26/01/2018 Breakfast


26/01/2018

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Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

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Munchetty.

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A Donald Trump visit to the UK is

back on. He confirms talks are under

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way for a trip in the second half of

the year.

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Good morning.

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It's Friday the 26th January.

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Also this morning:

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"Stop prescribing antibiotics

for sore throats."

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The NHS medicines watchdog tells

doctors to use paracetamol instead.

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BBC presenters agreed to take salary

cuts for a quality.

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We hear from the family

of a 13-year-old boy who was killed

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in an accident with one.

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Good morning. A weak pound has given

exporters a boost, meaning they can

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sell more overseas. How was the rest

of the economy? We will get the

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latest official figures this

morning.

One of the worst starts

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ever for an England cricketer, five

wickets out

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ever for an England cricketer, five

wickets out for eight runs. And

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Sarah has the weather.

Good morning.

A chilly start to the day. Mist and

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fog. A dry day ahead. Blue sky and

sunshine as well. All of the details

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coming up.

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Donald Trump will visit

the UK later this year,

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it has been confirmed.

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Downing Street has said

Donald Trump will once again

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confirm his commitment

to put America first

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when he delivers his keynote

speech in Davos later.

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The President met Theresa May

yesterday, denying any rift

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in the so-called

special relationship.

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Business presenter Sally Bundock

is in Davos for us.

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Sally, the US President

is making all the headlines

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there, isn't he?

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Good morning.

Good morning.

The trip

we were waiting for. Pomp and

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circumstance surrounding that. What

did he say?

There was a

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circumstance surrounding that. What

did he say?

There was a lot of

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attention, as you can imagine, on

his meeting with the UK Prime

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Minister, the reason may. It was

their first meeting since clashing

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over the tweets of far right videos

in November. -- Theresa May. It is

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the first time they met since

cancelling his trip earlier this

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month in London.

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He criticised the new US embassy.

There has been a lot of talk about

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the special relationship between

them. They met and discussed many

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issues. He said they were joined at

the hip when it comes to military

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matters. Donald Trump predicted a

tremendous amount of trade,

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increasing trade, between the

countries once the UK leads the

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European Union. There has been a lot

of talk about the body language

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between them. He was his usual self

in terms of how he was portraying

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himself in front of the press. But

Theresa May looked more awkward and

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gingerly sitting next to him as it

were. It is interesting how people

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interpret how they are getting on.

President Trump was definitely at

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pains to say the special

relationship still exists. When

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pressed about his reasons for coming

here to the World Economic Forum in

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Davos, this is what he said.

I don't

think elitist, globalist, I thought

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many people that want to invest lots

of money. They are coming back to

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the United States, they are coming

back to America to be I thought of

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it in those terms. After I said I

was going, there were many stories

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about the elite and the globalist

and planes flying in and everything

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else. It is not about that, it is

about investing money, jobs coming

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in, creating jobs. We are setting

records every week, every day, we

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are setting records.

When he was

walking among the delegates

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yesterday, I was trying to get a

picture like everyone else. It is

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interesting, the awkward feeling, in

mixed reception he is receiving. He

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had a speech later today. Lots of

anticipation about what he will say.

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Thank you very much, Sally

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anticipation about what he will say.

Thank you very much, Sally. Sally

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Bundock.

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Just after 7am, we'll be speaking

to an American journalist who has

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been following what he calls

the "Trump circus" in Davos.

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There's dispute at the heart

of the Government this morning,

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after Downing Street gave a public

rebuke of comments made

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by the Chancellor Philip Hammond

at the World Economic Forum in

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Switzerland.

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It comes as the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, prepares to set

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out his vision for the next stage

of talks about a transition

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period later today.

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At a speech in Davos,

Mr Hammond said he hoped the UK

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and EU economies will only move

"very modestly" apart after Brexit.

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To which a Number 10 spokesperson

has said that government plans

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for Brexit "could not be described

as very modest changes."

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Let's talk about this more

with our political correspondent,

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Leila Nathoo, who joins us

now from Westminster.

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Give us the oversight on how big a

clash this is.

Well, Philip Hammond

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subsequently tried to clarify his

remarks, stating we are leaving the

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single market, the customs union,

and that would be a change. But I

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think this is a reminder, really,

that there is still no consensus at

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the very highest levels of

government about what Brexit should

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look like the pit is no secret that

Philip Hammond has been on the

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remaining side of the argument. He

wants them to stick closely to the

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EU after Brexit. After those

comments, there was noise from the

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other end of the Conservative Party.

Jacob Rees-Mogg, a prominent

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backbencher, rough presenting Tory

Eurosceptics. -- representing. He

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was critical of the approach to

Brexit, saying he does not want to

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squander opportunities leaving the

EU.

For too long, negotiators seemed

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to be cowing to the EU, saying we

have to accept what they want and

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build from that. That is no way to

negotiate and for this country to

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behave.

More flexing ahead of this

speech by David Davis, the Brexit

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Secretary. He will lay out his

vision for the transition period,

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the two year period after leaving

the EU with much staying the same. I

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think this is something, the

transition period, the government

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wants it sorted out as soon as

possible. They say it will be the

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easy bit before tricky negotiations

with Brussels about the end state of

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Brexit. There is no agreement back

home about what exactly that should

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be. This is a reminder of that.

For

the moment, thank you.

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Most sore throats should be treated

with paracetamol rather

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than antibiotics, according

to new guidance from

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the NHS medicines watchdog.

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The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence,

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NICE, says the drugs

are prescribed in 60% of cases,

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despite being mostly ineffective.

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Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

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The overuse of antibiotics is

leading to the development of

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bacteria resistant to these

life-saving drugs. Leading health

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experts say this poses a serious

threat to the UK to be if we lose

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the ability to fight infection,

common medical procedures like

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Cesarean sections and cancer

treatments could become too risky.

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Prescribing antibiotics to treat a

sore throat is a prime example of

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the way they can be misused. Sore

throats account for one in four GP

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appointments in the UK related to

infections of the lungs and airways.

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Research suggests in 60% of those

cases, antibiotics are prescribed.

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But most sore throats are caused by

a viral infection, which antibiotics

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have no effect on.

We have become a

bit, umm, acclimatise to thinking we

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need antibiotics when we have

something wrong with us. We do not.

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We just have to be re-educated, I

guess, to preserve the use of

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antibiotics for really serious

infections.

The latest advice from

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the NHS medicines watchdog reminds

doctors and nurses that most sore

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throats will be better within a

week, and only the most serious

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bacterial infections need

antibiotics. Most patients have been

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advised to drink plenty of fluids,

take paracetamol or I

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take paracetamol or I -- Ibuprofen.

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More than 40 people have died

after fire at a hospital in South

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Korea.

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It was thought to have started

in the emergency room

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of the building in the city

of Milyang in the south-east

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of the country.

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Around 100 patients

were inside at the time.

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Businesses including

Jamie Oliver's Italian restaurants,

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Hilton Hotels and the shopping

channel QVC have all stopped selling

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some steak products,

after the company that supplied them

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was placed under investigation

by the Food Standards Agency.

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Russel Hume, who also supply meat

to the Wetherspoon's pub chain,

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said there has never been any

suggestion that their products

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caused illness and that the recall

was a "precautionary measure

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because of mislabelling."

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Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

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agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

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pay inequality at the corporation.

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An independent report on the issue

is due to be published next week.

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Our media editor,

Amol Rajan, reports.

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Hello. How do you feel about

salaries being published.

The

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publication of BBC people earning

over £150 got a Dhammika outcry.

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Many people had the same job as

women, though individual

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circumstances very a lot. Carrie

Gracie resigned her post as China

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editor in process, saying she will

return to London. Jon Sopel, John

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Humphrys, she would wince, and

Jeremy, said they will have their

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salaries reduced. She is going to

appear before a Select Committee

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next Wednesday shortly before the

Governor-General, his deputy, and

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others appear. Whereas competition

in the entertainment industry has

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intensified, the opposite is

happening in news. Many secure

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generous deals years ago. That world

has disappeared, and these people

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now have to get used to the fact

their salaries will disappear with

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it.

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The number of pothole related

breakdowns on British roads is

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rising, with the RAC blaming bad

weather and a lack of investment.

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Councils say they would need to

triple their road repair budgets to

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tackle a vast backlog of potholes.

Our transport correspondent,

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Victoria Fritz, has more.

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They can cost hundreds

of pounds' worth of damage

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and although councils fill in 2

million potholes a year,

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it seems like Britain's holes

are crumbling faster they then

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can be repaired.

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It doesn't take a lot to damage a

car. You can try to avoid them, you

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can't. You've only got to drive

around this borough and you'll find

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loads of them.

I take my children to

school and come across quite a few

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potholes on the way, which is a bit

dangerous with the car. It seems

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like after the horrible weather when

you have ice or really cold weather,

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they all we seem to appear.

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Normally potholes develop

after wet and cold weather,

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but the RAC says it's seeing

the number of breakdowns caused

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by driving in poor roads increase,

regardless of the season.

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RAC patrols attended 2,830 potholes

related breakdowns between October

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and December of last year.

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That's 11% more than the same

period the year before.

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Vehicles they attended typically

suffered damaged shock absorbers,

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broken suspension springs

and punctured wheels.

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Our local roads have suffered from

years of underinvestment, and we

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would like to see ring-fence funding

put in place so councils can plan

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their work appropriately and really

sort out the problem once and for

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all.

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The government says it's investing

£23 billion to increase capacity

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and improve road journeys.

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The majority of that will go

on major roads and motorways.

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With budgets under increasing

strain, the pressure is mounting

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on councils to plug the gaps

in local roads where most journeys

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begin or end.

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Victoria Fritz, BBC News.

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Plastic is one of the biggest

threats to the future of coral reefs

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followed by increasing

ocean temperatures,

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scientists are warning.

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More than 11 billion items

of plastic were found on a third

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of coral reefs in the Asia-Pacific

region, and this figure is predicted

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to increase to more

than 15 billion by 2025.

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Coral which comes into contact

with plastic is far more likely

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to develop diseases

than other sealife.

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Donald Trump is making a visit to

Davos. It is a talking shop for many

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famous people. But one famous guest

let his feet do the talking in Davos

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yesterday. Justin Trudeau! He became

a social media sensation with his

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pair of duck socks.

The Canadian

Prime Minister has fancy footwork

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form, as it were.

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The Canadian Prime Minister has

fancy footwear form,

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moose, maple leaves and rainbows

have featured in the past.

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This Chewbacca pair

were chosen when he met

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International Monetary Fund

CEO, Christine Lagarde.

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The sock star has worn science

fiction underwear before.

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To celebrate May the 4th,

or Star Wars Day, the PM pulled

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on a mismatched pair

of R2-D2 and C-3PO socks.

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That is daring.

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My socks are very boring today. Dark

blue.

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You've let the side down.

Had we had warning...

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What is your most unusual pair in

your drawl?

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I'm not a big one for novelty socks.

There's the whole argument.

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It is great fun.

Why not? Anyway, in the cricket, how

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often have we seen this in the past?

You've won the tournament and you

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take your foot off the gas. England

had won the one-day series against

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Australia 3-0, but today they've had

one of their worst start ever. Maybe

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we just took our foot off the gas.

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There'll be no Kyle Edmund

in the Australian Open final,

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-- they have somewhat recovered, but

are still in big trouble. There will

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be no Kyle Edmund in the Australian

Open final. Can Hyeon Chung beat

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Roger Federer in the second

semi-final?

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Jose Mourinho takes his all-star

Manchester United side,

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to Yeovil Town, in the FA Cup

fourth round this evening.

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Yeovil are 21st in League Two,

English football's fourth tier.

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And there are more injury worries

for Wales, ahead of the Six Nations.

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Scrum Half Rhys Webb is now

out of the tournament

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with a knee injury.

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Thank you.

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Will the ground be good to soft? I'm

not sure she will know about that,

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but Sarah can tell us about the

weather.

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but Sarah can tell us about the

weather.

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The ground is pretty soggy and it

been has unsettled and wet recently,

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but today it is looking like quite a

decent day. This was yesterday in

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Derbyshire and we have similar

things today. Blue sky and sunshine

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developing. A couple of showers

around this morning, but this ridge

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of high pressure is sitting across

the country and that's going to

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bring us some relatively dry and

settled weather. Through this

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morning it's a chilly start.

Scotland and Northern Ireland,

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temperatures below freezing and a

few mist and fog patches. Couple of

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showers pushing into East Yorkshire,

a few down towards Lincolnshire, but

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a lot of dry weather heading south

on the England and Wales. We could

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catch a couple of passing showers

for parts of Cornwall, Devon and

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Kent and Sussex, where is further

remade it's a dry start. There

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amount of cloud around in central

parts of England and a few misty and

0:17:460:17:50

foggy patches. The cloud breaks up

and then many of us see a decent

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day. Light winds and lots of dry

weather and plenty of sunshine for

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this afternoon. Temperatures fairly

typical for the time of year. 4-

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nine degrees. That should feel

pleasant and sunshine. A hint of

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things changing as rain arrives

initially in Northern Ireland and

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into the west of Scotland. The rain

fizzles out for a time and then the

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next batch of wet weather moves on

from the west and winds big up as

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well. Central and south-eastern part

stay with this clear skies and there

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we could see mist and fog preforming

through the night. This low pressure

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is towards the north of the UK. The

trailing weather front will bring

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wet and windy weather, especially

windy the northern Scotland. The

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Northern Isles could see severe

gales and then this rain track

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slowly eastwards across the country

through the day on Saturday,

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arriving in the south-east of

England, East Anglia through the

0:18:510:18:53

middle of the day. That's followed

by brighter skies from the

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north-west, with sunny spells and a

couple of showers. Generally

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temperatures are in double figures.

Most of us about 10- 12 degrees. The

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mild air on Saturday stays around at

the weekend. For Sunday, some rain

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across Scotland. Further south and

east, a lot of dry and mild weather.

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Temperatures 13- 14 degrees.

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Let's take a look at today's papers.

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The Times. Many focusing on this

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The Times. Many focusing on this

image of the press conference of

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sorts, with Donald Trump at Davos.

Donald Trump very much centre stage

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today. He has been talking to the

press overnight and we will reflect

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on some of the interviews he has

been doing throughout this morning.

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Another thing picked up from Davos,

comments about Brexit. The Guardian

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has a look at Theresa May's

leadership, saying it is under

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threat, as a fresh Tory revolt

erupts. Apparently she has bowed to

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pressure and disowned remarks by the

Chancellor last night, trying to

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cause a new Brexit revolt. Bill --

Philip Hammond said they would only

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seek modest changes in its

relationship with the EU, which she

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has countered.

The Daily Mirror. And extraordinary

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scenes in the House of Lords

yesterday. A woman made a speech and

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a great deal of emotion. Observer

saying they've never seen anything

0:20:350:20:38

quite like it in the chamber. She

was talking about her own cancer

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diagnosis.

We will reflect on that later. She

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got a standing ovation. A very

emotional speech. The Daily Mail,

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taking a look at some meat from a

supplier. The centre of a

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health-care scandal. Served at

several restaurant chains for 12

0:20:540:20:59

days before the public was warned.

Various outlets have been recalling

0:20:590:21:04

this meet. The standards agency

found problems at a wholesaler which

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supplies at least nine major chains,

including Jamie Oliver was a

0:21:080:21:15

restaurant.

You might think this is an alarming

0:21:150:21:17

headline. The new signing of Alexis

Sanchez. A drugs storm. It appears

0:21:170:21:26

the drugs test result on Monday was

false, as he was elsewhere. So he

0:21:260:21:33

fell foul of the whereabouts rule,

rather than any sort of real... In

0:21:330:21:37

athletics the consequences of that

ruling can be very severe?

0:21:370:21:42

I think there's a perfectly

reasonable explanation. He was

0:21:420:21:48

signing for Manchester United and

that can be explained. An alarming

0:21:480:21:51

headline if you take the face of it.

Can you spot the difference? Two

0:21:510:22:00

horses. The jockeys are different,

the numbers are different...

0:22:000:22:04

They are going in different

directions!

0:22:040:22:07

Apart from that, what the

difference?

0:22:070:22:09

Why do we need to spot the

difference?

0:22:090:22:12

Yesterday, punters put some money on

12 to one on a horse called African

0:22:120:22:19

Trader and it came third, so punters

were being paid out, then it turned

0:22:190:22:23

out it was a different horse.

African Trader ran later. So a case

0:22:230:22:35

of the wrong horse entering the

wrong race. During the last year

0:22:350:22:44

when it turned out it was a

different horse, trained by the same

0:22:440:22:48

trainer? They are microchipped, so

they will wonder how this happened.

0:22:480:22:53

In terms of spot the difference, I

notice you and I are almost

0:22:530:22:58

identically dressed.

You got the call last night?

0:22:580:23:03

It happens from time to time.

You both look very dapper.

0:23:030:23:08

The family of a 13-year-old

who was shot in the neck

0:23:080:23:12

after handling an air rifle

want to see tighter controls around

0:23:120:23:15

the type of guns that

killed their son.

0:23:150:23:19

Ben Wragge died in 2016.

0:23:190:23:20

His family want changes in the way

the public perceive air rifles.

0:23:200:23:23

Graham Satchell reports.

0:23:230:23:28

He was a lovely lad.

Very, very

kindhearted. His grandson died in a

0:23:280:23:37

tragic accident.

He was playing with

some friends at a friend's house.

0:23:370:23:41

They got hold of an air rifle. He

ran off. Just a terrible tragedy.

0:23:410:23:48

Ben Wragge was just 13 when he died.

The airgun belonged to his friend's

0:23:480:23:53

dad.

They seem to be treated as a

wheeze toys, but it proves they are

0:23:530:24:01

weapons and they need treating and

looking after as such -- boy's toys.

0:24:010:24:06

This is a shooting school in north

Wales. This is an instructor and the

0:24:060:24:13

death of Ben Wragge has prompted a

review of the rules on England and

0:24:130:24:16

Wales. You think this is a dangerous

weapon?

I don't think it's a

0:24:160:24:20

dangerous weapon in the right hands.

Anything in the wrong hands or

0:24:200:24:24

ill-advised towns could be

dangerous, just as a knife could be

0:24:240:24:28

dangerous in the wrong hands.

In a

shop next door, air guns for sale.

0:24:280:24:32

The rules? You have to be over 18 to

buy one. There are restrictions on

0:24:320:24:37

where you can use them and it is an

offence to let children five and

0:24:370:24:41

without supervision.

I think the law

we has works already and I don't

0:24:410:24:45

think we need any more. We need to

enforce the law we have and we need

0:24:450:24:49

to get education for young people

and I think that's absolutely

0:24:490:24:53

critical.

Hundreds and hundreds of

air rifles. This is Scotland, where

0:24:530:24:56

after another tragic death the law

changed last year. You now need a

0:24:560:25:01

licence to buy or own one and it

needed keep them under lock and key.

0:25:010:25:06

20,000 air guns were handed in and

destroyed in Scotland. Around 15,000

0:25:060:25:10

were licensed in the first six

months.

That is held in by the

0:25:100:25:16

trigger.

Riddick said the new rules

in Scotland penalised the

0:25:160:25:21

law-abiding majority and a

disproportionate, especially as

0:25:210:25:24

offences involving air rifles have

been falling for more than a decade.

0:25:240:25:28

In modern society, there are many

things that are potentially

0:25:280:25:32

dangerous and if we went down the

path of stopping something because

0:25:320:25:36

one person might have died, I don't

think we would achieve anything.

0:25:360:25:39

There are so many other...

Really?

Yes.

That's a tough thing to say. I

0:25:390:25:47

think a lot of people would say it

is worth it if we save one life.

0:25:470:25:51

Well, you have to look at

proportionality and merely doing

0:25:510:25:55

that doesn't actually achieve that

proportionality.

It can't be a

0:25:550:26:00

disproportionate response. We are

trying to stop this happening to any

0:26:000:26:05

other families. It doesn't matter

how bureaucratic it is, if it saves

0:26:050:26:09

a life, it saves a life.

And there's

the heart of this debate. Is it

0:26:090:26:14

worth introducing new rules that

need be burdensome for gun owners if

0:26:140:26:19

it saves one life? It is for the

government in Westminster to decide.

0:26:190:26:23

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

0:26:230:26:25

Still to come this morning: Ben

is at the Triumph motorcycle factory

0:26:250:26:28

looking at the success of British

manufacturing in the last 12 months.

0:26:280:26:36

Good morning.

Good morning. Welcome to the

0:26:360:26:41

factory, where they make Triumphal

motorcycles. This production line

0:26:410:26:48

does not stop. They make 25 of these

every hour. A lot of them are

0:26:480:26:53

exported overseas. The fall in the

value of the pound has been good

0:26:530:26:59

news for exporters, so how is the

rest of the economy? We will find

0:26:590:27:04

out from the official figures later

and talk more about that over the

0:27:040:27:08

course of the morning.

0:27:080:27:09

Time now for the news,

travel and weather where you are.

0:27:090:30:32

in half an hour.

0:30:320:30:33

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:30:330:30:35

Now, though, it's back

to Charlie and Naga.

0:30:350:30:37

Bye for now.

0:30:370:30:38

Hello.

0:30:440:30:45

This is Breakfast,

with Naga and Charlie.

0:30:450:30:47

We'll have the headlines

in just a moment.

0:30:470:30:49

Coming up on Breakfast today.

0:30:490:30:50

It's the biggest wildlife

survey in the world,

0:30:500:30:52

and as the RSPB's Big Garden Watch

gets under way tomorrow,

0:30:520:30:55

we'll join a family taking part.

0:30:550:31:01

After Baroness Jowell's powerful

testimony about suffering from brain

0:31:010:31:03

cancer yesterday, Lord Adonis

will reflect on the emotional

0:31:030:31:06

atmosphere at the Westminster.

