09/02/2018 Breakfast


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09/02/2018

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Hello - this is Breakfast,

with Charlie Stayt

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and Naga Munchetty.

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Just hours to the start of the 23rd

Winter Olympic Games

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in South Korea.

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Diplomacy is high on the agenda

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as senior figures from North Korea

and the US arrive in PyeongChang

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for the Opening Ceremony.

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And bad news overnight for British

medal hopeful Katie Ormerod -

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she's broken her heel

in snowboard training,

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and is out of the Games -

she'd already fractured her wrist.

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This is the scene in PyeongChang

this morning where plummeting

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temperatures have left some

concerned these could be the coldest

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winter games on record.

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Good morning - it's

Friday 9 February.

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Also this morning:

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Two British men - believed to be

Islamic State militants known

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for killing Western hostages -

are captured by Syrian Kurdish

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fighters.

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Good morning.

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Stock markets around the world have

taken a tumble for the second time

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this week - and a lot of it's

because of the prospect

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of higher interest rates.

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I'll have more in a moment.

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Human eggs have been grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

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And Carol has the weather.

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Good morning from the roof of

Broadcasting House in London. Rain

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will cross the rest of the

south-east. Some wintry showers,

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most prolific in the north and west.

Some of them will be over lower

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levels and heavy. We will see when

15 minutes.

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Good morning.

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First, our main story.

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There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

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of the Winter Olympics

in South Korea.

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The US Vice-President Mike Pence

and sister of the North Korean

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leader, Kim Jong-un,

are expected to arrive

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in Pyeongchang shortly

to watch the event.

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47 Russian athletes and coaches

implicated in doping

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allegations have lost a last-minute

appeal to take part in the Games.

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Our correspondent,

Stephen McDonell reports.

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After years of preparation, the

PyeongChang Winter Olympics is here.

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The venues are ready and the

spectators are pouring in. The cold

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and windy conditions don't seem to

be dampening people's enthusiasm but

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even the most diehard sports fans

are finding it difficult to dodge

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the political manoeuvres being

played out of these games. The North

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Korean leader's sister will be at

the Opening Ceremony and she will

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also meet South Korea's president.

The United States government has

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dispatched Vice President Mike Pence

who says he is here to challenge the

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North Koreans, reminding people of

the country's human rights abuses

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and nuclear weapons programme. Many

South Koreans say they find it a bit

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odd that the Trump Administration

has decided to counter the north of

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its own propaganda offensive at the

Olympics. But there are divided

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opinions amongst locals at these

games over how they will feel when

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North and South Korean athletes

march into the stadium together.

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TRANSLATION: many in the older

generation but is negatively. They

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say, why this unification flag and

not the South Korean flag?

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TRANSLATION: I hope this Olympics

belts the snow, but it is a gradual

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melt, not too fast.

Naturally, once

elite athletes start hitting the

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slopes here, then they will take

centre stage in the many spectators,

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this can't come soon enough but even

in the sporting arena, there are

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political dimensions here following

the recent doping scandal. Just

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hours before the Opening Ceremony

was due to start, 45 Russian

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athletes and two coaches lost their

appeal to participate. Those Russian

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athletes who are allowed to compete

here will do so under the Olympic

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flag and following any medals, the

Olympic theme will be played.

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Our Correspondent, Stephen McDonell,

is in Pyeongchang for us.

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Stephen, what is the atmospere

like ahead of the Opening Ceremony?

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How certain faces are going to be

seen today.

Absolutely. We are all

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read up on the Opening Ceremony to

see what is on offer that even

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before that starts in a few hours,

we have heard that President Moon

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Jae-in is hosting a VIP cocktail

party. You can imagine who would be

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there. Vice President Mike Pence,

meet Kim Jong-un's sister. How are

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you going? Nice weather we're

having. Do you like skiing? Even

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though there will not officially be

a meeting between the North Koreans

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and the American delegation, they

were all these types of

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possibilities, very intriguing.

Stephen, thank you very much. We'll

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be talking to Stephen throughout the

morning. The Winter Olympics will

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begin shortly and the Opening

Ceremony can be seen from 10:30am on

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BBC One, the red button and on line.

For a round-up if you are in

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BBC One, the red button and on line.

For a round-up if you are in England

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and Scotland, 7pm from --7 p.m. On

BBC Two.

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Two British extremists,

believed to be members of one

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of the so-called Islamic State

group's most notorious cells,

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have been captured by Syrian Kurdish

fighters in Syria -

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according to US officials.

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They are accused of

being part of a unit

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which executed 27 Western hostages

and tortured many more.

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Andy Moore reports.

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Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee

Elsheikh, the two Britons captured

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by Kurdish forces last month, and

questioned by the Americans.

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Together with two others, they

formed a kidnap gang which became

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known as the Beatles because they

were usually masked and the captors

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could only hear their British

accents. British aid worker Alan

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Henning was one of the least two

dozen foreign hostages they held

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Henning was one of the least two

dozen foreign hostages they held

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captive and then executed. Last

year, the American State Department

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designated Alexanda Kotey and El

Shafee Elsheikh is wanted terrorists

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who had fought for Islamic state.

Kotey was born in Paddington, of

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carne in and Greek Cypriots

background. The citations said he

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used:

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used: Elsheikh's family had fled Sue

Dann in the 1990s and he became a

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British citizen. According to the

State Department, he developed a

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reputation for water boarding, mock

executions and crucifixions. The two

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men were grabbed by a Kurdish led

militia. The fate of the two men is

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unknown. They could be sent to the

US detention centre at Guantanamo

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Bay or they could stand trial in the

States. The UK Foreign Office said

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it would not comment on individual

cases or ongoing investigations.

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Andi Mohr, BBC News.

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Andi Mohr, BBC News. -- Andy Moore.

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For the second time in a week,

US stock markets have fallen

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sharply, with the Dow Jones index

falling more than 4 per cent.

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Sean's with us on the

sofa to tell us more.

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Why's this happening?

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There are concerns about interest

rates, are they still bothering

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markets?

Definitely they are. At the

beginning of the week in America, we

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saw falls of 4% or more in the

American stock market, that Dow

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Jones industrial average.

The

equivalent of our FTSE 100.

30 of

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the biggest companies in America.

That fell by 4% earlier in the week.

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Then we had a few days which were

more calm. Last night in America,

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another fall of 4%. Overall, from

the top of the market, you could say

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we have seen a fall of around 10%.

To put it in context, the US market

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has been up by about 50%. You can

picture the graph. Some would say it

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is a correction rather than a

crisis. But why interest rates?

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Investors are thinking, if interest

rates are going to start going up,

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our own Governor of the Bank of

England said we are looking to see

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interest rates go up sooner than we

previously thought. If that happens,

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people are more likely to put their

money into savings accounts and

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things linked to interest rates

because you get a better return

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which is why you start to see a fall

in the stock market so people are

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not too sure what is going to happen

next.

We will keep an eye on it.

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Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

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Scientists removed egg

cells from ovary tissue

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at their earliest stage

of development, and matured them

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to the point they were

ready for fertilisation.

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Researchers at Edinburgh University

say it could help to preserve

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fertility in women, such as those

undergoing chemotherapy.

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Key US government agencies have

shut down for the second time

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in three weeks.

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-- The Senate failed to vote

on a budget deal before a midnight

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deadline, after a Republican senator

demanded a last minute ammendment.

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For the temporary shutdown to end,

the spending deal must be passed

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in both the Senate and the House

of Representatives and then signed

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by the President.

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When we show you pictures

of groundbreaking research taking

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place in laboratories,

it's usually the scientists

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who wear the goggles.

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But in this experiment

into insects' vision

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at the University of Newcastle,

it was praying mantises

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who were fitted

with tiny 3D glasses.

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And if you're wondering how

the spectacles stay in place,

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they were stuck on

temporarily using beeswax.

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Researchers say the results will be

used to help develop robots.

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It's like a mini personal cinema.

That was their many personal insect

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cinema. We are going to talk a lot

about this later on. Why would you

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put 3-D glasses on a bug?

Apparently, function of their eyes

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are less complicated than ours. If

scientists can figure out how they

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see 3-D, they can use that

information to get robots to see

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3-D. Rather than a robot being

programmed to come over to that

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point, it will be able to see you.

What Bill were they watching?

It was

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the circle is going round and round

film.

The praying mantis, one of

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those early species that will

survive a nuclear will --a nuclear

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war.

I thought that was cockroaches.

It is praying mantis is as well. I

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used to have a thing about praying

mantis is. It was one of those great

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little creatures. Have you got one

in the studio?

No, we don't.

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I can't believe it. Katie Ormerod,

when Britain's greatest hopes, on a

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snowboard, has broken her at heel.

We had a picture of her on that very

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screen with the rest cast.

She was

competing on Sunday but then

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overnight, another training injury.

That means she is out of the game is

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completely. Absolutely awful.

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completely. Absolutely awful. She

has tweeted that it is the worst

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luck she has had.

She broke her

keel, not a wrangle, just a day

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after fracturing her wrist. She is

already had surgery. She had been

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due to compete in the big error

vents. Those of the medical pictures

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showing the extent of the injury.

That will help bind it. The action

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is under way in the right to Opening

Ceremony. Going well in the team

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pairs event are the Olympic athletes

from Russia. But while they are

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competing, two coaches have lost

their appeals. They won't be at the

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Winter Olympics.

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West Bromwich Albion striker

Jay Rodriguez says he'll

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prove his innocence after being

charged by the FA for using racist

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language in an incident involving

the Brighton defender

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Gaetan Bong last month.

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He has until the 16th

of February to respond.

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And rugby union referee Joy Neville

will make history again tonight -

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she'll be the first woman to take

charge of a Pro-14 match.

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The former Ireland international

is already the first woman

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to referee a European club fixture -

that was in December.

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In the papers, something very odd

that Eddie Eagle has done. First of

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all, this is Eddie the Eagle's

preview of the Winter Olympics. This

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is the women's curling team. The

brooms looked like the ones I use in

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the kitchen. Eddie the Eagle says he

once went down a bobsled track in a

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walk at 70 miles an hour and its

span around and around. Have we got

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pictures? No, we don't.

It sounds

like another big event.

I've tried

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curling in a pub. Here they are

getting ready, the British team with

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the Korean mascot.

Do we know the

name?

We will see a lot of that over

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the next few weeks. Looking for the

first British competitor. We have

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Ben Kelly in the Mogul skiing.

Those

are the bumpy skis.

We will be

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looking ahead to some of the

characters and people who will be

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involved in the Games. Very exciting

this morning.

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It's gone off his!

-- piece.

It has been a few days.

0:14:520:15:08

Ministers warn employers after an

paid interns. An exclusive that the

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Guardian says it has the government

is launching a crack down on unpaid

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internships which has resulted in

550 warning letters sent to

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companies and enforcement teams to

tackle repeat offenders. Mike was

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just showing all of the stars and

characters to look out for in the

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Winter Olympics. Lizzy Yarnold on

the front page.

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This is the front page on the

Telegraph. The story has been

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knocking around for a few days, the

campaign about a new media campaign

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that is suggesting they will be

putting up the arguments for us

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remaining within Europe. Then on the

Daily Telegraph their lead story is

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the reporter says they've seen a

memo from Jeremy Corbyn, in

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connection with his meeting with

Michel Barnier. Worth saying that I

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understand the Labour Party have a

very different aspect is on this

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particular story. Maybe we will find

out more about that later.

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We've been talking about interest

rates and the concern about interest

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rates going higher.

That's what makes the front of the

0:16:180:16:23

FT this morning, a hawkish Bank of

England signalling a swift rate rise

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to keep inflation in check.

Effectively that means they might be

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looking to raise rates sooner than

they previously thought, which will

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be an interesting one. We will be

talking more about that in about 20

0:16:380:16:42

minutes. We have one of the chief

execs of a major bank on.

Every time

0:16:420:16:49

we talk about this, the cautionary

word is really important. Mortgage

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rates are still historically low.

Hugely. It is clearly a significant

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moment when they start ratcheting

up. At compared with the routine

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figures there used to be for so many

years...

Routine for many people

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affected by interest rates in the

90s, but for so many people who

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owned a house for ten years they

haven't seen a rise in interest

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rates other than the one we saw last

year. That's where it gets

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important. A lot of people used to

low interest rates. And the cap on

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Downing Street on the FT. Getting

into every paper.

What is the cat's

0:17:230:17:30

named?

Larry. That is the attempt to

stroke him, and that the chief

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executive of Mitsubishi in Europe.

Diplomacy in action. If he known for

0:17:370:17:44

being rather elusive? Larry, not the

chairman.

I'm not an expert on

0:17:440:17:51

either, I have to admit.

Thank you

and see you both later. Let's find

0:17:510:17:56

out what's happening with the

weather. We can take a look from

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above. Carol is somewhere on the

roof of New Broadcasting House, in

0:18:000:18:09

central London.

Is it pouring

0:18:090:18:12

central London.

Is it pouring with rain where you

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are? It was chucking it down

earlier, but the rain has stopped.

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The forecast for today is another

cold one. Not as cold as yesterday,

0:18:180:18:23

but cold nonetheless. The risk of

ice this morning on untreated

0:18:230:18:28

surfaces. Something to be aware of

if you are heading out early. Also

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once again some wintry showers in

the forecast, meaning a mixture of

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rain, sleet and snow and at times on

some of the heavier showers we will

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see some of that at lower levels as

well. Some snow on the hills through

0:18:420:18:46

the day. In the south-west first of

all you can see we've got some

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wintry showers, as we have in Wales,

north-west England and south-west

0:18:510:18:55

Scotland. We also have the remnants

of the rain moving away from the

0:18:550:18:59

south-eastern corner. For the rest

of us we are off to a dry start and

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when the sun gets up there will be a

fair bit of sunshine around. Looking

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at the forecast for the day, you can

see how the rain moves away from the

0:19:080:19:13

south-east. It lightens up with

sunshine. The wintry showers in the

0:19:130:19:17

west will start to move towards the

east, across the Midlands, through

0:19:170:19:21

Yorkshire and Lincolnshire and

temperatures still in single figures

0:19:210:19:26

for most of us. Into the evening and

overnight, we start with snow

0:19:260:19:31

showers in East Anglia. They will

move away, cold air moves in behind,

0:19:310:19:35

clear skies and again the risk of

ice. Then high pressure comes on,

0:19:350:19:41

accompanied by a front, bringing in

rain, snow and strengthening winds.

0:19:410:19:44

Through tomorrow that will move

eastwards, so we start on a cold

0:19:440:19:49

note in central and eastern areas,

but with sunny spells. This band

0:19:490:19:53

will come in. Increasingly the snow

will be in the hills and we have

0:19:530:19:57

rain at lower levels. Notice the

winds, especially in southern areas,

0:19:570:20:01

costing up to 50 miles an hour. --

gusting. Into Sunday, on Sunday

0:20:010:20:09

itself we have wintry showers in the

forecast. There will still be a lot

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of dry weather around and it will

still feel cold and some of those

0:20:130:20:18

wintry showers will get down to

lower levels. As for the outlook, it

0:20:180:20:21

does remain cold even as we head on

into next week. So I know you love

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the cold, Naga, so this must be a

0:20:270:20:31

into next week. So I know you love

the cold, Naga, so this must be a

0:20:310:20:32

really nice forecast for you.

Thank you very much! I appreciate

0:20:320:20:35

it.

Keep warm.

0:20:350:20:40

You can see my bottle of water on

the desk. In this place, this is

0:20:400:20:44

about the worst thing you can do.

Show people that we drink water

0:20:440:20:49

during the programme. Shocking. My

profound apologies to people who

0:20:490:20:54

thought we didn't drink water.

You missed the point. The point is

0:20:540:20:59

it's a plastic bottle. That's the

problem.

0:20:590:21:03

Richard Handley had Downs Syndrome

and was just 33 years

0:21:030:21:06

old when he died from complications

caused by severe constipation.

0:21:060:21:09

Yesterday, an inquest found

there were "gross and very

0:21:090:21:12

significant failings" in his care

and opportunities to give him

0:21:120:21:15

life-saving treatment were missed.

0:21:150:21:17

The government is currently

reviewing the deaths of people

0:21:170:21:20

with learning disabilities

in England and is due to publish

0:21:200:21:23

the first of its

findings next month.

0:21:230:21:25

This programme has been told

there is concern over a significant

0:21:250:21:29

number of cases.

0:21:290:21:32

Richard was cheeky and a huge sense

of the ridiculous.

Toilet humour.

0:21:320:21:41

Yes. Close to Richard's heart.

Because that's how the family dealt

0:21:410:21:45

with what was a lifelong problem for

Richard. Constipation. A problem

0:21:450:21:50

which should have been manageable,

but which killed him when he was 33.

0:21:500:21:55

It's just so incomprehensible, isn't

it?

It so devastating, really. It

0:21:550:22:00

shouldn't have happened.

Richard's

dye it was well looked after by his

0:22:000:22:06

family and care home, but when that

care home turned into supported

0:22:060:22:09

living he was allowed to eat what he

liked. By the time he was admitted

0:22:090:22:13

into hospital his constipation was

so severe he appeared full-time

0:22:130:22:16

pregnant.

I saw a picture of him

actually when he was lying on the

0:22:160:22:21

hospital bed. The picture was taken

after he had had one of the

0:22:210:22:24

procedures to hopefully reduce the

size of his tummy and looking at

0:22:240:22:28

that picture I couldn't believe my

eyes.

If all those measures to

0:22:280:22:32

protect him had been in place, it

wouldn't have happened.

He would

0:22:320:22:36

still be here?

He would still be

here, yes. I'd still have a son.

0:22:360:22:43

You'd still have a brother.

Yesterday, and inquest hearing

0:22:430:22:50

Ipswich found missed opportunities

to help Richard gross failures to

0:22:500:22:53

act by the hospital, report after

report has shown there are too many

0:22:530:22:58

avoidable deaths and three years ago

Jeremy Hunt ordered a world first,

0:22:580:23:02

scrutiny of every single death of a

learning disabled person in England.

0:23:020:23:06

It will be a very important moment

to step out and look at the way we

0:23:060:23:10

look after that particular highly

vulnerable group.

That review will

0:23:100:23:14

publish its first report next month,

what we've learnt that one in ten

0:23:140:23:18

deaths looked at so far have come

with red flag indicators. That might

0:23:180:23:24

mean, as with Richard, there is

evidence that treatment was delayed,

0:23:240:23:28

or perhaps there is evidence of

abuse or neglect or concerns have

0:23:280:23:31

been raised by a family member. This

woman led the serious case review

0:23:310:23:36

into Richard's death and also the

scandal of Winterbourne View. She

0:23:360:23:41

says both cases exposed a system

which cares deeply at the point of

0:23:410:23:45

birth, but less as a child becomes

an adult.

We know that they can be

0:23:450:23:48

fantastic when an infant derives in

this world -- arrives. The NHS has

0:23:480:23:54

done some astonishing things to keep

those alive. However, that appears

0:23:540:23:58

to caper and certainly sustained

austerities has shown us that

0:23:580:24:03

services have reduced and workforces

have diminished and that is left

0:24:030:24:10

families, some families,

floundering.

And do you think has

0:24:100:24:15

cost some learning disabled people

their life? Yes, indeed. It has. The

0:24:150:24:23

family have received apologies from

the hospital, the council and the

0:24:230:24:26

care provider. All sailors and have

been learnt, a phrase often use of

0:24:260:24:30

the unavoidable death. The

department for health say they must

0:24:300:24:34

stop. From July trusts will have the

published data on deaths and

0:24:340:24:38

evidence of improvement. NHS England

say they are committed to improving

0:24:380:24:41

the lives of people with a learning

disability.

0:24:410:24:43

Jayne's here now.

0:24:430:24:47

So many things from your film. One

is of course the personal poll taken

0:24:470:24:53

on Richard's family, then the bigger

questions about what difference this

0:24:530:24:57

will make. -- toll.

