015 to halve it.

1:08:001:08:02

Today, the government has published

a plan that aims to see 1 million

1:08:021:08:06

more disabled people in work

over the next 10 years.

1:08:061:08:09

We are making progress.

1:08:091:08:10

We've got 600,000 more disabled

people in work than we did

1:08:101:08:13

four years ago.

1:08:131:08:14

What we want to do is continue

to work with employers,

1:08:141:08:17

to continue to exploit

the opportunities of new technology

1:08:171:08:21

and to keep testing and learning

to find out what works,

1:08:211:08:24

what are the things that actually

can make a difference

1:08:241:08:27

so that more disabled people can

fulfil their potential

1:08:271:08:29

and get a good job.

1:08:291:08:30

Today's announcement also includes

measures to provide access

1:08:301:08:33

to personalised

support for those with

1:08:331:08:34

mental health issues and an increase

in the variety of healthcare

1:08:341:08:37

professionals who are able to issue

fitness-to-work notices

1:08:371:08:39

but with employment

rates for people with

1:08:391:08:41

learning disabilities at around 6%,

1:08:411:08:44

charities are warning

the progreess is too slow.

1:08:441:08:47

Nikki Fox, BBC News.

1:08:471:08:49

We'll be talking to the Work

and Pensions Secretary David Gauke

1:08:491:08:52

about this just after 8:00.

1:08:521:08:56

Investigations are under

way following the death

1:08:561:08:58

of a Bosnian Croat war criminal,

who drank poison in court

1:08:581:09:01

after he was convicted

of crimes against humanity.

1:09:011:09:03

Just moments after

United Nations judges

1:09:031:09:05

upheld his 20-year sentence at

the International Criminal Tribunal

1:09:051:09:10

in the Hague, Slobodan

Praljak said he rejected

1:09:101:09:12

the verdict and drank

what he said was poison.

1:09:121:09:16

The 72-year old died in hospital

and the UN announced the courtroom

1:09:161:09:20

was now "a crime scene".

1:09:201:09:22

A watchdog has found that police

helicopters take so long to reach

1:09:221:09:25

crime scenes that more than 40

per cent of incidents are over

1:09:251:09:28

before they arrive.

1:09:281:09:29

In its first independent study

of police air support,

1:09:291:09:32

Her Majesty's Inpectorate

of Constabulary said helicopters

1:09:321:09:34

and bases were providing

sub-standard responses

1:09:341:09:40

to ongoing incidents.

1:09:401:09:42

Inspectors have called

for the service in England and Wales

1:09:421:09:45

to be urgently reformed or replaced.

1:09:451:09:53

Litter on beaches rose

by 10% this year,

1:09:531:09:56

with a fifth of the rubbish made up

of on-the-go food and drinks items

1:09:561:09:59

such as cups, foil

wrappers and bottles.

1:09:591:10:01

The Marine Conservation

Society is now calling

1:10:011:10:03

on the Government to put a levy

on single-use items handed over

1:10:031:10:07

for free like plastic cutlery,

straws and sandwich packaging.

1:10:071:10:15

To really stop people from using

these items in the first place and

1:10:151:10:20

we believe a levy would create that

behaviour change as it has done with

1:10:201:10:24

a plastic bag charge.

1:10:241:10:25

American Airlines says it has

suffered a computer glitch,

1:10:251:10:28

which has allowed too many staff

to take time off over Christmas,

1:10:281:10:31

leaving 15,000 flights

without a pilot.

1:10:311:10:33

Earlier this year, Ryanair

was forced to cancel

1:10:331:10:35

thousands of flights

because of a similar mistake

1:10:351:10:38

with the scheduling of leave.

1:10:381:10:42

American Airlines is offering staff

extra money to tempt them

1:10:421:10:44

back to work.

1:10:441:10:49

Matt is going to have the weather

for some few minutes and John will

1:10:491:10:53

have the sport later.

1:10:531:10:57

It's being described as a huge

deal by scientists -

1:10:571:11:00

a breakthrough in migraine treatment

which appears to have reduced

1:11:001:11:02

the number and severity of attacks

in some people by half.

1:11:021:11:05

So just how significant

are these findings,

1:11:051:11:07

and when might

1:11:071:11:08

we see treatment

available on the NHS?

1:11:081:11:10

We're joined now by Sally Cleary,

who suffers from severe migraines,

1:11:101:11:13

and by Dr Fayyaz Ahmed,

a consultant neurologist.

1:11:131:11:18

Let's start with you. Celek, tells

what you suffer with.

I was

1:11:181:11:29

diagnosed nine years ago with the

birth of my third child in a woke up

1:11:291:11:33

one morning, my daughter was five

weeks old and I thought I had a

1:11:331:11:37

stroke. I was slurring my words, I

was confused and after a few days of

1:11:371:11:43

investigation, by a process of

elimination, I had a form of

1:11:431:11:47

migraine, very unusual and it has

quite interesting symptoms and I

1:11:471:11:55

don't get headaches with it. Because

it hasn't been diagnosed until then

1:11:551:12:03

what happens when you have one of

these? I have quite profound

1:12:031:12:11

physical symptoms. Confusion,

dizziness, problems with logical

1:12:111:12:15

reasoning, thinking of the next

step. I slur my words. I can't find

1:12:151:12:21

words, sometimes can't even speak. I

have problems following what people

1:12:211:12:27

are saying is. And I have one sided

numbness and weakness. It looks a

1:12:271:12:32

little bit like I have had a soap

--a stroke. I do have quite a fine

1:12:321:12:39

-- profound aura. It gives these

sort of different symptoms.

That is

1:12:391:12:50

a very graphic description of what

it is like living with the

1:12:501:12:53

condition. It is suggested the new

trials could reduce the number and

1:12:531:12:57

severity of migraine attacks.

Dr

Fayyaz Ahmed, tells a bit more. The

1:12:571:13:03

new drugs that are currently going

to be marketed only -- in the next

1:13:031:13:07

year or so, the first ever drug that

has been developed for migraine.

1:13:071:13:15

Currently, what drugs we use our

fourth depression, epilepsy. And

1:13:151:13:22

they also work for migraine.

It's a

bold claim. Does it work. --?

The

1:13:221:13:35

data suggests it works similar to

other drugs but the beauty of these

1:13:351:13:39

is they have little to know

side-effects. Secondly, the patient

1:13:391:13:44

will administer the drug themselves,

given as an infection like an

1:13:441:13:48

insulin injection. They do it

without going to the hospital and it

1:13:481:13:52

produced the hospital costs. It

depends on how it is marketed. The

1:13:521:13:58

best thing about the drug is that it

will work for migraine and it is a

1:13:581:14:03

ninth -- an anti- migraine drug, not

antihypertensive or anti- epileptic.

1:14:031:14:12

Sally was explaining about a --

aura.

Can you explain? What we know,

1:14:121:14:20

there is an area in the brain

involved in migraine. What happens

1:14:201:14:27

with the aura, you get similar

symptoms, flashing light in front of

1:14:271:14:30

your eyes. You develop numbness. And

as if you are developing a stroke.

1:14:301:14:39

It's very worrying for patients.

Sally, have you been offered any of

1:14:391:14:45

this?

I haven't but I have a

brilliant neurologist. My condition

1:14:451:14:51

is very well managed. I am on drugs

and on Botox for it. I don't have

1:14:511:15:00

any caffeine, no painkillers, three

litres of water. I avoid triggers.

1:15:001:15:05

I've still got this condition

comically even though the symptoms a

1:15:051:15:09

much milder, but I still do have

several attacks.

1:15:091:15:17

And for a lot of other people, you

say you are able to manage your

1:15:171:15:22

condition using what you have

presently but for people who have

1:15:221:15:26

not yet reached the point you are

at, this could be a real

1:15:261:15:29

breakthrough.

It could be. I think a

migraine is misunderstood. I don't

1:15:291:15:33

think people realise how many

different symptoms you can have with

1:15:331:15:37

a migraine. They are a bit

dismissive and say you have a

1:15:371:15:41

headache, then. A lot of people

don't have a headache with

1:15:411:15:44

migraines, and they have a myriad of

other symptoms. It can be disabling

1:15:441:15:49

and devastating, and it is really

positive that this is on the

1:15:491:15:53

horizon.

Thank you for sharing your

story with us, and thank you for

1:15:531:15:57

your time.

1:15:571:16:01

Here is Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:16:011:16:04

Here is Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:16:041:16:05

It is not all good news. It is

snowy.

It certainly is. If you are

1:16:051:16:11

waking up in eastern parts of North

Yorkshire, East Yorkshire, Norfolk

1:16:111:16:15

and northern Scotland, we have seen

for some of you similar to this one

1:16:151:16:19

Bridlington, that may cause problems

on the roads for you this morning.

1:16:191:16:23

Most waking up clear and frosty this

morning. Temperatures at the moment

1:16:231:16:27

across parts of the West Midlands

down to -5, -3 in north-west England

1:16:271:16:31

as well and we have seen some

showers overnight. Not just the snow

1:16:311:16:35

but a bit of an ice risk around, so

take it a bit gingerly on roads and

1:16:351:16:40

pavements. Taking a look at what is

happening, those showers coming in

1:16:401:16:44

on quite a cold and raw wind to

north-west Scotland. It is rain

1:16:441:16:48

showers mainly to the far west of

Wales, the far west of Devon, choral

1:16:481:16:52

and Northern Ireland. A bit of

brightness in between but there is

1:16:521:16:55

an ice risk here. Improving across

these areas, deteriorating in

1:16:551:17:01

eastern counties through the

afternoon, the same for other parts

1:17:011:17:04

of south-east Scotland. Most of

Scotland will have a dry and bright

1:17:041:17:08

day, lots of sunshine around. The

temperatures two or three degrees,

1:17:081:17:12

colder than that in the breeze. The

same in Northern Ireland but the

1:17:121:17:15

afternoon brighter than the morning.

Lots of dry weather around, some

1:17:151:17:19

sunshine as well but east the

Pennines you will see the showers

1:17:191:17:22

getting further and further

westwards. There will be a mixture

1:17:221:17:25

of rain, sleet, hail and snow. One

or two wintry flurry is getting

1:17:251:17:30

close to the south-east corner but

clouding over here, feeling like -3

1:17:301:17:34

-4 in the wind. We still have

showers in the far western fringes

1:17:341:17:38

of Cornwall at this stage. The

showers keep going in eastern parts

1:17:381:17:42

of England, south-east Scotland

again, with a slight covering of

1:17:421:17:45

snow. Ice cover the main risk for

some of you as we go into Friday

1:17:451:17:50

morning in the east. Tomorrow

morning in the west, clearer

1:17:501:17:52

conditions but very, very cold

indeed. Where you have snow lying in

1:17:521:17:56

parts of rural Scotland, -10 is not

out of the question. So chilly start

1:17:561:18:01

to Friday morning. Still some

showers, some wintry showers at that

1:18:011:18:05

in eastern England, but clearing up.

Icy wind easing for all but East

1:18:051:18:10

Anglia and the far south-east of

England. Much of England and Wales

1:18:101:18:14

having a dry and bright afternoon.

Cardiff Scotland and Northern

1:18:141:18:17

Ireland tomorrow. Still feeling very

cold out there but eventually

1:18:171:18:20

outbreaks of rain pushing in from

the north and the west and the

1:18:201:18:23

sudden change in wind direction.

This high-pressure means that

1:18:231:18:27

instead of bringing winds from the

Arctic we are bringing them from the

1:18:271:18:31

Atlantic, and the weather warms up

just a touch this weekend. It will

1:18:311:18:34

be a slow process, still feeling raw

with not as much sunshine around.

1:18:341:18:40

Lots of cloud, patchy rain and

drizzle in the west. Already eight

1:18:401:18:44

to 10 degrees in Scotland and

Northern Ireland and the milder air

1:18:441:18:47

will be down towards the south by

Saturday after overnight drizzle has

1:18:471:18:51

cleared. For many, much cloudier

than it was today, but temperatures

1:18:511:18:56

on the up. That is how it is

looking.

1:18:561:19:00

All this week, we have been looking

at the issues facing families

1:19:001:19:03

of children with special educational

needs and disabilities.

1:19:031:19:05

But what support is on offer

when those children become adults?

1:19:051:19:07

But what support is on offer

when those children become adults?

1:19:071:19:08

The education watchdog, Ofsted,

has told Breakfast there has been

1:19:081:19:11

little progress in providing

things like education,

1:19:111:19:13

health, and care for young people

once they get to 19,

1:19:131:19:15

with parents often describing

the system as a cliff edge.

1:19:151:19:18

Our disability affairs correspondent

Nikki Fox has been finding out more.

1:19:181:19:23

Did you have something to say?

1:19:231:19:26

Ruth loves being at this

specialist college.

1:19:261:19:29

What colour is this, Ruth?

1:19:291:19:33

But it has been tough

getting to this point.

1:19:331:19:42

Lovely, using your words...

1:19:421:19:44

Her dad had to fight

to get her an education,

1:19:441:19:47

health and care plan.

1:19:471:19:48

Introduced three years ago

as part of major reforms,

1:19:481:19:50

they were designed to help

children and young people,

1:19:501:19:53

like Ruth, up to the age of 25.

1:19:531:19:55

It took tribunals and around

two years to get one.

1:19:551:20:02

During that time, Ruth missed

a vital part in her course in speech

1:20:021:20:05

and language therapy.

1:20:051:20:06

She is 24 now, so she has

only got one year left.

1:20:061:20:09

Hello.

1:20:091:20:10

Life with disabilities is a fight.

1:20:101:20:12

The parents find it very hard.

1:20:121:20:13

Mum is extremely worried.

1:20:131:20:23

I once said, many years ago

to the social worker,

1:20:231:20:25

when she was small,

if something happens to me,

1:20:251:20:28

put her in the grave with me.

1:20:281:20:30

And I still feel that way,

because I do not actually feel that,

1:20:301:20:33

in the past 15 years,

we've actually made much

1:20:331:20:36

of an improvement, as far

as services are concerned,

1:20:361:20:38

for these vulnerable kids.

1:20:381:20:41

After recent inspections,

Ofsted has raised concerns

1:20:411:20:44

about a lack of help and resources

for students once they reach

1:20:441:20:47

the age of 19.

1:20:471:20:51

This report also says the transfer

to EHC plans has had a negative

1:20:511:20:55

impact on many young people's lives.

1:20:551:20:57

Wildlife expert Chris Packham wasn't

diagnosed with Asperger's

1:20:571:21:00

until he was in his 40s.

1:21:001:21:04

He has had a a successful career,

and he is convinced that access

1:21:041:21:07

to education is key.

1:21:071:21:18

The highly gifted, and the people

that find things difficult,

1:21:181:21:21

we can't ignore them.

1:21:211:21:22

They're worth the investment.

1:21:221:21:23

Everyone deserves a fair,

proper education.

1:21:231:21:25

That's what should be the underlying

principle of our society,

1:21:251:21:27

and at the moment,

they're not getting it.

1:21:271:21:30

It is karaoke afternoon at this

specialist training centre

1:21:301:21:32

for people with

learning disabilities.