0:31:060:31:14

And it's nearly 20 years

since Craig David burst

0:31:180:31:20

onto the charts.

0:31:200:31:21

After a few years away,

he's got a brand new album.

0:31:210:31:24

He'll be here just after 8:30.

0:31:240:31:28

All that is still to come.

0:31:280:31:29

But now a summary of this

morning's main news.

0:31:290:31:35

Donald Trump's visit to the UK is

back on the agenda, Downing Street

0:31:350:31:40

has confirmed.

It is expected to be

a working visit in the second half

0:31:400:31:45

of the year, without the pomp and

ceremony of a full state visit. The

0:31:450:31:51

announcement came at the end of a

meeting between him and the Prime

0:31:510:31:54

Minister at Davos. He said they like

to do a lot.

He would give his

0:31:540:32:00

keynote speech in Davos later this

week. He will likely talk about his

0:32:000:32:08

commitment to America first.

0:32:080:32:17

I don't think in terms

of elitists, globalists,

0:32:170:32:20

I thought many people that

want to invest lots of money.

0:32:200:32:23

They are coming back

to the United States,

0:32:230:32:25

they are coming back to America

to be I thought of it

0:32:250:32:28

in those terms.

0:32:280:32:29

After I said I was going,

there were many stories

0:32:290:32:32

about the elite and the globalists

and the planes flying

0:32:320:32:34

in and everything

0:32:340:32:35

else.

0:32:350:32:36

It is not about that,

it is about investing money,

0:32:360:32:38

jobs coming in, creating jobs.

0:32:380:32:40

We are setting records every week,

every day, we are setting records.

0:32:400:32:43

Downing Street has rejected a

suggestion from the Chancellor,

0:32:430:32:46

Philip Hammond, that any change to

the UK's relationship with the EU

0:32:460:32:53

would be modest. Number 10 responded

they want a deep and special

0:32:530:32:58

economic partnership with the EU

after leaving but it could not be

0:32:580:33:02

described as very modest.

0:33:020:33:07

Sore throats should be treated

with paracetamol rather

0:33:070:33:09

than antibiotics, according

to new guidance from

0:33:090:33:11

the NHS medicines watchdog.

0:33:110:33:12

The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence,

0:33:120:33:14

or NICE, says the drugs

are prescribed in 60% of cases,

0:33:140:33:17

despite being mostly ineffective.

0:33:170:33:18

Doctors say the condition usually

clears up within a week.

0:33:180:33:24

Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

0:33:240:33:27

agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

0:33:270:33:29

pay inequality at the corporation.

0:33:290:33:31

An independent report on the issue

is due to be published next week.

0:33:310:33:39

More than 40 people have died

after a fire at a hospital in South

0:33:420:33:45

Korea.

0:33:450:33:46

It was thought to have started

in the emergency room

0:33:460:33:48

of the building in the city

of Milyang in the south-east

0:33:480:33:51

of the country.

0:33:510:33:52

Around 100 patients

were inside at the time.

0:33:520:33:55

The Defence Secretary Gavin

Williamson has said Russia

0:33:550:33:57

is drawing up plans to cause

"thousands and thousands

0:33:570:33:59

and thousands of deaths" in Britain

by crippling vital infrastructure.

0:33:590:34:02

In an interview with

The Daily Telegraph he says Moscow

0:34:020:34:05

is spying on the UK's energy

network in an attempt

0:34:050:34:07

to spot vulnerabilities.

0:34:070:34:15

Businesses including

Jamie Oliver's Italian restaurants,

0:34:180:34:19

Hilton Hotels, and the shopping

channel, QVC, have all stopped

0:34:190:34:22

selling some steak products

after the company that supplied them

0:34:220:34:25

was placed under investigation

by the Food Standards Agency.

0:34:250:34:27

Russel Hume, who also supply meat

to the Wetherspoon's pub chain,

0:34:270:34:30

said there has never been any

suggestion that their products

0:34:300:34:33

caused illness and that the recall

was a "precautionary measure

0:34:330:34:36

because of mislabelling."

0:34:360:34:37

Plastic is one of the biggest

threats to the future of coral reefs

0:34:370:34:41

followed by increasing

ocean temperatures,

0:34:410:34:42

scientists are warning.

0:34:420:34:43

More than 11 billion items

of plastic were found on a third

0:34:430:34:46

of coral reefs in the Asia-Pacific

region, and this figure is predicted

0:34:460:34:49

to increase to more

than 15 billion by 2025.

0:34:490:34:52

Coral which comes into contact

with plastic is far more likely

0:34:520:34:55

to develop diseases

than other sealife.

0:34:550:35:03

There's been a rise in the number

of cars needing to be repaired

0:35:110:35:14

because of damage sustained

while driving over potholes.

0:35:140:35:17

The RAC says the increasing number

of potholes on our roads

0:35:170:35:20

are due to bad weather

and a lack of investment.

0:35:200:35:22

The government says £23

billion is being invested

0:35:220:35:24

in increasing road capacity

and improving journeys.

0:35:240:35:29

Now, a rare white lion cub is making

its first appearance at a zoo in

0:35:290:35:33

Mexico. It

0:35:330:35:41

Mexico. It looks like a star in the

making. Definitely not shy. Very

0:35:410:35:44

curious, very cute. It was born in

October and apparently rejected I

0:35:440:35:47

its mother. It is now being

hand-reared. The public has been

0:35:470:35:59

asked for name suggestions, that'll

be interesting.

What a dream

0:35:590:36:12

be interesting.

What a dream job to

hand rear that little cub, for a few

0:36:120:36:15

months at least, until it gets big.

What will we start with?

It has been

0:36:150:36:21

extraordinary in the cricket.

England won the series, 3-0. That

0:36:210:36:26

explains why things went pear shaped

in this match. They suffered one of

0:36:260:36:34

their worst ever start in history.

In Adelaide this morning they lost

0:36:340:36:37

the first five wickets for just

eight runs, you heard correctly.

0:36:370:36:43

There was a

0:36:430:36:48

There was a succession of batsmen

walking on and off. They were

0:36:480:36:51

heading for their worst ever score,

but Chris Woakes brought them back

0:36:510:36:57

with a huge 78.

0:36:570:37:03

with a huge 78. 192-9 is the lastest

score. Kyle Edmund, it wasn't to be.

0:37:030:37:10

Had a bit of an injury. But he is in

the top 30.

0:37:100:37:17

He was only the sixth man from

Britain to reach this phase of the

0:37:170:37:22

Grand Slam. He posted this on

Instagram last night.

0:37:220:37:31

He thanked the Australian Open,

0:37:310:37:32

saying "What an amazing

couple weeks it's been."

0:37:320:37:34

"Sorry I didn't get the win today,

but thank you for all the support,

0:37:340:37:38

it meant the world to me."

0:37:380:37:40

So, gone, but not forgotten.

0:37:400:37:42

There's not long to go before

the start of the second men's

0:37:420:37:45

semi-final at the Aussie Open.

0:37:450:37:46

South Korea's Hyeon Chung,

has already beaten Novak Djokovic in

0:37:460:37:49

Melbourne.

0:37:490:37:49

No Korean player has been

further in a Grand Slam,

0:37:490:37:52

but now, the world number 58 has got

to get past 19-time Grand Slam

0:37:520:37:56

champion Roger Federer,

who's still to drop a set

0:37:560:37:58

in the tournament.

0:37:580:38:00

How about this? Yeovil, 21st, taking

on Manchester United. The fourth

0:38:000:38:12

round of the FA Cup. They have a new

star with Alexis Sanchez making his

0:38:120:38:16

debut. He received a friendly

greeting from Yeovil. In a Tweet,

0:38:160:38:37

they gave him a sneak preview of the

away dressing room. They said it was

0:38:370:38:41

the biggest. Looks a bit empty. A

glimmer of what he will have to get

0:38:410:38:45

used to.

0:38:450:38:45

Well, back to the current Yeovil

team, and their manager,

0:38:450:38:48

Darren Way, has faced tougher

challenges than Manchester United.

0:38:480:38:50

Nine years ago he was in a car

crash, which meant he couldn't walk

0:38:500:38:54

for a year.

0:38:540:38:55

He's had 29 operations since,

and has been speaking

0:38:550:38:57

to Football Focus' Mark Clemmit.

0:38:570:38:59

At that stage, it was life or death.

I know what that feels like. It has

0:38:590:39:03

probably helped me deal with

football management. It has made me

0:39:030:39:06

more resilient, more determined. I

wake up with the willpower to

0:39:060:39:09

succeed.

Did you think you were

going to die?

Yes. A scary feeling,

0:39:090:39:13

that's for sure. I am very

appreciative of what Manchester

0:39:130:39:21

United did for me. Now I am manager.

Against all odds, to get into this

0:39:210:39:30

position, it is what dreams are made

of.

0:39:300:39:34

What an extraordinary story.

0:39:340:39:36

You can see more of that

interview ahead of the game,

0:39:360:39:39

which is on BBC One this evening.

0:39:390:39:41

Coverage starts at 7:30.

0:39:410:39:42

He puts it all into perspective.

Tomorrow, the feature on Saturday

0:39:420:39:45

morning is

0:39:450:39:50

morning is about some skiiers who

have been through horrendous

0:39:500:39:52

injuries but have gone back to the

snow in sit-skiing. You only use

0:39:520:39:59

your head.

I am learning to

snowboard and I find that hard

0:39:590:40:06

enough with all four limbs!

0:40:060:40:12

The controversy surrounding

the Presidents Club fundraiser

0:40:120:40:14

continues to have repercussions

for all who attended it earlier this

0:40:140:40:17

week, including the charity sector,

businessmen and politicians.

0:40:170:40:19

130 female hostesses worked

at the men-only event,

0:40:190:40:21

and some have come forward

allegeding sexually harassment.

0:40:210:40:23

The treatment of hospitality staff

and the culture and mentality

0:40:230:40:26

of clients attending these events

has raised serious questions

0:40:260:40:28

about appropriate

conduct and behaviour.

0:40:280:40:30

Nilufer Guler wasn't working

at the Dorchester Hotel event,

0:40:300:40:32

but has worked in the hospitality

industry for almost a decade.

0:40:320:40:40

Good morning.

Good morning.

You were

not working at the Presidents Club.

0:40:460:40:54

The events you have attended have

been similar. What are some of the

0:40:540:41:00

things that have happened to you in

the past?

Umm, I will not really go

0:41:000:41:04

into some of the details of sexual

harassment, just that it has

0:41:040:41:08

happened a lot. It happens all the

time in hospitality. It happens to a

0:41:080:41:15

lot of my colleagues.

Can you give

us a sense without going into

0:41:150:41:18

details?

Well, it is just things

like inappropriate touching,

0:41:180:41:23

advances, sexual advances, you know,

real, you know, pushing... You know,

0:41:230:41:31

sexual advances and inappropriate

touching.

Propositions?

Yes. You are

0:41:310:41:39

propositioned. It is a fairly

normalised thing.

What happens, you

0:41:390:41:47

are employed, you do a job, you

complain to an agency. You expect

0:41:470:41:53

them to forward it on. Have you had

any feeling it has been dealt with?

0:41:530:42:00

There is a lack of accountability. I

have had situations with a lot of my

0:42:000:42:07

colleagues complaining. Nothing has

happened because there is no real...

0:42:070:42:11

There is no real democracy in the

hospitality industry. There is no

0:42:110:42:15

union president, there is no process

which you can take. It is dominated

0:42:150:42:19

by zero-hour contracts. That means

if you do not want to appear like a

0:42:190:42:29

troublemaker, you have to shut up

otherwise you will not get the work.

0:42:290:42:34

With this particular event, people

were shocked. They were shocked at

0:42:340:42:38

some of the contracts the women

working there were forced to sign,

0:42:380:42:44

like nondisclosure, about what they

had to wear. Had he been required to

0:42:440:42:49

agree to anything along those lines

ahead of events?

0:42:490:42:59

ahead of events? -- Have you been.

I

have not been required to agree. But

0:42:590:43:03

there is a culture of being made to

appear in a certain way, to behave

0:43:030:43:08

in a certain way, towards guests,

you know...

You must have been given

0:43:080:43:16

descriptions, some guidance.

They

told me to dress like I am on my

0:43:160:43:20

first date. These kinds of things.

During my training, I did not have

0:43:200:43:25

to sign anything. But I am not

surprised people do. Yeah, it is a

0:43:250:43:31

common being. It is just one thing

of many, many, many, many issues in

0:43:310:43:35

hospitality. Part in parcel of a

whole range of, you know, unpaid

0:43:350:43:40

work, unpaid hours, long hours...

Why did you stick with the industry?

0:43:400:43:50

If there was a... I do not think

there is actually a choice on the

0:43:500:43:54

matter, you know? It is very, very

low-paid, and it is a tough

0:43:540:43:59

industry. There is a lot of

bullying, a lot of standing on your

0:43:590:44:03

feet for many hours wearing

uncomfortable clothes. Just taking

0:44:030:44:08

and taking and taking, like, this

kind of treatment, from, you know,

0:44:080:44:11

everywhere. It is not something you

choose to stick with. It is... If

0:44:110:44:17

you want to eat, I mean, if you can

survive without eating, then fine.

0:44:170:44:21

You know, it is not something people

want.

Do you think reports about

0:44:210:44:25

this Presidents Club dinner could

help the industry? Could it take a

0:44:250:44:31

look at itself? Would give people

like you working in the industry

0:44:310:44:34

more confidence to not put up with

it?

I think so. It is a starting

0:44:340:44:41

point. It is good it is closed, or

at least is being stopped. I think

0:44:410:44:46

we need a more... We need to do

more. We need to actually start

0:44:460:44:50

encouraging, especially young women,

to join the union, to... And that is

0:44:500:44:56

not to say unions are perfect

either, you know? It is to say try

0:44:560:45:01

and actually, collectively, and, you

know, create some sense of democracy

0:45:010:45:06

in the workplace. And, also, you

know, to take it be beyond an

0:45:060:45:12

individual issue. It is not not just

about individual grievances. We need

0:45:120:45:17

to actually even taken to the

streets, you know?

0:45:170:45:26

streets, you know? It is so

widespread.

Thank you very much.

0:45:260:45:31

Good morning. Time to take a look at

the weather. And the temperatures

0:45:310:45:37

might creep up. That's a glorious

picture. Not one we have been used

0:45:370:45:42

to,

0:45:420:45:42

picture. Not one we have been used

to, although yesterday was quite

0:45:420:45:43

sunny.

We had glimpses of sunshine

0:45:430:45:47

yesterday and fairly similar today.

This was yesterday in Derbyshire and

0:45:470:45:52

quite widespread sunshine on a

forecast across many parts of the

0:45:520:45:55

UK. That's down to the fact that we

have high pressure in charge. This

0:45:550:46:00

high pressure creeping in before the

next weather front arrives from the

0:46:000:46:04

Atlantic through the weekend. With

that high pressure and light winds

0:46:040:46:08

it is quite a chilly start. For

Scotland and Northern Ireland some

0:46:080:46:12

frost around and a few mist and fog

patches. Most places dry across

0:46:120:46:16

England and Wales, but a few showers

on the coast. We can cheer,

0:46:160:46:21

Yorkshire, down through

Pembrokeshire and Cornwall, a few

0:46:210:46:24

showers. Further inland dry start. A

bit of patchy cloud, which should

0:46:240:46:30

thin and break later. We could catch

a coastal shower in Kent and Sussex,

0:46:300:46:35

but they will ease. Things becoming

dry over the next few hours. The

0:46:350:46:41

cloud breaking up. Lots of sunshine

today. With light winds it will feel

0:46:410:46:46

pretty pleasant.

0:46:460:46:47

About 4- nine degrees in the

afternoon. Then things start to

0:46:510:46:55

change later in the afternoon, with

the next area of rain initially

0:46:550:46:58

arriving in Northern Ireland and

western Scotland, with the wind

0:46:580:47:01

begin up. That does tend to fizzle

but later in the night or persistent

0:47:010:47:06

rain heads in from the west. By the

early hours of Saturday it is really

0:47:060:47:11

the north-western half of the UK

that sees the cloud, rain and brisk

0:47:110:47:14

winds. Further south and east are

colder start to Saturday, with mist

0:47:140:47:18

and a little bit of frost as well.

So through Saturday it is dominated

0:47:180:47:23

by this low pressure. A lot of

isobars to the north of the UK.

0:47:230:47:29

Windy weather. Especially windy in

the Northern Isles and northern

0:47:290:47:32

parts of mainland Scotland. Gales or

severe gales. Further south, breezy,

0:47:320:47:39

with this rain moving slowly

eastwards. Becoming fairly light and

0:47:390:47:42

patchy by the time it arrives in the

south-east later and it will be

0:47:420:47:46

followed by brighter skies heading

in from the north and west. With

0:47:460:47:50

that mix of sunshine and blustery

showers we are all in double figures

0:47:500:47:53

on Saturday. We've already got the

mild air and heading into the second

0:47:530:47:58

half of the weekend even milder air

starts to head in from the

0:47:580:48:01

south-west. That sets us up for a

fairly decent day. It will be mild.

0:48:010:48:07

A bit more rain, especially in parts

of Scotland and maybe Northern

0:48:070:48:11

Ireland and western parts of England

and Wales. Further south and east we

0:48:110:48:14

are more likely to avoid wet

weather. Remaining dry through the

0:48:140:48:17

weekend. There will be a little bit

of rain on the cards and it will be

0:48:170:48:22

feeling quite blustery. Most of us

should see a little bit of dry and

0:48:220:48:26

decent

0:48:260:48:26

should see a little bit of dry and

decent weather through the weekend.

0:48:260:48:28

Thanks very much, Sarah.

0:48:280:48:31

Later this morning we'll get

the official figures on how well

0:48:310:48:34

the economy performed last year.

0:48:340:48:36

Ben is at a motorcycle

factory in Leicestershire.

0:48:360:48:37

We always love having a look around

factories. At a motorcycle factory

0:48:400:48:44

today.

Do you get to ride on one?

0:48:440:48:49

Maybe if I am good, a little later.

No promises. This is definitely a

0:48:490:48:55

work in progress. They are building

we Triumph motorcycles here. They

0:48:550:49:01

build about 25 every hour. Last year

was good news. A weak pound meant

0:49:010:49:10

there was some good news. First, the

good news with the economy was that

0:49:100:49:17

the weak pound has meant for many

factories it is better to export and

0:49:170:49:20

manufacturing has done really well.

There's also been a bit more money

0:49:200:49:24

in our pocket. Unemployment has

fallen to new record lows. The bad

0:49:240:49:28

news is inflation. The rising cost

of everything we buy. That's been

0:49:280:49:34

going up pretty sharply. That means

we've felt a bit of a squeeze on our

0:49:340:49:39

income. One of the things that has

missed out has been retail. Retail

0:49:390:49:43

sales have fallen sharply. For

manufacturers the economy has been

0:49:430:49:48

faring well. It's an interesting one

in terms of exports. But introduce

0:49:480:49:52

you to Paul, one of the bosses here.

Good morning to you both. Explain

0:49:520:49:59

how you fared this year.

It has been

a pretty good year? Overall we've

0:49:590:50:05

had a reasonable year. In the last

12 months the sales were up by 13%.

0:50:050:50:11

We had a record number of motorcycle

sales around the world. In addition

0:50:110:50:17

to that we've launched five new

motorcycles and you are standing in

0:50:170:50:21

front of the new motorcycles, and

we've had many other successes in

0:50:210:50:26

the business. This year we signed a

contract where our motorcycles will

0:50:260:50:30

be the official engine supplier for

championships around the world, so

0:50:300:50:34

it has been a good year for Triumph.

The weak pound has meant these

0:50:340:50:40

things are cheaper, if you sell them

overseas. That is added a boost and

0:50:400:50:44

that means you can take on more

staff?

The retail pricing around the

0:50:440:50:49

world is consistent and isn't

affected by the strength or weakness

0:50:490:50:51

of the pound. Effectively 85% of our

motorcycles are exported.

0:50:510:50:57

Essentially, basically, what you see

with the weak pound is we have

0:50:570:51:02

benefits, but we also have the

flipside, were basically we have

0:51:020:51:06

oversee the operations that cost us

more to run and also essentially the

0:51:060:51:12

motorcycles in those are

well-positioned.

Professor, it is

0:51:120:51:17

interesting because there is some

good news and some bad news. For

0:51:170:51:22

manufacturers it has been great, but

the danger of course is that if you

0:51:220:51:26

are importing from overseas postings

cost more as well?

Yes. If you look

0:51:260:51:30

at the recent data about the

economy, overall it is encouraging,

0:51:300:51:34

but we should still be vigilant.

Thank goodness politically we have

0:51:340:51:40

some kind of agreement about our

divorce Bill. So some uncertainty

0:51:400:51:47

about wrecks it has been cleared

away, which helps investors bring

0:51:470:51:51

back the confidence in the economy

-- Brexit. On the other hand it is

0:51:510:51:58

giving exports some additional

competitiveness, an advantage, in

0:51:580:52:00

the global market. We have more

competitiveness in the market which

0:52:000:52:06

is good for us, but we should also

be vigilant about the negative side,

0:52:060:52:11

because first of all it makes we

have less money in our pockets,

0:52:110:52:18

consumers have less money around to

buy goods, so we are in the worst

0:52:180:52:23

situation compared to before Brexit.

Our pay rises can't keep up with

0:52:230:52:29

inflation, so we have less money

left to buy real goods and on the

0:52:290:52:35

other hand inflation is coming up,

so it will make us more expensive to

0:52:350:52:39

buy foreign goods.

For now, thank

you to both of you. We will chat

0:52:390:52:44

later. I will show you more around

this place, got it is fascinating.

0:52:440:52:48

As I said they build about 25 every

hour. The goods come in as raw

0:52:480:52:53

materials, screws and alts, all

sorts of things, and then get

0:52:530:52:58

shipped out as brand-new bikes in a

box.