This is a world

first. No one has done a national

0:24:570:25:04

review of any group of death before

and they hope it will make changes.

0:25:040:25:09

They hope that this national review

of all learning disability deaths

0:25:090:25:12

will enable people to learn from

mistakes. Families like Richard's

0:25:120:25:18

are sick of hearing that phrase,

lessons have been learnt. We will

0:25:180:25:21

learn from mistakes. Six months

after Richard died in a hospital,

0:25:210:25:24

another person died. They had

learning disabilities and died of

0:25:240:25:30

constipation. There are good of

elements going on. Things like

0:25:300:25:34

healthcare passport for people with

learning disabilities, things like

0:25:340:25:37

an annual health review for people

with learning disabilities. Richard

0:25:370:25:42

had that passport. It said he was

largely independent. That was wrong.

0:25:420:25:46

Richard was invited to an annual

health check. He missed the

0:25:460:25:50

appointment and was struck off the

GP surgery, Cosby wrote to him to

0:25:500:25:53

invite him. He can't read and nobody

read him the letter. These

0:25:530:25:59

initiatives and changes are only

ever as good as the people and

0:25:590:26:02

systems that are implementing them.

The coroner did say there was one

0:26:020:26:06

thing that could have saved Richard,

a healthcare co-ordinator. Somebody

0:26:060:26:10

who had overarching review of what

he needed and to deal with all of

0:26:100:26:16

these agencies and join up the dots.

Last night the Department of Health

0:26:160:26:19

said they had no plans to introduce

this.

Thank you very much.

0:26:190:26:27

This morning we are going to go to

the national history Museum's dippy

0:26:270:26:31

the dinosaur. Well, it is no longer

at the Natural History Museum

0:26:310:26:36

because it started a UK tour. John

Maguire is with him this morning.

0:26:360:26:43

Good morning. Dippy takes his bow.

We are in Dorchester at the museum

0:26:430:26:52

and he is going on a two-year tour.

He has been out of the public days

0:26:520:26:56

for the first time in more than 100

years and has been refurbished. He

0:26:560:27:01

has been to Canada and he is now

back and will go on a nationwide

0:27:010:27:05

tour. It has -- will take two years

to get round. What is really cool

0:27:050:27:12

about this is that Dorchester is the

home of palaeontology, as we are

0:27:120:27:16

just up the road from the Jurassic

coast, where people are still

0:27:160:27:20

finding dinosaur fossils. Also this

view, the mezzanine, we didn't have

0:27:200:27:25

that at the natural history museum,

so it's a wonderful and perhaps

0:27:250:27:29

natural location. It is almost a

homecoming.

0:27:290:27:36

homecoming. Originally it roamed in

what is now the US. Not quite a

0:27:370:27:41

homecoming, I think you get what I

am saying. Anyway, we will tell you

0:27:410:27:45

more about him and have a great look

around and we will also completely.

0:27:450:27:49

292 bones, but there is one missing

and we will put the final one in

0:27:490:27:54

later.

0:27:540:31:12

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London newsroom

0:31:120:31:15

in half an hour.

0:31:150:31:16

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:31:160:31:18

Bye for now.

0:31:180:31:19

Hello - this is Breakfast

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

0:31:260:31:28

Munchetty.

0:31:280:31:30

We'll bring you all the latest news

and sport in a moment,

0:31:300:31:33

but also

on Breakfast this morning.

0:31:330:31:35

Snow, skis and skating.

0:31:350:31:36

The Opening Ceremony

of the Winter Olympics takes place

0:31:360:31:38

in South Korea today

and after eight, Clare Balding

0:31:380:31:46

I don't think that was her there.

0:31:510:31:53

When was the last time you sent

or received a love letter?

0:31:530:31:56

We'll be discussing

whether the practice has become

0:31:560:31:59

a dying art in the digital age.

0:31:590:32:01

(PAUSE FOR 5 SECS UPSOT + OW

"renaissance boys" + TX OOV)

0:32:010:32:04

-- From ruthless rulers

to revolting revolutions,

0:32:070:32:09

we'll be celebrating 25 years

of Horrible Histories.

0:32:090:32:16

Good morning,

0:32:170:32:17

here's a summary of today's main

stories from BBC News.

0:32:170:32:22

There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

0:32:220:32:24

of the Winter Olympics

in South Korea.

0:32:240:32:26

The US Vice-President Mike Pence

and sister of the North Korean

0:32:260:32:29

leader, Kim Jong-un,

are expected to be among those

0:32:290:32:31

watching the event in Pyeongchang.

0:32:310:32:33

47 Russian athletes and coaches

implicated in doping

0:32:330:32:35

allegations have lost a last-minute

appeal to take part in the Games.

0:32:350:32:43

Two British extremists believed to

be one of the most notorious Islamic

0:32:440:32:51

State sells members have been

captured in Syria. They were part of

0:32:510:32:55

the unit comprising four men from

London who became known as the

0:32:550:32:59

Beatles because of their British

accents. The State Department said

0:32:590:33:02

they beheaded more than 27 Western

hostages and tortured many more.

0:33:020:33:08

Global stock markets have continued

their volatility. It follows another

0:33:080:33:13

day of corrections in share prices

on Wall Street. The Dow Jones fell

0:33:130:33:18

by more than 1000 points for the

second time this week. There are

0:33:180:33:24

concerns central banks are going to

raise interest rates.

0:33:240:33:27

Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

0:33:270:33:31

Scientists removed egg

cells from ovary tissue

0:33:310:33:33

at their earliest stage

of development, and matured them

0:33:330:33:36

to the point they were

ready for fertilisation.

0:33:360:33:38

Researchers at Edinburgh University

say it could help to preserve

0:33:380:33:43

fertility in women, such as those

undergoing chemotherapy.

0:33:430:33:48

Key US government agencies have

shut down for the second time

0:33:480:33:51

in three weeks.

0:33:510:33:54

The Senate failed to vote

on a budget deal before a midnight

0:33:540:33:57

deadline, after a republican senator

demanded a last minute ammendment.

0:33:570:34:00

For the temporary shutdown to end,

the spending deal must be passed

0:34:000:34:03

in both the Senate and the House

of Representatives and then signed

0:34:030:34:06

by the President.

0:34:060:34:14

Marble's newest film, black Panther,

took place -- had its premiere take

0:34:160:34:21

place in London last night. -- Micro

three. The actor Michael B Jordan

0:34:210:34:29

said the bill was empowering the

young black people.

My ten-year-old

0:34:290:34:32

son did not have many superheroes to

identify with sober the kids to be

0:34:320:34:39

able to dream and imagine and see

themselves, without the typical

0:34:390:34:45

stereotypes were used to seeing, I

think it is extremely important for

0:34:450:34:48

the future.

Good to see some strong

female characters as well which is

0:34:480:34:53

pretty typical Marvel films. We will

see some strong characters in the

0:34:530:34:59

Winter Olympics but one of them,

young hopeful, you are gutted for.

0:34:590:35:04

One of the things that make the

Olympic -- the Winter Olympics so

0:35:040:35:09

great, the lottery of the snow and

ice. You can get injured in training

0:35:090:35:14

as Katie Ormerod has done, only 20,

a gold-medal hope. The last

0:35:140:35:18

Olympics, remember it was about

Elyse Christie getting disqualified.

0:35:180:35:26

For Katie Ormerod, she must wait for

another four years.

What is her

0:35:260:35:30

event? There was the snowboarding.

The big air, we do lots of tricks

0:35:300:35:37

but the one where you go down the

hill and ferries things on the way

0:35:370:35:42

down.

The potential for medals. But

she is out, she is in hospital and

0:35:420:35:46

has had surgery done.

0:35:460:35:52

has had surgery done. In

snowboarding, it's very painful. You

0:35:530:35:55

can't do about that.

0:35:550:35:56

We keep hearing it could be the best

wintyer olympics ever

0:35:560:36:04

Winter Olympics for Great britain,

and we mustn't take it for granted

0:36:070:36:14

It began in 1924, the first Winter

Olympics.

0:36:170:36:22

It all began in the 1920s. This was

Saint Moritz, one of the early

0:36:220:36:28

venues which went on to stage the

Olympics in 1928. British success in

0:36:280:36:32

those early years came be ice

hockey. The team here eventually won

0:36:320:36:38

gold in 1936. These days, they don't

qualify. Also, Bobsleigh. How

0:36:380:36:43

different sport was then, no

protective walls and by 64, it was

0:36:430:36:49

gold. The first-ever winter Gold in

Great Britain was made in Scotland.

0:36:490:36:53

These pictures show how massive

curling had begun -- become,

0:36:530:36:57

inspired by the gold medal in 1924.

All the thrills of watching the £30

0:36:570:37:03

stones as they are called smooth

over the ice. The trouble was, after

0:37:030:37:07

its appearance in the inaugural

games, it wasn't reintroduced until

0:37:070:37:11

1998 and didn't -- and it didn't

take long for Team GB to strike gold

0:37:110:37:16

again.

It's looking good. She's done

it.

Salt Lake City, 2002. The other

0:37:160:37:26

winter sport in which Britain has

struck gold as figure skating. From

0:37:260:37:31

the Queen of the ice Jeannette

artwork in 1952 to the golden years

0:37:310:37:35

of John Curry in the 1970s, Robin

cousins and many iconic moment of

0:37:350:37:40

turbulent team but a generation,

that was it. There was Eddie Eagle

0:37:400:37:44

to look to the hearts and a

scattering of bonds but the barren

0:37:440:37:49

ewes continued until Britain found

its place again. And then the

0:37:490:37:54

survivors of 2006 full is -- 2006.

Led by Lizzie Arnold and the

0:37:540:38:00

supporting crew of four years ago

which proved the current generation

0:38:000:38:03

never had it so good.

0:38:030:38:06

We can cross live now to Andy Swiss

who's in Pyeongchang.

0:38:060:38:14

First of all, we start with a low

lights. Katie Ormerod was carrying

0:38:160:38:22

on with a wrist batch of.

0:38:220:38:28

on with a wrist batch of. Horribly

cruel luck for Katie Ormerod. 24

0:38:290:38:36

hours later, she has broken a heel

and it is a bad break as well. She

0:38:360:38:47

was taken to Seoul for emergency

surgery. She said, words can't

0:38:470:38:52

describe how gutted I am. It is a

real blow to Team GB because she was

0:38:520:38:57

one of the biggest medal hopes.

Russia, you may remember, is banned

0:38:570:39:04

from these games because of the

doping scandal but controversially,

0:39:040:39:10

169 Russian athletes have been

allowed to compete here as neutrals,

0:39:100:39:15

Olympic athletes from Russia, they

are called. We saw two of them

0:39:150:39:19

taking part in the figure skating

heats earlier on today. Earlier Ron,

0:39:190:39:25

47 more Russian athletes who wanted

to compete here have had their

0:39:250:39:29

requests rejected. Even so, this

whole issue has caused a lot of

0:39:290:39:35

uncertainty and confusion on the eve

of the Winter Olympics.

0:39:350:39:45

of the Winter Olympics. I have been

told the White Tiger is the mascot.

0:39:450:39:49

What else is in store?

The Opening

Ceremony gets under way at 11

0:39:490:39:57

o'clock this morning your time. The

big theme is peace. That seems

0:39:570:40:02

particularly relevant seeing that

North Korea and South Korea will be

0:40:020:40:07

parading under a single flag.

Something that would have seemed

0:40:070:40:12

unthinkable a few weeks ago. There

will be lots of noise, lots of

0:40:120:40:19

colour. As far as Team GB are

concerned, they will be led by

0:40:190:40:26

Lizzie Yarnold won gold in 2014.

Around 40 of Team GB's 59 athletes

0:40:260:40:34

will take part in the parade. They

will not be taking part in the

0:40:340:40:41

Opening Ceremony deceiving. The big

question is, how will they keep warm

0:40:410:40:45

and combat the chill. The big news

from the athletes and the

0:40:450:40:49

spectators, it does feel a lot

milder.

That does feel good after

0:40:490:40:53

the worries of yesterday. The

Opening Ceremony is live on BBC One.

0:40:530:40:58

Coverage starts at 10:30 a.m.. Then

Kelly is now representing France. I

0:40:580:41:07

was trying to claim him but he is

flying the French flag.

Or is he an

0:41:070:41:15

Olympic athlete from France.

And

OAF?

0:41:150:41:25

Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time,

0:41:250:41:28

in what scientists hope

could be a breakthrough

0:41:280:41:30

in preserving fertility.

0:41:300:41:31

Researchers say it could offer

hope to women undergoing

0:41:310:41:33

treatments such as chemotherapy.

0:41:330:41:34

Let's find out more about this

from Professor Daniel Bryson,

0:41:340:41:37

who's a Professor of Embryology

at the University of Manchester.

0:41:370:41:42

Good morning to you. Can you give

us, if you like, the Leiman 's

0:41:420:41:52

version of this?

I think it's very

exciting because it's the first time

0:41:520:41:55

we've been able to grow human eggs

in the lab from an early stage. They

0:41:550:42:00

are dormant in the ovary when they

very tiny and immature. This allows

0:42:000:42:04

us to grow eggs in the lab for 20

days to the point where they are

0:42:040:42:09

mature and can be fertilised. The

first time we've been able to do

0:42:090:42:12

that in humans.

At what point have

they been removed?

Women are born

0:42:120:42:20

with several hundred thousand eggs

and they are immature and small and

0:42:200:42:25

dormant and when women reproduce,

they are released once a month. That

0:42:250:42:30

takes several months in the ovary.

Scientists have repeated that

0:42:300:42:35

process in the lab. Three phases.

The initial stage when they are very

0:42:350:42:39

small. Another stage when it matures

and it's the Burleigh Beach, the

0:42:390:42:45

growth but, that they've been able

to activate the eggs from being

0:42:450:42:50

dormant. That is the breakthrough.

Stupid question, how big is an egg?

0:42:500:43:01

Less than 0.1 millimetres. Tiny.

What has been a process in the

0:43:010:43:09

laboratory, who have they been taken

from?

They had tissue donated by

0:43:090:43:13

patients or they can use tissues

donated by patients who have

0:43:130:43:18

undergone cancer treatment. In this

study, they used fresh tissue. They

0:43:180:43:22

are taking bits of that tissue, put

it in the lab and dissected, taken

0:43:220:43:27

at the immature eggs. They put those

through this complex series of steps

0:43:270:43:35

using complicated chemical compounds

to get them through to maturity.

The

0:43:350:43:39

interesting part is the growth

element. Particularly for young

0:43:390:43:43

women who are undergoing

chemotherapy, cancer treatment. You

0:43:430:43:47

hear when older women are undergoing

chemotherapy, they can have their

0:43:470:43:53

eggs taken out and preserved but

it's the younger people this could

0:43:530:43:57

help.

Exactly. If the young girl or

woman goes to treatment, they can

0:43:570:44:03

surgically frees them all we can

make embryos with her partner and we

0:44:030:44:09

can take ovarian tissue and freeze

out that the only option with cancer

0:44:090:44:13

is to have transplanted back many

years later which is invasive and

0:44:130:44:16

risky. With this new technique we

can take the tissue out of the

0:44:160:44:21

freezer and take the eggs out and

grow them in the lab and use those

0:44:210:44:25

eggs in an IVF procedure. It was

another treatment to someone who has

0:44:250:44:29

cancer. That is very exciting for

the future. For some people, there

0:44:290:44:37

is a sense of concern about how much

science is doing.

Are those some

0:44:370:44:44

people who think, how far do we go

down certain alleys?

Most scientists

0:44:440:44:52

in this field are very responsible.

We have tight regulations. These

0:44:520:44:57

eggs that are matured in a lab would

never be used for treatment to make

0:44:570:45:02

a baby without full regulatory

oversight. The scientists involved

0:45:020:45:07

in the work emphasised these eggs

had to be tested to see if they are

0:45:070:45:11

normal, whether they can develop

normally we have a good reputation

0:45:110:45:14

but doing that in the UK.

Wasn't

nine out of 100 successful?

The

0:45:140:45:22

people doing this work, they need to

improve efficiency. They need to

0:45:220:45:29

make sure the eggs are very good

quality before they were testing and

0:45:290:45:34

the need to test them to make sure

they are normal and said they

0:45:340:45:38

develop normally. But this has been

20 years. We were able to do this 20

0:45:380:45:43

years ago with a mouse and now in

humans.

Dockers thank you very much.

0:45:430:45:52

-- thank you.

0:45:520:45:54

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

0:45:540:45:58

Good morning.

0:45:580:45:59

Good morning. This morning for many

of our cities and as cold start to

0:45:590:46:03

the day as yesterday, that doesn't

mean it won't be a cold day. The

0:46:030:46:10

other thing to watch out for is ice

on untreated surfaces. An icy start

0:46:100:46:15

for some of us and we've also got

wintry showers in the forecast. Some

0:46:150:46:19

of those even at lower levels and

some of the heaviest showers into

0:46:190:46:22

the weekend. The unsettled theme

continues. At 9am in south-west

0:46:220:46:28

England and Wales we do have some

wintry showers. Not all of us are

0:46:280:46:32

seeing them. They extend across

northern England and parts of

0:46:320:46:36

southern Scotland. In between

there's a lot dry weather. We've

0:46:360:46:41

also got another weather front and

we are right under it at the moment

0:46:410:46:45

in London. It is producing rain and

that will continue to make its way

0:46:450:46:49

in away from the south-eastern

corner into the North Sea. The it

0:46:490:46:53

will brighten up. Wintry showers in

the west will drift eastwards across

0:46:530:46:58

the Midlands, into East Anglia,

Yorkshire and Lincolnshire. Some of

0:46:580:47:02

the heavier ones could be in the

levels. Temperature wise, still

0:47:020:47:07

feeling cold. As we head to this

evening and overnight we start with

0:47:070:47:11

wintry showers in East Anglia, but

they will clear and then it's going

0:47:110:47:15

to be a cold night. Then we have an

active weather front coming in

0:47:150:47:19

across the north-west. That will

introduce windier conditions and

0:47:190:47:23

rain and also some snow. It's a cold

night, so the risk of ice again. We

0:47:230:47:28

pick the system up tomorrow as it

continues to move eastwards. It will

0:47:280:47:33

be a clear start and a bright start

across central and eastern areas

0:47:330:47:36

first thing, but through the day the

cloud will build as the weather

0:47:360:47:40

front moves from west to east and it

will be very windy tomorrow,

0:47:400:47:44

especially in the south, with gusts

of up to 50 miles an hour. Not

0:47:440:47:48

particularly cold. Look at the

temperatures. Ten and 11 in the

0:47:480:47:51

south. Heading through the evening

and into Sunday, all the rain and

0:47:510:47:59

snow connected with this weather

front moves eastwards and it looks

0:47:590:48:02

like it could bring some snow across

southern Scotland and northern

0:48:020:48:06

England and rain for the rest of us.

And then for Sunday, behind it, it

0:48:060:48:13

will brighten up in central and

eastern areas and there will still

0:48:130:48:16

be wintry showers in the west. Some

of those in Northern Ireland and

0:48:160:48:19

Scotland, the heavier ones, could be

at sea level. Temperatures will

0:48:190:48:24

still feel cold and that cold theme

continues into Monday.

0:48:240:48:28

still feel cold and that cold theme

continues into Monday.

0:48:280:48:30

Thanks very much. It is a bit

drizzly. Keep dry under that

0:48:300:48:35

umbrella!

0:48:350:48:40

Let's talk about the prospect of

interest rates rising now.

0:48:400:48:43

Possibly suit an unexpected?

We were talking about it affecting

0:48:430:48:47

the stock market this week but it

could also affect a lot of savers

0:48:470:48:52

and borrowers as well and that's

something Mark Carney was talking

0:48:520:48:55

about yesterday. Good morning.

0:48:550:49:02

Yesterday Mark Carney and his team

gave us an update on the Bank

0:49:020:49:06

of England's thinking

on interest rates.

0:49:060:49:07

They have been at historic lows

for a long time now.