1:21:321:21:34

Its aim - to get talented young

people like Ben Hanson a diploma

1:21:341:21:38

and a job.

1:21:381:21:39

He is on a placement which he hopes

will lead to paid work.

1:21:391:21:42

So you're working at a hotel.

Yes.

1:21:421:21:45

What are you doing at the hotel?

1:21:451:21:48

Do you have a dream?

Yes.

1:21:521:21:53

What is your dream?

1:21:531:22:02

Yeah, my dream is a posh hotel.

1:22:021:22:04

You want to work in a posh hotel?

Yes.

1:22:041:22:06

But, with only around 6% of people

with learning disabilities

1:22:061:22:09

in employment, despite his energy

and enthusiasm, the odds

1:22:091:22:11

are against him.

1:22:111:22:12

I think the whole

thing is difficult.

1:22:121:22:14

Post-18, one father described it

to me as jumping off a cliff.

1:22:141:22:17

There's no understanding that

lifelong learning disability

1:22:171:22:23

is there, that it's

with you for life.

1:22:231:22:32

And the education,

health and care plan -

1:22:321:22:34

well, fine, but that finishes at 25.

1:22:341:22:36

Then what?

1:22:361:22:36

Is college fun?

1:22:361:22:37

Yes!

1:22:371:22:38

Councils say there isn't enough

money or facilities to offer support

1:22:381:22:41

up to the age of 25,

but the Government says it has

1:22:411:22:44

recently put in an extra £45 million

to help families of young people

1:22:441:22:48

with special educational needs.

1:22:481:22:49

All Ruth's parents want

is for her education to continue

1:22:491:22:51

for as long as possible,

to give her the best shot at living

1:22:511:22:55

a fulfilled, happy life.

1:22:551:22:57

Our disability correspondent

Nikki Fox joins us now.

1:22:571:23:02

We saw Ruth there, and the concern

her parents have over what happens

1:23:021:23:09

when she turns 25, what care will be

provided. What does the future hold

1:23:091:23:14

for Ruth?

Well, I think if Ruth's

lovely parents could do anything it

1:23:141:23:20

would be to keep her in that

specialist college for as long as

1:23:201:23:24

possible. It was there, she is

thriving, she is happy, she is

1:23:241:23:28

learning to improve her

communication skills, and that kind

1:23:281:23:31

of stuff is really important for

people with quite complex, profound

1:23:311:23:35

disabilities, to improve

communication so that they lead a

1:23:351:23:38

happy and safe life in the future.

At Gilbert and Geraldine represent a

1:23:381:23:45

lot of parents of young children

like Ruth because it is an ongoing

1:23:451:23:51

stress. Gilbert said to us there,

when I die, put her in the grave

1:23:511:23:56

with me, what is going to happen?

Because really, when she leaves that

1:23:561:23:59

place in a year's time, they will

have to fight again. They fought for

1:23:591:24:04

the education, health and care plan

to get her there, she missed

1:24:041:24:08

education but she is there now. She

has one year left and they will have

1:24:081:24:12

to fight to get her to somehow live

independently in some kind of

1:24:121:24:15

supported living, hopefully, if that

is an option. But will she end up in

1:24:151:24:20

a residential care setting? All

these thoughts will be going

1:24:201:24:23

through, and they are getting older

now, you'll vote and Geraldine, and

1:24:231:24:26

they want her to be as happy as she

can possibly be -- Gilbert and

1:24:261:24:33

Geraldine. She needs to live as

independently and happy as possible.

1:24:331:24:38

You also introduced us to Ben, whose

dream, he says, well, one is to

1:24:381:24:43

work, and the dream job, work in a

posh hotel, was his phrase. What is

1:24:431:24:49

his situation? How is it going to

work out?

Here's on a placement at

1:24:491:24:54

the moment. He is not getting paid,

but that is what he wants to do. But

1:24:541:24:59

the figures for people with learning

disability like Ben are shockingly

1:24:591:25:04

low, at 6%, and that is a figure

that has actually decreased

1:25:041:25:07

overtime. So for someone like Ben,

the odds are really stacked against

1:25:071:25:14

him, but he desperately wants to

work. That is why Rosa Monckton, who

1:25:141:25:18

you saw in our peace, has set up a

centre to try and get people with

1:25:181:25:22

disabilities in employment. There is

an argument that people with

1:25:221:25:27

disabilities are forgotten when it

comes to the targets.

Because it is

1:25:271:25:31

too difficult to deal with an easier

to ignore?

Some would argue it is

1:25:311:25:37

quite easy. Supported employment is

a great option. For someone like

1:25:371:25:41

Ben, he would have somebody to get

him started in work, somebody he

1:25:411:25:45

could chat to if he has any

problems, to take the pressure off

1:25:451:25:50

the employer. Some would argue it is

an easy solution, but it costs

1:25:501:25:54

money, and maybe that is why. People

do definitely feel forgotten in that

1:25:541:26:00

figure when we talk about getting

people with disabilities into work.

1:26:001:26:06

Learning disabilities have their own

problems.

Thank you very much, and

1:26:061:26:12

we will be speaking to the Work and

Pensions Secretary later on this

1:26:121:26:15

morning. And you have been getting

in touch with us all week about

1:26:151:26:19

this, it has really touched a nerve

with our viewers.

1:26:191:26:23

If you would like to get in touch

with us about your stories,

1:26:231:26:26

e-mail [email protected],

or tweet us using the hashtag

1:26:261:26:28

#BBCSend.

1:26:281:26:35

You are watching Breakfast.

1:26:351:26:36

Still to come: For decades,

Christmas cards were as important

1:26:361:26:39

to the festive season

as turkey and presents.

1:26:391:26:41

But when it is faster, and free,

to send your greetings by social

1:26:411:26:45

media, we will be asking

if the tradition could finally

1:26:451:26:47

be dying out.

1:26:471:26:55

Do you have your Christmas card list

ready?

Oh yes.

I hope

1:26:551:30:19

Bye for now.

1:30:191:30:24

Hello - this is Breakfast

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

1:30:261:30:29

Munchetty.

1:30:291:30:30

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment,

1:30:301:30:42

President Trump has told Theresa May

that she should pay more attention

1:30:421:30:46

to tackling terrorism in the UK,

rather than criticising him.

1:30:461:30:49

The message was delivered

in a tweet last night

1:30:491:30:51

after Downing Street criticised

the US President for sharing

1:30:511:30:54

anti-Muslim videos posted

by a British far-right group

1:30:541:30:56

on social media.

1:30:561:30:57

The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister to cancel

1:30:571:31:00

Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

1:31:001:31:02

The United States has called

on the international community

1:31:021:31:05

to sever ties with North Korea -

it follows the country's latest

1:31:051:31:08

ballistic missile test.

1:31:081:31:09

North Korean state media claimed

that Wednesday's missile

1:31:091:31:11

launch was the most powerful

in the country's history.

1:31:111:31:14

At an emergency meeting

of the UN Security Council,

1:31:141:31:16

Washington's Ambassador to the UN,

Nikki Haley warned of dire

1:31:161:31:19

consequences if war were to break

out on the Korean peninsula.

1:31:191:31:22

The dictator of North Korea made

a choice yesterday that brings

1:31:221:31:25

the world closer to war,

not farther from it.

1:31:251:31:30

We have never sought war

with North Korea and still today,

1:31:301:31:33

we do not seek it.

1:31:331:31:44

If war does come, it will be

because of continued acts

1:31:441:31:47

of aggression like we witnessed

yesterday and if war comes,

1:31:471:31:50

make no mistake, the North Korean

regime will be utterly destroyed.

1:31:501:31:53

The government is setting out plans

to get a million more disabled

1:31:531:31:56

people into work over

the next 10 years.

1:31:561:32:02

Less than half of the UK's disabled

population is currently

1:32:021:32:05

in work and last year only eight

per cent of businesses employed

1:32:051:32:08

a person with a disability.

1:32:081:32:09

Charities say progress

from previous, similar schemes has

1:32:091:32:12

been too slow.

1:32:121:32:12

Scientists say they have made

an "incredibly important" advance

1:32:121:32:15

in the prevention of migraine.

1:32:151:32:16

The results of two clinical trials

1:32:161:32:18

published in the New England

Journal of Medicine

1:32:181:32:20

showed that injections of antibodies

can be used to neutralise a chemical

1:32:201:32:23

which is believed to

trigger severe headaches.

1:32:231:32:25

Around half of patients

reported a 50% reduction

1:32:251:32:27

in the number of attacks

they had each month.

1:32:271:32:30

Litter on beaches rose

by 10% this year,

1:32:301:32:32

with a fifth of the rubbish made up

of on-the-go food and drinks items

1:32:321:32:36

such as cups, foil

wrappers and bottles.

1:32:361:32:38

The Marine Conservation

Society is now calling

1:32:381:32:40

on the Government to put a levy

on single-use items handed over

1:32:401:32:43

for free like plastic cutlery,

straws and sandwich packaging.

1:32:431:32:47

Coming up on the programme,

Matt will have the weather.

1:32:471:32:53

First, goals.

1:32:531:33:06

What are the best goals of the

season. It got a thumbs up from Sam

1:33:061:33:13

Allardyce, who will take over at

Everton. I'm surprised it didn't get

1:33:131:33:17

more.

1:33:171:33:17

Everton impressed their new manager

Sam Allardyce but the night belonged

1:33:171:33:20

to one man, Wayne Rooney

scoring his first Everton hat trick,

1:33:201:33:23

his third, he says, one of the best

goals he's ever scored.

1:33:231:33:26

And it's hard to disagree,

when you're popping them

1:33:261:33:29

in from the halfway line.

1:33:291:33:30

And it gave departing interim

manager David Unsworth a big win.

1:33:301:33:50

A great hat-trick, a great

display from Wayne.

1:33:501:33:53

He is captain and captain

for a reason, going from a top

1:33:531:33:56

environment after a top spell,

tonight, we spoke about the bad run

1:33:561:33:59

having to come to an end,

it doesn't last forever

1:33:591:34:02

and being a real man does if you can

stand up there and fight

1:34:021:34:06

in times of trouble.

1:34:061:34:07

in times of trouble.

1:34:071:34:08

From great goals to important ones,

Raheem Sterling's 96th-minute winner

1:34:081:34:11

against Southampton extending

manchester City's winning run.

1:34:111:34:13

1-1 going into stoppage time,

he curled this effort

1:34:131:34:21

into the top corner.

1:34:211:34:23

And you might have thought he'd

scored from the halfway line,

1:34:231:34:31

wheeling away in delight.

1:34:311:34:32

It's a club-record 12th-successive

Premier League win..

1:34:321:34:37

-- win.

1:34:371:34:37

And Pep Guardiola was pleased.

1:34:371:34:39

Fourth-placed Arsenal scored five

against Huddersfield -

1:34:391:34:41

neat play for Olivier Giroud

to hammer home one of his two goals.

1:34:411:34:44

And Mo Salah matched him,

the Premier League's leading

1:34:441:34:47

goalscorer running on to this one

as Liverpool beat Stoke 3-0.

1:34:471:34:54

It's now 65 domes in Scotland -

Celtic managed to keep their 65 game

1:34:541:34:58

unbeaten run in domestic fixtures

going but only just,

1:34:581:35:00

a controversial Scott Sinclair

penalty in the final minutes

1:35:001:35:03

of the game rescued a point for

the champions against Motherwell.

1:35:031:35:05

Meanwhile Rangers beat second placed

Aberdeen 3-nil at Ibrox.

1:35:051:35:08

James Tavernier got

on the scoresheet twice either side

1:35:081:35:10

of a goal from Carlos Pena.

1:35:101:35:13

After touching down in New Zealand,

Ben Stokes has signed on to play the

1:35:131:35:18

Canterbury but will probably not

play to the Ashes. Relating to an

1:35:181:35:23

incident outside a Bristol

nightclub, police have handed their

1:35:231:35:27

file to the Crown Prosecution

Service.

1:35:271:35:29

Well following their victory

in the 1st Test, Australia batsman

1:35:291:35:32

Peter Hanscombe says his side

will continue to target the minds

1:35:321:35:35

of England's batsmen on the pitch

with their sledging.

1:35:351:35:38

Well, England bowler James Anderson

has his own message for the Aussies.

1:35:381:35:41

Something I've always

enjoyed, excuse me.

1:35:411:35:42

When someone is trying

to get under my skin,

1:35:421:35:47

not just in cricket but in all walks

of life, it makes me more

1:35:471:35:50

determined to succeed

so it is something from a personal

1:35:501:35:53

point of view that excites

me and will drive me

1:35:531:35:56

on to try and do the best I can

with bat and ball.

1:35:561:36:03

Chris Froome will target victory

at May's Giro d'Italia where he'll

1:36:031:36:06

attempt to seal a hat-trick

of successive Grand Tour wins.

1:36:061:36:08

The 4-time Tour de France winner

won the Vuelta a Espana

1:36:081:36:11

for the first time this year

as well as Le Tour again

1:36:111:36:15

and will attempt to become only

the third rider in history to hold

1:36:151:36:18

all three Grand Tour

titles at the same time.

1:36:181:36:21

In netball, England came

from behind to beat Malawi

1:36:211:36:23

and complete a 3-0 series win.

1:36:231:36:25

The Roses were eight goals adrift

after the first quarter

1:36:251:36:31

in Birmingham but came back

to complete a 62-60 victory.

1:36:311:36:33

England, who are ranked third

in the world, are building up

1:36:331:36:36

to the Commonwealth Games

in Australia next year.

1:36:361:36:42

By the looks of it,

they are in good form as well.

1:36:421:36:45

A big win for them.

1:36:451:36:49

We will talk to Mark Foster in a

moment. This week, he made a

1:36:491:36:54

statement in relation to his

sexuality and saying he is gay for

1:36:541:36:58

the first time. Such a big thing for

sport, feeling comfortable in their

1:36:581:37:03

own skin and performing better.

The

environment you work in, how

1:37:031:37:08

comfortable are you? We known

football, how many open gay

1:37:081:37:14

footballers are playing in the

Premier league? Do they feel

1:37:141:37:18

comfortable coming out? Is the

environment as well.

You as one of

1:37:181:37:24

the most successful British swimmers

of all time and we get to talk to

1:37:241:37:28

him now from his home in

Hertfordshire.

Good morning. It is

1:37:281:37:34

Naga here, can you hear me? We were

just talking about being comfortable

1:37:341:37:40

in your own skin and sports people

being comfortable in their own skin

1:37:401:37:44

timing with your decision this week

to make public your sexuality.

Why

1:37:441:37:50

did you do it? One of the reasons

why I have got this moustache, it's

1:37:501:37:57

not something on the regular, it is

to do with Movember, I am raising

1:37:571:38:04

awareness and I realised over the

last year, I had a big year, my dad

1:38:041:38:08

died, I realised I hadn't spoken to

him for an -- an awful lot and other

1:38:081:38:14

things in my personal life. I went

to some counselling and reflected a

1:38:141:38:19

bit and it's all about speaking,

because a lot of people hold things

1:38:191:38:23

in and with Movember, there are 6000

men every year, men and women, 80%

1:38:231:38:28

are men who take their own life and

it's not all linked to being gay but

1:38:281:38:33

at the same time people do struggle

with things and 70, when I was on

1:38:331:38:37

the block and competing, at home in

my personal life, I was out to

1:38:371:38:42

friends and family and close network

and when I went to work, I never

1:38:421:38:47

took it with me. Potentially, and I

know now looking back some of it is

1:38:471:38:55

foggy, there was a tiny bit of that

which was potentially holding me

1:38:551:39:00

back.