0:52:580:53:00

I will show you more later. Thanks

very much! Now to a theatre with a

0:53:000:53:08

difference, one curated by people

with dementia.

0:53:080:53:15

It's called Every Third Minute,

as that's when someone in the UK

0:53:180:53:21

is diagnosed with dementia.

0:53:210:53:22

The festival is called

'Every Third Minute'.

0:53:220:53:24

Our Entertainment correspondent

Colin Paterson has been along

0:53:240:53:26

to rehearsals.

0:53:260:53:28

A brand-new play cowritten by

someone who has been living with

0:53:280:53:31

dementia for eight years.

It's

important to me to my brain ticking

0:53:310:53:35

over.

The no different things. Bob

Fulcher was picked to work with

0:53:350:53:39

professional playwright for the

Every Third Minute festival. They've

0:53:390:53:49

created I See Land Ahead, a nautical

tale based on one of his paintings.

0:53:490:53:55

Bob, you were a farmer for more than

40 years. You are now 70 and now you

0:53:550:54:01

are a about to have a play on.

How

does that feel? Being part of this

0:54:010:54:06

festival has given me a chance to

put my message across about how

0:54:060:54:10

important it is to enjoy life, even

though I've had dementia for eight

0:54:100:54:16

years. Life is great.

But the

festival will also be incorporating

0:54:160:54:22

some more famous work on the

subject.

I have Alzheimer's disease.

0:54:220:54:26

Early onset.

Three years ago,

Julianne Moore won the best actress

0:54:260:54:34

Oscar for Still Alice.

Try

pretending you are me when you walk.

0:54:340:54:38

For the UK premiere of the stage

version, that role will be played by

0:54:380:54:42

Sharon small from the Inspector

Lumley mysteries.

I do feel the

0:54:420:54:47

pressure, but we are telling the

story in a slightly different way,

0:54:470:54:52

more theatrically.

I'm going...

Oh,

yes, Stamford. Have fun.

That will

0:54:520:55:03

be my job on this one, to try to get

people to see that people with

0:55:030:55:07

dementia are still, although

struggling, they are still trying to

0:55:070:55:13

get on with life and they are still

people. If I go further away I get

0:55:130:55:17

lost, but I do make myself go out,

because you've got to, haven't you?

0:55:170:55:22

And in another rehearsal room, Rosa

Peterson is listening to her play

0:55:220:55:27

being read by actors for the very

first time.

I'm glad I've done it.

0:55:270:55:31

It's an achievement. It just proves

that if you've got dementia you can

0:55:310:55:36

still do things, and I've done it.

And I'm wondering if it will help if

0:55:360:55:41

the man had a name.

She was paired

up with a brighter, and the play is

0:55:410:55:46

based on memories from Rosa's

childhood.

We still got a few bits

0:55:460:55:51

to alter.

A few words to sort out.

But pretty much better, I would say.

0:55:510:55:55

That would be good!

Yes, at the age

of 75, it is Rosa the writer and she

0:55:550:56:04

is loving it.

0:56:040:56:06

The Every Third Minute Festival is

on at the West Yorkshire Playhouse

0:56:060:56:09

in Leeds from February the ninth.

0:56:090:59:32

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London newsroom

0:59:320:59:35

in half an hour.

0:59:350:59:36

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:59:360:59:38

Hello.

1:00:101:00:11

This is Breakfast,

with Naga Munchetty and Charlie

1:00:111:00:13

Stayt.

1:00:131:00:13

Donald Trump says he's prepared

to apologise for retweeting

1:00:131:00:16

racist videos from a

far-right British Group.

1:00:161:00:18

His comments comes he arrives

in Switzerland to address world

1:00:181:00:21

leaders and confirmes talks

are under way for a trip to the UK

1:00:211:00:25

in the second half of the year.

1:00:251:00:33

Good morning.

1:00:431:00:46

"Stop prescribing antibiotics

for sore throats."

1:00:461:00:48

The NHS medicines watchdog tells

doctors to use paracetamol instead.

1:00:481:00:53

Four of the BBC's leading male news

presenters agree to take salary cuts

1:00:531:00:57

following revelations

about gender pay inequality.

1:00:571:01:02

A call for a change

in the rules on airguns.

1:01:021:01:04

We hear from the family

of a 13-year-old boy who was killed

1:01:041:01:10

in an accident with one.

1:01:101:01:12

Good morning. A weak pound has given

exporters a boost, meaning they can

1:01:121:01:21

sell more overseas. How is the rest

of the economy?

1:01:211:01:30

In sport, one of the worst starts

ever for England's cricketers.

1:01:301:01:33

They lost their first five wickets

for just eight runs,

1:01:331:01:36

against Australia in

Adelaide in their latest

1:01:361:01:38

One-Day International.

1:01:381:01:39

And Sarah has the weather.

1:01:391:01:42

And Sarah has the weather.

1:01:421:01:42

Good morning. A fresh start to

Friday. Glimpses of sunshine. But

1:01:421:01:49

things will turn unsettled later on.

More details in 15 minutes.

Thank

1:01:491:01:56

you. See you later.

1:01:561:01:57

More details in 15 minutes.

Thank

you. See you later.

1:01:571:02:00

Good morning.

1:02:001:02:02

Donald Trump will visit

the UK later this year,

1:02:021:02:04

it has been confirmed.

1:02:041:02:05

Downing Street has said

Donald Trump will once again

1:02:051:02:08

confirm his commitment

to put America first

1:02:081:02:10

when he delivers his keynote

speech in Davos later.

1:02:101:02:15

Donald Trump says he's prepared

to apologise for retweeting

1:02:151:02:18

racist videos from a

far-right British Group.

1:02:181:02:26

I don't think in terms

of elitists, globalists,

1:02:331:02:35

I thought many people that

want to invest lots of money.

1:02:351:02:38

They are coming back

to the United States,

1:02:381:02:41

they are coming back to America

to be I thought of it

1:02:411:02:44

in those terms.

1:02:441:02:45

After I said I was going,

there were many stories

1:02:451:02:47

about the elite and the globalists

and the planes flying

1:02:471:02:50

in and everything

1:02:501:02:51

else.

1:02:511:02:51

It is not about that,

it is about investing money,

1:02:511:02:54

jobs coming in, creating jobs.

1:02:541:02:55

We are setting records every week,

every day, we are setting records.

1:02:551:03:03

And you have been following the

great and the good. This is a man

1:03:071:03:11

who caused a stir. He is keen to

express how well the economy is

1:03:111:03:18

doing under him.

1:03:181:03:24

doing under him.

Quite a

conciliatory tone from Donald Trump.

1:03:251:03:30

He arrived yesterday. He had a big

meeting with Theresa May. It seems

1:03:301:03:36

they finally have an agreement,

though we have been around the

1:03:361:03:39

houses over the visit to the UK. The

Prime Minister will be pleased with

1:03:391:03:43

the warmer mood music from America.

Donald Trump said it was a myth

1:03:431:03:50

there was friction in their

relationship. He has done an

1:03:501:03:55

interview with Piers Morgan, which

will run later today. He talks about

1:03:551:04:01

some of the controversy,

1:04:011:04:12

some of the controversy, the

retweeting of Britain First, the

1:04:131:04:14

far-right organisation. He said he

read into it later and said he

1:04:141:04:18

realised it was racist and said he

was the least racist person ever. It

1:04:181:04:28

seems he tweets first, worries

later. He said the bigger point was

1:04:281:04:31

fighting Islamic terror. This is

about moving on, rebuild some of the

1:04:311:04:36

special relationship. Theresa May,

who left, she will be pleased the

1:04:361:04:44

meeting went well. She had the

longest amount of time with him. For

1:04:441:04:49

Number 10, that must be seen as

something good.

That you so much.

1:04:491:05:00

something good.

That you so much. --

Thank you.

1:05:011:05:03

There's dispute at the heart

of the Government this morning,

1:05:031:05:06

after Downing Street gave a public

rebuke of comments made

1:05:061:05:09

by the Chancellor Philip Hammond

at the World Economic Forum in

1:05:091:05:12

Switzerland.

1:05:121:05:12

It comes as the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, prepares to set

1:05:121:05:15

out his vision for the next stage

of talks about a transition

1:05:151:05:18

period later today.

1:05:181:05:19

At a speech in Davos,

Mr Hammond said he hoped the UK

1:05:191:05:22

and EU economies will only move

"very modestly" apart after Brexit.

1:05:221:05:25

To which a Number 10 spokesperson

has said that government plans

1:05:251:05:28

for Brexit "could not be described

as very modest changes."

1:05:281:05:31

Let's talk about this more

with our political correspondent,

1:05:311:05:33

Leila Nathoo, who joins us

now from Westminster.

1:05:331:05:36

In one sense this is semantics.

Modest, very modest, not modest, and

1:05:361:05:41

on the other hand, differences in

government thinking.

It is right to

1:05:411:05:50

say that. Periodically we see

differences in opinion over Brexit.

1:05:501:05:53

This is just another example. Philip

Hammond, no secret he was on the

1:05:531:06:02

remaining side of the argument. The

comments made by him in Davos have

1:06:021:06:11

raised the hackles of Brexiteers. He

said we are leaving the single

1:06:111:06:19

market and the customs union, but

Brexiteers in the Tory party see

1:06:191:06:23

this as an attempt to hijack Brexit.

David Davis was talking about the

1:06:231:06:30

transition period. At the same time,

we got comments from the other side

1:06:301:06:34

of the Tory party, Jacob Rees-Mogg,

a prominent backbencher chairing a

1:06:341:06:38

group of EU sceptics. He is critical

of the government's approach to

1:06:381:06:45

Brexit, talking about a fundamental

shift in tone being needed, saying

1:06:451:06:49

Britain was being powered by the EU,

talking about squandering the

1:06:491:06:54

opportunities presented to Brexit.

-- cowed. You see an example of the

1:06:541:06:59

divisions going on. The debate is

still alive over the end state of

1:06:591:07:04

Brexit, never mind the transition

period. That is the immediate

1:07:041:07:11

priority, get to the transition

period as soon as possible before

1:07:111:07:15

getting to negotiations over the

final end state. There is still no

1:07:151:07:20

consensus on that back home.

Thank

you for the moment.

1:07:201:07:26

Most sore throats should be treated

with paracetamol rather

1:07:261:07:28

than antibiotics, according

to new guidance from

1:07:281:07:30

the NHS medicines watchdog.

1:07:301:07:31

The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence,

1:07:311:07:34

NICE, says the drugs

are prescribed in 60% of cases,

1:07:341:07:36

despite being mostly ineffective.

1:07:361:07:37

Here's our health

correspondent, Dominic Hughes.

1:07:371:07:45

The overuse of antibiotics

is leading to the development

1:07:471:07:49

of bacteria resistant

to these life-saving drugs.

1:07:491:07:51

Leading health experts warn

this poses a serious

1:07:511:07:53

threat to the UK.

1:07:531:07:55

If we lose the ability

to fight infection,

1:07:551:07:59

common medical procedures such

as Cesarean sections and cancer

1:07:591:08:01

treatments could become too risky.

1:08:011:08:02

Prescribing antibiotics to treat

a sore throat is a prime example

1:08:021:08:05

of the way they can be misused.

1:08:051:08:11

Sore throats account

for nearly one in four of GP

1:08:111:08:14

appointments in the UK

related to infections

1:08:141:08:15

of the lungs and airways.

1:08:151:08:17

Research suggests that

in 60% of those cases,

1:08:171:08:19

antibiotics are prescribed.

1:08:191:08:21

But most sore throats are caused

by a viral infection,

1:08:211:08:27

on which antibiotics

will have no effect.

1:08:271:08:31

We have become a bit, umm,

acclimatised to thinking

1:08:311:08:35

that we need antibiotics whenever

we have got something wrong with us.

1:08:351:08:38

And we don't.

1:08:381:08:46

We just have to be re-educated,

I suppose, to preserve the use

1:08:461:08:49

of antibiotics for really

serious infections.

1:08:491:08:52

The latest advice from the NHS

Medicines Watchdog reminds

1:08:521:08:54

doctors and nurses that most sore

throats will be better

1:08:541:08:57

within a week, and only

the most serious

1:08:571:08:59

bacterial infections

need antibiotics.

1:08:591:09:03

Most patients are best advised

to drink plenty of fluids,

1:09:031:09:09

and to take paracetamol or Ibuprofen

to help with pain relief..

1:09:091:09:13

Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

1:09:131:09:21

Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

1:09:221:09:25

agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

1:09:251:09:28

pay inequality at the corporation.

1:09:281:09:29

An independent report on the issue

is due to be published next week.

1:09:291:09:33

Hey, Chris.

1:09:331:09:33

How do you feel about BBC talent

salaries being published?

1:09:331:09:36

The publication last year of the pay

for the BBC's on-air talent earning

1:09:361:09:39

over £150,000 prompted a huge

outcry, both because the top

1:09:391:09:42

of the list was dominated by men,

and because many men appeared to be

1:09:421:09:46

getting more money for doing

the same job as women,

1:09:461:09:49

though individual

circumstances varied hugely.

1:09:491:09:50

Earlier this month, Carrie Gracie

resigned her post as China editor

1:09:501:09:53

in protest, saying she

will return to London.

1:09:531:09:55

Now, her colleagues,

Jon Sopel, John Humphrys,

1:09:551:09:57

Hugh Edwards, and Jeremy Vine,

have all agreed in principle

1:09:571:10:00

to have their salaries reduced.

1:10:001:10:01

Ms Gracie is due to appear before

a Select Committee of MPs next

1:10:011:10:05

Wednesday shortly before

the Director-General,

1:10:051:10:06

his deputy, and the Director of News

and Current Affairs also appear.

1:10:061:10:12

Whereas competition

in the entertainment industry has

1:10:121:10:14

intensified, the opposite

has happened in news.

1:10:141:10:16

Many of those now taking paycuts

secured generous deals years ago.

1:10:161:10:19

That world has disappeared,

and these presenters now accept that

1:10:191:10:21

a chunk of their salaries will have

to disappear with it.

1:10:211:10:24

Amol Rajan, BBC News.

1:10:241:10:32

Apparently, Moscow is spying on the

energy network in the UK to find

1:10:471:10:51

vulnerabilities.

1:10:511:10:59

Businesses including

Jamie Oliver's Italian restaurants,

1:10:591:11:00

Hilton Hotels and the shopping

channel QVC have all stopped selling

1:11:001:11:03

some steak products,

after the company that supplied them

1:11:031:11:06

was placed under investigation

by the Food Standards Agency.

1:11:061:11:08

Russel Hume, who also supply meat

to the Wetherspoon's pub chain,

1:11:081:11:11

said there has never been any

suggestion that their products

1:11:111:11:14

caused illness and that the recall

was a "precautionary measure

1:11:141:11:17

because of mislabelling."

1:11:171:11:19

More than 40 people have died

after fire at a hospital in South

1:11:191:11:22

Korea.

1:11:221:11:22

It was thought to have started

in the emergency room

1:11:221:11:25

of the building in the city

of Milyang in the south-east

1:11:251:11:28

of the country.

1:11:281:11:29

Around 100 patients

were inside at the time.

1:11:291:11:37

The number of pothole related

breakdowns on British roads

1:11:411:11:43

is rising, with the RAC blaming bad

weather and a lack of investment.

1:11:431:11:47

Councils say they would need

to triple their road repair budgets

1:11:471:11:50

to tackle a vast

backlog of potholes.

1:11:501:11:52

Our transport correspondent,

Victoria Fritz, has more.

1:11:521:11:54

They can cost hundreds

of pounds' worth of damage

1:11:541:11:56

and although councils fill in 2

million potholes a year,

1:11:561:11:59

it seems like Britain's holes

are crumbling faster they then

1:11:591:12:01

can be repaired.

1:12:011:12:02

It doesn't take a lot

to damage a car.

1:12:021:12:05

You can try to avoid

them, you can't.

1:12:051:12:07

You've only got to drive around this

borough and you'll find

1:12:071:12:10

loads of them.

1:12:101:12:11

I take my children to school

and come across quite a few potholes

1:12:111:12:14

on the way, which is a bit

dangerous with the car.

1:12:141:12:17

It seems like after the horrible

weather when you have ice or really

1:12:171:12:21

cold weather, they all

we seem to appear.

1:12:211:12:23

Normally potholes develop

after wet and cold weather,

1:12:231:12:25

but the RAC says it's seeing

the number of breakdowns caused

1:12:251:12:28

by driving in poor roads increase,

regardless of the season.

1:12:281:12:31

RAC patrols attended 2,830 potholes

related breakdowns between October

1:12:311:12:33

and December of last year.

1:12:331:12:35

That's 11% more than the same

period the year before.

1:12:351:12:37

Vehicles they attended typically

suffered damaged shock absorbers,

1:12:371:12:40

broken suspension springs

and punctured wheels.

1:12:401:12:41

Our local roads have suffered

from years of underinvestment,

1:12:411:12:45

and we would like to

see ring-fence funding

1:12:451:12:47

put in place so councils can

plan their work appropriately

1:12:471:12:50

and really sort out

the problem once and for

1:12:501:12:52

all.

1:12:521:13:00

The government says it's investing

£23 billion to increase capacity

1:13:011:13:03

and improve road journeys.

1:13:031:13:04

The majority of that will go

on major roads and motorways.

1:13:041:13:07

With budgets under increasing

strain, the pressure is mounting

1:13:071:13:10

on councils to plug the gaps

in local roads where most journeys

1:13:101:13:13

begin or end.

1:13:131:13:14

Victoria Fritz, BBC News.

1:13:141:13:16

Violent scenes broke out in France.

One supermarket chain offered a 70%

1:13:271:13:32

discount on no --

1:13:321:13:41

One supermarket chain offered a 70%

discount on no --. It is a hazelnut

1:13:421:13:45

spread. People started pushing each

other. All of the stock was snapped

1:13:451:13:51

up in 15 minutes.

It looks like they

are picking it up off the floor.

1:13:511:13:56

Don't get between a

1:13:561:14:03

Don't get between a person and their

Nutella. Apparently one person got a

1:14:031:14:06

black eye.

1:14:061:14:08

Nearly 4,000 people have descended

on the small Swiss resort

1:14:081:14:11

of Davos for this year's gathering

of the so-called global elite.

1:14:111:14:14

More than 70 are world leaders

but all eyes will be

1:14:141:14:17

on one man today.

1:14:171:14:18

US President, Donald Trump,

will deliver a keynote address

1:14:181:14:20

after arriving yesterday

for meetings, including with Theresa

1:14:201:14:22

May.

1:14:221:14:23

Ryan Heath from the Politico news

website saw the President arrive

1:14:231:14:26

and joins us now.

1:14:261:14:31

What's

1:14:311:14:31

the atmosphere like surrounding

Donald Trump's visit, in terms of

1:14:311:14:35

impressions of senior members in

business, industry and politics,

1:14:351:14:40

observing him observing them?

It's a

very seesaw impression. If you talk

1:14:401:14:47

to the economic faction here, they

are more open to Donald Trump than

1:14:471:14:52

the more purely political people

here. If you are a big banker, a

1:14:521:14:56

tech titan, you might be benefiting

from that tax reform. You tend to

1:14:561:15:02

look past the tweeds, the harsh

rhetoric, and you think what's in it

1:15:021:15:06

for me? You can see how to cut a

deal with Donald Trump. So they are

1:15:061:15:10

more open-minded than the political

class, who are very allergic to

1:15:101:15:14

Donald Trump lashing out. They think

he has a lot to prove.

Economists

1:15:141:15:21

are more pragmatic. He certainly

made an entrance with helicopters

1:15:211:15:28

and upon surrounding that.

He has

brought almost half of his Cabinet

1:15:281:15:32

with him. We know he's got something

big up his sleeve today, but it was

1:15:321:15:37

a very strange atmosphere yesterday

when he came in. People rushed

1:15:371:15:40

around him like a celebrity. There

wasn't more than five seconds of

1:15:401:15:46

applause for Theresa May as people

rushed to see Donald Trump come in,

1:15:461:15:50

but he was almost silent reception.

There was a little bit of photo

1:15:501:15:54

taking, but he was almost like

people were witnessing a strange,

1:15:541:15:57

alien spectacle, rather than really

participating in Trump's arrival.

1:15:571:16:02

One of the things we are keen to

look at is Theresa May. You

1:16:021:16:07

mentioned her speech wasn't perhaps

received as warmly as you might have

1:16:071:16:12

hoped?

Absolutely. But it was better

than last year. Last year she gave a

1:16:121:16:18

very tough sounding speech at

Lancaster House the day before Davos

1:16:181:16:22

and she really came here in at

aftermath, the hangover of Brexit

1:16:221:16:26

and told a group of people that

didn't want it to happen that Brexit

1:16:261:16:30

was coming fast towards them.

Yesterday she had a different

1:16:301:16:34

approach and she focused on

technology and is trying to make

1:16:341:16:37

Britain a home for artificial

intelligence and innovations like

1:16:371:16:40

that. That went down well with some

people, but they found it strange

1:16:401:16:44

that she had this niche topic to

speak about, rather than lay out a

1:16:441:16:48

global vision for what Britain is

going to be after Brexit. The people

1:16:481:16:52

in this room want to know what the

new tax structure will be like in

1:16:521:16:56

Britain. Is everyone going to be

allowed to stay and enjoy Britain?

1:16:561:17:00

Theresa May was really focused on

the robots and what she would do to

1:17:001:17:05

regulate intranet platforms stop

white another thing we are

1:17:051:17:08

interested in is the so-called

special relationship. -- another

1:17:081:17:11

thing. The word "very" was put in

there by Donald Trump as well.