0:49:070:49:10

But in November the Bank of England

raised the cost of borrowing

0:49:100:49:14

for the first time in more than ten

years from 0.25% to 0.5%.

0:49:140:49:19

Its forecasts at the time indicated

there could be two more increases

0:49:190:49:22

of 0.25% over three years.

0:49:220:49:30

But yesterday, this is where things

changed, he gave a strong hint

0:49:330:49:38

that they were likely to go up

faster than we'd been expecting,

0:49:380:49:46

particularly if we take

into account how the economy

0:49:480:49:56

is going, rising steadily

as it is at the moment.

0:49:580:50:00

So what will that mean

for borrowers and savers?

0:50:000:50:03

Craid Donaldson is boss

of Metro Bank the boss of one

0:50:030:50:06

of the UK's newest banks.

0:50:060:50:07

When you hear is -- Mark Carney St

Bees restraint rises could be bigger

0:50:070:50:12

than we expected does that mean you

can pass on in full any interest

0:50:120:50:16

rate rise that the Bank of England

announces to savers?

I think what

0:50:160:50:22

Mark Carney was trying to warn

everybody for was getting ready, so

0:50:220:50:25

they are prepared. I expect rates

will be passed on to savers and

0:50:250:50:32

borrowers as well. There will be a

management to look after borrowers

0:50:320:50:37

and savers.

What is the link between

what the Bank of England says

0:50:370:50:40

interest rates are and your savings

account? If you have 0.7% of an

0:50:400:50:46

interest rate, if they go up by

0.25% in the next few months does

0:50:460:50:51

that mean you can put up your

savings rates by 0.25%?

Fully pass

0:50:510:50:56

it on? I don't know if we will fully

pass it on, but we put it up. We

0:50:560:51:02

will look at the lending rates. If

we pass it on to mortgages they will

0:51:020:51:11

also go on to savers. So it's really

looking at the difference between

0:51:110:51:17

deposits and lending and that's what

happens to people in markets.

So you

0:51:170:51:22

have mortgage products as well, so

you will be lending money to people.

0:51:220:51:26

Do you think people are ready for a

rate rise? Can they handle what we

0:51:260:51:30

might see in the next couple of

years?

The vast majority have been

0:51:300:51:36

on fixed rates. So they will be

fine. Also when we lend to people we

0:51:360:51:41

do it at a rate higher than

borrowing to make sure they can

0:51:410:51:44

afford it if rates go up. But four

out of ten people are sitting on a

0:51:440:51:48

standard variable rate. They play a

lot more money. -- pay. If you don't

0:51:480:51:55

understand that, talk to somebody,

because you shouldn't be paying that

0:51:550:51:59

much.

Mark Carney says, in terms of

the state of the economy...

How do

0:51:590:52:05

you view things? We have over 1000

customers, business customers,

0:52:050:52:11

joining us every week and they say

they are growing, recruiting people

0:52:110:52:15

and building their businesses,

carrying on. So I do see the

0:52:150:52:19

strength in the economy. That's why

we are creating 900 jobs this year,

0:52:190:52:23

because we are growing because we

are winning customers every day.

0:52:230:52:28

Where are you growing? Last week we

spoke about people... Branches being

0:52:280:52:34

closed. Can you open them where

people really need them?

We are

0:52:340:52:38

looking at Wolverhampton at the

moment, Birmingham, we are in

0:52:380:52:42

Manchester today and we will look at

places around Manchester, Leeds,

0:52:420:52:46

Liverpool. We are looking at new

markets, to grow nationally, but we

0:52:460:52:51

look after personal customers and we

also look after. Businesses We

0:52:510:52:56

really do need more competition on

the high street.

Not necessarily

0:52:560:53:02

rule villages?

We will get there. It

will just take time.

We will be

0:53:020:53:08

talking much more about that through

the morning.

0:53:080:53:11

Very interesting. Thank you.

0:53:110:53:17

Dippy is on tour. That's a dinosaur

travelling around the UK. And with

0:53:170:53:22

him is John Maguire! Good morning.

Good morning. Yes, 150 million years

0:53:220:53:31

ago Dippy and his mates were roaming

the planet and now he will go on a

0:53:310:53:36

two year tour around the UK. It is a

cast of the dinosaur bones. 292 made

0:53:360:53:43

of plaster of Paris. The great thing

about this location in Dorchester,

0:53:430:53:47

this is the home of palaeontology.

You also get this mezzanine view of

0:53:470:53:52

him, which you didn't use to get at

the Natural History Museum in

0:53:520:53:57

London. We will take you down to

have a closer images, and we can

0:53:570:54:02

tell you more about the process of

actually bringing in here. You may

0:54:020:54:06

remember about one year ago he left

the Natural History Museum. He had

0:54:060:54:13

been on display for more than 100

years. I think they took on

0:54:130:54:16

downstairs to keep him safe during

the Second World War. Now he's back

0:54:160:54:20

is about to go on this big journey

across the UK. Good morning. How has

0:54:200:54:26

this process being?

Long, exciting,

moments of, will it fit in the

0:54:260:54:33

space? It's been absolutely

brilliant and we are so delighted

0:54:330:54:36

with the outcome. Don't you think it

looks great in this space?

He does

0:54:360:54:40

look great. 25 metres long and he

fits in perfectly.

We just had to

0:54:400:54:45

take out a little bit of the balcony

to fit the tailing. There was a lot

0:54:450:54:49

of measuring going on. It came in at

86 pieces, but this race was over

0:54:490:54:54

200 pieces to put together, so it

was a long time. -- this base.

0:54:540:55:00

Dorset County has been fabulous.

This is a huge win for you. You will

0:55:000:55:06

double your numbers!

We are

anticipating a significant number of

0:55:060:55:10

people coming, up to 70,000 in the

next three months. It's a massive

0:55:100:55:15

moment for this museum and for this

part of the UK.

Let's have a bit

0:55:150:55:20

more of a walk round as we talk.

What is it you think that people

0:55:200:55:25

would want to see? Why is he so

exciting and inspirational?

I think

0:55:250:55:29

it is an exceptionally iconic museum

specimen. World-famous, from a whole

0:55:290:55:34

range of films and TV programmes.

Here's what people imagine a museum

0:55:340:55:39

dinosaur looks like. Why you would

want to see him here is you get a

0:55:390:55:44

very different experience. You get

much more up close and personal with

0:55:440:55:48

Dippy in this space, then previously

in the Natural History Museum. The

0:55:480:55:53

mezzanine at the new dimension and

one that is unique, I think.

Thank

0:55:530:55:56

you. The other thing that strikes me

about seeing him as a skeleton and

0:55:560:56:01

not as a model is you get an idea of

his physiology and how he would have

0:56:010:56:07

walked. How dinosaurs would have

made their way across the surface of

0:56:070:56:12

the planet 150 million years ago.

You can see him across the UK over

0:56:120:56:16

the next two years. For now, we

leave

0:56:160:59:39

I'm back with the latest

from the BBC London newsroom

0:59:390:59:41

in half an hour.

0:59:410:59:42

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

0:59:420:59:45

Bye for now.

0:59:450:59:46

Hello - this is Breakfast,

with Charlie Stayt

1:00:141:00:17

and Naga Munchetty.

1:00:171:00:17

Just hours to the start of the 23rd

Winter Olympic Games

1:00:171:00:20

in South Korea.

1:00:201:00:22

Diplomacy is high on the agenda

1:00:221:00:25

as senior figures from North Korea

and the US arrive in PyeongChang

1:00:251:00:28

for the Opening Ceremony.

1:00:281:00:36

And heartbreak overnight for British

medal hopeful Katie Ormerod -

1:00:391:00:42

she's broken her heel

in snowboard training,

1:00:421:00:44

and is out of the Games -

she'd already fractured her wrist.

1:00:441:00:49

This is the scene in Pyeongchang

just before the opening ceremony -

1:00:491:00:57

we'll talk about diplomacy.

1:00:581:01:06

Good morning.

1:01:201:01:28

Also, two British men are to be

Islamic State militants are

1:01:371:01:41

captured. Also, the prospect of high

interest rates. More on that in a

1:01:411:01:45

moment.

1:01:451:01:50

moment. Scientists succeed in

raising human eggs in the

1:01:521:01:59

laboratory. A band of rain in the

south-east of England. That will

1:01:591:02:03

clear, leaving sunny skies behind

but we also have wintry showers

1:02:031:02:06

moving from the West to the east.

More in 15 minutes. Perfect weather

1:02:061:02:11

to be standing on top of the

building in London.

1:02:111:02:15

Good morning.

1:02:151:02:16

First, our main story.

1:02:161:02:17

There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

1:02:171:02:19

of the Winter Olympics

in South Korea.

1:02:191:02:21

The US Vice-President Mike Pence

and sister of the North Korean

1:02:211:02:24

leader, Kim Jong-un,

are expected to arrive

1:02:241:02:26

in Pyeongchang shortly

to watch the event.

1:02:261:02:28

47 Russian athletes and coaches

implicated in doping

1:02:281:02:30

allegations have lost a last-minute

appeal to take part in the Games.

1:02:301:02:34

Our correspondent,

Stephen McDonell reports.

1:02:341:02:42

After years of preparation,

1:02:451:02:46

the PyeongChang Winter Olympics

is here.

1:02:461:02:48

The venues are ready

and the spectators are pouring in.

1:02:481:02:51

The cold and windy conditions don't

seem to be dampening people's

1:02:511:02:54

enthusiasm but even the most

diehard sports fans

1:02:541:02:56

are finding it difficult to dodge

the political manoeuvres

1:02:561:02:58

being played out of these games.

1:02:581:03:06

The North Korean leader's sister,

Kim Yo-jong, will be

1:03:061:03:09

at the Opening Ceremony and she'll

also meet South Korea's President,

1:03:091:03:12

Moon Jae-in.

1:03:121:03:13

The United States government has

dispatched Vice-President Mike Pence

1:03:131:03:17

who says he is here to challenge

the North Koreans, reminding people

1:03:171:03:20

of the country's human rights abuses

and nuclear weapons programme.

1:03:201:03:28

Many South Koreans say

they find it a bit

1:03:311:03:34

odd that the Trump administration

has decided to counter the North

1:03:341:03:37

with its own propaganda

offensive at the Olympics.

1:03:371:03:39

But there are divided opinions

amongst locals at these games

1:03:391:03:42

over how they'll feel when North

and South Korean athletes

1:03:421:03:44

march into the stadium together.

1:03:441:03:46

TRANSLATION:

Many in the older

generation view this negatively.

1:03:461:03:49

They say, why this

unification flag and

1:03:491:03:53

not the South Korean flag?

1:03:531:03:55

TRANSLATION:

I hope this

Olympics melts the snow,

1:03:551:03:57

but it is a gradual

melt, not too fast.

1:03:571:04:04

Naturally, once elite athletes start

hitting the slopes here,

1:04:041:04:06

then they will take centrestage

and for many spectators,

1:04:061:04:13

this can't come soon enough,

but even in the sporting arena,

1:04:131:04:16

there are political

dimensions here following

1:04:161:04:23

the recent doping scandal.

1:04:231:04:24

Just hours before

the Opening Ceremony

1:04:241:04:26

was due to start, 45 Russian

athletes and two coaches

1:04:261:04:28

lost their appeal to participate.

1:04:281:04:31

Those Russian athletes

who are allowed to compete

1:04:311:04:33

here will do so under the Olympic

flag and following any medals,

1:04:331:04:38

the Olympic theme will be played.

1:04:381:04:44

Stephen McDonell, BBC News

at the PyeongChang Olympics.

1:04:441:04:49

Two British extremists,

believed to be members of one

1:04:491:04:52

of the so-called Islamic State

group's most notorious cells,

1:04:521:04:54

have been captured by

Syrian Kurdish fighters in Syria

1:04:541:04:57

according to US officials.

1:04:571:04:58

They are accused of

being part of a unit

1:04:581:05:00

which executed 27 Western hostages

and tortured many more.

1:05:001:05:02

Andy Moore reports.

1:05:021:05:08

Alexanda Kotey and El Shafee

Elsheikh, the two Britons captured

1:05:081:05:10

by Kurdish forces last month,

and questioned by the Americans.

1:05:101:05:14

Together with Aine Davis

and Mohammed Emwazi,

1:05:141:05:19

they formed the kidnap gang that

became known as the 'Beatles'

1:05:191:05:22

because they were usually

masked and their captors

1:05:221:05:24

could hear only their

British accents.

1:05:241:05:32

British aid worker Alan Henning

was just one of at least two

1:05:321:05:35

dozen foreign hostages they held

captive and then executed.

1:05:351:05:38

Last year, the American

State Department

1:05:381:05:41

designated Kotey and Elsheikh

as wanted terrorists

1:05:411:05:45

who had fought for Islamic state.

1:05:451:05:47

Kotey was born in

Paddington in London.

1:05:471:05:49

He was of Ghanaian and

Greek Cypriot background.

1:05:491:05:51

The citation said he used

exceptionally cruel torture methods

1:05:511:05:58

including electronic

shock and waterboarding.

1:05:581:05:59

Elsheikh's family had

fled Sudan in the 1990s.

1:05:591:06:01

He became a British citizen.

1:06:011:06:07

According to the State Department,

he'd earned a reputation for

1:06:071:06:14

waterboarding, mock

executions and crucifixions.

1:06:141:06:17

The two men were captured

by the American-backed Syrian

1:06:171:06:20

Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led

militia.

1:06:201:06:21

The fate of the two men is unknown.

1:06:211:06:23

They could be sent to the US

detention centre at Guantanamo Bay

1:06:231:06:27

or they could stand

trial in the States.

1:06:271:06:29

The Foreign Office in the UK said it

would not comment on individual

1:06:291:06:32

cases or ongoing investigations.

1:06:321:06:33

Andy Moore, BBC News.

1:06:331:06:37

The owner of the Mirror

and Sunday Mirror has just announced

1:06:371:06:40

it's to buy the Express

and Star newspapers,

1:06:401:06:42

as well as celebrity magazine, OK!

1:06:421:06:49

Sean's here - how

significant a deal is this?

1:06:491:06:55

The Daily Express, the Daily Star,

OK! Magazine. The company that owns

1:06:551:07:01

the Daily Mirror, the Trinity Mirror

group, have proposed an acquisition

1:07:011:07:05

that they would like to buy these

titles for £130 million.

It's been

1:07:051:07:11

much rumoured, this link, at some

point about why they would like to

1:07:111:07:17

do it. You can see from the Commons

this morning from the Chief

1:07:171:07:21

Executive about the thinking behind

it, there are a lot of synergies, a

1:07:211:07:25

lot of efficiencies that can be made

between big companies like these and

1:07:251:07:29

they merge. Duplication, minimising,

reducing duplication, is something

1:07:291:07:33

that jumps out at me when you look

at the comments you. The printing of

1:07:331:07:40

these papers, the stories, the

websites. The stories are similar,

1:07:401:07:49

aren't they? There may be some

efficiencies. Very interesting.

1:07:491:07:58

efficiencies. Very interesting. They

are different aren't they? How does

1:08:001:08:05

that work? All quite important as

well. The reduction in local

1:08:051:08:15

newspapers recently, what is going

in the newspaper industry. We will

1:08:151:08:23

be speaking to the boss of Trinity

Mirror and about 30 minutes.

We are

1:08:231:08:28

talking about that interest rate

rises. That will have an impact on

1:08:281:08:36

equity markets.

The Dow Jones, the

equivalent of our FTSE 100, since

1:08:361:08:42

last November, he conceded that a

good run. It had an even better run

1:08:421:08:46

before that but right at the end,

that is key bit. We saw one big fall

1:08:461:08:51

of 4% on Monday night and we talked

about that. Then it bounced back a

1:08:511:08:57

little bit but last night, in

America, there was a fall of 4%.

1:08:571:09:02

There are falls in Asia overnight.

That is because people are thinking

1:09:021:09:09

interest rates might be on the rise.

If interest rates are on the rise,

1:09:091:09:14

people might start putting their

money into things linked to interest

1:09:141:09:20

rates like interest accounts and not

the stock market.

We will keep an

1:09:201:09:25

eye on that, especially when the

markets open.

1:09:251:09:28

especially when the markets open.

1:09:281:09:32

Researchers at Edinburgh University

have grown human eggs

1:09:321:09:35

in a laboratory for the first time.

1:09:351:09:41

The team say their findings

could lead to new ways of preserving

1:09:411:09:44

women's fertility .

1:09:441:09:45

Here's our Health and

Science Correspondent,

1:09:451:09:46

James Gallagher.

1:09:461:09:47

In laboratories in Edinburgh,

scientists have grown human eggs.

1:09:471:09:49

They had taken immature eggs that

women are born with and transformed

1:09:491:09:53

them so they are ready

to be fertilised.

1:09:531:09:55

It's taken decades of work to copy

what happens inside women's ovaries.

1:09:551:09:58

We never imagined that we would be

getting these kind of results

1:09:581:10:01

using human tissue.

1:10:011:10:04

So it's a significant step, but,

of course, the main objective for us

1:10:041:10:07

is to improve and determine

the safety of these techniques,

1:10:071:10:10

so that they could, in the future,

see an application.

1:10:101:10:16

It could be used for young girls

with cancer, as treatment can

1:10:161:10:20

damage their fertility.

1:10:201:10:20

So how would that work?

1:10:201:10:23

A girl diagnosed with cancer

would have a sample of her ovary

1:10:231:10:27

frozen before cancer treatment,

then later, as an adult,

1:10:271:10:29

the tissue would be defrosted,

an egg grown, fertilised,

1:10:291:10:32

and then put in the womb.

1:10:321:10:39

There may even be other applications

in fertility treatment.

1:10:391:10:45

This treatment is at an early

stage and needs refining.

1:10:451:10:47

None of the eggs have been

fertilised, so it is still uncertain

1:10:471:10:51

how viable they are.

1:10:511:10:53

James Gallagher, BBC News.

1:10:531:10:54

Key US government agencies have

shut down for the second time

1:10:541:10:57

in three weeks.

1:10:571:11:05

The Senate failed to vote

on a budget deal before a midnight

1:11:061:11:09

deadline, after a republican senator

demanded a last minute ammendment.

1:11:091:11:12

For the temporary shutdown to end,

the spending deal must be passed

1:11:121:11:19

in both the Senate and the House

of Representatives and then signed

1:11:191:11:22

by the President.

1:11:221:11:24

When we show you pictures

of groundbreaking research taking

1:11:241:11:26

place in laboratories,

it's usually the scientists

1:11:261:11:28

who wear the goggles.

1:11:281:11:29

But in this experiment

into insects' vision

1:11:291:11:31

at the University of Newcastle,

it was praying mantises

1:11:311:11:33

who were fitted

with tiny 3D glasses.

1:11:331:11:38

And if you're wondering how

the spectacles stay in place,

1:11:381:11:40

they were stuck on

temporarily using beeswax.

1:11:401:11:42

Researchers say the results will be

used to help develop robots.

1:11:421:11:50

We'll be talking about that a little

bit later.

1:11:571:12:00

Later today, the sister

of the North Korean leader

1:12:001:12:03

will attend the Winter

Olympics Opening Ceremony.

1:12:031:12:05

Kim Yo-jong will be the most senior

member of the ruling family

1:12:051:12:08

to ever visit South Korea.

1:12:081:12:09

So what do we know about her?

1:12:091:12:11

Part of the high-level

delegation sent by Pyongyang,

1:12:111:12:16

Ms Kim is the younger sister

of Kim Jong-un and a close adviser.

1:12:161:12:20

She is said to be very close

to the regime's leader.

1:12:201:12:22

The two of them lived

and studied together in Berne,

1:12:221:12:25

Switzerland.

1:12:251:12:26

She is the granddaughter

of North Korean founder

1:12:261:12:29

and President Kim Il-sung

and the daughter of Kim Jong-il.

1:12:291:12:32

She has been on the US

sanctions list for a year,

1:12:321:12:35

because of alleged links

to human rights abuses.