You mean performance wise or

personally?

I think both.

1:39:001:39:06

Performance wise. It's like going to

work with half of view. Some level,

1:39:061:39:14

I got good with dancing around the

truth. What are you doing on the

1:39:141:39:19

weekend? I'm just going to see

friends and family. I never shared

1:39:191:39:24

anything with my swimming

colleagues. The only one I did

1:39:241:39:28

confide in was by coach. If I was

having a bad time, I had somebody to

1:39:281:39:33

talk to. It was important to me to

share with someone then. It took a

1:39:331:39:41

long time until the age of 30. One

of my first swimming team-mates. And

1:39:411:39:48

when it came to being, some of my

life is in the public, I got used to

1:39:481:39:55

dancing around the edges and saying

half-truths.

How important do you

1:39:551:40:01

think it is for a sportsperson to

reveal that side of their personal

1:40:011:40:04

life? For the fans, but also the

sport?

I didn't think it's just

1:40:041:40:13

sports people. It is people in

general. This is not a question of,

1:40:131:40:17

if you are gay, come out. Everyone

at the right time. I am 47 and I've

1:40:171:40:23

been retired now fourth nine years

after representing Britain. It took

1:40:231:40:30

me a long time to become comfortable

with it in the outside world so to

1:40:301:40:35

speak. I suppose the analogy is, it

is strength in Numbers, having role

1:40:351:40:41

models. I went to an event last

night and we shared an awful lot of

1:40:411:40:48

stories, and similar stories about

our time in sport. Not being fully

1:40:481:40:52

present. Anyone would know if you

are not fully present in whatever

1:40:521:40:56

you are doing, part of your brain,

the brain is a complex thing, it is

1:40:561:41:02

always try to filter stop in the

background, don't mention this or

1:41:021:41:06

act in a certain way but if you can

be yourself, then you get more out

1:41:061:41:11

of yourself.

You spent a lot of time

with Colin Jackson. One of the

1:41:111:41:17

things that has come out in your

recent interview is that you weren't

1:41:171:41:20

open with each other about your

sexuality. When you look back on

1:41:201:41:24

that now... No. Had he think that

came about?

We both got used to

1:41:241:41:37

hiding away our personal lives. In

fairness, what happened was, I used

1:41:371:41:45

to train in Bath and these to watch

him work with the athletes. I

1:41:451:41:50

suppose that to me was probably, I

wanted to be away from the swimmers

1:41:501:41:57

so I did not have to share or see

that much of me. Friend of mine at

1:41:571:42:05

that time, Ross Baillie, died of

anaphylactic shock. It was a

1:42:051:42:09

horrendous experience. He can't have

moved in with me for two years. We

1:42:091:42:16

probably spent two weeks together at

the same time. But we were very

1:42:161:42:20

close friends. For me, he knew my

partner, came to the house and knew

1:42:201:42:31

my personal relationship. But I

never spoke about it. I never wanted

1:42:311:42:37

to dig into his personal life. I got

used to not asking questions about

1:42:371:42:43

other people. I did not want people

asking questions at me. In sport,

1:42:431:42:47

its masculinity, you think growing

up that to me, being gay for --

1:42:471:42:55

being gay was wrong. When I first

fell in love with somebody, I learnt

1:42:551:43:00

that love was wrong. That's not

right. That came from generations of

1:43:001:43:09

that's what I learnt as a child. I

think the both of us, we never

1:43:091:43:14

really shared our true selves

because you are in fear of being

1:43:141:43:19

vulnerable. I think in life, there

is love and fear. You are either in

1:43:191:43:25

love and happy or in fear of certain

things. It's difficult to be

1:43:251:43:30

vulnerable with other people.

I'm

thinking back on moments. He said

1:43:301:43:34

perhaps the media skirted around the

issue of your sexuality. I'm

1:43:341:43:37

thinking back to when you are

commentating with Rebecca Adlington.

1:43:371:43:43

Much of -- much was made of her

squeezing your knee and speculation

1:43:431:43:48

about your relationship. How did

that make you feel? Was that more

1:43:481:43:52

pressure in terms of how much you

could keep your life private?

Yeah,

1:43:521:43:57

I suppose the me, in a good way, it

was another way of trying to nudge

1:43:571:44:05

me out, so to speak. I suppose if I

didn't spend a lot of my life in the

1:44:051:44:11

public eye, that would not have been

a problem. I suppose that was

1:44:111:44:15

another example of people just

assuming that I am straight or it

1:44:151:44:22

was the paper trying to, I don't

know, Becky and Mark having a thing,

1:44:221:44:28

gossip and titillation. Becky knows

me and she knows my other half. We

1:44:281:44:34

laughed it off and at the same time,

it was quite shocking that that

1:44:341:44:40

became a news story when the Olympic

Games was going on behind us in the

1:44:401:44:45

distance. We are very good friends.

I winced at the time. I would have

1:44:451:44:52

gone, that was very flattering. And

I am gay and that is an opportunity,

1:44:521:44:59

certain opportunities have come up

for me around the 2012 Olympics,

1:44:591:45:02

strictly come dancing, people were

intruding into my private life and I

1:45:021:45:09

wish to me, looking back, there were

certain times, this is who I am and

1:45:091:45:15

I was more open and honest then them

this wouldn't have been an issue and

1:45:151:45:19

the only issue is, it's not about

being gay, there are a lot of gay

1:45:191:45:23

people out there, but it's more to

do with, Fernee, if could just be

1:45:231:45:28

yourself and not have too carry

around half-truths and half lives.

1:45:281:45:33

There is this big problem with

mental health. Speaking more with

1:45:331:45:38

friends or family, do be a bit more

vulnerable and it makes things an

1:45:381:45:42

awful lot easier because you've not

got this voice in your head all the

1:45:421:45:46

time saying this is not normal.

1:45:461:45:52

It is a very positive message you

are putting out in terms of mental

1:45:521:45:56

health, and it is good to see you

are in a good place as well. Thank

1:45:561:46:01

you for being with us on BBC

Breakfast.

1:46:011:46:06

Here is Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:46:061:46:11

Here is Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:46:111:46:11

It is a little bit nippy, Matt.

A

little bit nippy and some more. For

1:46:111:46:17

most of you, we start the day a

little bit frosty. It is dry and

1:46:171:46:23

sunny, many will stay dry and sunny

all day long but the picture behind

1:46:231:46:27

me shows it is not the same

everywhere. A bit of Saint Andrews

1:46:271:46:32

Day snow and it is not confined to

northern Scotland. This is the view

1:46:321:46:36

in Scarborough. Eastern parts of

North Yorks, East Yorkshire and

1:46:361:46:39

eastern parts of Yorkshire as well,

so there will be problems on the

1:46:391:46:43

roads for one or two back. I see on

the roads were northern and eastern

1:46:431:46:47

areas, and where we see rain showers

in the night, clear skies in

1:46:471:46:50

between. Parts of Devon and Cornwall

will have rained through the

1:46:501:46:54

morning. In between, most of us dry

and sunny after a frosty start. It

1:46:541:46:59

will still feel cold into the

afternoon. That northerly wind

1:46:591:47:02

really does have a buy to it today

and while temperatures on the

1:47:021:47:05

thermometer is reached two or three

degrees across parts of Scotland, it

1:47:051:47:09

will fill sub zero in northern and

eastern areas. Sleet and snow

1:47:091:47:14

flurries continuing. Lots of

sunshine around and a few showers

1:47:141:47:18

for Northern Ireland into the

afternoon. Staying dry the northern

1:47:181:47:21

England, but down these eastern

counties, the showers on the coastal

1:47:211:47:24

strip. I 3pm they will be further

inland. A mixture of rain with some

1:47:241:47:30

hail and thunder on the coast. A

little bit of sleet and snow inland.

1:47:301:47:34

Clouding over in south-east England.

Much of western England and Wales

1:47:341:47:38

should be fine but Pembrokeshire

down towards Cornwall will have some

1:47:381:47:41

showers by the end of the afternoon.

They drift offshore by the end of

1:47:411:47:45

the night and with the wind change

by the evening, the risk of ice to

1:47:451:47:51

take us into Friday morning's

Russia. These are the temperatures

1:47:511:47:54

to start your Friday morning. Most

towns and cities around the freezing

1:47:541:47:59

mark in the countryside. In rural

Scotland it could be as low as -10.

1:47:591:48:03

Today could be the coldest day of

the week, but staying cold tomorrow.

1:48:031:48:08

Icy winds and eastern England

becoming confined to East Anglia and

1:48:081:48:12

the south-east, as do the showers,

mainly rain showers by the end of

1:48:121:48:16

the afternoon. Much of England and

Wales having a dry and bright day

1:48:161:48:20

tomorrow. Cardiff Scotland and

Northern Ireland. Signs of a change

1:48:201:48:23

as temperatures lived across

north-west Scotland. That is because

1:48:231:48:27

as this high-pressure drifts its way

southwards we are bringing in winds

1:48:271:48:31

of the Atlantic instead of the

Arctic. So the message for this

1:48:311:48:34

weekend, slowly, and I emphasise the

word slowly, coming less chilly.

1:48:341:48:40

Still a raw day across England and

Wales, a little bit of sunshine east

1:48:401:48:44

of higher ground. Patchy rain and

drizzle in the west but around eight

1:48:441:48:48

to 10 degrees in Scotland and

Northern Ireland, and the milder air

1:48:481:48:52

reaching the coast by the time we

hit Sunday after some damp and

1:48:521:48:55

drizzly weather overnight. And it

gets colder again next week.

Have

1:48:551:49:01

you had your Breakfast this morning?

I haven't yet, no. I haven't.

1:49:011:49:06

you had your Breakfast this morning?

I haven't yet, no. I haven't.

We are

1:49:061:49:08

talking Breakfast now, talking

Breakfast cereals.

Well, for me it

1:49:081:49:11

is more like it afternoon, I should

be having lunch.

Nice pie and chips,

1:49:111:49:17

to keep you warm.

The story is about

Kellogg's, and cereal.

Sugar content

1:49:171:49:30

particularly, and Kellogg's have

made some moves in the past, and

1:49:301:49:33

they are making more moves today

now, adjusting some of the sugar

1:49:331:49:37

content in some cereals, but not all

of them.

1:49:371:49:39

Morning, everybody.

1:49:391:49:40

Chances are, at some point,

you will have had some

1:49:401:49:43

in your cupboards at home.

1:49:431:49:47

But Kellogg's, like all the major

cereal brands, saw a big drop

1:49:471:49:50

in sales of cereal.

1:49:501:49:51

They are making some changes,

cutting the sugar in Coco Pops,

1:49:511:49:54

getting rid of the Ricicles brands.

1:49:541:49:56

But long-term favourites

like Frosties are untouched.

1:49:561:49:58

Many still think there is too much

sugar in our cereal portions,

1:49:581:50:01

one of those being

nutritionist Dr Anna Robins.

1:50:011:50:07

When you take that 30 g serving,

there is approximately a third of

1:50:071:50:11

that total added sugar in that one

setting, so in that on-ball. So by

1:50:111:50:17

the time the child has finished its

it has already consumed a third of

1:50:171:50:22

the total upper limit of added

sugars per day. I think any move to

1:50:221:50:26

be helping the general public to

make healthier choices is a good

1:50:261:50:30

one, and the changes that are taking

place, while it is a positive step,

1:50:301:50:34

I don't think they go far enough to

be making these cereals are healthy

1:50:341:50:39

option in the morning.

1:50:391:50:40

With me now is Oli Morton,

managing director of Kellogg's UK.

1:50:401:50:45

Just to kick off, you are changing

your Coco Pops level, and do you

1:50:451:50:54

think children have been consuming

too much sugar at breakfasttime?

1:50:541:50:58

What we are announcing today is a

big overhaul of our cereal range,

1:50:581:51:03

and we have worked really hard to

get on seven out of ten of the

1:51:031:51:07

nation's reckless tables in the

morning. That consumers are saying

1:51:071:51:09

they want to make healthier choices

in the morning, but importantly they

1:51:091:51:13

want products to taste great. Our

response is exactly what we are

1:51:131:51:17

doing, and there are two parts to

that. The first part we're doing is

1:51:171:51:21

a big sugar overhaul in our

children's product. Coco Pops will

1:51:211:51:25

be a 40% reduction in sugar levels

while keeping the same great taste.

1:51:251:51:30

Is that because consumers, parents,

are thinking there is too much sugar

1:51:301:51:34

in these cereals, so you are

adapting to that, or is it because

1:51:341:51:38

you have said children are eating

too much sugar at breakfasttime?

It

1:51:381:51:42

is what consumers are telling us,

which is that they want to make his

1:51:421:51:46

healthier choices. If you take the

Coco Pops example of a 40% reduction

1:51:461:51:52

in sugar, that will be 17% sugar in

those cereals.

It still seems like

1:51:521:51:56

quite a lot.

If you look at that

from the government's perspective,

1:51:561:52:02

it doesn't qualify as a higher sugar

level. By keeping the sugar levels

1:52:021:52:09

down, we are able to focus on the

key things in these products, from

1:52:091:52:18

B-vitamins to iron.

Clearly there

has been a movement from consumers

1:52:181:52:22

towards products they think are

healthier, yet you have Coco Pops

1:52:221:52:28

and Rice Krispies which you are

making changes to, but Frosties,

1:52:281:52:35

they are still there. More than a

third of every cereal bowl is sugar,

1:52:351:52:39

and you are not making any changes

to that.

What we are talking about

1:52:391:52:44

today is the biggest change in a

decade. To reduce Coco Pops's levels

1:52:441:52:47

by 40% has taken five years of work

and £5 million of investment,

1:52:471:52:51

because the crucial part is you have

to keep the same great taste.

Why

1:52:511:52:56

couldn't you have, five years ago,

with Frosties, Crunchy Nut

1:52:561:53:02

cornflakes, because consumers want

less sugar at breakfasttime.

Well,

1:53:021:53:09

let me just talk about Frosties, two

of the interesting things we are

1:53:091:53:13

doing. Firstly, Ricicles, so Captain

Rick will be no more. We don't

1:53:131:53:21

actually see that that fits with

consumers' lifestyles are moving

1:53:211:53:24

forward. With Frosties, a fact you

may not know, for our generations

1:53:241:53:29

who grew up with these products, we

haven't position that towards kids

1:53:291:53:34

dance 2010. The majority of people

who eat Frosties are actually

1:53:341:53:38

adults. -- since 2010.

Is this about

kids, or adults?