1:17:111:17:19

If you think about where the UK and

the US are standing now, a lot of

1:17:191:17:24

the allies are concerned about the

direction of both countries. They

1:17:241:17:27

had a strong interest to play nice

yesterday and Donald Trump is very

1:17:271:17:30

charming person. You wouldn't know

it from the tweeds, that he was

1:17:301:17:34

really hamming it up with some of

the European CEOs. He was turning on

1:17:341:17:39

the hotelier charm that he is known

for and they were going for it.

1:17:391:17:43

There was a bit of that with the

Theresa May discussion. She will be

1:17:431:17:47

pleased to have hour-long

discussion. Everyone reaffirmed that

1:17:471:17:50

they want to work closely together

and perhaps we need not take too

1:17:501:17:54

seriously this idea that trade is

going to double overnight, but

1:17:541:17:57

clearly there is goodwill there.

Theresa May has the opening she

1:17:571:18:01

wanted for that even more special

relationship after Brexit.

Stay with

1:18:011:18:05

me a moment. We have some footage of

Donald Trump given one of his first

1:18:051:18:09

international interviews, with an

ITV journalist. It aired in the last

1:18:091:18:16

1.5 hours. Donald Trump explained

his decision to retweet videos by

1:18:161:18:21

right group.

It was done because I

am a big believer in fighting

1:18:211:18:28

radical Islamic terror. This was a

depiction of radical Islamic terror.

1:18:281:18:35

They were unverified videos, at

least one of them.

But I didn't do

1:18:351:18:39

it. It was a big story where you

are, but not where I am.

I get that.

1:18:391:18:48

This was airing in Britain and I

want them to get to the real you.

1:18:481:18:52

The real need is someone that loves

Britain, loves the UK, I love

1:18:521:18:56

Scotland. I wish... One of the

biggest problem they have been

1:18:561:19:01

winning, I won't be able to get back

there so often. I would love to go

1:19:011:19:06

there. As you know, before this

happened, I would be there a lot.

1:19:061:19:10

Very special people and a very

special place. I don't want to cause

1:19:101:19:14

any difficulty for your country,

that I can tell you.

Can I get an

1:19:141:19:19

apology out of you just for the

retweet? It would go a long way.

1:19:191:19:23

Here is what is fair. If you are

telling me these are horrible and

1:19:231:19:27

racist people, I would certainly

apologise, if you would like me to

1:19:271:19:32

do that.

I knew nothing about them.

And you would disavow yourself of

1:19:321:19:36

people like that?

I do want to be

involved with people like that. You

1:19:361:19:40

are telling me about them, as I

don't know anything about them.

That

1:19:401:19:44

interview airs on Sunday, the 28th

of January, at 10pm on ITV one.

I

1:19:441:19:49

assuming you heard that. This was an

issue that offended a lot of people

1:19:491:19:55

and it also cast a dark cloud across

the relationship between Theresa May

1:19:551:20:00

and Donald Trump and that needed to

be shown to be repaired at Davos.

1:20:001:20:04

Absolutely. You will listen into a

bit of a Swiss miracle. I don't

1:20:041:20:10

think any of us have heard Donald

Trump apologise before, even if it

1:20:101:20:13

was only a cause I apology. --

quasi- apology. But Donald Trump

1:20:131:20:23

tweets first before he thinks. The

difficulty a lot of people have

1:20:231:20:26

around the world with his style is

that governing is complicated. You

1:20:261:20:30

have to consider more than what

jumps into your thumbs when you are

1:20:301:20:36

racing through your Twitter wall. So

people in Britain would be wise to

1:20:361:20:40

keep on the back of their memories

how Trump behaves over time, not

1:20:401:20:44

just the last thing he said to Piers

Morgan or whoever he is talking to.

1:20:441:20:48

The relationship has to be based on

a little bit more than what you find

1:20:481:20:52

on your Twitter account when you

wake up in the morning.

Good to talk

1:20:521:20:56

to you. Thank you very much for your

time.

1:20:561:20:59

Here's Sarah with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:20:591:21:05

Good morning. Quite a fresh start to

your Friday morning. A little bit of

1:21:051:21:12

frost around and a few mist and fog

patches. Through the day it is

1:21:121:21:16

looking pretty decent for many of

us. This was the scene yesterday in

1:21:161:21:20

Oxfordshire and a similar story

today. Many of us will have blue sky

1:21:201:21:23

and sunshine. The fairly quiet

weather is down to this region of

1:21:231:21:28

high pressure moving on from the

Atlantic. That's keeping the weather

1:21:281:21:31

quiet before weather fronts ahead in

during the course of the night and

1:21:311:21:35

into the weekend. This morning for

Scotland and Northern Ireland, a

1:21:351:21:39

couple of misty and murky patches

and frost around. Further south

1:21:391:21:42

across England and Wales, are

largely dry and somewhat fresh

1:21:421:21:46

start. A couple of isolated showers

around the east and west coast, but

1:21:461:21:51

is avoiding the showers.

Temperatures around 4- five degrees.

1:21:511:21:55

Patchy cloud through central and

south-eastern parts of England, but

1:21:551:21:58

that should break up any mist and

fog patches. Looking like a quiet

1:21:581:22:02

day. You can see the sunshine

filtering across the country,

1:22:021:22:07

dissolving the cloud in the south

and east. Not wall-to-wall sunshine,

1:22:071:22:12

but a decent day. With light winds

temperatures are fairly typical of

1:22:121:22:15

the time of year, between 4- 90

degrees. Things change at a bit

1:22:151:22:20

later this afternoon, towards the

north-west. This rain heads in

1:22:201:22:26

across Northern Ireland and Scotland

into the early part of this evening.

1:22:261:22:29

It fizzles out for a time but then

the next area moves on from the

1:22:291:22:33

west, so by the end of the night in

the early Saturday we have rain

1:22:331:22:38

across much of Scotland, Northern

Ireland and in the western parts of

1:22:381:22:41

England and Wales. The south and

east, a colder start to Saturday

1:22:411:22:44

morning. Through the day it will be

dominated by a brisk weather front.

1:22:441:22:48

Low pressure, fairly deep, to the

north of the UK. There is a really

1:22:481:22:55

strong wind across the Northern

Isles and for mainland parts of

1:22:551:22:58

northern Scotland. Breezy further

south across the country as the rain

1:22:581:23:01

tracks eastwards. Coming light and

patchy by the time it reaches

1:23:011:23:06

southern and eastern England.

Followed by sunny spells and

1:23:061:23:10

blustery showers coming in from the

north-west, although temperatures

1:23:101:23:14

almost across-the-board upback into

double figures tomorrow. Mild air

1:23:141:23:17

arriving. For Sunday much milder air

sweeps in from the south-west. So

1:23:171:23:23

not a bad day for some of us on

Sunday. Much of England and Wales

1:23:231:23:28

should be largely dry. There will be

some rain at times for Northern

1:23:281:23:32

Ireland and later Scotland as well.

Which is certainly mild, up to about

1:23:321:23:36

13 degrees. That's the thing through

the weekend. It stays mild. Often

1:23:361:23:42

windy weather through the weekend

and there will be some rain at

1:23:421:23:45

thanks very much.

1:23:471:23:49

For nearly 40 years,

the RSPB has been encouraging us

1:23:491:23:53

to venture out into our gardens,

and count the birds that visit

1:23:531:23:56

so we get a snapshot

of the UK bird population.

1:23:561:23:59

This weekend, the Big Garden

Birdwatch returns with more

1:23:591:24:02

than half a million people set

to take part, including one

1:24:021:24:05

family in Cambridgeshire.

1:24:051:24:06

Breakfast's Tim Muffitt

is with them this morning.

1:24:061:24:11

Good morning!

Good morning and welcome to the back

1:24:111:24:19

garden of Emma, Woody and Nora. They

are getting ready for the Big Garden

1:24:191:24:23

Birdwatch.

We are all getting ready.

What's your favourite bird?

Robin.

1:24:231:24:28

Kingfisher.

Good stuff. We are doing

this because the world's biggest

1:24:281:24:35

wildlife survey gets under way this

weekend. Go out, into your garden if

1:24:351:24:40

you've got one or an outside space,

and count how many birds you can see

1:24:401:24:44

for one hour. Log which ones they

are, log on to the RSPB website and

1:24:441:24:49

the huge amount of information can

be collected from that. Jamie, you

1:24:491:24:52

are from the RSPB. How big a deal is

this survey?

Huge. It is the biggest

1:24:521:24:58

of its kind in the world, over

500,000 people take part every year.

1:24:581:25:03

Last year the most popular bird was

the sparrow. What have you learnt

1:25:031:25:07

about sparrows over the years

because of the survey?

The house

1:25:071:25:09

sparrow remains at number one or in

the top ten every year. The numbers

1:25:091:25:14

are plummeting in the UK, so we are

concerned.

When it comes to this

1:25:141:25:19

year, what are the particular

species you might see, which you

1:25:191:25:22

haven't seen before? And why might

that be?

There's been an influx of a

1:25:221:25:27

type of image, which has a massive

beak and crunches on seeds. You

1:25:271:25:31

might also see greenfinches as well.

What's happened weatherwise which

1:25:311:25:37

might help that?

With the fringe

areas a storm that swept quite a few

1:25:371:25:44

people into the country and with the

smaller birds, because it has been a

1:25:441:25:48

mild year last year, there should be

good numbers of them, good survival

1:25:481:25:52

rates.

If you get very lucky, tell

us about some of the most unusual

1:25:521:25:58

birds seen as part of this?

This

includes a beaten, and a massive

1:25:581:26:05

white tailed eagle.

The white tailed

eagle has been spotted?

Yes, flying

1:26:051:26:11

overhead of someone's Arden. --

garden.

Thank you. Have you loaded

1:26:111:26:18

your bird feeders? You don't need to

have one, but it does encourage

1:26:181:26:23

birds to come to the garden. Which

birds have you seen?

Wagtails. Don't

1:26:231:26:27

we? Robbins, who tips.

We sometimes

see starlings.

Let's load the bird

1:26:271:26:37

feeder. It takes place this weekend.

If you can get outside, it's a great

1:26:371:26:43

thing for the kids to do. Spot as

many birds as you can and try to

1:26:431:26:47

work out which ones they are. Huge

amount of information will be

1:26:471:26:50

collected from the activity.

We will be back with you later.

1:26:501:26:54

Thanks very much.

Those bird feeders are good because

1:26:541:26:59

the squirrels can't get to them as

easily.

1:26:591:27:02

Time now for the news,

travel and weather where you are.

1:27:021:30:22

in half an hour.

1:30:221:30:24

Now, though, it's back

to Charlie and Naga.

1:30:241:30:25

Hello.

1:30:321:30:32

This is Breakfast,

with Naga and Charlie.

1:30:321:30:34

We'll have the headlines

in just a moment.

1:30:341:30:36

Coming up on Breakfast today.

1:30:361:30:44

Donald Trump says he's prepared

to apologise for retweeting

1:30:451:30:49

racist videos from a

far-right British Group.

1:30:491:30:50

His comments comes he arrives

in Switzerland to address world

1:30:501:30:52

leaders and confirmes talks

are under way for a trip to the UK

1:30:521:30:56

in the second half of the year.

1:30:561:31:04

I do not want to cause any

difficulty for your country.

Would

1:31:061:31:12

you apologise?

If you said this was

horrible, I would certainly

1:31:121:31:18

apologise if you would like me to do

that. I know nothing about these

1:31:181:31:23

people.

You would disavow yourself

of them?

I know nothing about these

1:31:231:31:29

people.

President Trump being

interviewed by Piers Morgan.

1:31:291:31:38

Most sore throats should be treated

with paracetamol rather

1:31:421:31:44

than antibiotics, according

to new guidance from

1:31:441:31:46

the NHS medicines watchdog.

1:31:461:31:47

The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence,

1:31:471:31:50

NICE, says the drugs

are prescribed in 60% of cases,

1:31:501:31:53

despite being mostly ineffective.

1:31:531:31:55

Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

1:31:551:31:58

agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

1:31:581:32:00

pay inequality at the corporation.

1:32:001:32:02

An independent report on the issue

is due to be published next week.

1:32:021:32:10

More than 40 people have died

after a fire at a hospital in South

1:32:211:32:25

Korea.

1:32:251:32:25

It was thought to have started

in the emergency room

1:32:251:32:28

of the building in the city

of Milyang in the south-east

1:32:281:32:31

of the country.

1:32:311:32:31

Around 100 patients

were inside at the time.

1:32:311:32:34

The Defence Secretary Gavin

Williamson has said Russia

1:32:341:32:36

is drawing up plans to cause

"thousands and thousands

1:32:361:32:38

and thousands of deaths" in Britain

by crippling vital infrastructure.

1:32:381:32:41

In an interview with

The Daily Telegraph,

1:32:411:32:43

he says Moscow is spying on the UK's

energy network in an attempt to spot

1:32:431:32:47

vulnerabilities

1:32:471:32:47

in the country.

1:32:471:32:55

Businesses including

Jamie Oliver's Italian restaurants,

1:32:561:32:58

Hilton Hotels and the shopping

channel QVC have all stopped selling

1:32:581:33:01

some steak products,

after the company that supplied them

1:33:011:33:03

was placed under investigation

by the Food Standards Agency.

1:33:031:33:06

Russel Hume, who also supply meat

to the Wetherspoon's pub chain,

1:33:061:33:09

said there has never been any

suggestion that their products

1:33:091:33:11

caused illness and that the recall

was a "precautionary measure

1:33:111:33:14

because of mislabelling."

1:33:141:33:22

The number of pothole related

breakdowns on British roads

1:33:221:33:25

is rising, with the RAC blaming bad

weather and a lack of investment.

1:33:251:33:28

Councils say they would need

to triple their road repair budgets

1:33:281:33:31

to tackle a vast

backlog of potholes.

1:33:311:33:38

Now, a rare white lion cub

is making its first appearance

1:33:381:33:41

at a zoo in Mexico.

1:33:411:33:43

It looks like a star in the making.

1:33:431:33:49

Very curious, very cute. It enjoys

investigating it. It was that by its

1:33:491:33:59

mother so it is now being

hand-reared. It does not have a name

1:33:591:34:08

and the public is being asked for

suggestions. There are only 300 left

1:34:081:34:18

in the world.

I want that job. Just

a few months.

1:34:181:34:26

a few months. A few bottles, we'd

get on well. A few scratches. We

1:34:261:34:32

would be fine. A bit of a rough and

tumble.

It was an extraordinary game

1:34:321:34:37

of cricket.

1:34:371:34:42

of cricket. They have won the

series, which might explain their

1:34:451:34:48

worst start ever. They have caught

up, though.

1:34:481:34:52

It was all going so well

for England's cricketers

1:34:521:34:54

in their One-Day series

in Australia, but they suffered one

1:34:541:34:57

of the worst starts in their history

in Adelaide this morning

1:34:571:35:00

when they lost their first five

wickets for just eight runs.

1:35:001:35:03

Yes, you heard correctly, eight

runs.

1:35:031:35:05

There was a procession of batsmen

walking on and off the field

1:35:051:35:08

as England at one stage were heading

for their worst-ever one-day score

1:35:081:35:11

but they recovered thanks

to Chris Woakes who made

1:35:111:35:14

a brilliant 78.

1:35:141:35:15

England were all out

for 196 in reply.

1:35:151:35:21

Kyle Edmund. What a story. A bit of

an injury.

We were a bit busy when

1:35:221:35:31

it first started.

He was beaten by

Marin Cilic, but he

1:35:311:35:41

Marin Cilic, but he is in the top

30. He should be seeded by

1:35:411:35:44

Wimbledon.

He has his head held

high.

1:35:441:35:52

In the end it was not to be. Only

the sixth British man in the modern

1:35:531:35:58

era to get to that stage stage of

the Grand Slam. He was beaten in

1:35:581:36:02

straight sets by Marin Cilic in the

Australian Open.

1:36:021:36:07

He thanked the Australian Open,

saying "What an amazing couple

1:36:071:36:10

weeks it's been."

1:36:101:36:10

"Sorry I didn't get the win today,

but thank you for all the support,

1:36:101:36:14

it meant the world to me."

1:36:141:36:16

Yeovil, 21st, taking

on Manchester United.

1:36:161:36:20

The fourth round of the FA Cup.

1:36:201:36:21

They have a new star

with Alexis Sanchez

1:36:211:36:24

making his debut.

1:36:241:36:31

He received a friendly greeting from

Yeovil.

1:36:311:36:33

In a Tweet, they gave him a sneak

preview of the away dressing room.

1:36:331:36:37

They said it was the biggest.

1:36:371:36:45

Looks a bit empty. They joke it is

the biggest in League two.

1:36:481:36:57

Well, back to the current Yeovil

team, and their manager,

1:36:571:37:00

Darren Way, has faced tougher

challenges than Manchester United.

1:37:001:37:02

Nine years ago he was in a car

crash, which meant he couldn't walk

1:37:021:37:06

for a year.

1:37:061:37:07

He's had 29 operations since,

and has been speaking

1:37:071:37:10

to Football Focus' Mark Clemmit.

1:37:101:37:11

At that stage, it was life or death.

1:37:111:37:13

I know what that feels like.

1:37:131:37:15

It has probably helped me deal

with football management.

1:37:151:37:17

It has made me more

resilient, more determined.

1:37:171:37:20

I wake up with the

willpower to succeed.

1:37:201:37:22

Did you think you were going to die?

1:37:221:37:24

Yes.

1:37:241:37:24

A scary feeling, that's for sure.

1:37:241:37:26

I am very appreciative

of what Manchester United

1:37:261:37:28

did for me.

1:37:281:37:29

Now I am manager.

1:37:291:37:30

Against all odds, to get into this

position, it is what dreams

1:37:301:37:33

are made of.

1:37:331:37:41

What an extraordinary story.

1:37:491:37:51

You can see more of that

interview ahead of the game,

1:37:511:37:54

which is on BBC One this evening.

1:37:541:37:55

Coverage starts at 7:30.

1:37:551:37:56

This is mind-boggling. You could get

18 Yeovil Towns for one Alexis

1:37:561:38:07

Sanchez. £18.2 million a year, 18

times what it

1:38:071:38:17

times what it costs Yeovil for their

whole team. Not just a player, 18

1:38:311:38:34

clubs for one player. Probably why

he can afford to keep his two dogs

1:38:341:38:38

in his hotel. Atom and Humber. There

he is.

1:38:381:38:48

he is. "Didier Dogba." Not my pun.

Thanks. See you later on.

1:38:481:38:58

Warnings about the links

between alcohol and cancer should be

1:38:581:39:01

routinely included on drinks labels

in the UK, according

1:39:011:39:04

to health experts.

1:39:041:39:04

The Royal Society for Public Health

says only one in ten people

1:39:041:39:08

are aware of the risk

between drinking and seven different

1:39:081:39:10

types of cancer.

1:39:101:39:18

The group says 10 million people

in the UK are drinking alcohol

1:39:201:39:23

at levels which could be

harmful to their health.

1:39:231:39:26

At the moment, drinks companies only

have to put three warnings

1:39:261:39:29

on their packaging.

1:39:291:39:30

The number of units of alcohol,

a message not to drink

1:39:301:39:33

when pregnant, and a signpost to

the Government's drinkaware website.

1:39:331:39:35

Now, there are calls for bigger,

clearer labels which warn

1:39:351:39:38

of the specific health risks,

the low-risk drinking guidelines

1:39:381:39:40

of no more than 14 units a week

and the dangers of drink driving.

1:39:401:39:44

With us now is Duncan Stephenson

from the Royal Society for Public

1:39:441:39:48

Health.

1:39:481:39:49

Good morning.

Good morning.

Good

morning.

People are familiar with

1:39:491:39:52

the packaging. What do you wanted

look like?

We think there is scope

1:39:521:39:57

to have much more information. And

also to make the information more

1:39:571:40:02

clear. From the research we have

done with consumers, they are

1:40:021:40:07

concerned many of the health

warnings are buried on the back of a

1:40:071:40:12

bottle.

In the picture, a bottle of

wine. Where are the warning signs?

1:40:121:40:16

How big are they? Are they on the

front?

First of all, we want to see

1:40:161:40:24

calorie information on the front of

the bottle. We know 80% of the

1:40:241:40:29

public do not know about the

calories in alcohol. In visible

1:40:291:40:32

calories. It helps. -- Invisible.

And drinking guidelines.

1:40:321:40:43

And drinking guidelines. Back in

2016, two years ago, the Chief

1:40:571:41:00

Medical Officer revised the

guidelines. One in six know you only

1:41:001:41:02

are supposed to drink 14 units a

week. If you look at the bottles on

1:41:021:41:07

the shelves at a supermarket, they

have the old guidelines, three -

1:41:071:41:10

four units. Or they have no

information at all.

Does the public

1:41:101:41:17

can? If you go to get a bottle of

wine, will they even look? -- care.

1:41:171:41:23

There are three obligations already.

I wonder if someone wants to buy a

1:41:231:41:27

bottle

1:41:271:41:37

bottle of wine or whatever, they'll

just buy it. They might be more

1:41:441:41:48

mindful, but the calories... They

will still proceed.

Look at other

1:41:481:41:50

products on the market, food and

tobacco. Alcohol is behind the curve

1:41:501:41:54

in terms of providing information.

Food labels are pretty clear with

1:41:541:41:57

calorie information. There is

anecdotal evidence from supermarkets

1:41:571:42:02

people use them to influence

purchasing behaviour. The same is

1:42:021:42:06

true of tobacco with graphic

warnings. One in four people will

1:42:061:42:11

think twice about smoking as a

result.

Calorie information is

1:42:111:42:13

different... When we talked about

highlighting the links to cancer for

1:42:131:42:19

example, they are separate things.

One is health, one is dietary. The

1:42:191:42:23

links to cancer, why is that not

being absorbed at all?

One in ten

1:42:231:42:30

people do not know about the links.

Where would they find this

1:42:301:42:34

information?

Do you think the wine

industry, the alcohol industry, will

1:42:341:42:39

it be open to this?