1:12:351:12:42

Let's speak to Ramon

Pacheco Pardo

1:12:421:12:44

Korea Chair at the

Insititute for European

1:12:441:12:47

studies.

1:12:471:12:51

Good morning to you. Established to

us how important Kim Yo-jong years

1:12:511:12:59

and her arrival at the Winter

Olympics. She is the first member of

1:12:591:13:06

the Kim family -- family to visit

South Korea.

She is very close to

1:13:061:13:10

her brother plus she has a

1:13:101:13:17

her brother plus she has a very high

position in the government of North

1:13:201:13:23

Korea, the politburo, so she has

political power and family ties.

1:13:231:13:26

Just tell is a bit more about the

relationship between her and her

1:13:261:13:30

older brother. He is four years old.

They grow up together in

1:13:301:13:32

Switzerland. They know each other

since they were little which is not

1:13:321:13:36

that common in the North Korean

ruling family. In addition, she was

1:13:361:13:41

part of the propaganda machine that

put her brother in power and

1:13:411:13:45

basically made him retain power a

few years ago. Also I think this is

1:13:451:13:51

quite significant that if you look

at other members of the Kim family,

1:13:511:13:57

some have been executed. She is

ruling together with her brother in

1:13:571:14:01

the same politburo. She has a

position of power that other members

1:14:011:14:07

of the family don't have.

Do you

think she will be bringing with her

1:14:071:14:13

a direct message from North Korea to

South Korea and indeed, to the

1:14:131:14:18

Americans who are represented at the

Games by Mike Pence?

To South Korea,

1:14:181:14:24

definitely. Apparently there will be

a mention tomorrow between herself

1:14:241:14:29

and the South Korean president. I

don't think the Americans want to

1:14:291:14:34

meet with her. They are banned from

doing so because there are sanctions

1:14:341:14:38

on her but when it comes to South

Korea, I think she's probably going

1:14:381:14:44

to express to South Korea North

Korea wants to economic ties and it

1:14:441:14:51

wants to start again Family Reunion

is an improved relations between the

1:14:511:14:57

two countries.

We will get some of

those pictures and they will be

1:14:571:15:01

important in the international stage

but the reality check here is that

1:15:011:15:05

simultaneously, as we understand it,

North Korea is planning one of their

1:15:051:15:09

giant military parades. On the one

hand, the Winter Olympics gives them

1:15:091:15:13

an opportunity to send out one

message but they are keen to send

1:15:131:15:17

out a different one. Almost

simultaneously.

Absolutely. Looking

1:15:171:15:25

at the military parade, it is the

way to North Korea to tell the US

1:15:251:15:29

and the international community they

are missile power, don't ever strike

1:15:291:15:32

us. On the other hand you see this

dramatic approach towards South

1:15:321:15:36

Korea, which is a different and --

message. We are willing to discuss

1:15:361:15:43

important issues with South Korea

and the international community. We

1:15:431:15:47

have the military power, but we want

to have normal diplomatic relations

1:15:471:15:50

with other countries.

Thank you very

much for your time this morning.

1:15:501:15:55

That was the Korean share at the

Institute for Korean Studies.

1:15:551:16:02

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

1:16:021:16:05

Braving the elements up I on the

roof of new broadcasting house in

1:16:051:16:10

London. It doesn't look great at

there!

1:16:101:16:13

London. It doesn't look great at

there!

1:16:131:16:14

You are taking one for the team. It

is raining in London. It's been on

1:16:141:16:18

and off, but it is coming down

heavily at the moment. It will

1:16:181:16:22

however clear. For most of us

because we have cloud and rain

1:16:221:16:27

around, it's not as cold start the

day as it was yesterday, but it will

1:16:271:16:32

still be a day, especially if you

are hanging around our lives. The

1:16:321:16:36

forecast is again feeling cold. The

risk of ice on untreated surfaces

1:16:361:16:40

this morning. Some wintry showers in

the forecast as well and we will

1:16:401:16:45

lose the rain that we currently have

in London in the next few hours.

1:16:451:16:49

Starting at 9am, these are the

wintry showers in south-west

1:16:491:16:53

England, Wales, parts of northern

England and also across south-east

1:16:531:16:57

Scotland. By wintry showers I mean a

mix of rain, sleet and snow. As we

1:16:571:17:04

pull out to the big map you can see

that we've got the rain continuing

1:17:041:17:09

to move away from south-east

England, so behind, a lot of dry

1:17:091:17:13

weather and a fair bit of sunshine.

But the wintry showers in the west

1:17:131:17:17

will be drifting eastwards as we go

through the course of the day and

1:17:171:17:21

you can see them almost anywhere.

Temperatures, most of us in single

1:17:211:17:25

figures, so still feeling cold.

Then, heading through this evening

1:17:251:17:28

and overnight, we start with wintry

showers across East Anglia. They

1:17:281:17:33

will leave a cold night behind with

a lot of moisture round. Again the

1:17:331:17:37

risk of ice on untreated surfaces.

Then they will be low pressure with

1:17:371:17:42

an active front, coming in from the

north-west and introducing rain,

1:17:421:17:45

with snow, mostly on the hills, and

strengthening winds. So tomorrow we

1:17:451:17:51

start on a nice, bright and clear

note across central and eastern

1:17:511:17:55

parts of the UK, but the system

coming in from the west is moving

1:17:551:17:59

eastwards through the day. So the

cloud will continue and another

1:17:591:18:02

feature of the more's weather is it

will be wintry, especially in the

1:18:021:18:06

south, with gusts of up to 60 mph

potentially. So increasingly the

1:18:061:18:11

snow will retreat into the hills and

it will be rain at lower levels.

1:18:111:18:15

That will cross us during the course

of Saturday night. It could bring

1:18:151:18:20

snow across southern Scotland and

also northern England. It clears

1:18:201:18:22

into the North Sea on Sunday and

high did we have a cold day once

1:18:221:18:27

again. Sunshine in east, still

wintry showers in the west and some

1:18:271:18:32

of those even at lower levels will

get down as snow. As we head into

1:18:321:18:37

the new week we continue with this

cold thing.

1:18:371:18:41

the new week we continue with this

cold thing.

1:18:411:18:42

Yet you say it with a smile on your

face!

1:18:421:18:45

It's winter, it's not as bad.

You stay out there than!

1:18:451:18:53

Of the 800 UK nationals who have

travelled to fight for so-called

1:18:531:19:00

Islamic State, four brutal killers

dubbed 'The Beatles',

1:19:001:19:02

because of their British accents,

were the most notorious.

1:19:021:19:05

One of them, a militant

nicknamed Jihadi John,

1:19:051:19:07

was killed in a drone

strike in 2015.

1:19:071:19:09

Another was jailed

in Turkey last year.

1:19:091:19:11

Now the remaining two have been

captured by Kurdish fighters.

1:19:111:19:16

Let's talk more about this to Dr

Shiraz Maher, from the

1:19:161:19:19

International Centre

for the Study of Radicalisation.

1:19:191:19:23

Thank you very much for joining us

this morning. What do you know about

1:19:231:19:27

the capture of these two British

men?

I think their capture is highly

1:19:271:19:35

significant because 'The Beatles'

were a wanted group. They had been

1:19:351:19:40

known to have held a number of

Westerners hostage as and when known

1:19:401:19:43

to be incredibly brutal to those

they had in their captivity. These

1:19:431:19:47

men who were beheaded ultimately by

IS had been held before that for

1:19:471:19:52

quite a long period of time and had

been subjected to the most vicious

1:19:521:19:56

kind of torture by these people. The

fact that these two individuals have

1:19:561:20:01

now been caught will be very

significant and of course there will

1:20:011:20:04

be a lot of intelligence that people

want to know about.

What does the

1:20:041:20:11

future hold? Will they be trialled

or questioned?

There's a bit of a

1:20:111:20:14

legal grey whole right now. A number

of Western and British foreign

1:20:141:20:19

fighters who had travelled out there

and joined Islamic State have been

1:20:191:20:24

captured by the Kurds in some

instances, by the Free Syrian Army

1:20:241:20:27

in others. Those in the Iraqi side

tend to be passed over in the state

1:20:271:20:33

custody on that side of the board.

So there are some reports emerging

1:20:331:20:36

that these two individuals would

have been transferred into US

1:20:361:20:39

military custody. If they are we

could expect to see them stand trial

1:20:391:20:44

at some date in the future.

I

suppose what a lot of this comes

1:20:441:20:47

down to is how cooperative they will

be. Is there any history of captured

1:20:471:20:53

jihadist being cooperative with

authorities?

I think you do find

1:20:531:20:56

that. Not all of them will talk, but

increasingly with a number of IS

1:20:561:21:03

individuals who have been captured

and detained, you see them express

1:21:031:21:05

remorse about what they've done and

as a result of that really opening

1:21:051:21:09

up to their captors. That happened

in a number of cases. It is hard to

1:21:091:21:14

know with these individuals how hard

and they are and how committed they

1:21:141:21:17

remained to be ideology they were

once following, but time will tell

1:21:171:21:22

as to whether they will give up a

lot of their secrets.

What is the

1:21:221:21:26

situation in regards to the group

they were in, in terms of the

1:21:261:21:30

atrocities or things they've been

involved in?

It's important to know

1:21:301:21:34

that of course Islamic State

captured the world-class market

1:21:341:21:39

attention when it became a protest

state and government large parts of

1:21:391:21:42

Syria and Iraq. Of course the

western mac road led dilatory

1:21:421:21:45

campaign against them resulted in

that aspect of the group being

1:21:451:21:50

pushed back -- Western. But that's

not the be all and end all of a

1:21:501:21:55

group like this. It originally

emerged across Iraq and Syria and

1:21:551:22:02

emerged as a terrorist movement,

which is how we encounter it in the

1:22:021:22:06

West. So we have pushed back one

aspect of it, but it's really gone

1:22:061:22:12

back to its insurgent groups and

pulled back to the desert. We know

1:22:121:22:16

it still operating across parts of

Iraq and we know it will live to

1:22:161:22:20

fight another day with those remain

in its clutches at the moment.

But

1:22:201:22:23

in what form and with how much

strength? Because in Syria,

1:22:231:22:31

effectively Islamic State has been

beaten.

I think it is overstating

1:22:311:22:35

the case. I would certainly counter

against popping the champagne at

1:22:351:22:40

this moment in time. The estimates

on where Islamic State is, the US

1:22:401:22:46

government said it may be down to

3000 hardened fighters. That may not

1:22:461:22:51

sound like a lot, given what it was

at its watermark of tens of

1:22:511:22:55

thousands of fighters, but it is

worth noting the roots of this

1:22:551:22:59

organisation came off the back of Al

Qaeda in Iraq after the 2002

1:22:591:23:03

invasion and at that point comment

for it pushed into Syria and grew

1:23:031:23:06

into a what we know, it was

estimated to have about 1000

1:23:061:23:11

fighters. We are still looking at

three times the number in the court

1:23:111:23:16

today than those who emerged in the

first place.

Dr Maher, thank you

1:23:161:23:20

very much for talking to us.

1:23:201:23:27

There is a dinosaur roaming the UK.

John Maguire has the latest.

1:23:271:23:34

Yes, we would have roamed the earth

around 150 million years ago,

1:23:341:23:38

something like that. Dippy the

Dinosaur is in the UK now and he has

1:23:381:23:45

been on display for more than 100

years in the Natural History Museum

1:23:451:23:49

in London. He is now going on a

nationwide tour. If you are in

1:23:491:23:55

Dorchester, Birmingham, Newcastle,

Cardiff, Rochdale, Norwich or

1:23:551:23:58

anywhere near their opening next two

years you will get the chance to

1:23:581:24:02

come and see him. We are in

Dorchester and it is sort of the

1:24:021:24:07

home of palaeontology. You just up

the road from the Jurassic coast. It

1:24:071:24:11

feels as if it's a bit of a

homecoming but of course they would

1:24:111:24:15

have originally been in the United

States. That's a hallowed to Philip

1:24:151:24:19

Charles. You've been behind funding

the tour -- Phillipa. IK Kim on

1:24:191:24:29

tour?

This was way to people around

the country and of course Dippy had

1:24:291:24:33

a long heritage in the Natural

History Museum, but it felt like

1:24:331:24:37

such a great opportunity to take on

about and bring people in and of

1:24:371:24:41

course to have him here in Dorset

first is really exciting.

It's a

1:24:411:24:46

wonderful museum. He is 25 metres

long and just about fits in, by the

1:24:461:24:51

skin of his nose. Although there is

no skin on his nose. It feels to me

1:24:511:24:57

in a funny way it feels like a

homecoming. Why do people want to

1:24:571:25:01

see him?

I think the sheer scale. He

is truly magnificent. An amazing

1:25:011:25:06

thing. I think many people who may

have been to the Natural History

1:25:061:25:10

Museum themselves as the will

remember him, I know myself and the

1:25:101:25:15

trustees do. So he has a special

place in the hearts of the British

1:25:151:25:19

public.

Lovely. Thanks very much.

This is what he would have looked

1:25:191:25:23

like when he was roaming the earth

with his mates. With this location

1:25:231:25:27

you get a mezzanine level, so you

can get a Birds Eye view or a

1:25:271:25:31

pterodactyl's view of what he would

have looked like and what his

1:25:311:25:35

skeleton looks like these days. We

will bring you more from Dippy and

1:25:351:25:38

have a chat to lots of

1:25:381:28:58

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

1:28:581:29:00

Bye for now.

1:29:001:29:01

Welcome back.

1:29:091:29:15

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Dan Walker and Louise Minchin

1:29:151:29:17

Hello this is Breakfast

with Charlie Stayt and Naga

1:29:171:29:20

Munchetty.

1:29:201:29:20

There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

1:29:201:29:23

of the Winter Olympics

in South Korea.

1:29:231:29:25

The sister of the

North Korean leader,

1:29:251:29:27

Kim Jong-un, has arrived

in the country and is expected

1:29:271:29:30

to attend the event alongside US

Vice President Mike Pence.

1:29:301:29:32

Kim Yo-jong's arrival marks

the first time a member

1:29:321:29:35

of the North's ruling family

has visited the South.

1:29:351:29:40

Two British extremists,

believed to be members of one

1:29:401:29:42

of the so-called Islamic State

group's most notorious cells,

1:29:421:29:45

have been captured by Syrian Kurdish

fighters in Syria -

1:29:451:29:47

according to US officials.

1:29:471:29:48

They were part of a unit comprising

of four men from London,

1:29:481:29:52

who became known as the 'Beatles'

because of their British accents.

1:29:521:29:55

The US State Department said

they beheaded more than 27 Western

1:29:551:29:58

hostages and tortured many more.

1:29:581:30:06

Trinity Mirror newspapers has

announced a deal to buy several

1:30:131:30:19

newspapers. It brings celebrity

magazines such as OK! Magazine with

1:30:191:30:25

other newspapers.

1:30:251:30:27

Global stock market have

continued their volatility this week

1:30:271:30:29

- overnight Asian and Austrailia

markets have dropped overnight.

1:30:291:30:33

It follows another day

of corrections in share prices

1:30:331:30:35

on Wall Street.

1:30:351:30:36

The Dow Jones fell by more

than a thousand points

1:30:361:30:39

for the second time this week.

1:30:391:30:40

Investors are selling off shares due

to concerns central banks

1:30:401:30:43

are going to raise

interest rates soon.

1:30:431:30:45

Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

1:30:451:30:48

Scientists removed egg

cells from ovary tissue

1:30:481:30:50

at their earliest stage

of development, and matured them

1:30:501:30:53

to the point they were

ready for fertilisation.

1:30:531:30:56

Researchers at Edinburgh University

say it could help to preserve

1:30:561:30:59

fertility in women, such as those

undergoing chemotherapy.

1:30:591:31:04

Key US government agencies have

shut down for the second time

1:31:041:31:07

in three weeks.

1:31:071:31:08

(TX OOV) The Senate failed to vote

on a budget deal before a midnight

1:31:081:31:15

deadline, after a republican senator

demanded a last minute ammendment.

1:31:151:31:18

For the temporary shutdown to end,

the spending deal must be passed

1:31:181:31:21

in both the Senate and the House

of Representatives and then signed

1:31:211:31:24

by the President.

1:31:241:31:27

The European Premiere of Marvel's

newest super hero film,

1:31:271:31:30

Black Panther, took place

in London last night.

1:31:301:31:32

It is the first film

to focus on black characters

1:31:321:31:34

from the comics and has also

received praise for its portrayal

1:31:341:31:37

of strong female characters.

1:31:371:31:38

The actor, Michael B Jordan,

said that the film was empowering

1:31:381:31:41

for young black people.

1:31:411:31:49

My 10-year-old self did not have

many superheroes to kind of identify

1:31:501:31:53

with so for the kids now to be able

to dream and imagine and see

1:31:531:32:01

themselves, see different

possibilities in an empowerinng way,

1:32:031:32:06

without the typical stereotypes

we're used to seeing,

1:32:061:32:08

I think it is extremely

important for the future.

1:32:081:32:16

This is that the work they are doing

to the Winter Olympics. This

1:32:181:32:22

morning, we have one of those

stories.

Katie Ormerod, she has been

1:32:221:32:31

dreaming about being in the Winter

Olympics. Cold conditions, it is

1:32:311:32:37

snowboarding basically. Doing things

like the rails and various things on

1:32:371:32:44

the way down. Then write as you're

about to realise your dream and

1:32:441:32:48

achieve your dream, snow sports are

always going to be a bit of a

1:32:481:32:53

lottery. You have an injury. That

means she is in hospital instead of

1:32:531:32:56

competing. It is over for her. But

she is only 20. She can start again

1:32:561:33:03

in four years' time.

It is a

lifetime annuities.

1:33:031:33:12

It was a real blow to their medal

chances.

1:33:131:33:16

We can cross live now to Andy Swiss

who's in Pyeongchang -

1:33:161:33:19

Andy, really disappointing news

about Katie Ormerod,

1:33:191:33:21

she was planning to carry

on with a fractured wrist,

1:33:211:33:24

but with a broken heel

she has no chance.

1:33:241:33:26

Beautiful views there but not such

great news. Broken Hill means she

1:33:261:33:31

has no chance in these games now. --

broken heel.

It is desperately cruel

1:33:311:33:39

luck for Katie Ormerod. She broke

her wrist in a training accident.

1:33:391:33:43

She said that would not stop her. 24

hours later however, she broke her

1:33:431:33:48

heel and it was a bad break as well.

So bad, she was taken to Seoul for

1:33:481:33:56

emergency surgery. She said, words

can't describe how gutted she is.

1:33:561:34:04

The British team admit it is a big

blow. Yes, indeed.

She is in an

1:34:041:34:14

extreme sport, she sat at their

share of injuries, an incredible

1:34:141:34:17

thing, she's got brilliant

resilience. She comes back better

1:34:171:34:22

from injuries. You wouldn't wish

this on anyone. It will be very sad

1:34:221:34:28

for the rest of the team as well not

to have about. A very positive

1:34:281:34:32

member of the team. We just wish the

best. When she is fit and well, she

1:34:321:34:39

can come back and fulfil the great

potential that she has.

The other

1:34:391:34:47

big news concerns Russia's athletes.

Russia is banned from these games

1:34:471:34:53

because of their doping scandal but

controversially 169 Russian athletes

1:34:531:34:57

have been allowed to compete here

under a neutral lag. They are known

1:34:571:35:05

as OARs, Olympic athletes from

Russia. We saw a couple in the

1:35:051:35:09

Olympic figure skating earlier

today. 47 more Russian athletes had

1:35:091:35:14

their appeals rejected by the Court

of Arbitration for Sport. Even

1:35:141:35:20

still, this is caused a lot of

uncertainty right on the eve of

1:35:201:35:24

these Winter Olympics.

A bit of

action already so far. We are

1:35:241:35:29

looking forward to the Opening

Ceremony. I am sensing that could be

1:35:291:35:33

a few white tigers involved.