This is about us

1:53:381:53:45

responding to consumer needs. For

us, the biggest move we can make and

1:53:451:53:49

one we're really proud of is to make

sure get those sugar levels right in

1:53:491:53:53

the first place. The other part, as

adults talk about, is sugar. They

1:53:531:53:59

are asking is about health and that

same great taste, and we will bring

1:53:591:54:03

out a whole range of products to do

that.

One thing which has had a lot

1:54:031:54:07

of growth over recent years is

granola. A lot of people will see it

1:54:071:54:11

as being potentially a bit

healthier, especially the way it is

1:54:111:54:14

marketed. A lot your granola

products will have much more sugar

1:54:141:54:22

in them than your Coco Pops. How

does that work?

For us, there is a

1:54:221:54:30

great thing about Breakfast where it

is a lot about perception versus

1:54:301:54:33

reality, and across our cereals we

are very open about a sugar levels,

1:54:331:54:37

and these changes are a big part of

transparency from us, to talk about

1:54:371:54:41

these sugar levels. What is also

crucial, taking the granola example,

1:54:411:54:46

we started this new range 90 years

ago, founding the business on plant

1:54:461:54:50

-based simple food, healthy

nutrition. We will meet needs that

1:54:501:54:54

consumers are talking about...

So

they will have to be new brands.

1:54:541:55:03

Because flexatarian, obedient and

organic.

Is there a point at the end

1:55:031:55:09

of the day when, if you are an adult

over 35 and you want your cereal to

1:55:091:55:13

have more than a third of it as

sugar, you should be allowed to have

1:55:131:55:18

it. Why should you reduce your sugar

levels because other people think

1:55:181:55:21

you shouldn't have it?

What

consumers play back to us is that

1:55:211:55:24

some find it really important, on

taste, others find health really

1:55:241:55:27

important. So for those that want

taste and sugar, that is about how

1:55:271:55:33

we get that right for them, and do

that. The really important thing is

1:55:331:55:37

you have to keep taste right. The

piece we are really proud of,

1:55:371:55:41

because it is a big emotional

decision for consumers to make, is

1:55:411:55:44

when we come through with a 40%

reduction in sugar in Coco Pops,

1:55:441:55:49

they still taste great.

Thank you

very much for coming in this

1:55:491:55:53

morning. Very interesting one, to

see how consumers will change,

1:55:531:55:58

because we have seen huge changes in

Breakfast taste.

I wonder, would

1:55:581:56:06

Kelloggs UK be willing to sacrifice

sales in order to ensure that we as

1:56:061:56:11

a nation are healthier? A lot of it

comes down to you starting our days.

1:56:111:56:15

I think the two can go hand.

Firstly, the big decision not to do

1:56:151:56:21

Ricicles, that is a hit in sales but

when

1:56:211:56:28

Ricicles, that is a hit in sales but

consumers tell us they want sugar

1:56:281:56:29

levels to be lower, that goes hand

in hand. We are actually in excess

1:56:291:56:35

of 10% growth at the minute, so it

is about keeping on train with the

1:56:351:56:39

consumer and keeping ahead of it, to

make sure we do that right.

1:56:391:56:43

We will be back with the headlines

in just a few minutes.

1:56:432:00:03

Now, though, it is back

to Charlie and Naga.

2:00:032:00:06

Bye for now.

2:00:062:00:07

Hello this is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty

2:00:132:00:16

and Charlie Stayt Donald Trump

lashes out at Theresa May in a row

2:00:162:00:19

over anti-Muslim videos.

2:00:192:00:20

The Prime Minister criticised the US

President for sharing a series

2:00:202:00:22

of posts by the far-right group

Britain First.

2:00:222:00:29

But last night Mr Trump tweeted

that she should instead be focussed

2:00:292:00:31

on tackling terrorism.

2:00:312:00:35

Good morning it's

Thursday 30th November.

2:00:412:00:43

Also this morning.

2:00:432:00:46

A warning that children

with Special Educational Needs

2:00:462:00:49

aren't getting the support they need

once they hit 18.

2:00:492:00:51

We'll hear from parents desperately

concerned about what the future

2:00:512:00:54

holds for their families.

2:00:542:01:04

Kelloggs will be decreasing their

sugar in their cereals. I'll be

2:01:302:01:34

speaking about that a bit later. And

in sport, Sam Allardyce is

2:01:342:01:38

speaking about that a bit later. And

in sport, Sam Allardyce is due to be

2:01:382:01:41

Appointed the Everton manager after

their win last night.

2:01:412:01:44

# I'm so in love with you.

More than

ten million people hear him sing

2:01:442:01:49

every week, but you would be

forgiven for not knowing his name.

2:01:492:01:56

We'll speak to the Strictly singer

Tommy Blaze. And the weather: An icy

2:01:562:02:02

Arctic wind. This is the view a

short while ago in Scarborough. For

2:02:022:02:06

some, snow in the forecast. Details

in 15 minutes.

2:02:062:02:14

First, our main story.

2:02:142:02:16

In a blunt tweet President Trump has

told Theresa May that she should pay

2:02:162:02:19

more attention to tackling terrorism

in the UK, rather

2:02:192:02:22

than criticising him.

2:02:222:02:25

The message was delivered last night

after Downing Street

2:02:252:02:28

criticised the US President

for sharing anti-Muslim videos

2:02:282:02:31

posted by a British far-right

group on social media.

2:02:312:02:35

The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister

2:02:352:02:37

to cancel Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

2:02:372:02:40

Our North America Correspondent

Laura Bicker has more.

2:02:402:02:42

They may have held hands once but

this special relationship is being

2:02:422:02:46

tested by a series of presidential

tweets, first from the group called

2:02:462:02:53

Britain First, Donald Trump

retweeted three inflammatory videos

2:02:532:02:57

to his 43 million followers, the

first claimed incorrectly to show a

2:02:572:03:01

Muslim migrant attacking a man on

crutches. When challenged, the White

2:03:012:03:05

House said the videos might not be

real but the threat was.

Theresa May

2:03:052:03:10

and a lot of other world leaders

across the world know that these are

2:03:102:03:14

real threats, that we have to talk

about. I think Europe's seen that a

2:03:142:03:18

lot first hand and something the

president wants to continue to talk

2:03:182:03:21

about and continue to make sure that

we are dealing with.

Theresa May is

2:03:212:03:26

on a tour of the Middle East. But

her official spokesman said the

2:03:262:03:29

president had been wrong to share

the posts. It was that condemnation

2:03:292:03:34

which prompted a Twitter outburst

from Donald Trump's account. He told

2:03:342:03:38

Theresa May not to focus on him, but

to focus on the destructive Islamic

2:03:382:03:43

terrorism taking place within the

UK. We are doing just fine, he said.

2:03:432:03:49

The President has caused diplomatic

headaches for the UK several times

2:03:492:03:52

already this year. From backing

Nigel Farage as an ambassador to

2:03:522:03:58

Washington to attacking the London

Mayor Sadiq Khan all from his

2:03:582:04:01

favourite social media platform. It

may be a show of strength for his

2:04:012:04:05

supporters, but it may also weaken

his position abroad.

2:04:052:04:10

Let's get the latest on this

now from our political

2:04:102:04:13

correspondent Alex Forsyth,

who is travelling with

2:04:132:04:16

the Prime Minister and is in Jordan

for us this morning.

2:04:162:04:23

What are you hearing about this?

We

have not had a lot from the Prime

2:04:232:04:31

Minister directly to speak frankly,

we have the rebuke from Downing

2:04:312:04:36

Street yesterday saying Donald Trump

shouldn't have tweeted what he did

2:04:362:04:39

about Britain First but that wasn't

issued by the Prime Minister.

2:04:392:04:43

However, Theresa May's due to make

this trip to Jordan today, there'll

2:04:432:04:51

be business leaders and the focus is

expected to be on trade and the

2:04:512:04:55

economy. You can expect the Q & A

session to be dominated by this

2:04:552:05:01

response from Donald Trump because

senior figures in the Conservative

2:05:012:05:04

Party are becoming more and more

outspoken about this. The

2:05:042:05:09

Communities Secretary Sajid Javid

tweeted yesterday saying President

2:05:092:05:13

Trump endorsed the view of the hate

organisation that hates people.

2:05:132:05:27

Other senior conservatives say he

was right to say something. Liz

2:05:272:05:31

Truss, the leader of the Scottish

Conservatives Ruth Davidson, and

2:05:312:05:35

Jeremy Corbyn is calling on the

government to condemn Donald Trump

2:05:352:05:39

in the strongest possible terms. The

Lib Dems are calling on the

2:05:392:05:42

government to rescind Donald Trump's

invitation for a state visit so

2:05:422:05:47

increasing pressure and focus on

Theresa May this morning to see

2:05:472:05:50

exactly how she's going to react.

We'll keep a close eye on it. Thank

2:05:502:05:55

you very much.

2:05:552:05:57

The United States has called

on the international community

2:05:572:05:59

to sever ties with North Korea -

it follows the country's latest

2:05:592:06:02

ballistic missile test.

2:06:022:06:03

North Korean media claimed that

Wednesday's missile launch

2:06:032:06:06

was the most powerful

in the country's history.

2:06:062:06:08

At an emergency meeting

of the UN Security Council,

2:06:082:06:11

Washington's Ambassador to the UN

warned of dire consequences

2:06:112:06:14

if war breaks out.

2:06:142:06:16

A 24-year-old British man has been

killed in Syria while clearing

2:06:162:06:20

and dismantling mines in Raqqa.

2:06:202:06:24

Oliver Hall, from the Portsmouth

area, joined Kurdish armed groups

2:06:242:06:26

to fight against so-called Islamic

State.

2:06:262:06:28

He is the seventh British man

to have been killed in Syria

2:06:282:06:31

with the Kurdish-led group the YPG.

2:06:312:06:33

Plans to get an extra one million

disabled people into work will be

2:06:332:06:38

published by the government today.

2:06:382:06:39

Around 50% of disabled

people are in work, that's

2:06:392:06:42

around 3.5 million people,

compared to 80% of

2:06:422:06:44

non-disabled people.

2:06:442:06:49

We'll speak to the Work and Pensions

Secretary in the next few minutes.

2:06:562:07:05

Two clinical trials have shown

a new approach to preventing

2:07:052:07:08

migraine can reduce the number

of attacks, and their severity.

2:07:082:07:10

Both trials used antibodies

that shield the nervous

2:07:102:07:12

system from the headaches.

2:07:122:07:13

Here's more from our

health and science

2:07:132:07:15

correspondent James Gallagher.

2:07:152:07:16

Imogen started having migraines two

years ago when she was 16. She was

2:07:162:07:19

having attacks every week and they

forced her to take a year out of

2:07:192:07:21

college.

It was really scary. For

me, when they were happening, I had

2:07:212:07:25

no clue what they were because I

thought, a might ran was just a

2:07:252:07:31

headache, so we had to keep looking

into more serious things.

More There

2:07:312:07:41

is a chemical in the nervous system

to stop a might ran developing. One

2:07:412:07:51

trial gave patients injections.

Before the trial they were having

2:07:512:07:55

migraines eight days a month. 50% of

patients were able to cut their

2:07:552:07:59

number of migraines in half. Four

drug companies are developing

2:07:592:08:03

similar treatments and scientists

say a new therapy could give

2:08:032:08:06

patients their life back. These

treatments are the first migraine

2:08:062:08:13

specific preventives ever. For the

most substantial neurological cause

2:08:132:08:17

of disability on the planet. It has

a huge advance for all of us.

2:08:172:08:23

Imogen's migraines are under control

and she's now studying to be a

2:08:232:08:26

nurse. But currently available drugs

do not work for everyone and can

2:08:262:08:30

cause side effects. New options for

people living with migraine are

2:08:302:08:35

desperately needed.

2:08:352:08:36

Litter on beaches rose by 10% this

year with a fifth of the rubbish

2:08:442:08:48

made up of on-the-go food and drinks

items such as cups, foil

2:08:482:08:50

wrappers and bottles.

2:08:502:08:52

The Marine Conservation Society

is now calling on the Government

2:08:522:08:54

to put a charge on single-use items

handed over for free

2:08:542:08:57

like plastic cutlery,

straws and sandwich packaging.

2:08:572:08:58

There needs to be a motivation to

stop people from using these items

2:08:582:09:03

in the first place and we believe

that a levy would create that

2:09:032:09:06

behaviour change as it has done with

the plastic bag charge.

Mark Foster

2:09:062:09:11

has been telling Breakfast that it's

important for young people to be

2:09:112:09:14

confident in their own skin in his

first broadcast interview since

2:09:142:09:17

revealing that he is gay. Foster is

one of the most successful British

2:09:172:09:21

swimmers of all-time with six World

Championship titles, two

2:09:212:09:26

Commonwealth titles, 11 European

titles the to his name but he thinks

2:09:262:09:31

keeping his sexuality secret kept

him from achieving even more. He'd

2:09:312:09:34

always kept that part of his life

private but feels now it's time for

2:09:342:09:38

him to be himself.

It's not about

that I'm gay because so what there

2:09:382:09:43

are a lot of gay people out there,

but it's more to do with, for me, if

2:09:432:09:48

you can just be yourself and not

have to carry around half-truth and

2:09:482:09:53

half lies, then, you know, there's

this big problem with mental health

2:09:532:09:57

and if people only speak a bit more,

a friend or family and confide in

2:09:572:10:02

someone and be a little less

vulnerable, it makes things easier

2:10:022:10:06

because you don't have the voice in

your head all the time saying this

2:10:062:10:10

is not normal, trying to process and

filter things.

We are focussing on

2:10:102:10:20

issues around disability and

employment now, and Mr David Gauke

2:10:202:10:24

joins us. The comments by Donald

Trump first of all, can I ask you

2:10:242:10:29

about these. A blunt put touchdown

Theresa May for those who haven't

2:10:292:10:33

already seen it. Don't focus on me,

focus on the destructive Islamic

2:10:332:10:39

terrorism taking place within the

United Kingdom. What do you make of

2:10:392:10:42

his comments?

Well, President Trump

was wrong to retweet something

2:10:422:10:48

coming from Britain first. There are

ghastly obnoxious organisations. The

2:10:482:10:52

Prime Minister was absolutely right

to point out that he was wrong to do

2:10:522:10:57

so and I'm pleased that she did that

and, if Donald Trump doesn't like

2:10:572:11:02

it, so be it but the Prime Minister

was right.

It feels fairly

2:11:022:11:06

uncomfortable does it not though,

having the President of the United

2:11:062:11:09

States and our Prime Minister at

odds in this way over Twitter?

Well,

2:11:092:11:16

in normal circumstances, this sort

of thing doesn't happen. But we are

2:11:162:11:21

not in normal circumstances. The

fact is, when the President did what

2:11:212:11:25

he did yesterday in terms of

tweeting, re-tweeting Britain first,

2:11:252:11:30

I think the Prime Minister had no

choice but to point out that that

2:11:302:11:34

was wrong. She was correct to do so.

Of course, we want to have a good

2:11:342:11:40

relationship with the United States,

they are our closest security allie,

2:11:402:11:43

one of our most important economic

partners and we want to have that

2:11:432:11:48

close relationship and we need to

engage with the United States,

2:11:482:11:51

including the President of the

United States. But when he's got

2:11:512:11:55

something as badly wrong as he has,

we are right to call him out on it.