We are not

convinced they are. We embarked on

1:42:391:42:44

this research with the drinks

producers to better understand what

1:42:441:42:49

consumers think.

I just want to ask

about pricing. I remember many times

1:42:491:42:56

when successive governments have

talked about unit pricing. They said

1:42:561:43:01

it should be illegal for you to get

water and soft drinks at alcohol

1:43:011:43:09

places. If this is about getting

people to drink less alcohol, that

1:43:091:43:14

is presumably the ultimate goal,

pricing ultimately... What about

1:43:141:43:19

that?

There are three things, the

affordability of alcohol, unit

1:43:191:43:25

pricing taking place in Scotland

from May which is fantastic. We want

1:43:251:43:31

the rest of the UK to adopt that.

There is stuff around the

1:43:311:43:36

acceptability of drinking alcohol.

We have a

1:43:361:43:47

We have a programme called

Communities In Charge of Alcohol in

1:43:471:43:49

Manchester, supporting people,

though no legislation. You need a

1:43:491:43:52

mixture of both legislation and

regulation, and also information,

1:43:521:43:55

you need that to get to the public.

That is what this label label will

1:43:551:43:59

do.

There has been some research

saying they found little public

1:43:591:44:02

interest in it, in labelling drinks.

People are adverse to lots of

1:44:021:44:09

information crammed on a label.

We

would agree with that. We would

1:44:091:44:15

agree the information needs to be

presented in a clear fashion. If you

1:44:151:44:21

look at the pregnancy warning, the

drink-driving warning, it is buried

1:44:211:44:24

on the back. When we did consumer

research, few people noticed it.

1:44:241:44:28

But, yes, there needs to be a menu

of different options available for

1:44:281:44:35

information to the consumer.

Thank

you very much were talking to us.

1:44:351:44:41

From the Royal Society for Public

Health.

1:44:411:44:49

Things are looking a little bit

unsettled through the weekend, but

1:44:501:44:53

today we have a glorious Friday

ahead. A fresh and chilly start to

1:44:531:44:56

the day, but many of us will see

sunshine. This was yesterday in

1:44:561:45:01

Oxfordshire. Some blue sky on offer

today. The reason the weather is

1:45:011:45:07

quiet is because we have this

high-pressure XT and in across the

1:45:071:45:11

country. There are weather fronts

waiting out there in the Atlantic,

1:45:111:45:16

but this morning across Scotland and

Northern Ireland most places dry.

1:45:161:45:21

Chilly and frosty start. A couple of

showers for Aberdeenshire, and a few

1:45:211:45:26

showers down the north-east coast of

England. Many places start the day

1:45:261:45:29

dry as we head south in England and

Wales. A couple of isolated showers

1:45:291:45:36

around the west and east coast.

Further inland it is dry, quite a

1:45:361:45:40

bit of cloud around first thing, but

that cloud will thin and break and

1:45:401:45:46

any mist and fog patches lift away

over the next few hours. So, an

1:45:461:45:49

improving picture. Many of us will

see a return to blue sky and

1:45:491:45:54

sunshine and light winds. So it will

feel pleasant if you have outdoor

1:45:541:45:58

plans. Today temperatures are fairly

typical. About 4-9 degrees. Then

1:45:581:46:04

change into this evening. The rain

working in from the north-west.

1:46:041:46:09

Reindler Northern Ireland, Scotland,

perhaps a bit of snow on the highest

1:46:091:46:15

ground -- rain into Northern

Ireland. Then persistent rain moves

1:46:151:46:19

in from the west. It is the weather

front to start Saturday morning.

1:46:191:46:23

Clearer to the south and east, and

colder. Saturday dominated by the

1:46:231:46:28

low pressure. The centre of the low

pressure quite far to the north of

1:46:281:46:33

the UK. Still windy conditions and

this front has rain, especially

1:46:331:46:37

strong winds to the Northern Isles

and severe gales are possible here.

1:46:371:46:41

It is a breezy day and the band of

rain edges eastwards. It will be

1:46:411:46:46

light and patchy by the time we get

the southern and eastern parts of

1:46:461:46:50

England in the afternoon and it will

be followed by something brighter.

1:46:501:46:53

Sunny spells from the north-west.

Still some scattered showers, but

1:46:531:46:57

temperatures for the most part in

double figures. Then temperatures

1:46:571:47:00

rise into the weekend. On Sunday the

mild air comes in from the

1:47:001:47:05

south-west. A bit of a mixed day on

Sunday. Initially a bit of Reindler

1:47:051:47:09

Northern Ireland, moving north into

central Scotland. A couple of

1:47:091:47:13

showers for Western England and

Wales. Driest towards the east. 13-

1:47:131:47:19

14 degrees. Things staying mild

through the weekend. It is looking

1:47:191:47:23

windy at times. A bit of rain, but

not looking like a complete washout.

1:47:231:47:31

That's something to be pleased

about! Thanks.

1:47:311:47:34

The family of a 13-year-old

who was shot and killed

1:47:341:47:37

after handling an air rifle

want to see tighter controls around

1:47:371:47:40

the type of guns that

killed their son.

1:47:401:47:42

Ben Wragge died in 2016.

1:47:421:47:43

His family want changes in the way

the public perceives air rifles.

1:47:431:47:47

Graham Satchell reports.

1:47:471:47:48

He was a lovely lad.

1:47:481:47:50

Very, very kindhearted.

1:47:501:47:51

Peter Wragge's grandson died

in a tragic accident.

1:47:511:47:56

He was playing with some friends

at a friend's house.

1:47:561:48:00

They got hold of an air rifle.

1:48:001:48:04

It went off.

1:48:041:48:05

Just a terrible tragedy.

1:48:051:48:08

Ben Wragge was just 13 when he died.

1:48:081:48:12

The airgun belonged

to his friend's dad.

1:48:121:48:16

The air guns seem to be

treated as boy's toys,

1:48:161:48:21

but it proves they are lethal

weapons and they need treating

1:48:211:48:24

and looking after as such.

1:48:241:48:32

This is the North

Wales Shooting School.

1:48:331:48:37

Brett Davis the instructor here.

1:48:371:48:38

The death of Ben Wragge has prompted

a review of the rules

1:48:381:48:41

in England and Wales.

1:48:411:48:42

Do you think this is

a dangerous weapon?

1:48:421:48:45

No, I don't think it's a dangerous

weapon in the right hands.

1:48:451:48:48

Anything in the wrong hands

or ill-advised hands could be

1:48:481:48:51

dangerous, just as a knife could be

dangerous in the wrong hands.

1:48:511:48:54

In the shop next door,

air guns for sale.

1:48:541:48:56

The rules?

1:48:561:48:57

You have to be over 18 to buy one

in England and Wales.

1:48:571:49:05

There are restrictions

on where you can use them and it's

1:49:071:49:10

an offence

to let children fire

1:49:101:49:12

them without supervision.

1:49:121:49:12

I think the law we have

works already and I don't

1:49:121:49:15

think we need any more.

1:49:151:49:17

We need to enforce the law

we have and we need

1:49:171:49:20

to get education for young people

and I think that's absolutely

1:49:201:49:23

critical.

1:49:231:49:23

Hundreds and hundreds of air rifles.

1:49:231:49:25

This is Scotland, where

after another tragic death the law

1:49:251:49:27

changed last year.

1:49:271:49:28

You now need a licence

to buy or own one and you

1:49:281:49:32

need to keep them

under lock and key.

1:49:321:49:34

20,000 air guns were handed

in and destroyed in Scotland.

1:49:341:49:36

Around 15,000 were licensed

in the first six months.

1:49:361:49:39

That is held in by the trigger...

1:49:391:49:41

Critics say the new rules

in Scotland penalise the law-abiding

1:49:411:49:43

majority and are disproportionate,

especially as offences involving air

1:49:431:49:46

rifles have been falling

for more than a decade.

1:49:461:49:48

In modern society, there are many

things that are potentially

1:49:481:49:51

dangerous and if we went down

the path of stopping something

1:49:511:49:59

because one person might

not die, I don't think

1:49:591:50:01

we would achieve anything.

1:50:011:50:03

There are so many other

things that are risky.

1:50:031:50:06

Really?

1:50:061:50:06

Yes.

1:50:061:50:06

That's a tough thing to say.

1:50:061:50:10

I think a lot of people would say

it is worth it if we save one life.

1:50:101:50:15

Well, you have to look

at proportionality and merely doing

1:50:151:50:17

that doesn't actually achieve

that proportionality.

1:50:171:50:20

It can't be

a disproportionate response.

1:50:201:50:25

What we're trying to do is stop this

happening to any other families.

1:50:251:50:29

It doesn't matter how

bureaucratic it is, if it saves

1:50:291:50:32

a life, it saves a life.

1:50:321:50:33

And there's the heart

of this debate.

1:50:331:50:35

Is it worth introducing new rules

that may be burdensome for gun

1:50:351:50:38

owners if it saves one life?

1:50:381:50:40

It's for the government

in Westminster to decide.

1:50:401:50:46

Later this morning we'll get

the official figures on how well

1:50:461:50:49

the economy performed last year.

1:50:491:50:56

Ben is at a motorcycle

factory in Leicestershire.

1:50:561:51:01

Good morning. You're a boy with toys

today.

1:51:011:51:10

This is fascinating, looking at how

these things get made. We are at the

1:51:101:51:17

Triumph factory. Manufacturing has

been a real success story this year.

1:51:171:51:21

Later we will get the official

growth figures for the UK this year,

1:51:211:51:25

which will tell us how the economy

fared over the whole year.

1:51:251:51:28

Manufacturing did well, largely

because of the weak pound, which

1:51:281:51:34

means UK manufacturers that sell

overseas could sell products

1:51:341:51:37

cheaper. So all of that has been

good news. Let me run you through

1:51:371:51:41

the good and bad. Any factory has

been a success story and we've also

1:51:411:51:46

seen at employment has risen

sharply. The number of people out of

1:51:461:51:49

work is down. But at the same time

we've also seen that inflation is

1:51:491:51:54

rising quickly, so it might mean we

have less money in our pocket

1:51:541:51:58

because prices are rising for the

things we buy and consume on an

1:51:581:52:01

everyday basis. That has meant

retail sales have struggled quite a

1:52:011:52:05

lot. We are not going to the high

street. We might be buying less

1:52:051:52:09

because we feel we have less money

in our pockets. What happens this

1:52:091:52:13

year and next year, those are the

big questions. Let me introduce you

1:52:131:52:17

to Gaynor, who runs a recruitment

agency in Coventry.

How has the last

1:52:171:52:24

year been? We saw fantastic growth

last year. We had a 20% increase in

1:52:241:52:29

sales, however that was coupled with

the cost of recruiting people within

1:52:291:52:33

the sectors. That rose quite

significantly. By 25%. Therefore we

1:52:331:52:39

were only slightly up year-on-year

in terms of profit.

Why does the

1:52:391:52:44

cost of recruiting someone go up? To

get people to do jobs like this?

1:52:441:52:50

What was experienced over the last

couple of years is people are going

1:52:501:52:54

back to the EU and not coming in the

influx that they used to come in. So

1:52:541:52:58

we don't have the skills base in the

UK because we haven't been running

1:52:581:53:02

apprenticeship schemes and we

haven't got the skills directly from

1:53:021:53:06

them to tap straight into, therefore

we are spending more in terms of

1:53:061:53:10

advertising, recruitment, to get the

skills through the door.

Do you

1:53:101:53:16

worry about what happens next? We

see the growth we've seen, great

1:53:161:53:20

news for the economy, but that

relies on people having to do their

1:53:201:53:23

jobs.

It makes our job as recruiters

so much more difficult.

But we

1:53:231:53:28

always find a way. Thanks very much.

Let me introduce you to a --

1:53:281:53:36

Professor Wang. Last year was good

for most firms, especially

1:53:361:53:40

manufacturers. At lots of questions

at next year.

I feel next year will

1:53:401:53:45

be a challenge, we are set to start

the treaty negotiation with our EU

1:53:451:53:54

partners. Hopefully they will give

us some additional achievement along

1:53:541:53:59

the way and they will clear

uncertainties around Brexit, which

1:53:591:54:05

will give an additional boost to

investors' confidence.

That's the

1:54:051:54:09

good news. What are the worries of a

rise in? A lot of businesses say

1:54:091:54:15

next year would be tough.

We have

been doing well due to the weak

1:54:151:54:20

pound, but the value of the pound is

bouncing back. Looking at the

1:54:201:54:23

exchange rate, between the pound and

the dollar, it has risen to 1.4, up

1:54:231:54:32

from 1.2 last year. So if this trend

continues this means it will make

1:54:321:54:36

our exporting sector a struggle

again because our goods will be more

1:54:361:54:43

expensive.

OK, good to talk to you.

Thank you. That's really the issue

1:54:431:54:48

as far as business is concerned.

Last year remembered this growth

1:54:481:54:54

figures. We are expecting a figure

for the last quarter of about 0.3,

1:54:541:55:00

0.4%. So that means the economy grew

about 0.8%. Not great, but growth is

1:55:001:55:08

growth. It means more of us are in

work and hopefully wages will now

1:55:081:55:12

start rising. But it really is a

story that manufacturers have done

1:55:121:55:18

well. The question is what the new

year will bring as far as the

1:55:181:55:21

economy is concerned and whether the

really important service sector,

1:55:211:55:24

accounting for about three quarters

of our economy, whether it can do as

1:55:241:55:29

well as manufacturing. But pretty

impressive seeing how these things

1:55:291:55:32

are made. Hundreds of these things

roll-out of this factory and are

1:55:321:55:36

sold right around the world. I will

show you more later.

1:55:361:55:41

Is a BBC correspondent allowed to

sit on the bike?

1:55:411:55:46

Yes, but there is a way to get on

it. You will have to bear with me.

1:55:461:55:51

I've got all of my cables caught up.

I have to swing my leg over. I'm not

1:55:511:55:56

going to hit Wendy, the camerawoman.

There we go. Do you think I suit it

1:55:561:56:04

for size? It is probably the only

thing that will fit me in this

1:56:041:56:08

place.

It works! See you later.

1:56:081:56:09

That is a good look.

1:56:091:56:17

Still to come this morning:

1:56:171:56:25

It has been 20 years since Craig

David Chaytor fame and he is now

1:56:251:56:29

back with a new album and he will be

talking to

1:56:291:59:52

in half an hour.

1:59:521:59:53

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:59:531:59:54

Hello this is Breakfast, with

Naga Munchetty and Charlie Stayt.

2:00:152:00:18

Donald Trump says he's prepared

to apologise for retweeting

2:00:182:00:23

racist videos from a far right

British Group

2:00:232:00:26

His comments comes he arrives

in Switzerland to address

2:00:262:00:31

world leaders and confirms talks

are under way for a trip to the UK

2:00:312:00:34

in the second half of the year.

2:00:342:00:37

Good morning it's

Friday 26th January.

2:00:442:00:48

Also this morning -

2:00:482:00:51

Stop prescribing antibiotics

for sore throats -

2:00:512:00:54

the NHS medicines watchdog tells

doctors to use paracetamol instead.

2:00:542:01:00

Four of the BBC's leading male news

2:01:002:01:03

presenters agree to take salary

cuts, following revelations

2:01:032:01:06

about gender pay inequality.

2:01:062:01:12

After Tessa Jowell's powerful

testimony about suffering from brain

2:01:122:01:16

cancer yesterday we reflect on the

emotional atmosphere at Westminster

2:01:162:01:20

with someone who was there. Good

morning, the weak pound has been

2:01:202:01:25

good news for UK manufacturers this

year. It makes their goods cheaper

2:01:252:01:29

overseas, but what about the rest of

the economy? We get the official

2:01:292:01:33

growth forecast later. I will have

the details.

2:01:332:01:40

In sport, one of the worst starts

ever for England's cricketers.

2:01:402:01:42

They lost their first five wickets

for just eight runs,

2:01:422:01:45

against Australia, in Adelaide

in their latest one

2:01:452:01:47

day international.

2:01:472:01:48

They have recovered. Sarah has the

weather.

2:01:482:01:51

Good morning, pretty chilly start

this morning, we have some fog which

2:01:512:01:54

should clear and many of us will

seize on Blue Sky M Sunshine. I'll

2:01:542:01:59

bring you all of the details in

about 15 minutes.

2:01:592:02:03

We will see you then, Sarah. -- sees

some blue skies.

2:02:032:02:12

Good morning.

2:02:122:02:13

First, our main story.

2:02:132:02:14

Donald Trump has said he is prepared

to apologise for retweeting racist

2:02:142:02:17

comments from a far right

British group.

2:02:172:02:18

It comes as Downing Street confirmed

that the American President

2:02:182:02:21

will come to the UK later this year

for a scaled-down working

2:02:212:02:24

trip, without the pomp

and ceremony of a state visit.

2:02:242:02:26

The confirmation came

at the end of a meeting

2:02:262:02:28

between the President

and Theresa May in Davos,

2:02:282:02:30

in which Mr Trump said

he and the Prime Minister

2:02:302:02:33

were "on the same wavelength

in every respect".

2:02:332:02:35

In an interview with ITV,

the President talked

2:02:352:02:36

about his relationship with The UK.

2:02:362:02:38

about his relationship with the UK.

2:02:382:02:39

I don't want to cause any difficulty

for your country, that I can tell

2:02:392:02:42

you.

Can I get an apology out of you

for the retweets? It would go a long

2:02:422:02:46

way.

If you're telling me there are

horrible racist people.

Yeah.

I

2:02:462:02:53

would certainly apologise if you'd

like me to do that. I know nothing

2:02:532:02:55

about that.

Would you disavow

yourself of people like that?

You're

2:02:552:03:01

telling me about these people

because I know nothing about these

2:03:012:03:03

people.

2:03:032:03:06

President Trump -

The Piers Morgan Interview airs this

2:03:062:03:08

Sunday, the 28th January,

at 10pm on ITV1.

2:03:082:03:10

Later today, Mr Trump will adddress

world leaders where he's

2:03:102:03:13

expected to reinforce his

America First economic approach.

2:03:132:03:16

Simon Jack joins us from Davos. Good

morning, Simon.

It is chilly, there,

2:03:162:03:26

isn't it? He got a fairly warm

reception considering there were a

2:03:262:03:29

few noses he put out of joint before

arriving.

Definitely true. It set up

2:03:292:03:35

earlier in the week that everyone

would be booing Donald Trump, but

2:03:352:03:39

that wasn't the case, if you look at

the stock market and world growth

2:03:392:03:41

people think economic lead the world

is doing pretty well, in the view of

2:03:412:03:45

Piers Morgan, quite interesting. He

thinks he's the least racist person

2:03:452:03:48

in the world, he thinks written

first, that far right group, is a

2:03:482:03:53

bit like his own programme of

America first, which is what he sees

2:03:532:03:57

as a very reasonable way to proceed.

He's going to address the conference

2:03:572:04:01

later today and save America's

leading the way, economic growth is

2:04:012:04:05

very good here, world growth is very

good. I think today will be a

2:04:052:04:09

victory lap where he will point to

great economic news and safe isn't

2:04:092:04:13

what I have done great? -- and say

isn't what I have done great?

Simon

2:04:132:04:21

Jack in Davos.

2:04:212:04:23

There's dispute at the heart

of the Government this morning,

2:04:232:04:25

after Downing Street gave a public

rebuke to comments made

2:04:252:04:28

by the Chancellor Philip Hammond in

Davos.

2:04:282:04:29

It comes as the Brexit Secretary,

David Davis, prepares to set

2:04:292:04:32

out his vision for the next stage

of talks about a transition

2:04:322:04:35

period later today.

2:04:352:04:36

Yesterday, Mr Hammond said he hoped

the UK and EU economies will only

2:04:362:04:39

move "very modestly"

apart after Brexit.

2:04:392:04:40

To which a No 10 spokesperson has

said that government plans

2:04:402:04:45

for Brexit "could not be described

as very modest changes."

2:04:452:04:50

Let's talk about this

more with our Political

2:04:502:04:52

Correspondent Leila Nathoo,

who joins us now from Westminster.

2:04:522:05:00

So, it's a he says, we say

situation, which has ramifications

2:05:012:05:03

about what the big message is,

doesn't it?

Yeah, I think there has

2:05:032:05:08

been a kind of truce, if you like,

in the Cabinet over the Brexit

2:05:082:05:11

position. We know there is a wide

range of opinion among senior

2:05:112:05:14

ministers about what they want

Brexit a lot like. It is no secret

2:05:142:05:18

Philip Hammond was on the remaining

side of the argument and advocates a

2:05:182:05:22

close relationship with the EU after

Brexit. But it's telling that on the

2:05:222:05:27

same day we have Philip Hammond

making those comments we have the

2:05:272:05:30

other side of the spectrum of the

Tory party Jacob Rees-Mogg,

2:05:302:05:33

prominent backbencher and a leader

of the group of Tory Eurosceptic

2:05:332:05:37

MPs, also strongly criticising the

government for a lack of clarity and

2:05:372:05:40

a lack of vision on Brexit, saying

there needs to be a stronger message

2:05:402:05:44

and saying the EU is dictating all

the terms and talking about the risk

2:05:442:05:48

of squandering the benefits of

Brexit as he sees it. We see this

2:05:482:05:52

periodic eruption of a difference of

opinion with the government, and

2:05:522:05:56

it's very clear that at this stage

in their David Davis today will make

2:05:562:05:59

a speech about what he wants to see

of the transition period, it is

2:05:592:06:03

clear that at home there is still no

consensus about what the final

2:06:032:06:06

Brexit end-stage will look like.

Leila Nathoo, for the moment, thank

2:06:062:06:10

you.

2:06:102:06:11

Most sore throats should be

treated with paracetamol

2:06:112:06:13

rather than antibiotics,

according to new guidance

2:06:132:06:15

from the NHS medicines watchdog.