It'll

be interesting to see how this

1:35:331:35:40

Opening Ceremony pans out. It starts

at 11 o'clock in the morning your

1:35:401:35:46

time. We've had rehearsals here. We

are told the big theme of this

1:35:461:35:50

Opening Ceremony is peace which

seems very relevant at the moment

1:35:501:35:54

because North Korea and South Korea

will be parading into the stadium

1:35:541:35:59

together under one flag, something

which would have seemed unthinkable

1:35:591:36:04

a few weeks ago. Team GB will be led

into the stadium by Lizzie Yarnold

1:36:041:36:12

who won gold four years ago. 40

members of the British team will

1:36:121:36:18

parade in the stadium. There are 49

in total. The big question is how

1:36:181:36:24

calls will it be? We had minus 20.

The good news for the fans and

1:36:241:36:31

indeed the athletes parading

tonight, it is feeling a lot milder.

1:36:311:36:39

I do have an Opening Ceremony. White

tigers are the symbol of Korea even

1:36:391:36:45

though the last one was hunted in

the 1930s. Heated cushions?

1:36:451:36:56

the 1930s. Heated cushions?

They

won't need them now, it has warmed

1:36:561:36:58

up. You have one of those heated car

seats?

Never underestimate the power

1:36:581:37:07

of the bum warmer.

1:37:071:37:13

Here's how you can follow

the Winter Olympics on the BBC today

1:37:131:37:17

- you can watch build up

to the Opening Ceremony from 10:30

1:37:171:37:20

this morning on BBC One,

the Red Button and online.

1:37:201:37:23

And for a round up of all the day's

action if you're in England

1:37:231:37:26

or Scotland, you can watch

"Winter Olympics: Today

1:37:261:37:29

at the Games" at 7pm on BBC Two.

1:37:291:37:31

Don't forget, the one and only Clare

balding is with us. A little bit

1:37:311:37:35

later. Just build-up to the arrival

of cloud.

1:37:351:37:39

We have the second round of

Six Nations matches coming

1:37:391:37:42

up this weekend, and England head

coach Eddie Jones has ramped up

1:37:421:37:45

the mind games ahead

of their meeting with Wales.

1:37:451:37:48

He's questioned whether Wales

fly-half Rhys Patchell has

1:37:481:37:50

the "bottle" for the

match at Twickenham.

1:37:501:37:52

Patchell only has six caps

but he was instrumental as Wales

1:37:521:37:55

crushed Scotland last weekend.

1:37:551:37:56

It's a massive step up. He hasn't

played much test rugby at all. He's

1:37:561:38:03

a young guy doesn't have much

experience. He has great experienced

1:38:031:38:10

players around him. He has a lot of

experienced players coming at him.

1:38:101:38:14

The pressure on him is going to be

enormous. It depends if he has the

1:38:141:38:19

bottle to handle it.

He doesn't need

a heated cushion, he has a lovely

1:38:191:38:23

fire.

1:38:231:38:31

fire.

It wasn't a happy homecoming

to Danny McGuire. The defending

1:38:311:38:36

champions came from behind for a

victory. They were marching on

1:38:361:38:42

together last night. Elsewhere,

Huddersfield Giants picks up --

1:38:421:38:45

picked up their first win of the

season against Waddington. More at

1:38:451:38:50

8:30 a.m.. Including the last 100

years of Olympic highlights the

1:38:501:38:54

Great Britain but there have been

many barren years. Seven games,

1:38:541:38:58

nothing at all. No medals.

Here is hoping. Heady days, these

1:38:581:39:05

days, for the Olympics in winter.

1:39:051:39:11

A big deal announced in the world

of newspapers this morning.

1:39:121:39:19

There will be fewer?

1:39:191:39:22

It depends on this big merger.

Trinity Mirror group have the Mirror

1:39:221:39:28

titles and Richard Desmond's titles,

the Express, the Daily Star as well,

1:39:281:39:34

and when these things happen, it is

interesting to see what decision the

1:39:341:39:38

bosses make. The owner of the Mirror

and the Sunday Mirror announced he

1:39:381:39:45

will buy those publications. Just

under £130 million. Simon Fox is the

1:39:451:39:53

boss of Trinity Mirror and joins us

from London. Why is this a good deal

1:39:531:39:59

for readers of those newspapers?

Firstly, there will not be fewer

1:39:591:40:05

titles. It's a very deal because by

bringing two organisations together,

1:40:051:40:11

we can be stronger. Our editorial

teams together, instead of

1:40:111:40:19

duplicating and sending the same

reporters to the same football

1:40:191:40:23

matches. We can be much more

efficient and cover much more

1:40:231:40:28

breadth of coverage. It's good for

readers and advertisers and

1:40:281:40:32

shareholders and pension funds.

It's

not good for the people who work the

1:40:321:40:37

company.

Absolutely. If you are

employed by a financially stronger

1:40:371:40:44

organisation.

Will there be job

cuts?

Overtime because we are going

1:40:441:40:50

to remove duplication, mainly in

back-office functions. Two very

1:40:501:40:56

similar businesses together, and

inevitably, there is duplication is

1:40:561:41:02

there will be changes. Obviously we

will be talking to those teams in

1:41:021:41:06

due course. Broadly, this is very

good for all concerned.

On a

1:41:061:41:11

national level, you can see why that

duplication might not be necessary

1:41:111:41:16

but when you look at local

newspapers who have had a tough time

1:41:161:41:19

of it, Theresa May talking about

losing a bit of democracy because of

1:41:191:41:26

the amount of local papers that have

gone under, surely it can't be a

1:41:261:41:30

good thing if you are making

efficiencies across local

1:41:301:41:33

newspapers.

This transaction, we

operate around 100 regional papers.

1:41:331:41:42

Manchester News, through to the

Plymouth Herald. Trinity Mirror as a

1:41:421:41:47

group makes over £120 million. We

are absolutely committed to

1:41:471:41:52

continuing our investment for our

great regional titles, in print and

1:41:521:41:57

digitally.

Will you be closing any

local titles?

No plans to do that.

1:41:571:42:04

Let's take the Daily Mirror and the

Daily Express. To newspapers with

1:42:041:42:10

different approaches.

1:42:101:42:15

different approaches.

Will we see

any change there? Definitely not.

1:42:151:42:18

The Daily Mirror is not going to

become right-wing, the Daily Express

1:42:181:42:22

is not going to become left-wing. We

have 100 titles. Those editors have

1:42:221:42:30

full territorial independence. We

are quite used to operating aboard

1:42:301:42:36

stable of titles.

Will you have

journalists asked to write a story

1:42:361:42:43

from a right-wing perspective and

the next day, a left-wing

1:42:431:42:46

perspective?

We will not see

political teams Nick Singh in any

1:42:461:42:50

way. Sport, features, what we call

the back of the newspaper. We can

1:42:501:42:57

actually invest and improve our

products.

Part of your announcement,

1:42:571:43:05

you highlight the costs that he had

paid in relation to phone hacking,

1:43:051:43:11

saying they are higher than you

expected. Why should a company like

1:43:111:43:15

Trinity Mirror which is admitted

hacking people's phones be allowed

1:43:151:43:20

to increase its influence on more of

our newspapers?

Phone hacking was a

1:43:201:43:26

really bad part of our history,

before my time there. In fact, we

1:43:261:43:33

settled with Hugh Grant will over a

year ago. In our announcement, the

1:43:331:43:39

legal costs associated with coming

to the end was higher than it had

1:43:391:43:45

been and that's why we increased the

provision but fortunately, we are

1:43:451:43:49

getting towards the end of what's

been a long and difficult process.

1:43:491:43:54

We may have committed something in

the past that was wrong. It doesn't

1:43:541:44:00

matter now.

The editorial standards

today, ten years on, are completely

1:44:001:44:07

different. This could never happen

today.

If you've got the same sports

1:44:071:44:14

reporters covering things on the

back pages of the paper, why would

1:44:141:44:18

you go to buy the Daily Star or the

Daily Express or the Daily Mirror

1:44:181:44:22

ahead of another one if they are all

going to merge?

1:44:221:44:30

going to merge?

The idea is to

improve the coverage and different

1:44:301:44:32

people like different titles for

different reasons, as you say.

1:44:321:44:36

Different political points of view.

So what we are trying to do is to

1:44:361:44:41

improve and invest in the titles, to

prolong the circulation and to

1:44:411:44:45

develop the online digital

offerings.

Simon, thank you very

1:44:451:44:49

much. For anybody in the Midlands,

the Star is a different newspaper in

1:44:491:44:58

the Midlands.

Thank you for clearing that up.

1:44:581:45:04

It's just coming up to 7:45am and we

are with Carol who now has her

1:45:041:45:14

umbrella down.

What's going on?

1:45:141:45:15

The rain has finally stopped! This

morning it is not

1:45:151:45:21

The rain has finally stopped! This

morning it is not a cold start like

1:45:211:45:24

yesterday, but it will still feel

cold through the day. To start the

1:45:241:45:29

day there is also the risk of ice on

untreated surfaces. We've got rain

1:45:291:45:34

in the south-east which will clear.

We've also got quite a lot of wintry

1:45:341:45:37

showers around and that means a

mixture of rain, sleet and some

1:45:371:45:41

snow. Some heavier showers could

provide snow at lower levels. This

1:45:411:45:46

morning we have snow showers in the

west England, Wales, northern

1:45:461:45:50

England and especially south-east

Scotland. Those will drift eastward

1:45:501:45:55

through the day. Looking at the big

map you can see where we have rain

1:45:551:45:59

in the south-eastern corner. That

will continue to push into the near

1:45:591:46:02

continent as we go through the

morning, leaving a lot of dry

1:46:021:46:06

weather behind. Remember those

wintry showers I mentioned? They are

1:46:061:46:10

drifting eastward and we could see

one almost anywhere as we go through

1:46:101:46:14

the day. It will feel cold.

Temperatures roughly 4-7. Through

1:46:141:46:19

this evening and overnight we start

with wintry showers in East Anglia

1:46:191:46:23

and they will tend to move away,

then it will be a cold and dry night

1:46:231:46:27

for many, with the risk of ice. On

untreated surfaces. We've also got

1:46:271:46:31

low pressure coming into the

north-west of the country. That will

1:46:311:46:38

introduce rain, snow, mainly on the

hills, and strengthening winds and

1:46:381:46:42

it will be cold. Roughly minus 2-

two degrees. Tomorrow we start on a

1:46:421:46:49

cold note in central and eastern

areas. But the weather front brings

1:46:491:46:53

the rain and hill snow and it moves

to the north-east, with cloud

1:46:531:46:58

building ahead of it, eradicating

the brighter start. It will also be

1:46:581:47:02

very windy in the south, gusting 40-

50, maybe more. But look at the

1:47:021:47:08

temperatures! Some of us seeing

double figures. We haven't seen that

1:47:081:47:12

for a while. As we head through the

overnight period that system, the

1:47:121:47:18

weather front, producing the rain,

sleet and snow moves into the North

1:47:181:47:21

Sea. We could see some snow in

northern England for a time before

1:47:211:47:26

that clears and on Sunday we have

some sunshine behind that front. It

1:47:261:47:31

will be cold. And we also have

wintry showers, especially in the

1:47:311:47:34

north and west. In some of the

heavier ones we could see some of

1:47:341:47:39

those getting the lower levels,

meaning snow at lower levels. If you

1:47:391:47:42

like it cold, there's a treat for

you, because we are carrying on with

1:47:421:47:47

the cold being in the next week.

What do you think, Carol?

1:47:471:47:53

I don't think you will be too

1:47:531:47:55

What do you think, Carol?

I don't think you will be too happy,

1:47:551:47:55

Naga.

It makes me feel better to see what

1:47:551:47:59

happening in Pyeongchang.

It is pretty cold there, but today

1:47:591:48:03

isn't as called for the Opening

Ceremony it has been. Tomorrow won't

1:48:031:48:07

be as cold either. But then as we

head into the latter part of the

1:48:071:48:12

weekend, into Monday, it will turn

cold again and when you add on the

1:48:121:48:17

strength of the wind will make it

feel it. In the hills that time they

1:48:171:48:21

will have -16, with a westerly wind

of 32 mph.

1:48:211:48:24

I wouldn't like that! Random

question for the morning, well, it

1:48:241:48:29

will make sense in a moment. When

was the last time you broke all

1:48:291:48:33

received a love letter?

I think it was BC, actually. 500 BC.

1:48:331:48:40

A long time ago.

Well, you might be interested in

1:48:401:48:44

this. See you later.

1:48:441:48:46

There was a time when putting pen

to paper was the only way

1:48:461:48:49

to express your feelings

for an absent loved one.

1:48:491:48:52

But nowadays the language of love

is less letter-writing and more

1:48:521:48:55

texting, as technology

has taken over.

1:48:551:48:56

So could the art of writing love

letters be dying out?

1:48:561:48:59

Not if the Royal Mail have

anything to do with it.

1:48:591:49:02

They've compiled a list

of do's and don'ts for

1:49:021:49:05

the modern-day wordsmith.

1:49:051:49:06

To tell us more we're joined by poet

Louise Fazackerley and writer

1:49:061:49:09

Simon Garfield.

1:49:091:49:15

Good morning to both of you. Is it a

source of some dismay to you, the

1:49:151:49:21

idea of love letters slightly on the

wane?

I guess we probably knew that.

1:49:211:49:26

And we know why. It's so much easier

to write an e-mail. But we will

1:49:261:49:30

never discover love e-mails in the

attic, so that the value of the

1:49:301:49:36

letter. It means so much more. I

always thrilled... When I get

1:49:361:49:42

anything but junk mail through the

post, anything personal, and that

1:49:421:49:46

could be a thank you note or just an

expression of not necessarily love

1:49:461:49:55

but affection. I think the key in

all of this is to make sure that we

1:49:551:50:02

don't disregard love letters as

necessarily the most passionate

1:50:021:50:04

rings ever, -- things ever, but they

could just be nice things to write

1:50:041:50:12

to siblings or anyone in your family

and, as I say, the delight of

1:50:121:50:16

getting something through the post

is thought of a vanishing art, a

1:50:161:50:21

vanishing joy.

Would you not

appreciate a love letter in the form

1:50:211:50:26

of an e-mail?

I think it depends who

it was from, really. Obviously a

1:50:261:50:30

happily married man so I have to be

a bit careful. It wouldn't mean the

1:50:301:50:37

same thing, I don't think. The joy

of a letter is what you get from a

1:50:371:50:42

letter beyond just the text, the

words. It could be... You could tell

1:50:421:50:48

a lot from someone's handwriting,

from their choice of pen and paper

1:50:481:50:53

as well. If it means something, it's

something you want to hold to your

1:50:531:51:00

heart and keep and as an historian

who has written a lot about history

1:51:001:51:06

told through letters, the idea of...

What would you do now if you wanted

1:51:061:51:14

to tell someone their history? You

would need to have access to their

1:51:141:51:20

passwords, their computer. Some of

the letters behind us from the

1:51:201:51:25

British library. It's a fantastic

archive. E-mails are harder to

1:51:251:51:31

catalogue and see afterwards.

You

are someone who uses words. That

1:51:311:51:35

your world that you live in. Do you

think if love letters are dying out,

1:51:351:51:40

what are we missing out on?

I think

we are missing out on a very

1:51:401:51:45

particular moment in time and I

think that you forget how much you

1:51:451:51:49

love someone as time progresses. So

if you can capture those tiny little

1:51:491:51:53

details about how you both love the

smell of ironing, or other times

1:51:531:52:01

together, they could be lost.

But

they could be in other forms. It is

1:52:011:52:05

beautiful. There's no denying. We

look at those letters. We learn

1:52:051:52:09

about relatives from those letters,

but we aren't in those times. Does

1:52:091:52:14

it matter that they are in a

different form?

I don't think it

1:52:141:52:17

does. I'm a big fan of the text

message and e-mail and people having

1:52:171:52:22

these conversations and sometimes

people do print them out and keep

1:52:221:52:25

them in that sense. I wouldn't like

the idea that someone would be

1:52:251:52:29

worried about the spelling or

handwriting.

And I think that's

1:52:291:52:35

what's holding some people back as

well. They found people were

1:52:351:52:42

frightened and they somehow felt

that if you write a letter and post

1:52:421:52:47

it, they are being more tested in

their writing skills. So obviously

1:52:471:52:51

that great it frontage of the text

or tweak is the informality of it. I

1:52:511:52:56

think one writes a letter in a

different way. It is a slower, the

1:52:561:53:00

liberal whirring. You think of your

words more, maybe you will put a

1:53:001:53:07

beginning, middle and end to it.

It's a more thought out and

1:53:071:53:12

hopefully considered document as

well.

I do think you can learn a lot

1:53:121:53:18

from love letters. This reminded me

of something. This is Johnny Cash

1:53:181:53:22

wishing his life due a happy 56th

birthday. -- wife June. It is about

1:53:221:53:29

taking words and seeing how they can

apply to your own relationships. We

1:53:291:53:33

get old and get used to each other.

We think alike, we read each other's

1:53:331:53:37

mines, we know what the other wants

without asking. Sometimes we

1:53:371:53:41

irritate each other and little bit.

AB sometimes we take each other for

1:53:411:53:45

granted. Does that make you think of

me?

1:53:451:53:47

Not remotely. What I will share this

with you. I met Johnny Cash and Tim

1:53:471:53:53

Carter and I met them together and

we did have a really lovely

1:53:531:53:57

relationship, without wishing to

namedrop. So that doesn't surprise

1:53:571:54:01

me in the least.

That's why I was connecting.

1:54:011:54:04

Absolutely. I see where you're

going...

1:54:041:54:10

Dissed on live television! You can

share your photos with us, the

1:54:101:54:17

Dissed on live television! You can

share your photos with us, the

1:54:171:54:17

number is coming on the screen.

Let's feel the love with Dippy. John

1:54:171:54:26

Maguire is

1:54:261:54:26

Let's feel the love with Dippy. John

Maguire is with Dippy, the dinosaur.

1:54:261:54:28

Tell us more.

He is a plaster of Paris dinosaur,

1:54:281:54:34

made over 100 years ago. His head

weighs 500 kilograms in total 80

1:54:341:54:39

weighs two times. A magnificent

specimen about to go on to around

1:54:391:54:43

the UK over the next couple of

years. Wherever you are in the UK

1:54:431:54:47

you can see him in a museum near

you. They say never work with

1:54:471:54:52

children and animals, but we are

pretty sure Dippy will behave

1:54:521:54:55

himself. We are going to introduce

you to a group of schoolchildren who

1:54:551:55:01

are seeing Dippy for the first time.

Let's see what they make of him.

1:55:011:55:04

Come on out. Come and have a look.

What do you think of him?

He is

1:55:041:55:14

massive!

He is massive. Can you

imagine those wandering around on

1:55:141:55:20

the Earth 150 million years ago?

Where is evident? -- Evan? He has

1:55:201:55:28

been to see him in London already.

What's it like seeing him closer to

1:55:281:55:32

home? Good.

This is Beryl, the

exploring bear. Why have you brought

1:55:321:55:39

her?

She is a really good explorer.

And so why you. Have a good look

1:55:391:55:45

around and see what is think. They

are being very quiet. I think they

1:55:451:55:50

are really enjoying it very much.

1:55:501:55:56

are really enjoying it very much. He

is sort of coming home for you, as

1:55:571:56:01

I've been saying. What's it like to

have him here?

It's fantastic. It's

1:56:011:56:05

coming back to his own time zone on

the Jurassic coast and seeing these

1:56:051:56:11

kids a posture the reaction is just

why we have been working so hard

1:56:111:56:15

with a museum to bring him to Dorset

for ten weeks over the next period

1:56:151:56:19

of time.

He is in a museum and it is

ticket only, but there will be

1:56:191:56:23

tickets available in a few weeks. It

is a big deal, isn't it?