2:11:552:12:01

You use the phrase, we are not in

normal circumstances, a lot of

2:12:012:12:05

people wondering about the Trump

visit. Do you think it's time to

2:12:052:12:08

withdraw the invitation?

As I said,

it's important that we engage with

2:12:082:12:12

the United States and President

Trump just because there is a visit

2:12:122:12:16

doesn't mean that that is an

endorsement of everything that a

2:12:162:12:19

particular leader says or does and,

the United States is a very

2:12:192:12:23

important allie to us. So we have

got to continue to engage. That

2:12:232:12:27

invitation's gone out, it's been

accepted, the details to be

2:12:272:12:33

finalised and who knows, it might be

educational.

So let us talk about

2:12:332:12:38

the issues around getting more

disabled people into work. You are

2:12:382:12:41

pledging to get one million more

people into the work place in a

2:12:412:12:45

decade over the space of ten years.

Tell us about those proposals?

It's

2:12:452:12:50

an ambitious target, but it's

important we do everything we can to

2:12:502:12:54

make sure people can fulfil their

potential. The vast majority of

2:12:542:12:57

disabled people who're out of work

do want work. We have made progress

2:12:572:13:01

in recent years, there are 600,000

more disabled people in work than

2:13:012:13:05

was the case four years ago but

there's further to go. That means

2:13:052:13:08

ensuring that we have got a welfare

system that gives people the

2:13:082:13:12

personalised support so they can get

into work, a health system that is

2:13:122:13:17

working to ensure that we prevent

problems, preventing people from

2:13:172:13:22

working, and also we need to have a

culture shift, we need employers who

2:13:222:13:26

are looking to do what they can to

provide opportunities to disabled

2:13:262:13:30

people. We have very many excellent

employers in this country doing

2:13:302:13:34

great work but we need toe ensure

that happens across-the-board and

2:13:342:13:40

that the government prosides the

employers and support they need to

2:13:402:13:43

get people who have disabilitied

into work.

Did you really call this

2:13:432:13:48

an ambitious target, a million over

ten years, in the same sentence you

2:13:482:13:52

said in four years, 600,000 people

have got work, so in what way is

2:13:522:13:57

this ambitious because a lot of

critics are saying it's the

2:13:572:14:01

opposite, you have set a low target,

it could be a lot higher and you

2:14:012:14:04

could do a lot more?

We have made

great progress, but as you progress,

2:14:042:14:09

sometimes these things can get

harder.

Hold on, so you are saying

2:14:092:14:13

the process is going to slow down

and you know it?

No, let us be clear

2:14:132:14:18

of the numbers, there are 3.5

million people in work today who're

2:14:182:14:23

disabled, we are looking to move

that to 4.5 million people that. Is

2:14:232:14:29

a substantial increase and that will

require a lot of work on a number of

2:14:292:14:32

fronts, in terms of working with

employers, the welfare system, the

2:14:322:14:35

health system. That is about

increasing opportunities for large

2:14:352:14:40

numbers of people. So it is an

ambitious programme, one that we

2:14:402:14:45

believe that we can deliver and what

we are setting out today is some of

2:14:452:14:49

the measures that we are going to

take and also the plan to how we are

2:14:492:14:53

going to test and learn and how we

are going to innovate in this area

2:14:532:14:58

to ensure we increase opportunities

for disabled people and people with

2:14:582:15:01

health conditions that at the moment

don't get the chances that they need

2:15:012:15:05

and it's really important for them

and also for our economy that we

2:15:052:15:09

make progress on this.

I don't want

to get bogged down in this but you

2:15:092:15:15

keep using the word ambitious which

is just not true. You seem to be

2:15:152:15:19

officially saying that the rate at

which people will get work in the

2:15:192:15:22

next few years is slowing down,

according to your official figures,

2:15:222:15:25

that is what you are saying, and

specifically a lot of critics say

2:15:252:15:30

specific to those with learning

disabilities, there is almost

2:15:302:15:33

nothing in your outlining of your

proposals that will address any of

2:15:332:15:38

their needs and they often think

they're the most forgotten of all

2:15:382:15:42

the people in these situations?

2:15:422:15:47

I don't accept that. To go from 3.4

million disabled people in work to

2:15:472:15:53

4.5 million in the course of a

decade would be extraordinary

2:15:532:15:56

progress. Yes, we have made progress

in the last four years. I am pleased

2:15:562:16:03

about that. But if we don't take

further steps, then frankly we could

2:16:032:16:09

go backwards. It is the case that

people with disabilities are three

2:16:092:16:13

times more likely to leave work,

sorry, twice as likely to leave work

2:16:132:16:18

as those without disabilities. And

they find it harder to get into

2:16:182:16:22

work. We do need to take steps,

notwithstanding the progress we have

2:16:222:16:27

already made. That is why we set out

in the paper today a number of

2:16:272:16:31

measures across the piece. There is

particular focus on mental health

2:16:312:16:36

and those with musculoskeletal

conditions, because those are the

2:16:362:16:44

largest groups were we think we can

make progress. But across the board

2:16:442:16:48

for every type of group we are

making steps. It does require a

2:16:482:16:52

culture change and it requires

government to take steps ensuring

2:16:522:16:58

people get that personalised support

with the welfare system. We are

2:16:582:17:02

doing that. This is a really

important approach that can

2:17:022:17:05

transform significant numbers of

lives.

You have used the word is

2:17:052:17:10

ambitious and important. How much

money are you pledging, how much new

2:17:102:17:15

money are you pledging to these

important ambitions?

Today is not a

2:17:152:17:21

day when we are setting out new

money.

How much money will you be

2:17:212:17:25

putting into this important new

ambitious programme? The question

2:17:252:17:30

was how much money will you be

putting into this programme that is

2:17:302:17:33

ambitious?

We have already set out a

number of areas of expenditure. For

2:17:332:17:40

example, when it comes to innovation

in this particular area there is a

2:17:402:17:44

£70 million programme we have

announced. This is in a context

2:17:442:17:48

where we spend £50 billion a year on

disabled people, people with health

2:17:482:17:54

conditions. We spend a very

significant sum of money every year

2:17:542:17:58

on this. What today is about is

about how we find ways in which we

2:17:582:18:03

can innovate. Find ways in which we

can change the culture. Find ways in

2:18:032:18:07

which we can find additional money.

One example, spending £39 million on

2:18:072:18:19

people accessing psychological

support, psychological therapies. We

2:18:192:18:26

have already set out how we are

spending £330 million over the next

2:18:262:18:30

four years in terms of personal

support packages for people with

2:18:302:18:34

disabilities, to help them, and

health conditions, to help them into

2:18:342:18:39

work. This is an important set of

policies.

This week we have been

2:18:392:18:44

doing a series of reports on the

problems faced by many people,

2:18:442:18:47

including those with learning

disabilities. I think your words

2:18:472:18:51

will ring pretty hollow with them.

What they are seeing is the reality

2:18:512:18:55

of the situation. They look back at

the place from 2015 from the

2:18:552:19:02

Treasury, I'm not sure, maybe you

were in the Treasury at the time,

2:19:022:19:05

the place was... Increasing

employment levels among people with

2:19:052:19:10

learning disabilities is a key aim

of the government. The aim is to

2:19:102:19:17

have the employment gap between

disabled and non-disabled people. It

2:19:172:19:21

was an aim, a pledge, it was

ambitious. They probably used the

2:19:212:19:25

same words you are using now. A lot

of people will think you are saying

2:19:252:19:30

the words with little to back it up.

That place did not happen. It is

2:19:302:19:34

nowhere near?

Hold on. Since 2014,

the employment rate for disabled

2:19:342:19:40

people has gone up by 4.7%. For the

population as a whole it has gone up

2:19:402:19:46

by 2.2%. As I say, we have been

making progress in terms of

2:19:462:19:51

increasing the employment rate. --

the employment rate amongst disabled

2:19:512:19:57

people. There is more we need to do.

We have a record of making

2:19:572:20:02

improvement in this area in terms of

the employment rate but there is

2:20:022:20:05

further work that needs to be done.

What we are setting out today in the

2:20:052:20:10

paper is how we are going to do

that. We can increase the number

2:20:102:20:13

from 3.5 million to 4.5 million over

the course of a decade. If we can do

2:20:132:20:21

that, that would be good news for

the British economy because we are

2:20:212:20:24

tapping into the talents of people.

But perhaps more importantly, there

2:20:242:20:30

will be good news for the million

people who will be able to get into

2:20:302:20:34

work and have all the benefits that

work provides. That is why we are

2:20:342:20:39

making this announcement.

David

Gauke, thank you for your time.

2:20:392:20:43

The work and pensions secretary.

2:20:432:20:48

Here's Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:20:482:20:53

It is cold. It is

2:20:532:20:54

It is cold. It is going to get

colder.

2:20:542:20:58

It is cold. The start of

meteorological winter not till

2:20:582:21:02

tomorrow but it has started already.

Most startling dry and sunny. -6 in

2:21:022:21:08

parts of Worcestershire. Some are

now waking up to a good covering of

2:21:082:21:14

snow in Yorkshire, Norfolk and parts

of Scotland. That will cause a few

2:21:142:21:21

issues on the roads. I see in

places. The showers in eastern

2:21:212:21:26

England will push further west. Rain

showers to the west of Wales, Devon

2:21:262:21:31

and Cornwall, Northern Ireland.

Turning drier later. For the vast

2:21:312:21:39

majority it will be a dry and fairly

sunny day but a cold day. Arctic

2:21:392:21:44

with us. With a wind blowing across

the country and added wind-chill,

2:21:442:21:50

-3, -4 in eastern Scotland. Central

Scotland with lots of sunshine. A

2:21:502:21:55

dry afternoon in Northern Ireland.

Eastern counties of England the

2:21:552:22:01

greater chance of showers later.

Most rain, hail or sleet. Clouding

2:22:012:22:08

over to the south-east. Much of the

West will stay dry and bright.

2:22:082:22:15

Showers in Wales will become more

confined to the far west. Tonight,

2:22:152:22:18

clear for many. Lots of cloud in

eastern England. A strong breeze.

2:22:182:22:25

Wintry showers. Increased risk of

ice. Temperatures just above

2:22:252:22:32

freezing. Elsewhere, temperatures

below freezing. Colder night in

2:22:322:22:35

parts of Scotland. -10 tomorrow

morning. A cold start to Friday. I

2:22:352:22:43

see winds across eastern England

easing down. Confined to East Anglia

2:22:432:22:50

and the south-east. Showers on the

coastal strip. Much of England and

2:22:502:22:55

Wales dry with sunshine tomorrow.

Cloudy day with sunny breaks in

2:22:552:22:58

Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Later, a change in wind direction.

2:22:582:23:02

That is due to this area of

high-pressure drifting south into

2:23:022:23:05

weekend. The yellow colours an

indication of something less chilly

2:23:052:23:11

pushing its way in. Slowly, and I

emphasise slowly, getting milder

2:23:112:23:15

this weekend. Saturday still quite

roar in England and Wales. Wet

2:23:152:23:21

conditions to the north-west of

Scotland. The mild air will be down

2:23:212:23:27

towards the south coast by the time

we get to Sunday. Doubled --

2:23:272:23:31

double-figure temperatures after

early drizzle. Right conditions east

2:23:312:23:35

of high ground. A lot of cloud

around this weekend. The upside, if

2:23:352:23:38

you like your weather not to chilly,

it will be a touch milder, but

2:23:382:23:44

colder weather is never too far

away.

2:23:442:23:45

colder weather is never too far

away.

2:23:452:23:48

Back next week. Not to chilly is

always preferred, isn't it?

2:23:482:23:52

It depends. Cold and crisp from me.

Thank you.

2:23:522:23:55

Will the government make good

on its promise of bringing high

2:23:552:23:58

speed internet access

to all of us by 2020?

2:23:582:24:02

The key company that

it will have to rely

2:24:022:24:04

on to make that happen -

Openreach - is warning it could risk

2:24:042:24:07

missing the target unless it decides

how it's going to do

2:24:072:24:10

the work very soon.

2:24:102:24:11

Ross Hawkins is in North Wales.

2:24:112:24:16

They have come up with a clever way

to get people connected. I see

2:24:162:24:21

cables behind you. Explain how they

will achieve what many people are

2:24:212:24:24

seeing is a big problem for auroral

areas?

Yeah, we have cables, we have

2:24:242:24:32

snow. Something even more exciting

than that. People lived on the high

2:24:322:24:37

side of the valley. But the high

speed network was down there. What

2:24:372:24:45

did they do? They came up with a

solution. This drone. Attached to

2:24:452:24:51

the bottom of that, as it takes off,

is actually some fishing line. They

2:24:512:24:56

use the fishing line to fly out

there over the valley. They then

2:24:562:24:59

managed to drop the fishing line

down and use that to drag across the

2:24:592:25:05

fibre-optic cable, which then meant

they can have high-speed Internet up

2:25:052:25:12

here. There goes the cable. They can

use that to drug -- drag across. 12

2:25:122:25:18

drone pilots they have trained,

according to the company Openreach,

2:25:182:25:22

behind this. The head of engineering

is not allowed to do it any more

2:25:222:25:27

because he is scared -- he has

scared some sheep. What difference

2:25:272:25:30

has admitted to you, Chris?

Tremendous difference. It has

2:25:302:25:35

brought light to the dark side.

In

practical terms that means what? How

2:25:352:25:41

long did it take to download a film

before and how long does it take

2:25:412:25:44

now?

I made wait for the afternoon

for the film to come and now it is

2:25:442:25:49

about 12 minutes. A Blu-ray film.

You will be thinking that is all

2:25:492:25:57

very well for rural Wales. I don't

live on the side of a valley. I is

2:25:572:26:02

my broadband not as fast as Chris'?

Headhunted from Openreach can answer

2:26:022:26:07

that. This is clever and innovative

but the government wanted to force

2:26:072:26:11

you legally to put in place

broadband right across the country

2:26:112:26:16

and you are resisting their

proposal, putting a counter offer.

2:26:162:26:20

Why not accept what the government

wants?

We are not resisting it.

2:26:202:26:25

Their plan is from 2020 people

request broadband at 10 megabits per

2:26:252:26:31

second minimum. Our offer we have

made to government is better,

2:26:312:26:33

however. We are saying we will

deploy to everybody from next year

2:26:332:26:38

if they accept our offer.

But you

have made this counter innocence to

2:26:382:26:44

what the government promised

consumers in their manifesto. You

2:26:442:26:47

know there are -- your industry

rivals think there is a problem with

2:26:472:26:50

your offer, if you fail to give

people who don't have the advantage

2:26:502:26:53

of drums the server broadband they

want, they will hold you to account.

2:26:532:26:59

How can we trust Openreach to

deliver what you say you will?

So

2:26:592:27:03

far we have delivered to 95% of the

UK. That is a huge amount of effort,

2:27:032:27:09

commitment and investment, partly

funded by government. We want to go

2:27:092:27:13

further. We think the right thing to

do is to make a generous offer to

2:27:132:27:18

government in order to bring greater

than 10 megabits broadband to

2:27:182:27:21

absolutely everybody and started

from next year.