2:06:152:06:17

The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence - Nice -

2:06:172:06:20

says the drugs are prescribed in 60%

of cases, despite being

2:06:202:06:23

mostly ineffective.

2:06:232:06:24

Here's our Health

Correspondent Dominic Hughes.

2:06:242:06:27

The overuse of antibiotics

is leading to the development

2:06:272:06:29

of bacteria resistant

to these life-saving drugs.

2:06:292:06:33

Leading health experts warn this

poses a serious threat to the UK.

2:06:332:06:39

If we lose the ability to fight

infection, common medical procedures

2:06:392:06:44

such as Cesarean sections and cancer

treatments could become too risky.

2:06:442:06:48

Prescribing antibiotics to treat

a sore throat is a prime example

2:06:482:06:51

of the way they can be misused.

2:06:512:06:55

Sore throats account for nearly one

in four of GP appointments in the UK

2:06:552:06:59

related to infections

of the lungs and airways.

2:06:592:07:01

Research suggests that

in 60% of those cases,

2:07:012:07:04

antibiotics are prescribed.

2:07:042:07:07

But most sore throats are caused

by a viral infection,

2:07:072:07:10

on which antibiotics

will have no effect.

2:07:102:07:14

We have become a bit, umm,

acclimatised to thinking

2:07:142:07:21

that we need an antibiotic whenever

we have got something wrong with us.

2:07:212:07:25

And we don't.

2:07:252:07:28

We just have to be re-educated,

I suppose, to preserve the use

2:07:282:07:31

of antibiotics for really

serious infections.

2:07:312:07:34

The latest advice from the NHS

Medicines Watchdog reminds doctors

2:07:342:07:42

and nurses that most sore throats

will get better within a week,

2:07:432:07:46

and only the most serious bacterial

infections need antibiotics.

2:07:462:07:48

Most patients are best advised

to drink plenty of fluids,

2:07:482:07:50

and to take paracetamol or Ibuprofen

to help with pain relief.

2:07:502:07:53

Dominic Hughes, BBC News.

2:07:532:08:01

Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

2:08:062:08:09

agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

2:08:092:08:11

pay inequality at the corporation.

2:08:112:08:13

Last year revelations about the pay

for on-air talent earning more

2:08:132:08:19

than £150,000 prompted calls

for salaries to be reviewed.

2:08:192:08:21

An independent report on the issue

of pay inequality at the BBC is due

2:08:212:08:24

to be published next week.

2:08:242:08:28

Defence Secretary Gavin Williamson

said Russia is drawing up plans to

2:08:282:08:33

cripple thousands of people in the

UK. He says Russia is spying on the

2:08:332:08:44

UK to spot vulnerabilities.

2:08:442:08:45

Businesses including

Jamie Oliver's Italian restuarants,

2:08:452:08:47

Hilton Hotels and the shopping

channel QVC have all stopped selling

2:08:472:08:49

some steak products,

after the company that

2:08:492:08:51

supplied them

was placed under investigation

2:08:512:08:52

by the Food Standards Agency.

2:08:522:08:54

Russel Hume,

which also supplies meat

2:08:542:08:57

to the Wetherspoon's pub chain,

said there has never been any

2:08:572:09:00

suggestion that its products caused

illness and that the recall

2:09:002:09:02

was a "precautionary measure

because of mislabelling".

2:09:022:09:10

More than 40 people have died after

a fire in hospital in South Korea.

2:09:102:09:14

It was thought to have started in

the emergency room of the building

2:09:142:09:18

in the south-east of the country.

Around 100 patients were inside at

2:09:182:09:23

the time.

2:09:232:09:27

The number of pot-hole related

breakdowns on British roads

2:09:272:09:29

is rising, with the RAC blaming bad

weather and a lack of investment.

2:09:292:09:32

Councils say they would need

to triple their road repair

2:09:322:09:35

budgets to tackle a vast

backlog of potholes.

2:09:352:09:36

Our Transport correspondent

Victoria Fritz has more.

2:09:362:09:41

They can cost hundreds

of pounds' worth of damage

2:09:412:09:43

and although councils fill

in two million potholes

2:09:432:09:48

a year, it seems like Britain's

holes are crumbling faster they then

2:09:482:09:51

can be repaired.

2:09:512:09:52

It don't take a lot to damage a car.

2:09:522:09:54

You try to avoid them, you can't.

2:09:542:09:56

You've only got to drive around this

borough and you'll find

2:09:562:10:01

loads everywhere.

2:10:012:10:02

I take my children to school

and come across quite a few potholes

2:10:022:10:05

on the way, which is a bit

dangerous with the car.

2:10:052:10:07

It seems like after the horrible

weather when you have ice or really

2:10:072:10:11

cold weather, they all

we seem to appear.

2:10:112:10:12

Normally potholes develop

after wet and cold weather,

2:10:122:10:14

but the RAC says it's seeing

the number of breakdowns caused

2:10:142:10:17

by driving in poor roads increase,

regardless of the season.

2:10:172:10:20

RAC patrols attended 2,830

potholes related breakdowns

2:10:202:10:25

between October and

December of last year.

2:10:252:10:29

That's 11% more than the same

period the year before.

2:10:292:10:34

Vehicles they attended typically

suffered damaged shock absorbers,

2:10:342:10:36

broken suspension springs

and punctured wheels.

2:10:362:10:40

Our local roads have suffered

from years of underinvestment

2:10:402:10:43

and we would like to see ring-fence

funding put in place so councils can

2:10:432:10:47

plan their work appropriately

and really sort out the problem once

2:10:472:10:49

and for all.

2:10:492:10:50

The government says it's investing

£23 billion to increase capacity

2:10:502:10:53

and improve road journeys.

2:10:532:10:57

The majority of that will go

on major roads and motorways.

2:10:572:10:59

With budgets under increasing

strain, the pressure is mounting

2:10:592:11:01

on councils to plug the gaps

in local roads where most

2:11:012:11:04

journeys begin or end.

2:11:042:11:12

There were unprecedented scenes in

the House of Lords yesterday when

2:11:142:11:17

Baroness Tessa Jowell received a

standing ovation for an impassioned

2:11:172:11:22

speech about cancer care.

2:11:222:11:25

The former Culture Secretary

was diagnosed with a brain tumour

2:11:252:11:28

last year, and she told her story

to her fellow peers.

2:11:282:11:30

I got into a taxi but I couldn't

speak. I had two powerful seizures.

2:11:302:11:38

I was taken to hospital. Two days

later I was told that I had a brain

2:11:382:11:44

Schumer. Less than 2% of Cancer

Research UK and then is spent on

2:11:442:11:51

brain tumours and no new vital drugs

have been developed in the last 15

2:11:512:12:00

years. So many cancer patients

collaborate and support each other

2:12:002:12:05

everyday. They create that community

of love and determination that they

2:12:052:12:12

find each other every day. All we

now ask is that doctors and health

2:12:122:12:21

systems learn to do the same, and

for us to work together. To learn

2:12:212:12:26

from each other. In the end, what

gives a life meaning is not only how

2:12:262:12:37

it is lived but how it draws to a

close. I hope that this debate will

2:12:372:12:47

give hope to other cancer patients

like me, so that we can live well

2:12:472:12:54

together with cancer, not just dying

of it. All of us for longer. Thank

2:12:542:13:06

you.

APPLAUSE

2:13:062:13:12

Sitting on the row in front

of Baroness Jowell in the Lords

2:13:192:13:22

yesterday was Lord Adonis,

a former cabinet colleague

2:13:222:13:23

in the Labour Government.

2:13:232:13:25

He joins us now from Westminster

2:13:252:13:27

Thank you for your time this

morning. Those people who did not

2:13:272:13:31

see it happening yesterday, you were

in the chamber and there was a lot

2:13:312:13:34

of emotion and I know you were

sitting very close to Tessa Jowell.

2:13:342:13:39

Tell us about that moment and what

it felt like in the chamber.

It's

2:13:392:13:43

the most amazing scene I've ever

experienced in the House of Lords

2:13:432:13:45

and I've been there for 13 years.

It's not just that Tessa is a very

2:13:452:13:50

great friend of so many of us in the

Lords, but that has speech was so

2:13:502:13:53

powerful and so moving, and she

talked about her inexperience

2:13:532:13:58

suffering from a brain tumour and

how she was diagnosed and all the

2:13:582:14:01

treatment she has gone through

since, and what she has done with

2:14:012:14:04

others who are battling cancer in

the same way. Just sort of waves of

2:14:042:14:09

emotion swept over the house on all

sides, and as you saw in the clip,

2:14:092:14:14

at the end, something that has never

happened in the Lords before took

2:14:142:14:17

place, which was a standing ovation.

The Lords, I assure you, is one of

2:14:172:14:23

the most subdued assemblies in the

world. Some mumbling is all you

2:14:232:14:31

usually get but she aroused

affection and emotion and what she

2:14:312:14:36

said at the end about hope and what

we all need to do, for those who

2:14:362:14:43

have any share in responsibility of

these matters is to focus on

2:14:432:14:46

research, improve survival rates,

improve care for those who are

2:14:462:14:49

suffering so that more people who

are battling cancer have hope. It is

2:14:492:14:54

just unbelievably moving and many of

us were in tears afterwards.

Lord

2:14:542:15:00

Adonis, you have referenced it

already and quite a few people have

2:15:002:15:02

made the point that there is clearly

a lot of personal emotion for those

2:15:022:15:06

who have known her a long time. Huge

respect amongst her colleagues. But

2:15:062:15:10

even during that speech, her message

was in many ways not so much about

2:15:102:15:14

her own situation, it was more about

the greater situation, others who

2:15:142:15:19

might be in a similar circumstance.

Tessa always thinks of others. I

2:15:192:15:25

have personal experience of this,

she's been a very close personal

2:15:252:15:27

friend of mine for many years and

helped me enormously personally, and

2:15:272:15:31

as I look around the chamber of the

Lords and the gallery, because there

2:15:312:15:35

were hundreds of her friends in the

gallery watching this debate, I

2:15:352:15:38

could just go through all those who

I knew had been touched by her

2:15:382:15:43

personally. That was very moving.

Watches had also which was so

2:15:432:15:47

powerful, and I know will resonate

far and wide, and I imagine across

2:15:472:15:50

the world, not just in this country,

this big message to cancer sufferers

2:15:502:15:54

that you are not alone, you're part

of a community of those going

2:15:542:15:57

through similar experiences, that

huge amounts is being invested in

2:15:572:16:01

Cancer Research UK. We need make

more progress on it. Brain tumours,

2:16:012:16:06

which are particularly horrific, and

we haven't made nearly enough

2:16:062:16:09

progress in recent years, we all

need to stick together, and if we do

2:16:092:16:13

so and we really focus then we can

improve the lot of those who have to

2:16:132:16:17

go through this experience is.

2:16:172:16:18

If we do so and we really focus, we

can improve a lot of those who have

2:16:182:16:18

to go through these experiences.

2:16:182:16:19

can improve a lot of those who have

to

Sometimes, it is true,

2:16:192:16:22

politicians at the moment come in

for a lot of stick map and there

2:16:222:16:27

is... The atmosphere around a lot of

discussions around politics,

2:16:272:16:31

personally or otherwise, at the

moment can be quite toxic, it is a

2:16:312:16:35

moment, you reflected on that in

your first answer, sometimes, there

2:16:352:16:38

are some times when bigger things

come to the fore and this felt were

2:16:382:16:42

like one of those moments.

What was

so striking about the debate, it

2:16:422:16:49

followed after Tessa Jowell's Beach,

was that peers from all sides of the

2:16:492:16:53

house, irrespective of party, all

expressed deep friendship and

2:16:532:16:58

kinship with Tessa -- it followed

after Tessa Jowell's speech. You

2:16:582:17:06

would not have known which party was

which. And, Jeremy Hunt, Health

2:17:062:17:11

Secretary, sat in the chamber for

the whole of the debate, not a

2:17:112:17:14

member of the House of Lords, but

sat there all the way through, the

2:17:142:17:17

health minister, Lord O'Shaughnessy,

make it very moving speech in which

2:17:172:17:24

he said at the end that hope was the

great theme that had come out of the

2:17:242:17:29

speech. Something that touched us

all, is youngest daughter was called

2:17:292:17:33

Hope, and he will think of what she

said every day after.

Lord Adonis,

2:17:332:17:39

thank you very much for your

reflections. Tessa Jowell's speech

2:17:392:17:45

in the House of Lords yesterday.

2:17:452:17:49

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

2:17:492:17:50

The main stories this morning:

2:17:502:17:52

Donald Trump says that he is

prepared to apologise for retweeting

2:17:522:17:55

racist videos from British far right

groups.

2:17:552:18:04

groups. -- from a British far right

group. Doctors are told to stop

2:18:042:18:06

prescribing antibiotics for sore

throats - and recommend painkillers

2:18:062:18:08

like paracetamol instead.

2:18:082:18:12

Yesterday we enjoy it a little bit

of sunshine, a little glimpse of it,

2:18:122:18:15

not sure if there is much in the

forecast! Sarah has the answers.

2:18:152:18:23

Things looking mixed, fairly

unsubtle through the weekend, for

2:18:232:18:26

today, most of us should see a

little bit of sunshine. Mist and fog

2:18:262:18:31

around to start the day, chilly

start to things. East Sussex here,

2:18:312:18:35

captured by one of our weather

watchers. A lot of dry weather, an

2:18:352:18:39

area of high pressure to the

south-west, just extending across

2:18:392:18:43

the UK today, keeping things pretty

quiet, before the weather fronts

2:18:432:18:47

move in from the Atlantic. Any mist

and fog should clear away, isolated

2:18:472:18:52

showers around some of the coast but

most places staying dry, showers

2:18:522:18:57

fading away, and the cloud across

central and eastern parts, thinning

2:18:572:19:00

and breaking. Light wind, sunshine,

Scotland and Northern Ireland, the

2:19:002:19:07

sunshine should turn hazier, as

cloud creeps in. Temperatures around

2:19:072:19:12

four to 7 degrees, and across

England and Wales, dry, bright

2:19:122:19:15

weather on the cards, with light

wind and temperatures fairly

2:19:152:19:20

typical, seven to 9 degrees, should

feel pretty pleasant. Patchy cloud

2:19:202:19:25

out there, longer spells of sunshine

developing later in the afternoon

2:19:252:19:28

across central and south-eastern

parts of England. Later on today we

2:19:282:19:32

will see rain arriving from the

North West, into this evening for

2:19:322:19:36

Northern Ireland and Scotland,

things turned cloudy, windy, with

2:19:362:19:39

outbreaks of rain. More persistent

rain rolling in from the West during

2:19:392:19:43

the early hours of Saturday morning.

East-West split, care and chilly

2:19:432:19:48

across the South and East, further

north and west looking milder,

2:19:482:19:52

cloudy, with rain and wind. Saturday

weather dominated by low pressure,

2:19:522:19:57

sitting up to the north of the UK.

Trailing weather front bringing wet

2:19:572:20:00

and windy weather through the day.

Particularly windy towards the

2:20:002:20:04

Northern Isles, severe gales, windy

as well across Scotland, breezy

2:20:042:20:11

further south, with rain pushing

east. Quite light and patchy by the

2:20:112:20:14

time it reaches southern and eastern

parts of England, and will be

2:20:142:20:18

followed by brighter conditions, but

also blustery showers heading in

2:20:182:20:22

from the North West. Temperatures in

double figures on Saturday, mild air

2:20:222:20:25

continues to plough in from the

south-west as we head into the

2:20:252:20:29

second half of the weekend. Sunday

is going to be a particularly mild

2:20:292:20:33

day, there will be rain in the

north, probably for Northern

2:20:332:20:36

Ireland, pushing through central

Scotland. If you showers further

2:20:362:20:40

south. Many places staying dry, mild

and breezy. Temperatures up to 13,

2:20:402:20:46

14 degrees on Sunday. Through the

weekend, things staying pretty mild

2:20:462:20:50

for all of us it will be quite

windy, with some rain, particularly

2:20:502:20:55

during Saturday. Most places should

sing a little bit of dry and

2:20:552:21:00

brighter weather too. Not not

entirely bad

2:21:002:21:05

weather for bird-watching!

2:21:052:21:12

For nearly 40 years,

the RSPB has been encouraging us

2:21:142:21:16

to venture out into our gardens

and count the birds that visit

2:21:162:21:19

so we get a snapshot

of the UK bird population.

2:21:192:21:22

This weekend, the Big Garden

Birdwatch returns with more

2:21:222:21:24

than half a million people set

to take part, including one

2:21:242:21:26

family in Cambridgeshire.

2:21:262:21:27

Breakfast's Tim Muffitt

is with them this morning.

2:21:272:21:29

The point about this, you don't have

two be in some extraordinary

2:21:292:21:32

location, you can be in your back

garden and take part!

Exactly, get

2:21:322:21:35

outside, into a garden, if you have

got one, and open space, and observe

2:21:352:21:40

birds for an hour, that is the idea

of the big garden Bird watch, 39

2:21:402:21:46

years, the worlds biggest wildlife

survey. We have some people getting

2:21:462:21:50

ready for it, Emma is with Nora and

Woody. You have a beatable drawing

2:21:502:21:56

of the Kingfisher.

My favourite bird

is a robin.

Loading up the bird

2:21:562:22:05

figures, this information collated

from the big garden bird watch has

2:22:052:22:08

really been useful for

ornithologists and conservationist

2:22:082:22:10

's. How big a deal is it?

It is

huge, huge number of people taking

2:22:102:22:17

part, half a million people go out

each year and into their garden and

2:22:172:22:21

see what they can see.

Last year

what was the main finding, what was

2:22:212:22:24

the most popular bird?

The house

sparrow, it has been at number one

2:22:242:22:29

for a long time, but we know there

is real trouble, huge declines over

2:22:292:22:32

the last few decades.

What

information have you gleaned which

2:22:322:22:37

has helped our understanding of

sparrows and the challenges they

2:22:372:22:39

face?

We know that sparrows need

thick hedges to nest in, insects to

2:22:392:22:45

feed their chicks over spring and

summer, in winter we can help by

2:22:452:22:48

putting out food like this.

This

year, what are the more unusual

2:22:482:22:54

species that you might find, and why

might that be? I gather that the

2:22:542:22:58

weather has been different?

Weather

is always an interesting factor,

2:22:582:23:02

huge influx of the giant French,

that came in autumn, still lingering

2:23:022:23:07

around, we may get some popping up

in garden. It is like a parrot,

2:23:072:23:11

almost, they hawfinch and a lot of

the smaller birds, good breeding

2:23:112:23:19

seasons.

Are those birds easy to

identify?

2:23:192:23:31

identify?

We have a pack which can

help people identify birds like

2:23:312:23:34

bluetits, which are very popular.

You may get a one in a million spot,

2:23:342:23:39

really unusual birds, that you see

in garden sometimes, what might they

2:23:392:23:42

be? We have had a bit turn, which is

normally popping up in reedbeds, and

2:23:422:23:49

white tailed eagles, 8-foot

wingspan, flying barn door, that has

2:23:492:23:55

been in gardens in Scotland.

That is

its nickname, it is a massive bird.

2:23:552:24:00

You probably will not see it unless

you are in the most most Ramon parts

2:24:002:24:08

of Scotland.

Why do you think this

is a good idea, what do the kids get

2:24:082:24:11

from it?

I think it is really

important to encourage children to

2:24:112:24:16

be into nature and have an interest

in what is around them, by taking

2:24:162:24:19

part in the big garden word botch --

bird-watcher, it is fantastic.

You

2:24:192:24:26

have more unusual ones here... What

are you hoping to spot? The ideal

2:24:262:24:30

spot?

We would like to see a robin,

we have one in the garden, also a

2:24:302:24:37

wagtail, whether it will turn up in

the hour, you never know what you

2:24:372:24:41

are going to get.

Shall we load the

bird feeder, let's go over there,

2:24:412:24:44

Jamie, come with us, certain types

of feeds that can encourage

2:24:442:24:49

particular types of bird, what

should you put out if you have a

2:24:492:24:53

bird?

Sunflower seeds are really

good, for bluetits and finches. We

2:24:532:24:57

have some seeds that are really

useful, tiny little black seeds,

2:24:572:25:01

Niger seeds. And fat balls. When

they need layers of fat, these are

2:25:012:25:09

very important.

Could this be a good

year for the information and the

2:25:092:25:16

data you collect?

If we get a chilly

weekend, birds will come here in big

2:25:162:25:19

numbers. So it could be an

interesting one.

Fingers crossed, if

2:25:192:25:25

you are taking part in the big

garden bird watch, best of luck, and

2:25:252:25:28

you are doing a very useful thing,

because a lot of useful information

2:25:282:25:31

has been gathered to help us

understand the challenges that birds

2:25:312:25:36

face. Are you excited?

CHEERING

We saw some starlings earlier...

We

2:25:362:25:41

will let you know how we get on.

I

had to say, watching closely, I

2:25:412:25:46

don't think during all the time you

have been speaking we have seen a

2:25:462:25:49

single bird, have you seen any?

We

have seen starlings. Earlier. We

2:25:492:25:54

heard them as well. The hour they

will be watching, has not come about

2:25:542:26:01

yet, so it doesn't matter.

Course it

doesn't, of course it doesn't.

2:26:012:26:06

Charlie, you have been picking

holes, you have just been picking

2:26:062:26:09

holes! Look out for the birds,

looked down at the moment, talking

2:26:092:26:13

about potholes, we have been talking

about complaints that they have not

2:26:132:26:16

been

2:26:162:26:16

filled in with enough. There is a

backlog of potholes to be filled in,

2:26:162:26:21

lots of you have been commenting on

this this morning, thank you for

2:26:212:26:25

getting in touch. Jane says,

potholes are extremely dangerous for

2:26:252:26:30

cyclists, unfortunately this brings

up another concern for them, car

2:26:302:26:33

drivers, when trying to avoid a

pothole, often do not give the

2:26:332:26:37

cyclist enough space. It is an issue

that gets people going, John in

2:26:372:26:42

Cumbria, trailing a new type of

tarmac, plastic pellets added to it,

2:26:422:26:46

makes it more durable. Longer

lasting.