We are

1:56:231:56:27

trying to build on the national

history idea and we've got events

1:56:271:56:33

happening all along the coast, as

far as Taunton, Salisbury, and

1:56:331:56:37

everywhere in between. That's about

getting people involved with nature

1:56:371:56:45

and the natural environment and

that's what the Jurassic Trust is

1:56:451:56:50

trying to do.

Get people involved

with the natural world. Thank you. A

1:56:501:56:54

link from the fast 150 million years

ago right up to the date and the

1:56:541:56:59

next generation of explorers and

palaeontologists getting a good look

1:56:591:57:03

at Dippy.

Thanks very much. It is fascinating.

1:57:031:57:06

You can see the awe in those

children.

1:57:061:57:15

Lovely to see.

1:57:151:57:17

Time now to get the news,

travel and weather where you are.

1:57:172:00:36

in half an hour.

2:00:362:00:37

Plenty more on our website

at the usual address.

2:00:372:00:39

Bye for now.

2:00:392:00:40

Hello.

2:00:432:00:44

This is Breakfast with Charlie Stayt

and Naga Munchetty.

2:00:442:00:47

Just hours to the official start

of the 23rd Winter Olympic

2:00:472:00:49

Games in South Korea

2:00:492:00:50

Diplomacy is high on the agenda

as senior figures from North Korea

2:00:502:00:53

and the US arrive in Pyeongchang

for the Opening Ceremony.

2:00:532:01:00

And heartbreak overnight for British

medal hopeful Katie Ormerod.

2:01:002:01:03

She's fractured her heel

in snowboard training,

2:01:032:01:04

and is out of the Games.

2:01:042:01:06

She'd already fractured her wrist.

2:01:062:01:12

This is the scene in Pyeongchang

just before the Opening Ceremony.

2:01:122:01:20

We will be talking about the

excitement with TV presenter Clare

2:01:212:01:26

Balding.

2:01:262:01:34

Good morning, it's

Friday 9th February.

2:01:342:01:36

Also this morning...

2:01:362:01:39

Two British men - believed to be

Islamic State militants known

2:01:392:01:42

for killing 27 Western

hostages - are captured

2:01:422:01:44

by Syrian Kurdish fighters.

2:01:442:01:46

Good morning.

2:01:462:01:49

The owner of the Daily Mirror has

bought the Daily Express,

2:01:492:01:54

the Daily Star.

2:01:542:01:58

The boss just me there would be job

cuts but it would be good for

2:01:582:02:02

readers.

2:02:022:02:04

Scientists succeed in growing human

eggs in a laboratory, raising hopes

2:02:042:02:07

of new fertility treatments.

2:02:072:02:08

And Carol has the weather.

2:02:082:02:10

Good morning from the roof of

Broadcasting House in London. We had

2:02:102:02:15

rain this morning. The rain in the

south-east is continuing to move

2:02:152:02:18

away. There will be wintry showers,

a mix of rain, sleet and hail and

2:02:182:02:24

they could be almost anywhere. More

in 15 minutes.

2:02:242:02:31

Good morning.

2:02:312:02:33

There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

2:02:332:02:36

of the Winter Olympics in South

Korea.

2:02:362:02:38

The US Vice President Mike Pence

and sister of the North Korean

2:02:382:02:40

leader, Kim Jong-un,

are expected to arrive

2:02:402:02:43

In a last minute development,

47 Russian athletes and coaches

2:02:432:02:46

implicated in doping allegations

were told they have lost

2:02:462:02:48

an appeal to take part.

2:02:482:02:52

Our Correspondent,

Stephen McDonell, reports.

2:02:522:02:53

After years of preparation,

the PyeongChang Winter Olympics

2:02:532:02:55

is here.

2:02:552:02:57

The venues are ready

and the spectators are pouring in.

2:02:572:03:02

The cold and windy conditions don't

seem to be dampening people's

2:03:022:03:04

enthusiasm but even the most

die-hard sports fans

2:03:042:03:10

are finding it difficult to dodge

the political manoeuvres

2:03:102:03:18

being played out at these Games.

2:03:182:03:21

The North Korean leader's sister,

Kim Yo-jong, will be

2:03:212:03:23

at the Opening Ceremony and she'll

also meet South Korea's President,

2:03:232:03:26

Moon Jae-in.

2:03:262:03:29

The United States government has

dispatched Vice-President Mike Pence

2:03:292:03:33

who says he is here to challenge

the North Koreans, reminding people

2:03:332:03:36

of the country's human rights abuses

and nuclear weapons programme.

2:03:362:03:40

Many South Koreans say

they find it a bit

2:03:402:03:44

odd that the Trump administration

has decided to counter the North

2:03:442:03:47

with its own propaganda

offensive at the Olympics.

2:03:472:03:53

But there are divided opinions

amongst locals at these games

2:03:532:03:55

over how they'll feel when North

and South Korean athletes

2:03:552:03:58

march into the stadium together.

2:03:582:04:02

TRANSLATION: Many in the older

generation view this negatively.

2:04:022:04:04

They say, why this

unification flag and

2:04:042:04:06

not the South Korean flag?

2:04:062:04:11

TRANSLATION: I hope this

Olympics melts the snow,

2:04:112:04:13

but it is a gradual

melt, not too fast.

2:04:132:04:18

Naturally, once elite athletes start

hitting the slopes here,

2:04:182:04:21

then they will take centrestage

and for many spectators,

2:04:212:04:24

this can't come soon enough,

but even in the sporting arena,

2:04:242:04:27

there are political

dimensions here following

2:04:272:04:30

the recent doping scandal.

2:04:302:04:35

Just hours before

the Opening Ceremony

2:04:352:04:37

was due to start, 45 Russian

athletes and two coaches

2:04:372:04:39

lost their appeal to participate.

2:04:392:04:47

Those Russian athletes

who are allowed to compete

2:04:492:04:51

here will do so under the Olympic

flag and following any medals,

2:04:512:04:54

the Olympic theme will be played.

2:04:542:04:56

Stephen McDonell, BBC News

at the Pyeongchang Olympics.

2:04:562:05:02

Our Correspondent, Stephen McDonell,

is in Pyeongchang for us.

2:05:022:05:07

It is going to be really interested.

Everyone is gearing up to get

2:05:072:05:12

excited and get involved in the

winter Olympics. Also the political

2:05:122:05:17

events, shall we say,

behind-the-scenes, they will also be

2:05:172:05:23

closely watching those.

Absolutely

here, people are so excited about

2:05:232:05:29

the opening ceremony. There are not

too many skiers on this mountain

2:05:292:05:33

because the crowds are starting to

head into town, drifting towards the

2:05:332:05:39

stadium. Interestingly, in recent

hours, we have seen images broadcast

2:05:392:05:45

on television of the sister of the

North Korean leader. She stepped off

2:05:452:05:49

the plane and the Korean cameras are

following however she goes. She will

2:05:492:05:56

be in the stadium alongside the US

vice president. We're all waiting to

2:05:562:06:00

see what comes of this opening

ceremony. The cultural aspects of

2:06:002:06:05

it, the political aspects of it, the

two Korean teams coming in together,

2:06:052:06:12

it will be quite an historic event

and there is a lot of enthusiasm for

2:06:122:06:16

it. Thank you very much. Good to see

you.

2:06:162:06:30

Two British extremists,

believed to be members of one

2:06:302:06:33

of the so-called Islamic State

group's most notorious cells,

2:06:332:06:35

have been captured by Syrian Kurdish

fighters in Syria -

2:06:352:06:37

according to US officials.

2:06:372:06:38

They became known as the Beatles due

to their Richard Jackson 's. They

2:06:382:06:45

headed more than 27 Western hostages

and tortured many more. The Mirror

2:06:452:06:52

newspapers has reached a deal to buy

a number of other titles including

2:06:522:06:56

the Daily Express and the daily

Star. The agreement brings together

2:06:562:07:00

tabloids from the opposite ends of

the political spectrum. The chief

2:07:002:07:05

Executive of Trinity Mirror told us

there would be changes.

There will,

2:07:052:07:10

over time, be job cuts. We are going

to remove duplication, mainly in

2:07:102:07:16

back-office functions. We are

bringing two similar businesses

2:07:162:07:20

together. When you do that there is

a certain amount of duplication. It

2:07:202:07:25

does not affect regional newspapers

at all. We operate around 100

2:07:252:07:31

regional newspapers like Manchester

Evening News and the Plymouth

2:07:312:07:34

Herald. Trinity Mirror, as a group,

makes over £120 million. We are

2:07:342:07:41

absolutely committed to continuing

our investment in great regional

2:07:412:07:46

titles, both in print and digitally.

2:07:462:07:50

Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

2:07:502:07:58

In laboratories in Edinburgh,

scientists have grown human eggs.

2:08:122:08:14

They've taken immature eggs that

women are born with and transformed

2:08:142:08:17

them so they are ready

to be fertilised.

2:08:172:08:19

It's taken decades of work to copy

what happens inside women's ovaries.

2:08:192:08:23

We never imagined that we would be

getting these kind of results

2:08:232:08:25

using human tissue.

2:08:252:08:26

So it's a significant step, but,

of course, the main objective for us

2:08:262:08:29

is to improve and determine

the safety of these techniques,

2:08:292:08:31

so that they could, in the future,

go into some kind of application.

2:08:312:08:34

It could be used for young girls

with cancer, as treatment can

2:08:342:08:37

damage their fertility.

2:08:372:08:38

So how might it work?

2:08:382:08:40

A girl diagnosed with cancer

would have a sample of her ovary

2:08:402:08:42

frozen before cancer treatment,

then later, as an adult,

2:08:422:08:45

the tissue would be defrosted,

an egg grown, fertilised,

2:08:452:08:48

and then put in the womb.

2:08:482:08:51

There may even be other applications

in fertility treatment.

2:08:512:08:54

This treatment is at an early

stage and needs refining.

2:08:542:09:00

None of the eggs have been

fertilised, so it is still uncertain

2:09:002:09:03

how viable they are.

2:09:032:09:05

James Gallagher, BBC News.

2:09:052:09:13

In about two and a half hours, the

eyes of the world will be in South

2:09:132:09:19

Korea because they will be watching

the opening ceremony of the winter

2:09:192:09:23

Olympics.

2:09:232:09:26

Clare Balding will be presenting

the BBC's coverage of the Games

2:09:262:09:30

and has just returned.

2:09:302:09:35

Do a big scene setter for us.

It is

about 50 miles from the border of

2:09:352:09:43

North Korea. It is not a town, it is

a bit like going to Northumberland,

2:09:432:09:51

it is one of my favourite places. It

will be the smallest Winter Olympic

2:09:512:09:57

venue for a long time. The venues

are not that far apart. There is

2:09:572:10:04

that region where the ski jump and

the sliding events will be, and the

2:10:042:10:10

Alpine events, and then there is a

coastal region as well. You see the

2:10:102:10:16

sea lapping up against the snow

virtually. That is worth thing is

2:10:162:10:22

like hurling will take place. How

does it feel? It was really cold in

2:10:222:10:33

Seoul. I had a lovely day in the

sunshine at Pyeongchang. It is not

2:10:332:10:38

too bad today. I think it would be

almost impossible to do what I did

2:10:382:10:45

in Sochi, which was roaming around.

With the time difference as it is,

2:10:452:10:50

to do mornings live and then

highlights, it is not possible. I

2:10:502:10:58

did not have my shopping trolley

this time around.

Before we talk

2:10:582:11:03

around the potentials of glory and

some of the characters, it is a

2:11:032:11:09

nightmare for any sports star. They

work to go into the Olympics and

2:11:092:11:12

this is your moment.

Katie Ormerod

missed out narrowly on selection

2:11:122:11:17

four years ago when she was 16. She

was one of the medal hopes. A big

2:11:172:11:23

start

2:11:232:11:31

start of the X Games. She broke her

wrist and was still going to compete

2:11:312:11:35

but this time around she broke her

heels she has been operated on this

2:11:352:11:41

morning, Korean time.

We saw the

pins, two pins in her heels. She is

2:11:412:11:49

in bed now with a cast on and

everything. As Mike said, she is 20

2:11:492:11:55

years old but four years.

One of the

big stars, Lindsay von has had so

2:11:552:12:03

many injuries. She is really old,

33. You have a life span in winter

2:12:032:12:11

sports and Katie is very young, so

hopefully there are another couple

2:12:112:12:13

of chances.

You have a compilation

of ones to watch. Talk us through

2:12:132:12:19

some names.

Lizzy Yarnold. She is

carrying the flag. An amazing honour

2:12:192:12:34

to actually be the one to carry the

flag. She is hoping to become the

2:12:342:12:40

first British athlete ever to

successfully defend a Winter Olympic

2:12:402:12:45

title. Obviously, Bob skeleton is

her thing. In Sochi she led all four

2:12:452:12:51

runs and the margins got bigger.

This season she has struggled a bit

2:12:512:12:55

and only reached the podium once.

She got a bronze medal. She will

2:12:552:12:59

need to get a good time on the ice

and get to know the track. She talks

2:12:592:13:05

about different tracks having

different characteristics and having

2:13:052:13:13

a personality. She has not worked

out with this track in Pyeongchang

2:13:132:13:16

is a stroppy teenager or not.

The

opening ceremony will take her time

2:13:162:13:20

today was my one concern would be,

it being so cold. I think the

2:13:202:13:26

British team have the electric

suits. Therefore, they have warmed

2:13:262:13:31

trousers, like the swimmers have.

They have warming trousers and

2:13:312:13:35

jackets. She also said something

about she will hold alternate hands

2:13:352:13:41

and keep one hand inside the just

because they are so concerned.

I

2:13:412:13:46

hope she wears gloves as well.

And

hand warmers inside the gloves.

2:13:462:13:53

Those pictures, what is it, just

half an inch?

I would never be able

2:13:532:13:59

to do it.

My chin is too big. I'm

going to stay out of that one.

Ellie

2:13:592:14:08

Morgan was a gymnast as a kid. --

Billie Morgan. He will be competing

2:14:082:14:18

in the air at the end of the games

he will also be doing slope style.

2:14:182:14:25

This is what Jenny Jones won the

gold medal in in Sochi. We have all

2:14:252:14:29

these really exciting Trinity,

young, cool events. That is why kids

2:14:292:14:36

will love to watch.

It offers some

fantastic pictures.

It is brilliant,

2:14:362:14:43

isn't it? This time of year, when it

is grey and damp, to be able to look

2:14:432:14:49

at beautiful, snow-covered mountains

can it lets you do beautiful things.

2:14:492:14:54

This is how I see...

This is myself.

Will we see that in four years' time

2:14:542:15:02

in Beijing?

No, exactly. There are

some great characters in winter

2:15:022:15:07

Olympics.

2:15:072:15:17

Olympics. In Sochi she was

disqualified.

She say she is

2:15:182:15:25

concerned the redemption bit is

done, I've done it, this she wants

2:15:252:15:29

to do for all the fans and family

and friends who supported her. She

2:15:292:15:34

is outstanding and I'm so impressed

with her resilience. Elise Christie

2:15:342:15:39

has had a lot of help and mental

strength now. It is off the scale so

2:15:392:15:46

I really hope she can do it and her

first medal chance will be on

2:15:462:15:50

Tuesday.

Isn't it a bit ironic that

one of the other competitors was

2:15:502:15:55

South Korean and she got loads of

stick about blocking her.

And taking

2:15:552:16:01

her out. She got lots of online

abuse. Lindsey Vonn, who I would say

2:16:012:16:06

is the biggest international star

and favourite for the women's

2:16:062:16:09

downhill, has talked about the

online abuse she got after she said

2:16:092:16:13

she would compete here for the

people of America and not for the

2:16:132:16:17

President and she has already said I

won't go to the White House and not

2:16:172:16:20

visit Trump if I win a gold medal

and got a load of abuse. It is just

2:16:202:16:24

modern life and you've got to do

with it. Frankly, you have to learn

2:16:242:16:30

to disrespect what needs

disrespecting.

Looking at some of

2:16:302:16:33

the downhill skiing, one of the

things that is hard to get across in

2:16:332:16:37

television is just how steep it is.

It sounds like a very obvious thing

2:16:372:16:41

to say.

Yeah, and also they will

spray it with water and make it I

2:16:412:16:48

see a. I ski a bit and used to ski a

lot, I hate ice and I hate the noise

2:16:482:16:53

of it and everything about it. This

is Marcel Hirscher, he in terms of

2:16:532:16:57

hot favourites, he has a great

chance of winning a gold medal. He

2:16:572:17:02

has not got an Olympic gold medal

yet, he is Austrian, won six out of

2:17:022:17:07

eight slalom races in the World Cup

this year, never won an Olympic gold

2:17:072:17:11

medal, this is his great chance,

some people think he's one of the

2:17:112:17:14

greatest skiers of all time but you

cannot be considered that if you

2:17:142:17:17

don't have an Olympic gold medal.

Dave Ryding will be up against him,

2:17:172:17:22

from Lancashire, he learned to ski

on plastic slopes here.

He didn't go

2:17:222:17:26

into the snow until he was 16.

15

and I think it was.

Can you give us

2:17:262:17:32

an idea of your studio, we have

pictures of it, where you will be

2:17:322:17:37

taking the info in.

We have a

curling rink and randomly placed, a

2:17:372:17:42

skeleton and I brought those toys

back from Korea, the mascot

2:17:422:17:46

somethings.

Is that where you are

going to be sitting?

Yes, I can move

2:17:462:17:50

and walk down to various positions

but it looks quite good, doesn't it?

2:17:502:17:54

You are lucky being allowed to walk,

we have to be stuck to the sofa.

Do

2:17:542:17:58

they not let you move?

That would be

too much.

2:17:582:18:03

Do you ice the floor?

Obviously the

floor is completely covered in ice,

2:18:032:18:08

it's very cold in there, Charlie,

yes! Special shoes with offset

2:18:082:18:14

blades so that I can negotiate the

terms into the table.

You will be

2:18:142:18:18

wearing a helmet and goggles.

The

whole thing. You will tune in at

2:18:182:18:23

10:30am now.

Good idea. At least do

one sequence like that.

I would

2:18:232:18:27

actually.

I look forward to it

already.

2:18:272:18:32

It is a fabulous studio, I'm sure it

will be great, enjoy. If you want to

2:18:322:18:37

follow the Winter Olympics on the

BBC today, as Clare Balding

2:18:372:18:42

mentioned, you can watch the

build-up to the opening ceremony

2:18:422:18:45

from 10:30am on BBC One. The red

button and access online. If you

2:18:452:18:50

want around above all of the day's

action if you are in England or

2:18:502:18:57

Scotland you can watch:

2:18:572:19:05

Winter Olympics: Today

at the Games at 7pm on BBC Two.

2:19:052:19:08

Here's Carol with a look

at this morning's weather.

2:19:082:19:10

it's

2:19:102:19:11

as it was yesterday and not nearly

as cold as we are heading. The Greg

2:19:112:19:18

-- great cloud is pushing away. We

have had some rain over the

2:19:182:19:24

south-east but that will clear away,

the forecast is a cold day ahead and

2:19:242:19:26

we have wintry showers in the

forecast meaning a mixture of rain,

2:19:262:19:31

sleet and snow and hail, and also

the risk of some ice first thing

2:19:312:19:35

this morning. In between all of that

there will be a fair bit of dry

2:19:352:19:39

weather and also some sunshine. If

we start the forecast at 9am in the

2:19:392:19:42

south west of England, there are

some wintry showers this morning, as

2:19:422:19:47

a parts of Wales, northern England

and the southern and south-eastern

2:19:472:19:51

Scotland. We have the wintry rain,

sleet and snow moving eastwards so

2:19:512:19:55

as we pull out to the big map you

can see where we have rain in the

2:19:552:20:00

south-east. Through this morning it

will pull away leaving dry weather

2:20:002:20:03

behind it, some sunny spells, but

don't forget the wintry showers. The

2:20:032:20:07

wintry showers in the west

continuing to push to the east

2:20:072:20:10

joining forces with some of them

that will remain in the east.