Thank you very much.

2:27:212:27:26

Who knows, a drunk would be coming

to help with the Internet by you

2:27:262:27:29

sometime soon. If it doesn't, you

will have Openreach to answer

2:27:292:27:33

questions.

2:27:332:27:37

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

2:27:372:27:39

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

2:30:562:30:58

Now though it's back

to Charlie and Naga.

2:30:582:31:00

Bye for now.

2:31:002:31:01

Hello, this is Breakfast with

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt.

2:31:042:31:07

Good morning.

2:31:072:31:08

First, our main story.

2:31:082:31:17

In a blunt tweet, President Trump

has told Theresa May that she should

2:31:172:31:20

pay more attention to tackling

terrorism in the UK,

2:31:202:31:22

rather than criticising him.

2:31:222:31:23

The message was delivered last night

after Downing Street criticised

2:31:232:31:25

the US President for sharing

anti-Muslim videos posted

2:31:252:31:27

by a British far-right

group on social media.

2:31:272:31:31

The row has placed more pressure

on the Prime Minister to cancel

2:31:312:31:37

Mr Trump's state visit

to the UK next year.

2:31:372:31:42

It is important that we engage with

the United States and President

2:31:422:31:45

Trump. Just because there is a

visit, that does not mean it

2:31:452:31:47

Trump. Just because there is a

visit, that does not mean it is an

2:31:472:31:49

endorsement of everything that

leader does, and the USA is an

2:31:492:31:52

important ally to us. The invitation

has gone out, it has been accepted,

2:31:522:31:58

details to be finalised, and, who

knows, it might be educational.

2:31:582:32:02

The United States has called

on the international community

2:32:022:32:04

to sever ties with North Korea

following the country's latest

2:32:042:32:06

ballistic missile test.

2:32:062:32:07

North Korean state media claimed

that Wednesday's missile launch

2:32:072:32:13

was the most powerful

in the country's history.

2:32:132:32:15

At an emergency meeting

of the UN Security Council,

2:32:152:32:19

Washington's Ambassador

to the UN warned of dire

2:32:192:32:21

consequences if war were to break

out on the Korean peninsula.

2:32:212:32:24

The Government is setting out plans

to get a million more disabled

2:32:242:32:27

people into work over

the next ten years.

2:32:272:32:29

Less than half of the UK's disabled

population is currently in work

2:32:292:32:32

and charities say progress

from previous, similar

2:32:322:32:33

schemes has been too slow.

2:32:332:32:36

Scientists say they have made

an "incredibly important" advance

2:32:362:32:38

in the prevention of migraine.

2:32:382:32:42

The results of two clinical trials

showed that injections of antibodies

2:32:422:32:44

can be used to neutralise a chemical

which is believed to

2:32:442:32:47

trigger severe headaches.

2:32:472:32:49

Around half of patients reported

a 50% reduction in the number

2:32:492:32:51

of attacks they had each month.

2:32:512:32:59

Earlier, consultant neurologist said

he believed the treatment was a

2:32:592:33:04

genuine breakthrough.

New drugs that

are currently going to be marketed

2:33:042:33:07

in the next year or so, they are the

first-ever drug that has been

2:33:072:33:13

developed for migraine and would

work for migraine because currently

2:33:132:33:15

what drugs we use are the drugs used

for depression, epilepsy, hybrid

2:33:152:33:21

pressure, and they also work for

migraine but this will be the first

2:33:212:33:25

ever drug developed for migraine

that will work for migraine.

2:33:252:33:32

The nation's Breakfast habits are

changing and Kellogg says it will

2:33:322:33:37

cut sugar across some of the big

brands.

2:33:372:33:39

Sean, what was the boss saying? A

couple of brands in particular, Coco

2:33:392:33:45

Pops will see sugar reduced, there

will still be 17 grams of sugar per

2:33:452:33:52

100 grams of Coco Pops but it is

less than previously. They named

2:33:522:33:56

Rice crispy is as well. Then you go

onto the other brands that have

2:33:562:34:02

quite high sugar content 11 grams in

every 30 grams portion, they are not

2:34:022:34:06

doing anything there.

17 grams of sugar in a 30 grams...

2:34:062:34:12

In 100 grams, so 17% of Coco Pops,

this is after they have made the

2:34:122:34:17

changes, a reduction of nearly half

of what it was previously. I asked

2:34:172:34:23

him what it was that was driving

these changes.

It is what consumers

2:34:232:34:28

are telling us about, they want to

make healthier choices and I think

2:34:282:34:32

if you take the Coco Pops example of

40% reduction in sugar, it will be

2:34:322:34:39

17% sugar in the serial...

It still

seems quite a lot?

From a Government

2:34:392:34:45

perspective it does not qualify as a

high sugar food. It is something we

2:34:452:34:49

take seriously because by getting

sugar levels down and most

2:34:492:34:52

importantly keeping the same great

taste, we are able to talk about the

2:34:522:34:56

great things in these, like the B

vitamins and the iron.

As he was

2:34:562:35:03

saying, that amount of sugar in a

bowl of Coco Pops is not classified

2:35:032:35:06

as a high sugar level serial by the

Government, which is perhaps why we

2:35:062:35:11

may see changes in the future to the

likes of frost is, crunchy nut

2:35:112:35:19

cornflakes and their granola

relative to the new Coco Pops will

2:35:192:35:23

have quite a high sugar level so it

is controversial and a lot of

2:35:232:35:26

campaigners will say it is still too

much sugar, particularly when

2:35:262:35:29

consumed by children.

It is really about whether the

2:35:292:35:33

Government lowers its recommended

levels...

2:35:332:35:35

And who knows, one day, a sugar tax,

we have seen it on fizzy drinks, it

2:35:352:35:40

is not expected on cereals but that

might be the kind of pressure that

2:35:402:35:44

is in the pipeline.

Good guest for us to have as well.

2:35:442:35:47

Yes, he was very interesting.

2:35:472:35:50

The British Olympic swimmer

Mark Foster has been telling

2:35:502:35:52

Breakfast that it's important

for young people to be

2:35:522:35:54

confident in their own skin,

in his first broadcast interveiw

2:35:542:35:57

since revealing that he is gay.

2:35:572:35:58

Foster is one of the most succesful

British swimmers of all time,

2:35:582:36:01

with six World Championship titles,

two Commonwealth titles and 11

2:36:012:36:04

European titles to his name,

but thinks keeping his sexuality

2:36:042:36:06

secret kept him from

achieving even more.

2:36:062:36:08

Until earlier this week he had

always kept this part

2:36:082:36:10

of his life private,

but feels now its time

2:36:102:36:12

for him to be himself.

2:36:122:36:14

It is not about that I am gay

because, so what, there are lots of

2:36:142:36:18

gay people out there. It is more to

do with, for me, if you could just

2:36:182:36:23

be yourself and not have to carry

around half-truths and half lies,

2:36:232:36:29

there is a big problem with mental

health, if people only speak a

2:36:292:36:34

little bit more, with friends or

family, providing someone, be a

2:36:342:36:40

little bit more vulnerable, you

don't have this voice in your head

2:36:402:36:43

all the time saying, this is not

normal, and trying to process things

2:36:432:36:47

and filter things.

Mark Foster, talking to us earlier.

2:36:472:36:52

Coming up here on Breakfast

this morning...

2:36:522:36:54

We're getting some top tips on job

hunting from one of the best

2:36:542:36:57

in the business at showcasing

the talents of those

2:36:572:36:59

with special educational needs.

2:36:592:37:00

We'll be joined by the Bafta-award

winning producer behind some of this

2:37:002:37:03

week's most stunning

Blue Planet moments.

2:37:032:37:13

# I'm so in love with you...

2:37:162:37:18

Over ten million people

hear him sing every week,

2:37:182:37:20

but you'd be forgiven for not even

knowing his name.

2:37:202:37:22

We'll be talking to Strictly

singer Tommy Blaize before

2:37:222:37:24

the end of the programme.

2:37:242:37:29

All of that coming up but first we

will celebrate, what did you say,

2:37:292:37:33

the best goal of the season and the

season is not over yet?

2:37:332:37:37

One of the best golf Wayne Rooney

has ever scored in his career, which

2:37:372:37:41

is a long and successful one, this

will be on the short list for goal

2:37:412:37:45

of the season. We will show you the

goal in a minute, Wayne Rooney

2:37:452:37:49

capping of an incredible performance

with a hat-trick last night, which

2:37:492:37:52

got a thumbs up from Sam Allardyce,

who will take over as Everton

2:37:522:37:55

manager later on today. Wayne

Rooney's feat were doing the

2:37:552:38:00

talking.

We will be talking about thumbs

2:38:002:38:03

later as well.

Interesting, looking forward to

2:38:032:38:07

that!

2:38:072:38:09

Everton impressed new manager

Sam Allardyce but the night

2:38:092:38:11

belonged to one man.

2:38:112:38:15

Wayne Rooney scoring his

first Everton hat-trick,

2:38:152:38:17

and what a way to get it,

a goal from his own half.

2:38:172:38:21

He says it's one of

the best he's ever scored.

2:38:212:38:23

His new manager will want

to see him get a few more.

2:38:232:38:27

Sam Allardyce will be looking to

improve Everton's fortunes so far

2:38:272:38:30

this season.

2:38:302:38:33

The third one, it felt to me, Joe

was out of his goal, and it just

2:38:332:38:40

went through.

I saw you celebrating

as soon as you hit it, you knew it

2:38:402:38:44

was giving game, you caught it

right, didn't you?

As soon as I

2:38:442:38:48

caught the ball, it is one of them,

it could slice off, I try to hit it

2:38:482:38:52

hard enough to go in but try and

keep some control.

2:38:522:38:58

Very understated, I would be

screaming the roof down if I scored

2:38:582:39:01

from the halfway line!

2:39:012:39:03

From great goals to late ones,

Raheem Sterling grabbing manchester

2:39:032:39:06

city's winner with the last kick

of the game.

2:39:062:39:11

It was 1-1 going into stoppage time

against Southampton.

2:39:112:39:16

Based on this reaction,

scoring important goals is just

2:39:162:39:18

as satisfying as great ones.

2:39:182:39:22

Fourth placed Arsenal scored five

against Huddersfield -

2:39:222:39:25

Oliver Giroud hammering home one

of his two goals.

2:39:252:39:31

And, not to be outdone,

Mo Salah also scored twice

2:39:312:39:33

for Liverpool as they beat

Stoke 3-0.

2:39:332:39:35

He's the Premier League's top

goalscorer with 12.

2:39:352:39:38

From scoring runs to unbeaten runs -

Celtic have now gone 65

2:39:382:39:40

domestic matches unbeaten

after their draw against Motherwell.

2:39:402:39:44

Meanwhile, Rangers beat second

placed Aberdeen 3-0 at Ibrox.

2:39:442:39:47

James Tavernier on

the scoresheet twice.

2:39:472:39:54

After touching down in New Zealand,

Ben Stokes has signed to play

2:39:542:39:57

domestic cricket for Canterbury,

but is unlikely

2:39:572:39:59

to play in the Ashes.

2:39:592:40:00

He's still to hear if he'll be

charged following an incident

2:40:002:40:04

outside a Bristol nightclub.

2:40:042:40:08

The police have handed their file

to the Crown Prosecution Service.

2:40:082:40:12

In netball, England came

from behind to beat Malawi

2:40:122:40:14

and complete a 3-0 series win.

2:40:142:40:16

The Roses were eight goals adrift

after the first quarter

2:40:162:40:18

in Birmingham but came back

to complete a 62-60 victory.

2:40:182:40:22

England, who are ranked third

in the world, are building up

2:40:222:40:24

to the Commonwealth Games

in Australia next year.

2:40:242:40:26
2:40:262:40:32

All going well for them. Do you want

to know what we are talking about

2:40:322:40:37

when we talk about thumbs? We cannot

see it now but Sam Allardyce's from

2:40:372:40:41

Ben is a bit trendy, and you have

got a Dendy thumb as well, which

2:40:412:40:52

shocks us.

I didn't realise there was anything

2:40:522:40:54

unusual about it, to be honest with

you.

2:40:542:40:57

Let's have a look.

It bends backwards. Instead of,

2:40:572:41:02

what, being straight?

It does bend backwards slightly more

2:41:022:41:07

than some do, but it prompted a lot

of people to get in touch, it is

2:41:072:41:11

funny the things people get in touch

about!

2:41:112:41:14

I feel like there is a lot of

support out there today, other

2:41:142:41:17

weirdly...

Shall we go through some of the

2:41:172:41:21

pictures?!

Chris says his bended thumbs are

2:41:212:41:26

good for pushing in drawing pins.

True.

2:41:262:41:29

This is stupid from Bedfordshire.

Not such a strong bend from Gareth.

2:41:292:41:39

This one is a bit odd. It is like

the reverse of the heart.

2:41:392:41:46

I was hoping we would get a female

form in amongst all of these male

2:41:462:41:50

thumbs, Allison got in touch and

said she always assumed her thumbs

2:41:502:41:54

were normal.

As did I!

2:41:542:41:57

Can we make it clear there is no

normal or abnormal, no need to feel

2:41:572:42:02

isolated because your thumb may bend

more than someone else's.

2:42:022:42:06

Good in a thorn Wall, right?

I don't often do a thumbs up to

2:42:062:42:13

people.

I don't think I will do it either!

2:42:132:42:18

Yours is more of a sideways thumb

than a thumbs up!

2:42:182:42:21

Thank you, John.

2:42:212:42:24

All this week we've been looking

at the issues facing

2:42:242:42:27

families of children

with Special Educational Needs

2:42:272:42:28

and Disabilities -

but what support is on offer

2:42:282:42:30

when those children become adults?

2:42:302:42:32

The education watchdog Ofsted has

told Breakfast there's been little

2:42:322:42:34

progress in providing things

like education, health

2:42:342:42:36

and care for young people

once they get to 19,

2:42:362:42:38

with parents often describing

the system as a cliff edge.

2:42:382:42:41

Our disability affairs

correspondent Nikki Fox has

2:42:412:42:42

been finding out more.

2:42:422:42:43

Did you have something to say?

2:42:432:42:45

Ruth loves being at this

specialist college.

2:42:452:42:46

What colour is this, Ruth?

2:42:462:42:50

But it has been tough

getting to this point.

2:42:502:42:54

Lovely, using your words...

2:42:542:42:59

Her dad had to fight

to get her an education,

2:42:592:43:01

health and care plan.

2:43:012:43:03

Introduced three years ago

as part of major reforms,

2:43:032:43:05

they were designed to help

children and young people,

2:43:052:43:10

like Ruth, up to the age of 25.

2:43:102:43:12

It took tribunals, and around

two years, to get one.

2:43:122:43:14

During that time, Ruth missed

a vital part in her course in speech

2:43:142:43:17

and language therapy.

2:43:172:43:18

She is 24 now, so she has

only got one year left.

2:43:182:43:22

Hello.

2:43:222:43:24

Life with disabilities is a fight.

2:43:242:43:26

The parents find it very hard.

2:43:262:43:30

It's extremely worrying.