2:26:462:26:56

lasting. We talk about this quite a

lot on the programme, and we will

2:26:562:26:59

continue to do

2:26:592:30:18

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

2:30:182:30:20

Now though it's back

to Charlie and Naga.

2:30:202:30:22

Bye for now.

2:30:222:30:27

Hello, this is Breakfast with

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

2:30:272:30:30

Good morning.

2:30:302:30:31

First, our main story.

2:30:312:30:32

Donald Trump has said he is prepared

to apologise for retweeting racist

2:30:322:30:35

comments from a far right

British group.

2:30:352:30:37

It comes as Downing Street confirmed

that the American President

2:30:372:30:39

will come to the UK later this year

for a scaled-down working

2:30:392:30:42

trip, without the pomp

and ceremony of a state visit.

2:30:422:30:46

The confirmation came at the end

of a meeting between the President

2:30:462:30:49

and Theresa May in Davos,

in which Mr Trump said

2:30:492:30:51

he and the Prime Minister

were "on the same wavelength

2:30:512:30:53

in every respect".

2:30:532:30:55

In an interview with ITV,

the President talked

2:30:552:30:56

about his relationship with The UK.

2:30:562:30:59

I don't want to cause any difficulty

for your country, that I can tell

2:31:012:31:06

you...

Can I get an apology for the

retweets? It would go a long way

2:31:062:31:11

Here is what is fair, if you are

telling me there are horrible racist

2:31:112:31:17

people I would certainly apologise

if you would like me to do that, I

2:31:172:31:21

know nothing about them.

You would

disavow yourself with people like

2:31:212:31:25

that

You are telling me about these

people, I know nothing about these

2:31:252:31:29

people.

2:31:292:31:29

people.

2:31:292:31:30

'President Trump -

The Piers Morgan Interview' airs

2:31:302:31:32

this Sunday, the 28th January,

at 10pm on ITV1.

2:31:322:31:38

Most sore throats should be

treated with paracetamol

2:31:382:31:40

rather than antibiotics,

according to new guidance

2:31:402:31:42

from the NHS medicines watchdog.

2:31:422:31:44

The National Institute for Health

and Care Excellence - or NICE -

2:31:442:31:46

says the drugs are prescribed in 60

per cent of cases,

2:31:462:31:49

despite being mostly ineffective.

2:31:492:31:50

Doctors say the condition usually

clears up within a week.

2:31:502:31:57

Several of the BBC's leading male

news presenters and journalists have

2:31:572:32:00

agreed to take salary cuts,

following revelations about gender

2:32:002:32:02

pay inequality at the corporation.

2:32:022:32:03

The decision by Huw Edwards,

Jeremy Vine, John Humphreys

2:32:032:32:05

and Jon Sopel follows last year's

revelations about the pay

2:32:052:32:08

for on-air talent earning more

than 150-thousand pounds,

2:32:082:32:10

which prompted calls

for salaries to be reviewed.

2:32:102:32:12

An independent report on the issue

of pay inequality at the BBC is due

2:32:122:32:15

to be published next week.

2:32:152:32:23

The Chancellor was speaking at the

World Economic Forum, Number Ten

2:32:342:32:37

responded by saying it wants a deep

and special economic partnership

2:32:372:32:41

with the EU, after leaving. But the

changes in the relationship would

2:32:412:32:45

not be described as very modest.

2:32:452:32:50

The Defence Secretary Gavin

Williamson has said Russia

2:32:502:32:52

is drawing up plans to cause

"thousands and thousands

2:32:522:32:54

and thousands of deaths" in Britain

by crippling vital infrastructure.

2:32:542:32:56

In an interview with

the Daily Telegraph he says Moscow

2:32:562:32:59

is spying on the UK's energy

network in an attempt

2:32:592:33:01

to spot vulnerabilities.

2:33:012:33:09

There's been a rise in the number

of cars needing to be repaired

2:33:092:33:12

because of damage sustained whilst

driving over potholes.

2:33:122:33:14

The RAC says the increasing number

of potholes on our roads

2:33:142:33:17

are due to bad weather

and a lack of investment.

2:33:172:33:19

The government says £23 billion

is being invested

2:33:192:33:26

Some cute pictures for you. A rare

white lion cub making its first

2:33:262:33:31

appearance at a a zoo? Mexico,

proving to be a star. It

2:33:312:33:36

appearance at a a zoo? Mexico,

proving to be a star. It is curious,

2:33:362:33:38

not camera-shy at all and is

enjoying investigating its surround,

2:33:382:33:43

we don't know if it a boy or girl

yet. Born in October, rejected by

2:33:432:33:47

its mother. It doesn't have a name

either. Children in the zoo who

2:33:472:33:52

visit the zoo are being asked for

suggestions, there are only round

2:33:522:33:57

300 white lions in the world.

2:33:572:34:07

Still to come on the programme.

# Took her for a drink on Tuesday

2:34:072:34:14

had beener... ... #

2:34:142:34:19

Still to come this morning,

it's 20 years since Craig

2:34:192:34:21

David shot to fame.

2:34:212:34:22

After a few years away,

he's back with a new album.

2:34:222:34:25

He'll be here in a few minutes.

2:34:252:34:26

UK manufacturing had

it's strongest year

2:34:262:34:28

UK manufacturing had

its strongest year

2:34:282:34:29

in a decade in 2017.

2:34:292:34:30

Ben is at the Triumph

motorcycle factory looking

2:34:302:34:32

at the prospects for this year

2:34:322:34:34

And after 9am, we'll

meet Wendy, who's memoir

2:34:342:34:41

And after 9am, we'll

meet Wendy, whose memoir

2:34:412:34:42

'Somebody I Used To Know',

reflects on her life

2:34:422:34:45

since being diagnosed

with early on-set dementia.

2:34:452:34:46

All that still to come.

2:34:462:34:47

But first Mike's

here with the sport.

2:34:472:34:51

Did I see you doing dad dancing to

Craig David? Hopefully you weren't

2:34:512:34:57

watching. Dad dancing! That is a bit

mean. I don't know what it was, but

2:34:572:35:04

it caught my eye. When Craig David

is on later you can dance in the

2:35:042:35:08

background. I was a fan and my

daughters are now. You rant -- want

2:35:082:35:13

me dancing in the background?

We are talking tennis.

2:35:132:35:19

We are talking tennis.

2:35:192:35:21

Despite his defeat, Kyle Edmund,

will now be in the world's top 30,

2:35:212:35:26

and will soon replace the injured

Andy Murray as British number one.

2:35:262:35:29

Now though, in Melbourne,

attention has turned

2:35:292:35:31

to the second semi-final,

and it's the great Roger Federer,

2:35:312:35:33

the 19-time grand slam winner,

against another surprise of this

2:35:332:35:35

tournament, Hyeon Chung.

2:35:352:35:41

It's the furthest a Korean

player has ever gone,

2:35:412:35:43

and he did knock out

Novak Djockovich.

2:35:432:35:45

But Federer has

been back to his best,

2:35:452:35:47

and hasn't as yet dropped

a set in this tournament.

2:35:472:35:50

You can keep up to date with that

Federer match on Five Live Extra

2:35:502:35:54

and the sport website this morning.

2:35:542:35:55

Well, now, if we travel

west from Melbourne,

2:35:552:35:57

along south Australia's

coastline, some 440 miles,

2:35:572:35:59

past their own Dartmoor

and Mount Gambier

2:35:592:36:01

and Kangaroo Island,

we get to Adedaide, where England's

2:36:012:36:03

cricketers have been involved

in the most extraordinary

2:36:032:36:04

match this morning.

2:36:042:36:09

England made a horrendous start -

one of the worst in their history

2:36:092:36:12

as they lost their first five

batsmen for just eight runs.

2:36:122:36:15

Yes - eight runs - but a brilliant

78 from Chris Woakes rescued

2:36:152:36:18

the innings, and meant England

were able to reach 196 all out.

2:36:182:36:21

Still a poor total, but a lot better

than it might have been.

2:36:212:36:26

Australia are going well on 68-2.

2:36:262:36:34

Australia are going well on 70-3.

2:36:342:36:36

That poor start looks like costing

England who at least have

2:36:362:36:38

already won the series.

2:36:382:36:43

FA Cup 4th round this weekend.

2:36:432:36:45

Tonight on BBC One,

Yeovil of League Two

2:36:452:36:48

host Manchester United,

with new star signing,

2:36:482:36:51

Alexis Sanchez who is worth

on his own 18 Yeovil

2:36:512:36:54

towns.

2:36:542:36:57

He is set to earn over

£18 million a year.

2:36:572:37:00

18 times the annual wage bill

of the whole Yeovil squad.

2:37:002:37:08

That figure means he can keep his

two dogs in luxury at their hotel in

2:37:112:37:15

Manchester. What accent was that? I

think it was a Monty Python one. His

2:37:152:37:24

two dogs, Atom and Humber. I wonder

if they will be stay travelling with

2:37:242:37:29

him to Yeovil. They have their own

shirts. It is like an entourage.

2:37:292:37:36

Great fun, bounding round, and there

is a few puns in the paper. One of

2:37:362:37:43

Manchester. What accent was that? I

think it was a Monty Python one. His

2:37:432:37:46

two dogs, Atom and Humber. I wonder

if they will be stay travelling with

2:37:462:37:48

him to Yeovil. They have their own

shirts. It is like an entourage.

2:37:482:37:51

Great fun, bounding round, and there

is a few puns in the paper. One of

2:37:512:37:54

the dogs is saying "I wish I had

signed for Pup Guardiola."

2:37:542:37:56

# Do I look like Didier Drogba."

Yes, so that is live on BBC One

2:37:562:37:59

tonight. See if the dogs are there

and if Sanchez can be worth 18 times

2:37:592:38:05

the whole Yeovil Town squad.

2:38:052:38:11

the whole Yeovil Town squad. I

reckon your next guest might be

2:38:122:38:13

following. You don't want me to stay

round and do some dad dancing. Do it

2:38:132:38:18

in the background. You will enjoy

it.

2:38:182:38:23

Craig David had his first chart hit

at just 19 and become synomous

2:38:232:38:26

with UK garage and R&B

in the late 90s.

2:38:262:38:28

But, as music tastes changed,

it's fair to say Craig had

2:38:282:38:31

a lull in his career.

2:38:312:38:32

But in the last 18 months,

his career has exploded again -

2:38:322:38:35

becoming even more successful

now than before.

2:38:352:38:36

He's here with his brand new album,

but first let's rewind

2:38:362:38:41

some of his old music.

2:38:412:38:49

# Inter selecta

2:38:582:39:00

# Can you fill me in

2:39:002:39:04

# Saying why were you creeping

around late last night

2:39:042:39:09

# Why did I see two shadows moving

in your bedroom light

2:39:092:39:12

# Now you're dressed in black

2:39:122:39:13

# When I left you

were dressed in white

2:39:132:39:16

# Can you fill me in?

2:39:162:39:18

# Just call me, call me

2:39:182:39:19

# Monday

2:39:192:39:21

# Took her for a drink on Tuesday

2:39:212:39:23

# We were making love by Wednesday

2:39:232:39:27

# And on Thursday and

Friday and Saturday

2:39:272:39:29

# We chilled on Sunday

2:39:292:39:30

# More than just a feeling

2:39:302:39:31

# This is more than just a crush

2:39:312:39:33

# This ain't some romantic gesture

2:39:332:39:35

# This right here

is called real love

2:39:352:39:37

# And nothing really matters

2:39:372:39:39

# As long as there's

you and me there's us

2:39:392:39:41

# And I ain't letting go now

2:39:412:39:43

# I ain't felt nothing

like this, like this

2:39:432:39:51

# I know you, I know you, I know you

like this, like this

2:39:512:39:59

# Stumbling. #

2:40:022:40:10

Craig David joins us now.

2:40:132:40:16

Good morning to you.

How are you?

How are you. Mike, father and

2:40:162:40:23

daughter, they love your music, two

generation, their dance to your

2:40:232:40:28

musicful.

That is what makes me so

grateful, I am seeing 14,

2:40:282:40:34

15-year-old kids going home and

saying have you heard of this new

2:40:342:40:40

guy and the parents are like, Craig

David? I never expected that.

Is it

2:40:402:40:45

better this time round?

Yes. Yes. It

is sweeter. I have been able to see

2:40:452:40:51

how my songs have touched people.

People have said their best holidays

2:40:512:40:55

and they remember a song attached to

that or their met their partner. I

2:40:552:40:59

am thinking isn't that what is music

is about?

I have beening thissing

2:40:592:41:03

about it from your point of view,

your experience in the industry.

2:41:032:41:06

First time round, tell me if I am

wrong, I would imagine it would be

2:41:062:41:10

wow, this is great, but how long

will it last? What is this industry

2:41:102:41:15

about? Had a few knocks along the

way, so I wonder, is this an

2:41:152:41:20

experience where you can go I know

what this industry is about, I am

2:41:202:41:23

going to enjoy it and I have life

outside it?

I get it now, it is

2:41:232:41:27

like, when I was a 17-year-old kid

from a working class family, many my

2:41:272:41:32

mum's flat, next minute you are in

arenas and travelling the world. It

2:41:322:41:36

was so fast. I loved every moment

but this time round it is like I can

2:41:362:41:39

see it for what it is, it is not so

much about chart positions and how

2:41:392:41:43

many records you sell, it is going

out on stage and making memories for

2:41:432:41:48

people. I want the fans to be like,

I had a great time at a show, I

2:41:482:41:53

heard my song, this is my favourite

song. I live for that now.

On that

2:41:532:41:58

theme, so you sound reflective in a

way at the moment, can you remember

2:41:582:42:03

day when you did something

excessive, sometimes we hear about,

2:42:032:42:07

was it Andy Murray who said he

bought a Ferrari immediately then

2:42:072:42:11

regretted, thought what am I doing

that for? Did you have a crazy

2:42:112:42:15

moment when you did something when

you first had, mine a lot 06 wealth

2:42:152:42:19

ultimately, did you do stuff like

that?

It was excessive but, it was

2:42:192:42:23

one of the best things I have done,

which was said mum, jump in the car,

2:42:232:42:28

let me take you on a little journey

to this little place. She was OK,

2:42:282:42:34

jumped in, had her blindfolded, she

was thinking what is going on. I

2:42:342:42:38

opened the car door, I said this is

your new home, you have looked after

2:42:382:42:41

me for 17 years in this council flat

we have been in, I want you to have

2:42:412:42:45

a home with a garden, that was the

best feeling ever, if everything

2:42:452:42:49

stopped at that point an I didn't

put another record, which us good.

2:42:492:42:53

That is 23409 excessive, that is

being a Goodison and saying thank

2:42:532:42:57

you do your mum?

That is where my

loyalty lie, it was about family.

2:42:572:43:02

How was her reaction at that moment.

She was lost, she walked in and she

2:43:022:43:06

still didn't quite get it because I

opened the door and walked her in,

2:43:062:43:11

she was like where are we? The penny

dropped. I thought that is what life

2:43:112:43:15

is about. It I get it. You can buy

cars and whatever you need but it is

2:43:152:43:20

relationship, and I his the new

single with Dan called I Know You it

2:43:202:43:26

is about friendship and being here

together and enjoying this moment

2:43:262:43:30

and I live for it.

2:43:302:43:31

together and enjoying this

moment and I live for it.

2:43:312:43:37

Let's take a listen to your

new track Live in The Moment.

2:43:372:43:40

# Let's live in the moment

# No point holding

2:43:402:43:44

# To what's broken

# Let's live in the moment,

2:43:442:43:48

# One door opens,

# Another one closes

2:43:482:43:52

# Start living in the moment

# In the moment

2:43:522:43:59

# We got

# All the time... #

2:43:592:44:08

What is nice is that this isn't too

far away from the music I remember

2:44:082:44:13

when you first started out and it,

there is a temptation isn't there to

2:44:132:44:17

say I'm doing something different. I

want to hit a new audience, you

2:44:172:44:22

haven't Donagh that?

I have come

first circle.

2:44:222:44:33

first circle. Even the sentiment of

the song, talking about living in

2:44:332:44:35

the moment, don't worry about the

problems of yesterday, let us be

2:44:352:44:40

hear right now. Born to Do It was

like that. The time is now, the new

2:44:402:44:44

album is all that, it is all R & B

like you used to rave when your were

2:44:442:44:49

going out with your friends.

You

seen as an old timer, in the

2:44:492:44:54

industry, a veteran?

People say they

use different ways and when I hear

2:44:542:44:58

people say he is is a legend, coming

through, but the craziest thing is

2:44:582:45:04

backstage, the guests, they must be

13, 14-year-old old,ing a self fib.

2:45:042:45:11

There is two generation connecting

with the music, that is the most

2:45:112:45:14

exciting thing.

Do you find it

interesting how different genres of

2:45:142:45:18

music are mixing? You have

collaborated with Bastille for

2:45:182:45:22

example, we were talking to storm

sip looking at grime, there doesn't

2:45:222:45:28

seem, 25 years ago we do this, do

you that, we don't mix, now it seems

2:45:282:45:33

so collaborative?

We are in that

place where if you were here the

2:45:332:45:40

first time, late 90s, where maybe

hip-hop and R & B were starting to

2:45:402:45:44

merge, that is where for me being

with Bastille, I am not saying Jay

2:45:442:45:50

Z, Linkin Park when they connected,

that record and then seeing JP

2:45:502:45:53

Cooper being on this album and it

beings a mix, AJ Tracey and Ella

2:45:532:45:59

May, I feel like R & B 2018, people

are ready for it.

Who is on your

2:45:592:46:04

wish list to collaborate with?

To be

honest, I am grateful for the people

2:46:042:46:09

I have got. There is the Beyonces of

the world, but there is the Khalids

2:46:092:46:16

and the new wave. I am grateful for

everyone who has been part of this

2:46:162:46:20

album.

2:46:202:46:25

Longevity in the music industry is

an amazing thing. From our era, you

2:46:252:46:29

think of people like the Rolling

Stones, still doing performances in

2:46:292:46:34

their 70s. Do you think RM to be

artists, rap artists, can you see

2:46:342:46:39

that continuing?

Yes, of course.

Because it hasn't reached that point

2:46:392:46:46

yet because of the way the industry

is, it hasn't got there yet.

It's

2:46:462:46:50

what I had to learn. The relevance

of teenagers now discovering the

2:46:502:46:55

music is being able to not

necessarily keep telling a story. I

2:46:552:46:58

don't need to keep saying about the

first album, if you were there first

2:46:582:47:04

time, you are rolling with me. It's

going into the unknown and saying,

2:47:042:47:08

how can I be relevant to you? I have

to go into the studio like a new

2:47:082:47:13

artist and the artists you have

mentioned, they have always been

2:47:132:47:17

able to evolve and find themselves,

be relevant to different John Ruiz

2:47:172:47:20

and different demographics. It's

amazing.

Leaning in. It's a great

2:47:202:47:27

phrase.

It's where the magic

happens.

You are having a good time.

2:47:272:47:35

I'm having a great time.

Thanks for

joining us.

2:47:352:47:38

Craig David's album is called

The Time is Now and is out today.

2:47:382:47:42

I'll tell you what else is

2:47:422:47:44

I'll tell you what else is out

today, hopefully the sunshine. The

2:47:442:47:48

sun will be making an appearance for

many of us today.

2:47:482:47:51

We have got some mist and frost

around to start with for some, all

2:47:512:47:59

of this care of the high pressure

pushing across the country, keep

2:47:592:48:04

weather fronts at bay for now. They

will make their way in over the

2:48:042:48:08

weekend. Any mist and fog patches we

have got should lift and clear and

2:48:082:48:16

the cloud in southern and eastern

England will thin out and break up,

2:48:162:48:20

so sunny spells wherever you are for

a time today and with light winds,

2:48:202:48:24

it should feel quite pleasant out

there. For Scotland and Northern

2:48:242:48:27

Ireland, largely dried with some

cloud working in from the west later

2:48:272:48:31

on. Plenty of blue sky across

northern England, Wales and the

2:48:312:48:39

south-west of England as well, where

a dry afternoon should bring

2:48:392:48:44

temperatures of 9 degrees. Some

cloudy patches across eastern

2:48:442:48:50

England could produce a shower or

two but it should mostly stay dry.

2:48:502:48:56

Things change overnight as we see

this weather front arrive, heavy

2:48:562:49:02

rain working in from the west later

in the night. An east-west split to

2:49:022:49:07

your Saturday morning. Eastern

areas, quite chilly with clear

2:49:072:49:11

skies, where further west we have

the rain and fairly strong winds as

2:49:112:49:15

well. Tomorrow, dominated by this

area of low pressure, sitting far to

2:49:152:49:21

the north but the isobars show us it

will be a windy day. Articulately

2:49:212:49:26

windy in northern Scotland and the

Northern Isles where it could be

2:49:262:49:30

gale force. Breezy further south as

well and this band of patchy rain

2:49:302:49:35

working eastwards. Behind it, I

returned to something brighter and

2:49:352:49:40

fresher with those temperatures back

into double figures by the time we

2:49:402:49:44

get to tomorrow. We have got the

wind and the rain as well. We will

2:49:442:49:49

continue to see that mild air

feeding in, so on Sunday, a mixed

2:49:492:49:59

day. For Scotland and parts of

Northern Ireland, quite a wet day,

2:49:592:50:02

but further south for England and

Wales, drier and quite mild with

2:50:022:50:07

temperatures reaching up to 13 or 14

degrees. That is the theme for this

2:50:072:50:11

weekend. Staying mild, pretty breezy

at times and although there will be

2:50:112:50:16

a bit of rain, particularly on

Saturday, most places should see

2:50:162:50:21

some drier and brighter weather as

well.