2:20:102:20:14

Temperature is nothing to write home

about, between 4-6 so it will feel

2:20:142:20:18

cold especially if you are standing

around outside. This

2:20:182:20:28

around outside. This evening and

overnight the showers eventually get

2:20:282:20:29

into East Anglia, probably late

afternoon into the evening and clear

2:20:292:20:32

away leaving a cold and dry night

for many leaving a risk of ice

2:20:322:20:35

again. The active system coming in

from the west will introduce windier

2:20:352:20:37

conditions, rain and some snow but

most of the snow will be on the

2:20:372:20:41

hills. Temperature is -2 up to plus

two. Tomorrow we start on a cold and

2:20:412:20:51

bright note but the weather front

bringing rain and hill snow will

2:20:512:20:55

move steadily eastwards, so the

cloud continuing to build ahead of

2:20:552:20:57

it as it does so. Look at the

temperatures, windy in the south,

2:20:572:21:03

mind you, gusting up to 40, 50 mph

and possibly more but temperatures

2:21:032:21:08

tens and elevens and a little high

as we push north. The weather front

2:21:082:21:12

will continue to move away

eventually through the latter part

2:21:122:21:14

of the night into the North Sea. It

may well deposit overnight some snow

2:21:142:21:19

over southern Scotland and northern

England but as it moves away the

2:21:192:21:22

skies will brighten and we will

season sunshine and it will feel

2:21:222:21:25

cold, and we will have wintry

showers in the north and west. Some

2:21:252:21:29

of the heavier showers, some of the

snow in the showers will get down to

2:21:292:21:33

lower levels. Look at the

temperatures, going back down. Naga

2:21:332:21:38

and Charlie, it continues on this

cold theme for next week.

2:21:382:21:42

The time is 8:21am.

2:21:442:21:50

Richard Handley had Downs Syndrome

and was just 33 years

2:21:502:21:52

old when he died from complications

caused by severe constipation.

2:21:522:21:55

Yesterday, an inquest found

there were "gross and very

2:21:552:21:57

significant failings" in his care.

2:21:572:21:58

The Government is currently

reviewing all deaths of people

2:21:582:22:01

with learning disabilities

in England, and is due

2:22:012:22:04

to publish the first

of its findings next month.

2:22:042:22:06

They told BBC Breakfast

there is concern over

2:22:062:22:08

a significant number of cases.

2:22:082:22:09

Jayne McCubbin reports.

2:22:092:22:10

Richard was cheeky and had a huge

sense of the ridiculous.

2:22:102:22:13

Toilet humour.

2:22:132:22:14

Yes.

2:22:142:22:15

Close to Richard's heart.

2:22:152:22:18

Because that's how the family dealt

with what was a lifelong

2:22:182:22:20

problem for Richard.

2:22:202:22:21

Constipation.

2:22:212:22:23

A problem which should

have been manageable,

2:22:232:22:25

but which killed him when he was 33.

2:22:252:22:28

It's just so incomprehensible,

isn't it?

2:22:282:22:30

It so devastating, really.

2:22:302:22:31

It shouldn't have happened.

2:22:312:22:34

Richard's diet was well looked

after by his family and care home,

2:22:342:22:41

but when that home turned

into supported living he was allowed

2:22:412:22:43

to eat what he liked.

2:22:432:22:49

By the time he was admitted

to Ipswich hospital his constipation

2:22:492:22:51

was so severe he appeared

full-term pregnant.

2:22:512:22:53

I saw a picture of him,

actually, when he was lying

2:22:532:22:56

on the hospital bed.

2:22:562:22:57

The picture was taken after he had

had one of the procedures

2:22:572:23:00

to hopefully reduce the size

of his tummy and looking at that

2:23:002:23:03

picture I couldn't believe my eyes.

2:23:032:23:06

If all those measures

to protect him had been in place,

2:23:062:23:08

it wouldn't have happened.

2:23:082:23:09

He would still be here?

2:23:092:23:11

He would still be here, yes.

2:23:112:23:15

I'd still have a son.

2:23:152:23:17

You'd still have a brother.

2:23:172:23:23

Yesterday, an inquest

here in Ipswich found missed

2:23:232:23:25

opportunities to help

Richard and gross failures

2:23:252:23:27

to act by the hospital.

2:23:272:23:35

Report after report has shown

there are too many avoidable deaths

2:23:352:23:37

and three years ago Jeremy Hunt

ordered a world first,

2:23:372:23:40

scrutiny of every single death

of a learning disabled

2:23:402:23:42

person in England.

2:23:422:23:43

It will be a very important moment

to step out and look at the way

2:23:432:23:47

we look after that particular

highly vulnerable group.

2:23:472:23:49

That review will publish

its first report next month,

2:23:492:23:53

but we've learnt that one in ten

deaths looked at so far have come

2:23:532:23:56

with red flag indicators.

2:23:562:23:57

That might mean, as with Richard,

there is evidence that treatment

2:23:572:24:00

was delayed, or perhaps

there is evidence of abuse

2:24:002:24:03

or neglect or concerns have been

raised by a family member.

2:24:032:24:06

This woman led the Serious Case

Review into Richard's death and also

2:24:062:24:09

the scandal of Winterbourne View.

2:24:092:24:15

She says both cases expose a system

which cares deeply at the point

2:24:152:24:18

of birth, but less as

a child becomes an adult.

2:24:182:24:21

We know that they can be fantastic

when an infant arrives

2:24:212:24:23

in this world.

2:24:232:24:30

We know that the NHS has done some

astonishing things to keep

2:24:302:24:33

infants alive.

2:24:332:24:34

However, that appears to taper

and certainly sustained

2:24:342:24:40

austerity has shown us that services

have reduced and workforces

2:24:402:24:44

have diminished and that has left

families, some

2:24:442:24:46

families, floundering.

2:24:462:24:49

And do you think has cost some

learning disabled people

2:24:492:24:51

their life?

2:24:512:24:52

Yes, indeed.

2:24:522:24:53

It has.

2:24:532:24:56

Richard's family have received

apologies from the hospital,

2:24:562:25:00

their council and the care provider.

2:25:002:25:02

All say lessons have been learnt,

a phrase often used

2:25:022:25:06

after an avoidable death.

2:25:062:25:08

The Department of Health

say they must stop.

2:25:082:25:10

From July, trusts will have

the published data on deaths

2:25:102:25:13

and evidence of improvements.

2:25:132:25:14

NHS England say they are committed

to improving the lives of people

2:25:142:25:17

with a learning disability.

2:25:172:25:22

Jayne's here now.

2:25:222:25:26

Harrowing to hear from Richard's

family. Lots of people would say,

2:25:262:25:29

looking at this would say, the

review is happening but the only

2:25:292:25:37

thing is the hope that something

changes.

This world first review,

2:25:372:25:42

the hope is it leads to a better

understanding about what's going mad

2:25:422:25:46

lessons will be learned but families

are sick of that phrase. Months

2:25:462:25:49

after Richard died another person

with learning disabilities died of

2:25:492:25:54

the same problem, constipation, in

the same hospital. Lessons have been

2:25:542:25:59

learned, the hospital says. There

have been lows of positive changes

2:25:592:26:02

to try and make sure that lessons

are learned, the introduction of

2:26:022:26:06

things like health passports, annual

health checks for people with

2:26:062:26:10

learning disabilities. But Richard

had a health passport and said he

2:26:102:26:13

was largely independent. He wasn't.

Richard had access to annual health

2:26:132:26:17

checks and was invited to one, he

mist the appointment, why? They sent

2:26:172:26:22

him a letter and he couldn't read

and nobody read the letter to him.

2:26:222:26:27

New initiatives are only worth the

paper they are written on if they

2:26:272:26:30

are permitted properly. Last night

the Department of Health told me had

2:26:302:26:33

no plans to introduce a scheme

recommended by the coroner that he

2:26:332:26:37

said could have saved his life, and

that was for a health care

2:26:372:26:42

coordinator. No plans at all. We

were told that we should be shamed

2:26:422:26:47

by our health care system is for

people with learning disabilities.

2:26:472:26:50

Thank you very much.

2:26:502:26:54

The time is a 20 6am. We will be

back with you around 8:30am. Time

2:26:542:27:00

for the news, travel and weather

where

2:27:002:30:19

website at the usual address.

2:30:192:30:19

Hello, this is Breakfast with

Charlie Stayt and Naga Munchetty.

2:30:292:30:33

There are just hours to go

until the Opening Ceremony

2:30:332:30:36

of the Winter Olympics in South

Korea.

2:30:362:30:39

The sister of the North Korean

leader, Kim Jong-un,

2:30:392:30:42

has arrived in the country

and is expected to attend

2:30:422:30:44

the event alongside US

Vice President Mike Pence.

2:30:442:30:46

Kim Yo-jong's arrival marks

the first time a member

2:30:462:30:49

of the North Korean ruling family

has visited South Korea.

2:30:492:30:52

Two British extremists,

believed to be members of one

2:30:522:30:54

of the so-called Islamic State

group's most notorious cells,

2:30:542:30:58

have been captured by Syrian Kurdish

fighters in Syria

2:30:582:31:00

according to US officials.

2:31:002:31:05

They were part of a unit comprising

of four men from London,

2:31:052:31:08

who became known as "The Beatles"

because of their British accents.

2:31:082:31:11

Andy Moore reports.

2:31:112:31:13

Alexanda Kotey and

El Shafee Elsheikh -

2:31:132:31:15

the two Britons captured by Kurdish

forces last month and

2:31:152:31:22

questioned by the Americans.

2:31:222:31:23

Together with Aine Davis

and Mohammed Emwazi,

2:31:232:31:26

they formed the kidnap gang that

became known as the Beatles,

2:31:262:31:28

because they were usually masked

and their captors could hear

2:31:282:31:31

only their British accents.

2:31:312:31:36

British aid worker Alan Henning

was just one of at least two dozen

2:31:362:31:39

foreign hostages they held captive

and then executed.

2:31:392:31:43

Last year, the American State

Department designated Kotey

2:31:432:31:45

and Elsheikh as wanted terrorists

who had fought for Islamic State.

2:31:452:31:48

Kotey was born in

Paddington in London.

2:31:482:31:51

He was of Ghanaian and

Greek Cypriot background.

2:31:512:31:54

The citation said he used

exceptionally cruel torture methods,

2:31:542:31:58

including electronic

shock and waterboarding.

2:31:582:32:02

Elsheikh's family had

fled Sudan in the 1990s.

2:32:022:32:04

He became a British citizen.

2:32:042:32:07

According to the State Department,

he'd earned a reputation

2:32:072:32:09

for waterboarding, mock

executions and crucifixions.

2:32:092:32:14

The two men were captured

by the American-backed

2:32:142:32:16

Syrian Democratic Forces,

a Kurdish-led militia.

2:32:162:32:24

The fate of the two men is unknown.

2:32:252:32:28

They could be sent to the US

detention centre at Guantanamo Bay

2:32:282:32:30

or they could stand trial

in the States.

2:32:302:32:32

The Foreign Office in the UK said it

would not comment on individual

2:32:322:32:36

cases or ongoing investigations.

2:32:362:32:37

Andy Moore, BBC News.

2:32:372:32:43

Human eggs have been fully grown

in a laboratory for the first time.

2:32:432:32:46

Scientists removed egg cells

from ovary tissue at their earliest

2:32:462:32:49

stage of development,

and matured them to the point

2:32:492:32:51

they were ready for fertilisation.

2:32:512:32:53

Researchers at Edinburgh University

say it could help to preserve

2:32:532:32:56

fertility in women, such

as those undergoing chemotherapy.

2:32:562:33:00

Key US government agencies have

shut down for the second

2:33:002:33:03

time in three weeks.

2:33:032:33:04

The Senate failed to vote

on a budget deal before

2:33:042:33:07

a midnight deadline,

after a republican senator demanded

2:33:072:33:09

a last minute ammendment.

2:33:092:33:11

For the temporary shutdown to end,

the spending deal must be passed

2:33:112:33:14

in both the Senate and the House

of Representatives and then

2:33:142:33:17

signed by the President.

2:33:172:33:25

Quite a few developments linked to

newspaper ownership.

2:33:292:33:34

Yes, good morning. The owner of the

mirror and the Sunday Mirror has

2:33:342:33:38

announced it will buy those

publications, including the Daily

2:33:382:33:41

Express, the Daily Star and OK

magazine. They were previously owned

2:33:412:33:47

by Richard Desmond. We were chatting

earlier to the boss of Trinity

2:33:472:33:52

Mirror and he told me there would be

job cuts at some of the titles as

2:33:522:33:56

they get some of those efficiencies

and reduce duplication. But he

2:33:562:34:01

argued it would be good news for the

company overall and better value for

2:34:012:34:05

money and readers would not lose

out. The shares are up about 6% on

2:34:052:34:10

the back of that, so investors are

happy. US markets have fallen

2:34:102:34:15

sharply again overnight. They were

down 4% last night. We saw a fall in

2:34:152:34:22

Asia as well. But here in the UK the

FTSE 100 is only down a smidgen. The

2:34:222:34:29

falls in the markets have been

because of the feeling that the rise

2:34:292:34:32

in interest rates will be sooner

than expected. All of that could

2:34:322:34:38

affect our biggest building society,

nationwide, which has seen an

2:34:382:34:42

increase in profits over the last

nine months. But mortgage lending,

2:34:422:34:46

which could be affected by the

interest rates, has fallen by about

2:34:462:34:53

£2 billion as the housing market

cools in the UK. Loads of things

2:34:532:34:58

beautifully link between them.

Your producer did a very good job of

2:34:582:35:02

writing your scripts.

Come on! Well ban for reading them

2:35:022:35:08

so well.

I will pass on your thanks. You can

2:35:082:35:11

throw it right back at me if you

want!

2:35:112:35:18

And coming up here

on Breakfast this morning...

2:35:182:35:21

Why sending a praying

mantis to the cinema

2:35:212:35:24

could help develop robots.

2:35:242:35:28

Dippy the Dinosaur has arrived

on the Jurassic Coast

2:35:282:35:30

for the start of his UK tour.

2:35:302:35:32

We'll be there before 9am to see

how he's settling in.

2:35:322:35:40

And we'll meet SuRie,

the UK's entry for this year's

2:35:432:35:47

Eurovision Song Contest.

2:35:472:35:54

Also, Horrible Histories, 25 years

old. We will be talking to the

2:36:002:36:04

people who have been working on the

books and the programmes. This week

2:36:042:36:09

we have been celebrated the rights

granted to women over the age of 30.

2:36:092:36:15

Getting the boat 100 years ago. So

we have been seeing this drawing

2:36:152:36:22

being done by one of the guys behind

horrible histories of a suffragette

2:36:222:36:26

on the sofa and eventually with a

BBC mark.

2:36:262:36:34

The great thing about Horrible

Histories is that it has brought so

2:36:342:36:38

many things to life.

I am a big fan. It is so

2:36:382:36:46

educational, it sinks in without you

realising it.

What have we got? Two

2:36:462:36:51

and half hours until the opening

ceremony?

2:36:512:36:57

Maybe in the future Katie will look

back on this, but she is out of the

2:36:572:37:07

Olympics, a real medal hope, but she

has fractured heel and she has been

2:37:072:37:11

operated on. She tweeted a picture

this morning saying fixed, but not

2:37:112:37:15

fixed in time.

2:37:152:37:19

We can cross live now to Andy Swiss

who's in PyeongChang.

2:37:192:37:22

Andy, really disappointing news

about Katie Ormerod.

2:37:222:37:26

She was planning to carry on with

a fractured wrist, but with a

2:37:262:37:29

broken heel she has no chance.

2:37:292:37:35

Yes, it is desperately cruel for

Katie. On Wednesday she had a

2:37:352:37:41

training accident, she broke her

wrist, but she said she would still

2:37:412:37:45

carry on and compete. But 24 hours

later another accident and she broke

2:37:452:37:49

her heel and it is a bad break as

well. She has been taken for

2:37:492:37:56

emergency surgery in Seoul. She

posted a couple of photos online and

2:37:562:38:00

the message, words cannot describe

how gutted I am. She was one of the

2:38:002:38:05

British team's big medal hopes and

Team GB admit it is a big blow.

She

2:38:052:38:13

has had her fair share of injuries

already and she is very young and

2:38:132:38:17

she has got this brilliant

resilience and she comes back better

2:38:172:38:21

from injuries. You would not wish

this on anyone in the team at this

2:38:212:38:24

point and it will be very sad for

the rest of the team not to have to

2:38:242:38:30

bear. She is a very positive member

of the team and that is a big loss,

2:38:302:38:33

but we wish her the best recovery

and when she is fit and well she can

2:38:332:38:38

look forward to the future and come

back and fulfil the great potential

2:38:382:38:42

that she has.

The other big news

concerns Russian athletes. Russia

2:38:422:38:49

are banned from the games because of

their doping scandal, but

2:38:492:38:54

controversially 169 Russian athletes

are being allowed to compete here as

2:38:542:39:00

neutrals, Olympic athletes from

Russia. A couple of them were

2:39:002:39:05

competing in the figure skating

earlier on. Earlier on 47 more

2:39:052:39:09

Russian athletes had their request

to take part in these games

2:39:092:39:13

rejected. That will cause a lot of

relief for some people at the games,

2:39:132:39:19

but this issue has created confusion

and uncertainty on the eve of the

2:39:192:39:23

Winter Olympics.

I know some of the

action is already under way, but

2:39:232:39:27

what can we expect from the opening

ceremony?

The opening ceremony

2:39:272:39:33

begins at 11am your time. There have

been rehearsals taking place here

2:39:332:39:39

all week. The big theme of the

opening ceremony we are told is

2:39:392:39:43

peas, which seems relevant bear in

mind that North Korea and South

2:39:432:39:47

Korea are parading into the stadium

together under one flag, something

2:39:472:39:51

that would have seemed unthinkable a

few weeks ago. Team GB will be led

2:39:512:39:57

into the stadium by Lizzie Yarnold

who won gold at the Sochi games four

2:39:572:40:01

years ago. 40 of the 59 members of

team GB are expected to take part in

2:40:012:40:07

the opening ceremony. Some of them

are competing over the weekend. The

2:40:072:40:12

big question is can people keep warm

tonight? We had -20 oh earlier in

2:40:122:40:17

the week and the good news is that

it is getting milder today, but it

2:40:172:40:22

promises to be a pretty chilly start

to the Winter Olympics.

We can keep

2:40:222:40:29

warm at home and watch the opening

ceremony from the warmth of our

2:40:292:40:32

homes. The build-up is at 10:30

a:m..

2:40:322:40:40

I understand it could get as low as

-20 six.

We keep hearing it could be

2:40:402:40:48

the best Winter Olympics for Great

Britain. But this is not the norm.

2:40:482:40:54

Think back to the 90s and the barren

years before that, so I had a great

2:40:542:40:59

day yesterday rummaging through the

archives to come up with my

2:40:592:41:02

highlights of the last nearly 100

years.

2:41:022:41:05

It all began in the 1920s.

2:41:052:41:07

This was St Moritz, one of the early

venues which went on to stage

2:41:072:41:10

the Olympics in 1928.

2:41:102:41:11

British success in those early years

came in the ice hockey.

2:41:112:41:14

The team here eventually

won gold in 1936.

2:41:142:41:17

These days, they don't qualify.

2:41:172:41:20

Also success in bobsleigh.

2:41:202:41:22

How different the sport was then,

no protective walls.

2:41:222:41:24

And by '64, it was gold.

2:41:242:41:28

The first-ever Winter gold

for Great Britain had

2:41:282:41:30

been made in Scotland.

2:41:302:41:32

These pictures show how

massive curling had become,

2:41:322:41:34

inspired by the gold medal in 1924.

2:41:342:41:38

VOICEOVER:

For 3,000 Scotsmen,

and all the thrills of watching

2:41:382:41:40

the 30-pound stones,

as they're called, gliding

2:41:402:41:42

over the smooth ice.