2:43:302:43:35

I once said, many years ago

to the social worker,

2:43:352:43:38

when she was small,

if something happens to me,

2:43:382:43:40

put her in the grave with me.

2:43:402:43:42

And I still feel that way,

because I do not actually feel that,

2:43:422:43:47

in the past 15 years,

we've actually made much

2:43:472:43:54

of an improvement, as far

as services are concerned

2:43:542:43:56

for these vulnerable kids.

2:43:562:43:57

After recent inspections,

Ofsted has raised concerns

2:43:572:44:00

about a lack of help and resources

for students once they reach

2:44:002:44:03

the age of 19.

2:44:032:44:07

This report also says the transfer

to EHC plans has had a negative

2:44:072:44:10

impact on many young people's lives.

2:44:102:44:13

Wildlife expert Chris Packham wasn't

diagnosed with Asperger's

2:44:132:44:15

until he was in his 40s.

2:44:152:44:24

He's had a successful career,

and is convinced that access

2:44:242:44:27

to education is key.

2:44:272:44:28

The highly gifted, and the people

that find things difficult,

2:44:282:44:30

we can't ignore them.

2:44:302:44:31

They're worth the investment.

2:44:312:44:32

Everyone deserves a fair,

proper education.

2:44:322:44:36

That's what should be the underlying

principle of our society,

2:44:362:44:39

and, at the moment,

they're not getting it.

2:44:392:44:44

It's karaoke afternoon at this

specialist training centre

2:44:442:44:47

for people with

learning disabilities.

2:44:472:44:50

Its aim - to get talented young

people like Ben Hanson a diploma

2:44:502:44:53

and a job.

2:44:532:44:57

He's on a placement which he hopes

will lead to paid work.

2:44:572:45:00

So you're working at a hotel.

2:45:002:45:01

Yeah.

2:45:012:45:02

What are you doing at the hotel?

2:45:022:45:07

I'm working in the bar, serving

customers on the tables.

2:45:072:45:13

Do you have a dream?

2:45:132:45:14

Yes.

2:45:142:45:15

What is your dream?

2:45:152:45:16

Yeah, my dream is a posh hotel.

2:45:162:45:18

You want to work in a posh hotel?

2:45:182:45:19

Yes.

2:45:192:45:23

But with only around 6% of people

with learning disabilities

2:45:232:45:25

in employment, despite his energy

and enthusiasm, the odds

2:45:252:45:27

are against him.

2:45:272:45:29

I think the whole

thing is difficult.

2:45:292:45:31

Post-18, one father described it

to me as jumping off a cliff.

2:45:312:45:38

There's no understanding that

a lifelong learning disability

2:45:382:45:40

is there, that it's

with you for life.

2:45:402:45:43

And the education,

health and care plan -

2:45:432:45:45

well, fine, but that finishes at 25.

2:45:452:45:47

Then what?

2:45:472:45:48

Is college fun?

2:45:482:45:49

Yes!

2:45:492:45:50

Councils say there isn't enough

money or facilities to offer support

2:45:502:45:52

up to the age of 25,

but the Government says it has

2:45:522:45:55

recently put in an extra £45 million

to help families of young people

2:45:552:45:58

with special educational needs.

2:45:582:46:01

All Ruth's parents want

is for her education to continue

2:46:012:46:04

for as long as possible,

to give her the best shot at living

2:46:042:46:07

a fulfilled, happy life.

2:46:072:46:16

Nikki Fox, BBC News.

2:46:162:46:20

Our disability correspondent

Nikki Fox joins us now.

2:46:202:46:22

You watch family s like Ruth's

family, this must be worrying as she

2:46:222:46:32

approaches 25.

It is a constant

worry and battle. They have a lot of

2:46:322:46:38

things to worry about but Ruth

probably won't get a job. If they

2:46:382:46:43

had their way she would stay at the

specialist college for ever because

2:46:432:46:47

she is so happy there. She is a good

example of how so many parents,

2:46:472:46:51

particularly with young people, who

have quite complex profound

2:46:512:46:55

disabilities feel about what will

happen when I'm no longer here, how

2:46:552:47:00

will my son or daughter live

independently? What will happen? We

2:47:002:47:04

have had a tweet, so many tweets

come I've had some personal ones.

2:47:042:47:08

Kathleen says the key thing about

the cut-off to SEND support is just

2:47:082:47:13

because her daughter is 25 years old

doesn't mean she is cognitive leap

2:47:132:47:18

25 years old so why should her

education be stopped?

Nancy Doyle is

2:47:182:47:25

a chartered psychologist. She has

been working on the programme

2:47:252:47:30

Employable Me, looking at how people

with learning disabilities and

2:47:302:47:36

physical disabilities get back into

the workplace. Thank you for your

2:47:362:47:40

time this morning. I know every

story is different and that's one of

2:47:402:47:46

the things we have been learning

this week, individual stories and

2:47:462:47:50

requirements and needs. If there is

a theme to the problems they face,

2:47:502:47:53

what is it?

I think one of the

themes is that there is a huge focus

2:47:532:47:58

on what people can't do, so any

diagnostic process and any process

2:47:582:48:02

you have to go through to get an

education or health care plan is

2:48:022:48:07

really, really focused on

difficulties, deficits and problems.

2:48:072:48:11

At the end of that process people

are left with very little hope and

2:48:112:48:14

very little confidence.

We heard in

the peace we ran before you, Nancy,

2:48:142:48:19

in the film, that Ben is aspiring

and having work experience at the

2:48:192:48:26

moment but aspires to have a job in

a posh hotel. Knows were his words.

2:48:262:48:31

One of the issues is who will

support him? Were other resources to

2:48:312:48:37

enable him -- where are the

resources to enable him to have a

2:48:372:48:40

job?

There are lots of resources for

people in work, access to work and

2:48:402:48:47

providing funding and support

workers, providing coaches, and

2:48:472:48:51

advice to employers. Employers want

to get involved in disability

2:48:512:48:54

employment but they sometimes feel

embarrassed, they are not sure what

2:48:542:48:58

they are allowed to do and what they

are allowed to ask and when we

2:48:582:49:01

provide practical advice we can

encourage employers to take a bit of

2:49:012:49:04

responsibility for this, and in

return what they get us very loyal,

2:49:042:49:09

very committed members of their

team, people who aren't going to

2:49:092:49:12

leave after six months, people who

are going to be really, really happy

2:49:122:49:15

to have been given a chance.

One of

the problems I know many disabled

2:49:152:49:20

people face is at the stage when

applying for a job, whether or not

2:49:202:49:24

to disclose whether you have a

disability, and I noticed in your

2:49:242:49:29

programme which I loved, is that one

of the recruiter said no, don't put

2:49:292:49:33

it. That's pretty shocking, isn't

it?

To be honest, I disagree. I

2:49:332:49:39

think actually, it can be a real

advantage. Having a disability can

2:49:392:49:47

be the perfect answer to the

strengths and weaknesses question we

2:49:472:49:51

all get asked. I have this condition

but it doesn't affect my memory, for

2:49:512:49:55

example. In next week's programme we

will meet somebody who is visually

2:49:552:50:01

impaired but has the most amazing

memory so it gives them an

2:50:012:50:04

opportunity to talk about that. When

they talk about their weaknesses

2:50:042:50:07

they can be very practical about it

and say, well, these are the things

2:50:072:50:11

I found difficult but this is what

you need to do to support me.

2:50:112:50:16

Somebody like Ryan from last week's

programme needs a bit of space to

2:50:162:50:20

let his kicks out and he can say

that to an employer and an employer

2:50:202:50:23

can say we can do that and it takes

some of the worry out of -- ticks

2:50:232:50:28

out.

We have had so much view

interaction as we have done this

2:50:282:50:35

series. Sarah says she has a friend

who has a deaf son who went to

2:50:352:50:39

university to learn glass-making and

since doing that he has not been

2:50:392:50:42

able to get a job because people

don't know how to communicate with

2:50:422:50:45

him because he uses British sign

language. What would be your advice

2:50:452:50:48

to someone like that who is

struggling?

I think you have to

2:50:482:50:53

select your employer carefully. One

of the things about declaring a

2:50:532:50:58

disability in the application

process is you are going to find out

2:50:582:51:00

who is prejudiced and who is not.

That might limit your pool but if

2:51:002:51:06

you find the right employer you will

find the right job and finding work

2:51:062:51:10

is a two-way process, it isn't just

about somebody who will accept you,

2:51:102:51:14

do someone who you will accept and

who you feel you can work with.

2:51:142:51:17

There are a of ways to communicate

with people who are deaf and British

2:51:172:51:21

sign language, and learning British

sign language can be really fun, so

2:51:212:51:25

it might be he finds an employer who

recognises the value of his

2:51:252:51:29

glass-making skills and really wants

to put that effort in and that would

2:51:292:51:33

be win for both people.

Nancy, thank

you for taking some time out this

2:51:332:51:37

morning and thank you as well.

2:51:372:51:41

Here's Matt with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:51:412:51:42

Good morning, it might be the first

day of winter, already a Christmassy

2:51:462:51:49

feel for some, this is the view in

Scarborough recently, some heavy

2:51:492:51:54

showers pushing through Yorkshire,

East Yorkshire and some St Andrews

2:51:542:51:58

day snow for some in the north and

east of Scotland. Snow showers only

2:51:582:52:02

affect a small portion of the

country but they will have an impact

2:52:022:52:04

on travel plans. Those wintry

showers continue to push further

2:52:042:52:08

inland across eastern England

throughout the day. We have

2:52:082:52:11

outbreaks of rain and sleet brushing

off, across Wales and south-west

2:52:112:52:16

England, and Northern Ireland, bit

of sunshine in between. Either side

2:52:162:52:19

of the country in between them we

have a slice of sunshine, lots of

2:52:192:52:24

sunshine for many, crisp and cold

day, Arctic air is with us, whether

2:52:242:52:28

you have sunshine or not it will be

an afternoon where temperatures

2:52:282:52:31

almost feel subzero, it feels like

-3, -4 with the wind and showers in

2:52:312:52:38

Scotland. Bright afternoon in

Northern Ireland, looking day in

2:52:382:52:41

south-west Scotland and not do that

in north-west England but the

2:52:412:52:43

showers in eastern England will get

to the eastern portion of the

2:52:432:52:46

Pennines into the East Midlands by

the afternoon and rain around the

2:52:462:52:49

coast by the stage. Sleet and hail

inland and snow over the hills.

2:52:492:52:53

Clouding over to the south-east of

England from eastern England will

2:52:532:52:56

feel like -3, -4. Showers in the

west will be confined to

2:52:562:53:00

Pembrokeshire and Cornwall later on.

Overnight the showers continue to

2:53:002:53:05

push in across eastern parts of

England. A risk of ice into tomorrow

2:53:052:53:09

morning. Temperatures just above

freezing, the wind will make it feel

2:53:092:53:14

colder. The rest of the country,

widespread frost into Friday morning

2:53:142:53:17

and where the snow is lying it could

get as low as -10 in parts of

2:53:172:53:21

Scotland. On Friday, still icy winds

in England, a few showers, windy,

2:53:212:53:28

rainy showers in the south-east

corner, much of south-east England

2:53:282:53:31

and Wales having a fine and bright

day, cloudy for Scotland and

2:53:312:53:34

Northern Ireland, splashes of rain,

slowly turning milder and this

2:53:342:53:39

weekend it turns cloudy with some

rain but temperatures on the rise

2:53:392:53:42

just a little. Back to Naga and

Charlie.

2:53:422:53:46

Thank you very much. Cold.

Yes, could have done that in a word.

2:53:492:53:56

The Northern Ireland Secretary has

told Breakfast that the government

2:53:562:53:59

recognises that the final Brexit

deal will have to recognise

2:53:592:54:01

the unique challenges posed

by the Irish border.

2:54:012:54:03

The Irish government and the EU have

been pushing for Northern Ireland

2:54:032:54:06

to remain inside the customs union

and Single Market,

2:54:062:54:08

even if the rest of the UK leaves.

2:54:082:54:10

That's now the main sticking point

stopping Brexit negotiations

2:54:102:54:12

from moving on to trade.

2:54:122:54:13

Chris Buckler has been

looking at the challenges.

2:54:132:54:17

For many months now,

politicians have been huddled

2:54:172:54:21

in Brexit negotiations,

the UK and the EU both

2:54:212:54:23

pushing their priorities.

2:54:232:54:27

And what is decided on one

of the key issues will have quite

2:54:272:54:30

an impact here.

2:54:302:54:32

The Derry Donegal Vipers

are an Irish-American football team,

2:54:322:54:35

and their players come from both

Northern Ireland and the Republic.

2:54:352:54:40

Our whole team is split

almost down the middle,

2:54:402:54:43

from either side of

the border, which is great.

2:54:432:54:46

A key question is, what will happen

to that border after Brexit?

2:54:462:54:49

In the future, is it possible

that people will have

2:54:492:54:52

to negotiate their way

through customs posts as they once

2:54:522:54:54

did in the past?

2:54:542:54:57

A hard border would make it

difficult, because you pretty much

2:54:572:55:00

have to go through customs checks

to go to training a couple

2:55:002:55:03

of times a week.

2:55:032:55:04

They'll think you're suspicious

carrying these big bags

2:55:042:55:06

and helmets across.

2:55:062:55:08

That is a journey many

take on a daily basis.

2:55:092:55:12

Some are wondering what their

morning commute will be

2:55:122:55:14

like in the future.

2:55:142:55:23

Everybody says they do not want

a hard border, but the detail of not

2:55:232:55:27

having a hard border,

it has never been clearly

2:55:272:55:29

defined for me.

2:55:292:55:30

She lives in County Donegal,

and every day crosses the border

2:55:302:55:40

to go to a job as a principal

of a school in Londonderry.

2:55:402:55:43

This is an old customs

post right here.

2:55:432:55:45

That was the place

where you were stopped.

2:55:452:55:51

It is a 15 Minute Drive.

2:55:512:55:54

Her concerns about a hard border go

beyond potential traffic delays.

2:55:542:55:56

The community is quite seamless.

2:55:562:56:02

The community is quite seamless.

2:56:022:56:03

A lot of talk about the economy,

and the impact on the economy.

2:56:032:56:06

Much less the social fabric

on the society of a border people,

2:56:062:56:09

which we are.

2:56:092:56:10

Many cross the border regularly

to go to school, even hospital.

2:56:102:56:13

They said that the British

Government has been too late

2:56:132:56:15

in recognising the true

impact of Brexiteer.

2:56:152:56:23

They're not thinking

about the consequences of Brexit.

2:56:232:56:25

The consequences for people

who have become used,

2:56:252:56:33

and have mortgages and kids

in college, based upon a livelihood

2:56:332:56:41

which appreciates the fact

that you can move across

2:56:412:56:43

the island without tariffs.

2:56:432:56:45

The biggest obstacle to ensuring

there are no obstacles on the many

2:56:452:56:48

border bridges and roads

are to do with customs.

2:56:482:56:50

The EU says if Northern Ireland

was to stick to the same economic

2:56:502:56:54

rules, the issue would be solved.