2:50:212:50:22

some drier and brighter weather as

well.

2:50:222:50:24

Sarah, thanks very much.

2:50:242:50:26

Later this morning, we'll get

the official figures on how well

2:50:262:50:28

the economy performed last year.

2:50:282:50:30

Ben is at a motorcycle

factory in Leicestershire.

2:50:302:50:36

His choice. Boys and toys and all

that. He has got a monster with him.

2:50:362:50:42

Morning, Ben.

Look at this BT.

Welcome to Hinckly in Lincolnshire.

2:50:422:50:49

-- look at this beauty. I am on this

bike to show you a bit about how

2:50:492:50:56

this is put together. That bit is

made in Austria, this bid is made

2:50:562:51:01

right here in the UK. The frame you

can see, all welded together, that

2:51:012:51:06

is made in Thailand, whilst busy I

am sat on is made in Spain.

2:51:062:51:12

Everything is brought here and

assembled here but that means this

2:51:122:51:19

is affected by the exchange rate,

the pound falling in value after the

2:51:192:51:23

Brexit boat,

2:51:232:51:29

Brexit boat, meaning imports are

more expensive. But if you trade

2:51:292:51:32

abroad generally, things are

cheaper. Inflation has meant we have

2:51:322:51:37

less money in our pockets for

retail. Now, if I can get off the

2:51:372:51:42

bike in a dignified manner. Let me

introduce you to do people with me

2:51:422:51:46

this morning. Paul is one of the

buses here and Gaynor, you work in

2:51:462:51:50

recruitment. Paul, explain how the

last year has been for you. Tough

2:51:502:51:57

for some firms but manufacturers

have done quite well?

It has

2:51:572:52:05

have done quite well?

It has been a

fourth successive record sales year

2:52:062:52:08

for us. We delivered 63,500

motorcycles around the world

2:52:082:52:17

motorcycles around the world and we

sign another contract to become an

2:52:172:52:19

official motor provider and also

launched the brand in Vietnam as

2:52:192:52:26

well.

The exchange rate on the pound

is less of an issue for you but it

2:52:262:52:35

does cost you more to import?

Our

pricing is benchmarked across the

2:52:352:52:40

competition is our pricing hasn't

moved but when we sell across 57

2:52:402:52:46

countries around the world, yes we

make sales internationally, but the

2:52:462:52:51

flip side is that it costs us more

to run our international operations

2:52:512:52:54

and it costs more to buy the

components as well. So there is a

2:52:542:53:00

marginal advantage for us.

Gaynor,

you get a lot of people into these

2:53:002:53:05

jobs in recruitment say you have a

good overview of the industry. How

2:53:052:53:11

has the year been for you with so

much unemployment? -- uncertainty?

2:53:112:53:20

Our main sector is manufacturing and

engineering. We have had a record

2:53:212:53:25

year, a 20% increase in sales, but

on the flip side to that, the cost

2:53:252:53:30

of recruiting people and attracting

the skills required in these types

2:53:302:53:33

of business has gone up by 25%.

How

do your costs go up to recruit

2:53:332:53:38

people?

In 2016, we had an abundance

of people from eastern Europe that

2:53:382:53:45

were ready and available with the

skill set to start work. What has

2:53:452:53:49

happened now is they have gone back

home, they are not coming over, so

2:53:492:53:54

recruitment agencies like ourselves

are having to think outside the box,

2:53:542:53:57

we are having to advertise on radio,

on multiple job boards, which all

2:53:572:54:02

costs money to recruit whereas

before it was free.

That is really

2:54:022:54:06

interesting. Thank you both for now.

That's really an issue for all

2:54:062:54:12

businesses to content with right

now. They have got to work out what

2:54:122:54:16

next year will bring because

manufacturing has done pretty well

2:54:162:54:19

over the last year and we will get

those official growth figures for

2:54:192:54:22

the last quarter, the last three

months of last year, giving us a

2:54:222:54:26

picture for all how all of 2017 was.

The big question is what will 2018

2:54:262:54:34

bring, particularly around the

concern around Brexit and the global

2:54:342:54:38

economy? Things looking better but

some big clouds on the horizon as

2:54:382:54:45

far as business is concerned. Now,

they have said I can't take this

2:54:452:54:50

home with me, even though I'd quite

like to drive it back to the studio.

2:54:502:54:56

I think we can come up with a plan

to sneak it out, Ben. You and I can

2:54:562:55:00

come up with a plan.

No one will notice.

2:55:002:55:04

He is enjoying himself.

2:55:042:55:08

It's a situation most people

never want to face -

2:55:082:55:10

a life-threatening medical emergency

which requires you to

2:55:102:55:12

deliver first aid.

2:55:122:55:13

But when 10-year-old Hanna was faced

with that situation,

2:55:132:55:17

she knew exactly what to do

and helped save her mum's life.

2:55:172:55:19

Now, the British Red Cross

wants first aid training

2:55:192:55:22

to be taught in school.

2:55:222:55:23

Hanna joins us now alongside her mum

Michelle and Tracey Taylor

2:55:232:55:25

from the British Red Cross.

2:55:252:55:31

Good morning, everyone. Hanna, I

know you are quite nervous. Did you

2:55:312:55:35

get to meet Craig David?

Yes.

Are

you a big fan?

No.

That is better

2:55:352:55:47

still. Mum, can you tell us what

happened?

Hanna was on half term.

2:55:472:55:54

She had finished first aid at school

and broken up for half term. Whilst

2:55:542:55:58

that a friend's house, I had a

headache. I asked for paracetamol,

2:55:582:56:03

had two tablets which went

paracetamol, they were Coco Dumble,

2:56:032:56:08

and as I was going home, I reacted.

My breathing started to be laboured

2:56:082:56:14

and by the time I got home, I was in

a real state and I collapsed.

Hanna,

2:56:142:56:20

that is when you saw your mum. What

did you do?

At first, I panicked and

2:56:202:56:27

then I thought of my first aid

training and I put her in the

2:56:272:56:31

recovery position and phoned 999.

What did they say on the phone to

2:56:312:56:35

you, because I am assuming mum

wasn't conscious?

They asked me

2:56:352:56:41

where I lived,

2:56:412:56:48

where I lived, in Manchester, and

then I put the phone onto my mum and

2:56:482:56:52

they were just saying, like, be calm

and everything until they came.

And

2:56:522:56:57

you had had lessons at school in

first aid. Do you think that helped

2:56:572:57:01

you be a little bit more in control?

Yes.

What had you learned?

How to

2:57:012:57:09

put someone in the recovery position

and just to do everything is someone

2:57:092:57:18

is unconscious but still breathing.

The paramedics arrived. What did

2:57:182:57:23

they say to you when they arrived?

They said that it's brilliant that I

2:57:232:57:29

phoned the ambulance and then got in

the ambulance and we went to the

2:57:292:57:33

hospital.

And everything is OK?

Everything's fine now.

This is the

2:57:332:57:42

point, isn't it? It's a perfect

example of those lessons have

2:57:422:57:47

hopefully taught something, but

would enough people know what to do,

2:57:472:57:52

what Hanna did?

It's such a

brilliant example, to have the

2:57:522:57:55

presence of mind to help your mum in

that situation. But what we do know

2:57:552:58:00

is that the vast majority of people,

even adults wouldn't be able to help

2:58:002:58:06

in that situation, so that is why we

are calling on the government to

2:58:062:58:11

include first aid within the

national curriculum as a compulsory

2:58:112:58:15

element so that every child can get

that opportunity to learn, like

2:58:152:58:19

Hannah did -- like Hanna did,

because she learnt it but not every

2:58:192:58:24

child gets a chance.

If the UK

unusual in the rest of the world

2:58:242:58:31

that it is not on the curriculum?

There are definitely places in the

2:58:312:58:35

world where it is a core part of the

curriculum. You get these core

2:58:352:58:40

points in your life and it's a life

skill. We believe that everybody

2:58:402:58:46

should have these skills. We are not

asking for people to be doctors and

2:58:462:58:51

paramedics. We are asking for people

to know some basic first aid so that

2:58:512:58:56

if you are in a situation and your

mum needs help, whether it is your

2:58:562:59:01

mother, anybody on the street, you

have the confidence that the

2:59:012:59:05

knowledge to help people.

Briefly,

if you are an adult and you are not

2:59:052:59:10

at school, where can you go to learn

these skills?

There are lots of

2:59:102:59:16

different opportunities. You can go

on a first aid course. You can also

2:59:162:59:20

download the free first aid app from

the British Red Cross. There is lots

2:59:202:59:25

of online learning on our website.

It doesn't have to be a formal

2:59:252:59:29

setting the course. There are loads

of opportunities to learn and it is

2:59:292:59:33

about simple skills. It doesn't have

to be complicated. If you look at

2:59:332:59:38

Hanna's story, her mum collapsed,

she was but unable to respond, so

2:59:382:59:51

Hanna new, what I have to do, I had

to roll her on her side to help her

2:59:512:59:55

breathing, tilt head back and then

get help. Really simple.

Hanna, what

2:59:552:59:57

did your teachers say after this

happened?

They said it was

2:59:572:59:59

brilliant.

Because sometimes they

must wonder whether the children are

2:59:593:00:04

listening but you are the perfect

example. Great to see this morning.

3:00:043:00:09

So glad your story ended well.

3:00:093:00:14

The family of a 13-year-old

who was shot and killed

3:00:143:00:16

after handling an air rifle wants

to see tighter controls

3:00:163:00:19

around the type of guns

that killed its son.

3:00:193:00:21

Ben Wragge died in 2016.

3:00:213:00:22

His family wants changes in the way

the public perceives air rifles.

3:00:223:00:25

Graham Satchell reports.

3:00:253:00:33

He was a lovely lad.

3:00:333:00:36

Very, very kind-hearted.

3:00:363:00:37

Peter Wragge's grandson died

in a tragic accident.

3:00:373:00:40

He was playing with some friends

at a friend's house.

3:00:403:00:44

They got hold of an air rifle.

3:00:443:00:52

It went of off.

3:00:543:00:56

Just a terrible tragedy.

3:00:563:00:57

Ben Wragge was just 13 when he died.

3:00:573:00:59

The airgun belonged

to his friend's dad.

3:00:593:01:01

They seem to be treated as boy's

toys, but it proves they are weapons

3:01:013:01:05

and they need treating

and looking after as such.

3:01:053:01:07

This is a shooting school in north

Wales and Brett is an instructor.

3:01:073:01:13

The death of Ben Wragge has prompted

a review of the rules

3:01:133:01:16

in England and Wales.

3:01:163:01:18

Do you think this is

a dangerous weapon?

3:01:183:01:21

I don't think it's a dangerous

weapon in the right hands.

3:01:213:01:25

Anything in the wrong hands

or ill-advised hands could be

3:01:253:01:28

dangerous, just as a knife could be

dangerous in the wrong hands.

3:01:283:01:31

In a shop next door,

air guns for sale.

3:01:313:01:34

The rules?

3:01:343:01:35

You have to be over 18 to buy one.

3:01:353:01:37

There are restrictions

on where you can use them in England

3:01:373:01:41

and Wales and it is an offence

to let children fire

3:01:413:01:44

them without supervision.

3:01:443:01:45

I think the law we have

works already and I don't

3:01:453:01:47

think we need any more.

3:01:473:01:49

We need to enforce the law

we have and we need

3:01:493:01:51

to get education for young people

and I think that's absolutely

3:01:513:01:54

critical.

3:01:543:01:55

Hundreds and hundreds of air rifles.

3:01:553:01:57

This is Scotland, where

after another tragic death the law

3:01:573:02:00

changed last year.

3:02:003:02:02

You now need a licence

to buy or own one and you

3:02:023:02:05

need to keep them

under lock and key.

3:02:053:02:08

20,000 air guns were handed

in and destroyed in Scotland.

3:02:083:02:13

Around 15,000 were licensed

in the first six months.

3:02:133:02:17

That is held in by the trigger...

3:02:173:02:19

Critics say the new rules

in Scotland penalise the law-abiding

3:02:193:02:21

majority and are disproportionate,

especially as offences involving air

3:02:213:02:24

rifles have been falling

for more than a decade.

3:02:243:02:30

In modern society, there are many

things that are potentially

3:02:303:02:32

dangerous and if we went down

the path of stopping something

3:02:323:02:35

because one person might

have died, I don't think

3:02:353:02:37

we would achieve anything.

3:02:373:02:43

There are so many other...

3:02:433:02:44

Really?

3:02:443:02:45

Yes.

3:02:453:02:47

That's a tough thing to say.

3:02:473:02:49

I think a lot of people would say

it's worth it if we save one life.

3:02:493:02:53

Well, you have to look

at proportionality and merely doing

3:02:533:02:55

that doesn't actually achieve

that proportionality.

3:02:553:03:03

It can't be

a disproportionate response.

3:03:063:03:08

We're trying to stop this happening

to any other families.

3:03:083:03:10

It doesn't matter how

bureaucratic it is, if it saves

3:03:103:03:12

a life, it saves a life.

3:03:123:03:14

And there's the heart

of this debate.

3:03:143:03:15

Is it worth introducing new rules

that may be burdensome for gun

3:03:153:03:18

owners if it saves one life?

3:03:183:03:20

It's for the government

in Westminster to decide.

3:03:203:03:28

Thank you for getting in touch,

looking that the question of whether

3:03:343:03:38

the law needs to change. It is

something that touches you. We will

3:03:383:03:43

keep an eye on that, because the

story progress,

3:03:433:03:47

We will keep an eye on that,

3:03:473:03:48

story progress,

3:03:483:05:23

with the lunchtime news.

3:05:233:05:25

Bye, bye.

3:05:253:05:33

It a theatre festival with a

difference curated by people who

3:05:343:05:39

have dementia. It is called Every

Third Minute. They are writing some

3:05:393:05:45

of the plays. Our entertainment

correspondent has been along to

3:05:453:05:49

rehearsals.

3:05:493:05:51

correspondent has been along to

rehearsals.

3:05:513:05:53

You have to put it in the sink and

soak it.

3:05:533:05:56

A brand-new play co-written

by someone who has been living

3:05:563:05:59

with dementia for eight years.

3:05:593:06:00

It's important to me,

to keep my brain ticking over.

3:06:003:06:03

To know different things.

3:06:033:06:05

Bob Fulcher was picked to work

with a professional playwright

3:06:053:06:07

for the Every Third Minute Festival.

3:06:073:06:14

They've created I See

Land Ahead, a nautical

3:06:143:06:16

tale based on one of his paintings.

3:06:163:06:20

Bob, you were a farmer

for more than 40 years.

3:06:203:06:22

You're now 70 and now

you are about to have a play on.

3:06:223:06:25

How does that feel?

3:06:253:06:26

Being part of this festival has

given me a chance to put my message

3:06:263:06:30

across about how important

it is to enjoy life.

3:06:303:06:32

Even though I've had

dementia for eight years,

3:06:323:06:34

life is great.

3:06:343:06:42

But the festival will

also be incorporating

3:06:453:06:47

some more famous

work on the subject.

3:06:473:06:52

I have Alzheimer's disease.

3:06:523:06:54

Early onset.

3:06:543:06:56

Three years ago, Julianne Moore

won the best actress

3:06:563:06:58

Oscar for Still Alice.

3:06:583:07:01

Try pretending you

are me when you walk.

3:07:013:07:04

For the UK premiere of the stage

version, that role will be played

3:07:043:07:08

by Sharon Small from

the Inspector Lynley Mysteries.

3:07:083:07:09

I do feel the pressure,

but we are telling the story

3:07:093:07:12

in a slightly different

way, more theatrically.

3:07:123:07:20

I'm going...

3:07:213:07:25

Oh, yes, Stanford.

3:07:253:07:27

Have fun!

3:07:273:07:29

That will be my job

on this one, to try to get

3:07:293:07:32

people to see that people

with dementia are still,

3:07:323:07:34

although struggling,

they are still trying to get

3:07:343:07:36

on with life and they

are still people.

3:07:363:07:44

If I go further away I get lost,

but I do make myself go out,

3:07:453:07:48

because you've got to, haven't you?

3:07:483:07:50

And in another rehearsal room,

Rosa Peterson is listening

3:07:503:07:52

to her play being read by actors

for the very first time.

3:07:523:07:57

I'm glad I've done it.

3:07:573:07:58

It's an achievement.

3:07:583:07:59

It just proves that if you've

got dementia you can

3:07:593:08:02

still do things, and I've done it.

3:08:023:08:04

And I'm wondering if it will help

if the man had a name.

3:08:043:08:08

She was paired up with a writer,

and the play is based on memories

3:08:083:08:11

from Rosa's childhood.

3:08:113:08:16

We've still got a few bits to alter.

3:08:163:08:18

A few words to sort out.

3:08:183:08:20

But pretty much there, I would say.

3:08:203:08:23

That'd be good!

3:08:233:08:24

Yes, at the age of 75,

it is Rosa the writer

3:08:243:08:27

and she is loving it.

3:08:273:08:35

I am delighted to say we are joined

by Wendy Mitchell. She was diagnosed

3:08:363:08:41

with dementia in 2014, now written a

book about living with the

3:08:413:08:44

condition. The title of the book,

Somebody I Used To Know.

That is

3:08:443:08:48

right.

And it is a reflection from

you, from the moment when you first

3:08:483:08:54

found out, can you recall a bit

about that time?

Oh, yes, I can

3:08:543:09:00

recall sitting in the, with the

consultant, and simply seeing the

3:09:003:09:05

word Alzheimer's on a paper in front

of her, and it was simply a case of,

3:09:053:09:12

yes, I'm sorry you have

Alzheimer'sess, there is nothing we

3:09:123:09:16

can do, thank you, bye, so there was

no follow up appointment, no you

3:09:163:09:25

literally felt abandoned.

The book

explains your progression, and the

3:09:253:09:32

progression of the dementia.

Yes.

But also how you were enlightened

3:09:323:09:37

about other people's attitudes to

people with dementia, particularly

3:09:373:09:41

ones who think, once you have got it

you are at a certain stage.

People

3:09:413:09:46

often, when they hear the word

dementia they think of the end, and

3:09:463:09:50

it has to have a beginning and a

middle, and there's so much living

3:09:503:09:55

to be done during that time.

And so, I just like people to think

3:09:553:10:01

that when you get a diagnosis, it

isn't the end, it is just the

3:10:013:10:06

beginning of a different sort of

life.

Wendy, explain to people

3:10:063:10:10

watching this, because they will be

listening to you and hearing what

3:10:103:10:13

you say and you are recollecting

things clearly but there are times

3:10:133:10:18

when there is like a void of things

that have happened or recollection,

3:10:183:10:22

describe that for us.

Just like,

just like in an hour's timely have

3:10:223:10:30

forgotten what we have talked about,

but I will remember that I've had a

3:10:303:10:34

nice time here today. So, it is the

detail that we so often forget, and

3:10:343:10:41

during the bad days, it is like

there is a fog in your brain, and it

3:10:413:10:48

is very difficult to make sense of

the world around you, and the, what

3:10:483:10:52

the time is, what the day is s what

you're meant to be doing, and I

3:10:523:10:58

always tell myself, during these

moments, that it's not me, it's the

3:10:583:11:03

disease, so I'll just sit and wait

for it to, for the fog to clear.

It

3:11:033:11:08

is interesting you say you sit and

wait, because the book, looks at the

3:11:083:11:12

person you often talk to the person

you were.

That is right.

Before you

3:11:123:11:16

were diagnosed in the book. You were

someone who was highly organised,

3:11:163:11:22

highly motivated, busy, all the

time, and probably didn't suffer

3:11:223:11:26

fools. I think is probably fair to

say. And it has been interesting

3:11:263:11:31

reading the book, looking at your

attitude towards people with

3:11:313:11:35

dementia and also how you have

applied the skills you have, and

3:11:353:11:42

had, to managing dementia.

What I am

always saying is we had talents

3:11:423:11:48

before that day and we don't

suddenly lose those talents

3:11:483:11:52

overnight, so, yes, I was highly

organised, and I'm so grateful for

3:11:523:11:57

that, because I haven't had to learn

that new skill, because being

3:11:573:12:02

organised helps me to cope on a

day-to-day basis.

When you first

3:12:023:12:07

came in you said it is a good job

it's the morning, because you were

3:12:073:12:12

saying that your day very much

depends, how you areer, depend on

3:12:123:12:15

the time of day.

It does. My, my tea

time on wards, it is like my

3:12:153:12:23

batteries are running out and I need

to put new batteries in. It is very

3:12:233:12:31

difficult then to, to have a

conversation like this, most of my

3:12:313:12:37

evenings are spent simply sitting,

and almost recharging my batteries

3:12:373:12:42

ready for the next day.

What would

you say, if there are people

3:12:423:12:46

watching now, who are either scarred

they may suffer with Alzheimer's or

3:12:463:12:50

who have family members who are

beginning to show signs or who are

3:12:503:12:55

very far into the disease, who are

struggling, what is the one piece of

3:12:553:12:59

advice you can give them?

I would

say to them, yes, it is a bummer of

3:12:593:13:06

a diagnosis to get, you can't get

away from that, but, if you think of

3:13:063:13:12

it as the start of a different type

of life, and that life of adapting

3:13:123:13:20

and out manoeuvring all the

challenges that dementia throws at

3:13:203:13:25

you, then, you can still have a life

filled with laughter and add ven

3:13:253:13:29

thurs just like anybody else.

Can I

say you have given me the best quote

3:13:293:13:36

of the day, this morning, lovely to

see you and the book is absolutely

3:13:363:13:40

fascinating. It is an interesting

read. The book is Somebody I Used To

3:13:403:13:44

Know. Lovely to see you here.

Thank

you.

We will be back tomorrow from

3:13:443:13:49

6.00, do have a lovely day. Bye.

3:13:493:13:54

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