2:56:542:56:56

The Prime Minister has been very

clear in saying that,

2:56:562:56:58

as we leave the European Union,

we leave the single market

2:56:582:57:01

and we leave the customs union.

2:57:012:57:04

But we know there need to be

specific outcomes to meet the unique

2:57:042:57:07

circumstances of Northern Ireland,

and the island of Ireland

2:57:072:57:10

as a whole.

2:57:102:57:11

That sounds like a desire to deal.

2:57:112:57:17

Particularly as the Irish government

have the ability to block Brexit

2:57:172:57:20

talks from moving on.

2:57:202:57:21

They want guarantees

about the border.

2:57:212:57:23

That means there will be

more clashes to come.

2:57:232:57:26

Chris Buckler, BBC News at the Irish

border.

2:57:262:57:29

Chris is in Strabane this morning

and we can talk to him now.

2:57:292:57:33

Chris Como you are on a long journey

today to tell us all about the

2:57:332:57:38

issues people are facing, who either

live either side of the border and

2:57:382:57:41

work the other side.

Yes, indeed. If

you take a look behind me, Basta

2:57:412:57:49

Republic of Ireland over there and

we are standing in Northern Ireland,

2:57:492:57:52

that is Lippett and this is Strabane

so you get a sense of how close the

2:57:522:57:57

two places are but beyond that, how

close the communities are, so today

2:57:572:58:02

on BBC news throughout the day we

are going to go along the 300 miles

2:58:022:58:06

of this border and talk to people

about the impact of this. Lifford.

2:58:062:58:12

Of course it depends on the Brexit

deal and you got a sense from the

2:58:122:58:16

Northern Ireland Secretary that they

are prepared to deal. There are

2:58:162:58:19

reports this morning that the

British government is already

2:58:192:58:22

talking to the Irish government and

the EU about potentially putting in

2:58:222:58:27

place trade rules which ensure there

is no divergences on a number of

2:58:272:58:31

issues between Northern Ireland and

the Republic of Ireland, that of

2:58:312:58:34

course depends on Northern Ireland

having its own government and of

2:58:342:58:37

course at the moment power-sharing

has collapsed so there is lots of

2:58:372:58:41

challenges in the Brexit

negotiation, not just between the EU

2:58:412:58:46

and the UK.

Certainly. Chris, where

are you travelling to today? You

2:58:462:58:49

have 300 miles to go.

Yes, we

started up in Derry and we are

2:58:492:58:56

travelling to Strabane somewhere

else at lunchtime and somewhere else

2:58:562:59:00

at tea-time and just above the

Belfast Dublin Road by ten o'clock

2:59:002:59:06

tonight. It's going to be a long

trip but I will talk to plenty of

2:59:062:59:09

people along the way.

Thank you,

Chris. The time is 8:59am.

2:59:092:59:15

Blue Planet II has been mesmerizing

audiences by revealing the beautiful

2:59:152:59:17

and sometimes bizarre creatures that

live in our oceans.

2:59:172:59:20

In this Sunday's episode

we will see two worlds collide,

2:59:202:59:22

where the sea meets the land.

2:59:222:59:23

We'll speak to the Bafta-award

winning producer behind

2:59:232:59:25

the programme in just a minute,

but first let's take a look.

2:59:252:59:35

The Moray eel.

2:59:362:59:42

It is a specialist crab hunter. The

crab's deadliest enemy. To feed, the

2:59:422:59:56

crabs must keep going. But nowhere

is safe. An octopus, also a crab

2:59:563:00:14

killer. The crabs make a dash for

it.

3:00:143:00:28

We're joined now by

producer Miles Barton.

3:00:323:00:37

You had the job of making people

feel sorry for crabs?

I think the

3:00:373:00:43

little creatures in the world are

ones that are taken for granted. We

3:00:433:00:48

see crabs on the shore and say, who

cares about them? But they have

3:00:483:00:52

lives to lead, these guys have to

run the gauntlet of these horrendous

3:00:523:00:56

predators every single day of their

lives, and I think to bring that

3:00:563:01:01

experience to life, which they are

doing on an hourly basis, every few

3:01:013:01:04

hours they have to go out on the

tide, they get attacked by these

3:01:043:01:08

predators.

People will probably

recognise some of the creatures you

3:01:083:01:13

are talking about, who are the

creatures they are trying to avoid?

3:01:133:01:20

The crabs are the stars of our

sequence but the guys lurking in the

3:01:203:01:24

pool of the moray eel, and metre

long creature. We had gone out to

3:01:243:01:29

film the moray eel, that is what we

expected to film, and what happens

3:01:293:01:32

is you see a splash way off in the

distance, you rush down as fast as

3:01:323:01:37

possible, we had two teams, the fast

response team, the younger members

3:01:373:01:40

of the team, if I may say so,

carrying the camera, start filming.

3:01:403:01:46

I bring up the rear with a big

camera and tripod and the main

3:01:463:01:51

cameraman, then we would form the

action. Sometimes we filmed it from

3:01:513:01:55

two cameras and the crucial moment

was when the Eagles would leave the

3:01:553:02:01

water and actually pluck the crabs

off the rocks.

Even as you were

3:02:013:02:06

filming the sequence, some of these

creatures were trying to grab the

3:02:063:02:11

camera people's legs?

What we

discovered, after a while spending

3:02:113:02:16

time trying to find the eels, we

would be walking along and suddenly

3:02:163:02:21

find your ankle was rapped by eight

little tentacles and you looked down

3:02:213:02:25

and it was quite a shock, you would

realise there is an octopus trying

3:02:253:02:29

to grab you, because the octopus is

there is well trying to catch the

3:02:293:02:34

crabs, so any movement above and

they grab it, whether it is a crab

3:02:343:02:37

this big or a human this big, they

are plucky little creatures. So what

3:02:373:02:42

we ended up with was two predators

for the price of one, so it was a

3:02:423:02:47

rather satisfactory and.

The stories

you come up with, or you show us,

3:02:473:02:53

are just so fantastic. We have got

jumping fish as well to talk about?

3:02:533:02:59

Wonderful, probably the most

terrestrial fish on land, they spend

3:02:593:03:02

most of their time out of the water,

they even seem to fear water, so

3:03:023:03:07

when a wave comes in they all lead

the other way. They have got a

3:03:073:03:11

totally novel method of motion.

But

they are definitely fish, classed as

3:03:113:03:16

fish?

Yes, they bend their tails and

flicked away from the waves, as you

3:03:163:03:21

see. They just leap, but not with

their limbs, as it were, but with

3:03:213:03:28

their tails. It is a bit of a love

story because there was a particular

3:03:283:03:32

male who was guarding his nest hole,

then every time a female would go by

3:03:323:03:37

he would turn black, display his

orange dorsal fin and desperately

3:03:373:03:41

dance up and down, he thinks he is

doing a seductive dance, it looks a

3:03:413:03:45

bit comic to us, but, with luck, he

attracted the female into his hole

3:03:453:03:52

to lay their eggs.

Some of the

creatures you are focusing on maybe

3:03:523:03:56

once we think we know a lot about,

penguins for example. There has been

3:03:563:04:00

a lot of wildlife stub about

penguins but the joy of Blue Planet

3:04:003:04:04

2 is you find new things out about

creatures we thought we knew.

This

3:04:043:04:09

was a new take on the penguins, we

had been to this speech before,

3:04:093:04:14

myself, in South Georgia, and the

penguins have this struggle to get

3:04:143:04:18

past what we can easily describe as

the biggest ball of blubber in the

3:04:183:04:24

world, 5000 elephant seals lined the

beach and these penguins have to

3:04:243:04:28

pick their way through. I have been

there and picking your way through

3:04:283:04:32

these animals that weigh tonnes, and

if they get angry and start

3:04:323:04:37

attacking each other, they will go

straight through you, so the poor

3:04:373:04:41

old penguins, game, every day they

have to negotiate this wall of

3:04:413:04:47

blubber.

Negotiate a wall of

blubber, fantastic. Thank you so

3:04:473:04:51

much for joining us. Blue Planet 2

on BBC One at 8pm on Sunday evening,

3:04:513:04:58

thank you so much for talking to us.

It is 9:04am, we will chat to the

3:04:583:05:04

man who has soundtracks of the most

famous moment on Strictly in a

3:05:043:05:08

moment, the finger behind the

scenes, they don't get the credit

3:05:083:05:10

they deserve.

No, they are fabulous. First, a look

3:05:103:06:46

they deserve.

the BBC London newsroom in half an

3:06:463:06:48

hour, plenty more on the website,

but now it is back to Charlie Stayt

3:06:483:06:52

and Naga Munchetty. Goodbye.

3:06:523:06:56

Millions of us tune in every weekend

to see the stars strut their stuff

3:07:003:07:03

on the Strictly dance floor,

but the performances wouldn't

3:07:033:07:05

be nearly as special

without the fantastic live music

3:07:053:07:07

which accompanies them.

3:07:073:07:08

Our next guest may not be

the show's most famous face,

3:07:083:07:11

but without question he is one

of its best-known voices.

3:07:113:07:13

Tommy Blaize is a singer

in the Strictly Come Dancing big

3:07:133:07:23

band, and he's also worked with some

of the biggest names in music.

3:07:293:07:32

Let's have listen to him

doing what he does best.

3:07:323:07:35

# I...

3:07:353:07:35

# I'm so in love with you.

3:07:353:07:37

# Whatever you want me to.

3:07:373:07:39

# Is alright with me.

3:07:393:07:44

# Cos you make me feel so brand new.

3:07:443:07:52

# I want to spend my whole

life with you, yeah.

3:07:523:08:02

# Let me say that since.

3:08:033:08:06

# Since we've been together, baby.

3:08:063:08:10

# Loving you forever

is what I need...#.

3:08:103:08:21

One of those songs, Tommy, that it

seems a shame to interrupt!

3:08:263:08:30

Beautiful, absolutely beautiful.

Welcome, by the way. It is a real

3:08:303:08:35

discipline, what you do, just

explain to people, the beginning of

3:08:353:08:38

the week presumably you are

presented with a load of songs that

3:08:383:08:41

you are going to sing?

On average at

the beginning of the series when

3:08:413:08:45

there are lots of contestants we get

14, 17 songs a week, we are given

3:08:453:08:50

the songs on the Monday morning and

we allocate who will be singing and

3:08:503:08:57

we just try and learn the lead

vocals during the week, we get

3:08:573:09:01

together with the band on Friday

evening for a few hours, then

3:09:013:09:04

Saturday morning we just hit it as

much as we can and go through it all

3:09:043:09:10

with the dancers and check

everything is right before we go to

3:09:103:09:13

air.

But in terms of artistic

interpretation, you are limited to

3:09:133:09:18

some extent, argue?

Yes, you have to

stick to the edits.

Because of the

3:09:183:09:23

weight Strictly works?

Yes, the

dancers choreographed everything to

3:09:233:09:28

the music so you don't want to put

the wrong lyric in the wrong place

3:09:283:09:31

or go off and ad-lib, it has to be

more role as what they have danced

3:09:313:09:35

to all week.

When I was on the

programme, I noticed some songs

3:09:353:09:40

which you have traditionally heard

men singing, you put a female lead

3:09:403:09:43

on there, some songs you change from

3-4 to 4-4, from normal beats two

3:09:433:09:51

adults, for example, so how did you

decide...

We never decide that, that

3:09:513:09:55

is done by production and we are

given the edits, Dave Arce is

3:09:553:09:59

meticulous and copies everything as

he hears it so we are given those

3:09:593:10:04

songs in 3-4 with a female version

and we just...

Do you ever you ever

3:10:043:10:08

say no?

No, we enjoy the challenge

of singing something different every

3:10:083:10:13

week.

Always makes me laugh, Dave

Arce, is he the band leader?

Musical

3:10:133:10:19

director.

That wave he does, it

always looks a bit awkward to me,

3:10:193:10:29

like you doesn't really want to

waive!

He is quite shy, into his

3:10:293:10:32

music and everything else, the other

stuff is uncomfortable for him

3:10:323:10:37

sometimes! His wave is getting

better every week!

One of the great

3:10:373:10:42

things about working on Strictly is

the people you meet in terms of,

3:10:423:10:45

Anastasia was on, this year we have

Alexandra Burke, another great

3:10:453:10:51

musician, and you get a glimpse of

their world and work with them as

3:10:513:10:55

well, Amy Whitehouse you have worked

with, what are the highlights for

3:10:553:10:57

you?

I was lucky to grace the stage

when we sang at Nelson Mandela's

3:10:573:11:05

90th birthday party, we got to play

with Amy Whitehouse, Stevie wonder,

3:11:053:11:11

all these different people, Queen,

said it has been fantastic.

To say

3:11:113:11:16

you have been on stage with Steve

the Wonder and Amy Whitehouse.

3:11:163:11:21

Another favourite of yours was

thinking You'll Never Walk Alone. We

3:11:213:11:28

will show it and then you can say

why it was so important.

3:11:283:11:37

# And you'll never walk alone.

# You'll never walk...

3:11:373:11:45

# Alone.

So, Simon Rimmer bouncing there with

3:11:453:11:54

his partner, but it meant so much to

so many people, such an evocative

3:11:543:11:58

song?

Me being a Scouser, I am

really proud of that song, I'm a big

3:11:583:12:03

Liverpool fan as well so to get to

be able to sing that song, for me,

3:12:033:12:08

was really, really special, and

after I did that I was invited to

3:12:083:12:11

Anfield to have a little poor round,

so it was even more special for me.

3:12:113:12:15

You have got your own album out now,

is it a whole different thing from

3:12:153:12:20

being part of a bigger band, to put

yourself front and centre?

It is, I

3:12:203:12:27

have always done that, even before

Strictly, so when Strictly came

3:12:273:12:33

along it took a back-seat, if you

like, and all of a sudden I am being

3:12:333:12:37

pushed forward to do this album and

it is lovely, it is songs that have

3:12:373:12:40

been a part of my life over the

years, songs like Sitting On The

3:12:403:12:45

Dock Of The Bay, songs that we have

done on strictly, like, If You Don't

3:12:453:12:53

Know Me By Now, songs that have

moved me over the years, and it was

3:12:533:12:58

a real joy to make.

Occasionally

there are mishaps on Strictly,

3:12:583:13:03

things that go wrong on the floor.

Are you aware, as a performer, that

3:13:033:13:07

maybe something is going wrong or

something happening that should not

3:13:073:13:11

have been?

We shot the Christmas

special a couple of days ago and

3:13:113:13:15

there was a brilliant moment where

Robbie Savage was supposed to come

3:13:153:13:18

through a particular door and

everything was set up and the music

3:13:183:13:21

was going and the door didn't open,

so there are moments like that which

3:13:213:13:26

just brilliant!

That what you can we

do, normal you can't, that if it!

3:13:263:13:33

Tomic, great to have you with us,

good luck with the album.

3:13:333:13:37

Tommy's album is called Life & Soul.

3:13:373:13:39

That's all we've got

time for this morning,

3:13:393:13:41

but we'll both be back

here tomorrow from 6am.

3:13:413:13:43

Have a lovely day.

3:13:433:13:45

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