2:41:422:41:44

The trouble was, after its

appearance in the inaugural games,

2:41:442:41:46

it wasn't officially reintroduced

to the Olympic family until 1998.

2:41:462:41:53

And it didn't take long for Team GB

to strike gold again.

2:41:532:41:56

It's looking good.

2:41:562:41:58

She's done it!

2:41:582:42:01

Salt Lake City, 2002.

2:42:012:42:06

The other winter sport

in which Britain has struck

2:42:062:42:08

gold is figure skating.

2:42:082:42:09

From the queen of the ice

Jeannette Altwegg in 1952

2:42:092:42:12

to the golden years,

with John Curry in the 1970s,

2:42:122:42:15

Robin Cousins four years later

and the iconic moment

2:42:152:42:17

of Torvill and Dean.

2:42:172:42:19

But for a generation,

that was pretty much that.

2:42:192:42:22

There was Eddie the Eagle

to lift the hearts,

2:42:222:42:24

and a scattering of bronze,

but the barren years continued

2:42:242:42:26

until the curlers of 2002 helped

Britain find its place again.

2:42:262:42:30

And then came the sliders

of Shelley Rudman of 2006,

2:42:302:42:33

Amy Williams with gold four years

later, followed by Lizzie Arnold

2:42:332:42:38

and the supporting crew of four

years ago, proving the current

2:42:382:42:42

generation have never

had it so good.

2:42:422:42:49

Some of the British highlights of

the last 100 years.

Your favourite,

2:42:492:42:53

Charlie? It is of course Eddie the

Eagle. It is the story. In a way it

2:42:532:43:01

is not the sport, it was the

craziness of the whole thing which

2:43:012:43:06

remains. Every time I see that...

There is something special about the

2:43:062:43:13

Winter Olympics because of the

lottery and the characters and the

2:43:132:43:16

snow and the ice. Join Neville does

not lack bottle.

2:43:162:43:24

The former Ireland international

and rugby union referee will make

2:43:242:43:27

yet more history tonight when she'll

become the first woman to take

2:43:272:43:29

charge of a Pro 14 rugby match,

Ulster versus Southern Kings.

2:43:292:43:32

Neville is already the first woman

to oversee a men's European club

2:43:322:43:35

fixture but she says

she often encounters negativity.

2:43:352:43:37

Often the little stories of coming

into clubs and, "Oh,

2:43:372:43:39

are you here to referee the third

division men's game?"

2:43:392:43:42

I'm like, "No, I'm actually

here to ref the division one."

2:43:422:43:44

And they're like, "Oh,

will you be able to keep up

2:43:442:43:47

with the pace of play?"

2:43:472:43:48

You know, it's...

2:43:482:43:49

I don't get defensive,

there's no point, because you don't

2:43:492:43:52

win if you get defensive.

2:43:522:43:53

They'll get annoyed and you'll

get annoyed, there's

2:43:532:43:56

no message being sent.

2:43:562:44:04

A great icon for women in the men's

game. It all begins at 10:30 a:m..

2:44:052:44:18

Shall we just go to the studio?

Shall we relocate? That is decided

2:44:192:44:25

then.

2:44:252:44:30

then. From ruthless rulers... I

can't say yet.

Try saying Horrible

2:44:322:44:39

Histories.

2:44:392:44:42

Over the last 25 years

Horrible Histories

2:44:422:44:44

has brought us shocking

facts and bonkers beliefs

2:44:442:44:46

all accompanied with a healthy dose

of

2:44:462:44:47

gore.

2:44:472:44:48

It began as a book series

that has gone on to sell

2:44:482:44:51

31 million copies worldwide.

2:44:512:44:55

Since then, it's become a stage

production, TV show and even a film

2:44:552:44:58

out later this year.

2:44:582:44:59

In a moment, we'll speak

to author Terry Deary

2:44:592:45:01

and illustrator Martin Brown.

2:45:012:45:03

But first, let's take a look.

2:45:032:45:04

And welcome to this lovely occasion.

2:45:042:45:05

Love Day, 1458.

2:45:052:45:06

Yes.

2:45:062:45:07

Led by Queen Margaret,

members of the English royal family

2:45:072:45:10

process into St Paul's Cathedral.

2:45:102:45:11

Oh, a little stumble there.

2:45:112:45:12

Nerves obviously playing a part.

2:45:122:45:13

The Yorkists in their white ribbons

and the Lancastrians in their red.

2:45:132:45:16

Oh, a little shove, there,

from Queen Margaret

2:45:162:45:18

on the Earl of Warwick.

2:45:182:45:21

Yes, a bit of regal horseplay,

but I'm sure all in the spirit

2:45:212:45:24

of peace and harmony.

2:45:242:45:25

And we now just await Queen

Margaret's husband, King Henry VI.

2:45:252:45:28

Ah, yes, and there he is.

2:45:282:45:29

OK.

2:45:292:45:30

Great stuff, guys.

2:45:302:45:31

Great stuff.

2:45:312:45:33

That's lovely.

2:45:332:45:34

Let's all just simmer down.

2:45:342:45:35

So the aim today is

to get you Lancies -

2:45:352:45:37

big up - and you Yorkies -

respect - together in one room,

2:45:372:45:40

just feeling the love.

2:45:402:45:43

One big happy family.

2:45:432:45:47

So all you have to do,

just lean over to the person next

2:45:472:45:50

to you and just hold hands.

2:45:502:45:53

Great, the King's gone mad again.

2:45:532:45:55

Yeah.

2:45:552:45:56

I think we're getting the Duke

of York to take over anyway.

2:45:562:45:59

You and whose army?!

2:45:592:46:01

Terry Deary and Martin

Brown, welcome.

2:46:012:46:07

Terry, just to explain for those

people who do not know, the idea is

2:46:082:46:12

yours, is that fair to say? Gulp it

started as a joke book, Horrible

2:46:122:46:18

Histories joke book. I put in a few

facts with the jokes.

For example,

2:46:182:46:25

where did the French buy their

guillotines? In the chopping centre,

2:46:252:46:29

of course. And I found that the

facts were better than the jokes, so

2:46:292:46:35

we ended up with a fact book with

jokes and a joke book with facts,

2:46:352:46:39

and Horrible Histories was born.

Accompanied with fantastic pictures.

2:46:392:46:43

I was working with the publishers

beforehand on something similar, we

2:46:432:46:48

did a bit of history in those books.

When we thought, can we do more

2:46:482:46:53

history, the editor said, hang on,

something has come in you might be

2:46:532:46:57

interested in. She put us together.

And that was Horrible History.

I am

2:46:572:47:05

sure some people are not familiar

with Horrible Histories. What have

2:47:052:47:08

you not covered yet that you would

like to cover? You have covered a

2:47:082:47:13

martyr?

We haven't done the BBC.

Look forward to that one!

I wanted

2:47:132:47:22

to do the Horrible Histories of

Australia, because their history is

2:47:222:47:26

just self written for Horrible

Histories, it is horrible.

I get

2:47:262:47:31

requests for China, India and

Russia.

Terry, fundamentally, if you

2:47:312:47:37

were to break down, you embrace the

gore. I do not want to this the

2:47:372:47:45

history part, that you embrace the

gore?

It is human experience. It is

2:47:452:47:52

not gore for the sake of gore.

People suffer this, how would you

2:47:522:47:57

cope with somebody did that to you?

You measure yourself, that is the

2:47:572:48:01

nice thing about Horrible Histories.

The transformation from books into

2:48:012:48:05

television, did that change how you

approach the stories you are

2:48:052:48:09

covering?

Not really, the BBC

brought in some absolutely top adult

2:48:092:48:15

scriptwriters, sketch writers, which

was a great idea. They are so

2:48:152:48:19

competent at their job. I stick to

writing books and plays, they do

2:48:192:48:25

their job.

When my kids were younger

I remember watching the one about

2:48:252:48:32

the Incas. There was a song about

the England Lord which has remained

2:48:322:48:34

in my head!

For the first series we

were not nervous, but it was our

2:48:342:48:41

baby, we have been with this for a

long time and we wanted to see how

2:48:412:48:45

it went. They asked our opinions but

they got it, like the stage guys

2:48:452:48:49

they just get it. They have been

going for ten years. We can sit back

2:48:492:48:54

and enjoy it like regular punters.

Illustration is your thing, how long

2:48:542:48:59

have you been working this morning?

Eight is the idea. What can we do,

2:48:592:49:05

can we do this or that? But once you

have the idea, it is a question of

2:49:052:49:11

building the picture.

So talk us

through what you went for? About it

2:49:112:49:16

is a suffragette on the couch. I am

sure you would have had

a

2:49:162:49:21

suffragette on the couch if you have

the chance, back in the day.

We have

2:49:212:49:25

been lucky to talk to descendants of

suffragettes this week, marking the

2:49:252:49:30

100 year anniversary of women over

30 getting the votes.

It is almost

2:49:302:49:37

wee won? We have come far, but a

long way to go.

When you're doing

2:49:372:49:45

the illustrations, this was done in

record time. Do you work very

2:49:452:49:50

quickly?

I wish! I am hopelessly

slow, that is my problem. I tend to

2:49:502:49:58

work same size. If the drawing in

the book will be this big, I will

2:49:582:50:03

draw it that big, otherwise I will

spend hours putting on detail that

2:50:032:50:08

is not strictly necessary. Sometimes

it is just a gag. One of my

2:50:082:50:11

favourite ones is of the Middle

Ages, or the early Middle Ages,

2:50:112:50:17

where all the documents had seals on

them. That is how you made your

2:50:172:50:20

signature. So I just drew a seal.

Which was a terrible pun.

I quite

2:50:202:50:28

like it.

You can spend too Lahmert,

it is a little gag and you move on.

2:50:282:50:33

Some of the books at 180 joints.

How

long do you spent writing them?

2:50:332:50:40

About two or three weeks. I am too

busy to spend time writing.

Terry,

2:50:402:50:46

when you were young, was history

your thing? Paint as a picture, you

2:50:462:50:52

are nine years old or 11 years old

at school, getting history taught to

2:50:522:50:57

you?

I was not taught history, I was

taught how to pass the 11 plus. I

2:50:572:51:03

learned nothing about history. At

secondary school we had stories

2:51:032:51:06

dictated to us which we copied down

verbatim.

Literally just dates, no

2:51:062:51:13

understanding?

No understanding, no

interest, no human content.

Lots of

2:51:132:51:17

people complain that history used to

be taught that way instead of doing

2:51:172:51:23

what you do, telling stories.

Importing people still think that

2:51:232:51:27

important dates are important. We

are much more about the people. --

2:51:272:51:32

important people still think. You

have your kings, queens, rulers and

2:51:322:51:37

dictators, but as poor chinooks had

to seeds and their families -- but

2:51:372:51:45

as poor schmucks had to.

Which

period stoked your interest the

2:51:452:51:53

most?

I have been asked so many

times, I always say all the eras

2:51:532:52:00

with dirty and dangerous terrible

toilets, poor food. I said the best

2:52:002:52:05

time was the 1950s when I grew up. A

little girl said was that the Middle

2:52:052:52:09

Ages?!

Are academics snooty about what you

2:52:092:52:16

do?

Some of them, because I sell

more books than men. Others say

2:52:162:52:20

really unpleasant things about me

like Tyler parasite because I use

2:52:202:52:26

that wonderful research, but that is

absolutely right.

I am pleased that

2:52:262:52:30

has been cleared up. What have you

brought?

It is a little figure. One

2:52:302:52:36

of my favourite people from history

is a peasant, just the ordinary

2:52:362:52:41

person. Mr and Mrs on the kids,

trying to survive. This year we are

2:52:412:52:48

still celebrating...

Commemorating.

Commemorating 100 years after the

2:52:482:52:52

First World War. The helmet is

synonymous with the Tommy in the

2:52:522:52:57

trenches. The thing is, that is not

on general release until the summer

2:52:572:53:04

of 1916. Some of them were left in

the trenches in the early days,

2:53:042:53:07

soldiers would come in, pick up the

helmet and use it, but as far as

2:53:072:53:12

being issued to everyone, it only

happened midway through 16. So for

2:53:122:53:17

the first two years of the war,

halfway through the war, they faced

2:53:172:53:21

machine guns and bombs wearing a

cloth cap. It puts into perspective

2:53:212:53:26

what those guys did.

That is

Horrible Histories.

Very much

2:53:262:53:31

Horrible Histories.

It has been

lovely having you.

It has been

2:53:312:53:34

great.

2:53:342:53:35

To coincide with Horrible Histories'

25th anniversary, there

2:53:352:53:37

are celebratory editions

of

2:53:372:53:38

their bestselling classics.

2:53:382:53:42

Let's have a look at the weather

with Carol

2:53:422:53:46

Let's have a look at the weather

with Carol. Where are

2:53:462:53:48

Let's have a look at the weather

with Carol. Where are you and how

2:53:482:53:50

are you?

Not too bad, I am on the roof of

2:53:502:53:53

Broadcasting House in London. A band

of rain has pushed through, showers

2:53:532:53:58

are following behind, and for many

others it is not as cold a start as

2:53:582:54:02

yesterday. It was -6 at sure airport

yesterday, this morning it was 12

2:54:022:54:09

degrees higher than that. Quite a

difference. But it will nevertheless

2:54:092:54:14

be cold. First thing this morning

there is the risk of ice on

2:54:142:54:18

untreated surfaces, so watch out.

The rain is clearing the south-east

2:54:182:54:22

and we have wintry showers, meaning

a mix of rain, sleet and snow and

2:54:222:54:27

maybe some hail. Across south-west

England, Wales, northern England in

2:54:272:54:32

south-east Scotland.

Looking at the big map, you can see

2:54:322:54:35

how the rain across the south-east

moves away. There will be a lot of

2:54:352:54:39

dry weather and sunshine. Those

wintry showers I have just

2:54:392:54:51

wintry showers I have just pointed

out will move eastwards through the

2:54:512:54:52

course of the day and it is cold

enough for them to be falling almost

2:54:522:54:55

anywhere. Do not be surprised if you

see sleet or snow at times.

2:54:552:54:57

Temperatures roundabout four 27

Celsius, feeling chilly.

2:54:572:55:01

Through the evening and overnight,

we start with wintry showers across

2:55:012:55:04

East Anglia before they clear away.

Clear skies follow behind, it will

2:55:042:55:08

be cold. The risk of ice on

untreated surfaces again. Then an

2:55:082:55:13

area of low pressure with a potent

front comes into the West,

2:55:132:55:18

introducing stronger winds and some

rain and mostly held snow.

2:55:182:55:21

Temperature wise, -2-macro two plus

two, still cold.

2:55:212:55:27

Tomorrow starts with the risk of ice

but a fair amount of sunshine. As

2:55:272:55:31

the weather front comes in, the wind

will strengthen across the South,

2:55:312:55:35

gusting 40 or 50 mph, possibly more.

The rain will come in with held

2:55:352:55:41

snow. Temperature wise, double

figures, we will not know ourselves.

2:55:412:55:46

Ten or 11 for sun. -- for some.

Temperature is higher in the North

2:55:462:55:52

than this afternoon. From Saturday

into Sunday the whole system pushes

2:55:522:55:57

into the North Sea. It could deposit

snow across southern Scotland and

2:55:572:56:03

northern England. We will keep an

eye for you. As it moves behind it

2:56:032:56:07

hit will brighten. There will be

some sunshine but it will feel cold.

2:56:072:56:11

Towards the West we have those

wintry showers, also in the north.

2:56:112:56:18

It will be snowing at times lower

levels.

2:56:182:56:21

We might be complaining of the cold,

it will be nothing like they will

2:56:212:56:25

see in South Korea. Today it will be

try, not as cold as it has been.

2:56:252:56:31

These other temperatures tomorrow,

-16 in the morning, warming to -14

2:56:312:56:36

in the afternoon. A westerly winds

in excess of 30 mph. So the wind

2:56:362:56:41

chill with that, it will be bone

chilling. It should stay dry, but

2:56:412:56:46

heading from Sunday to Monday we

will see wintry showers, and it will

2:56:462:56:50

be windy as well.

2:56:502:56:56

Glad you stay dry, Carol Good use of

brolly, congratulations!

2:56:562:57:02

It sounds like something

from a Disney movie, a bespectacled

2:57:022:57:04

praying mantis with a special power

which makes him different

2:57:042:57:06

to all the other insects.

2:57:062:57:09

In fact, this was part of some very

serious research into 3D

2:57:092:57:11

vision and how it might be

used in robotics.

2:57:112:57:14

It was led by Vivek Nityananda,

who can tell us more.

2:57:142:57:22

A very good morning to you. This was

your research. The way we have

2:57:222:57:28

explained it is you have these

praying mantis, they are wearing 3D

2:57:282:57:33

goggles? Can you set up what was

happening?

We put on these 3D

2:57:332:57:38

goggles on the praying mantis is so

we could show them the kind of 3D

2:57:382:57:44

illusions.

How did you put the

2:57:442:57:45

we could show them the kind of 3D

illusions.

How did you put the

2:57:452:57:45

goggles on them?

We fix them with

beeswax, we put a spot of beeswax on

2:57:452:57:55

the praying mantis's forehead, if

you like.

What are they seeing?

Just

2:57:552:58:02

the normal world through the

glasses, but when we show them a

2:58:022:58:06

stimulus we are showing different

colours to each eye, that is what

2:58:062:58:09

the glasses help achieve.

When you

show them this stimulus, does that

2:58:092:58:15

appear to them as a 3D film would

appear to us if we were wearing 3D

2:58:152:58:20

glasses?

More or less exactly that.

So what is the advantage of putting

2:58:202:58:25

these spectacles on a praying mantis

when you could just see what happens

2:58:252:58:29

to us?

The only insects that we know

have 3D vision, we can ask whether

2:58:292:58:36

they have a completely different way

of doing 3D vision compared to

2:58:362:58:40

others, if it is an easier, simpler

solution to doing three division

2:58:402:58:45

then we can try to implement it.

How

do you know if an insect has three

2:58:452:58:51

division?

By putting on these

glasses and sharing them the

2:58:512:58:54

allusions.

But you said you put them

on because you know they have it?

2:58:542:58:59

Some work in the 1980s but prisms in

front of their eyes, by manipulating

2:58:592:59:05

the strength of the prisms it showed

that the praying mantis has three

2:59:052:59:12

division.

Where does this research

lead you? What do you do with this

2:59:122:59:20

information?

They have a different

way of seeing in 3D which is much

2:59:202:59:25

easier to implement. We're hoping we

can model that and use in robotics.

2:59:252:59:30

How would it be useful?

It requires

much less computing power. You can

2:59:302:59:37

have a lightweight robot, you can

compute distance using much less

2:59:372:59:41

processing power. Currently we try

to mimic human 3D vision. If you can

2:59:412:59:48

make mantis 3D vision, you can do it

with much less.

So effectively you

2:59:482:59:53

could have a robot able to judge

depth of field rather than just

2:59:532:59:57

going to a fixed point, knowing it

could come up to you and be close to

2:59:573:00:02

you but keep a proximity?

Keep

distance, or when it reaches out to

3:00:023:00:09

catch something I can judge that

distance.

How long before we see

3:00:093:00:13

this?

We have just found out what

the mantises do, we have developed a

3:00:133:00:20

model and are ready to collaborate.

Thank you, Vivek Nityananda. Good to

3:00:203:00:24

see you.

3:00:243:00:30

For more than a century at the

Natural History Museum in London,

3:00:303:00:36

Dippy the dinosaur made it his home

and now he is going on tour. John

3:00:363:00:41

Maguire is there for us this

morning. Quite a lot of youngsters

3:00:413:00:46

have been enjoying it.

It is

fantastic. Yes, it officially opens

3:00:463:00:50

tomorrow. It is ticketed before

Dippy goes on to a right across the

3:00:503:00:58

UK. It has been an incredible

challenge to get him here to Dorset

3:00:583:01:02

in Dorchester. They just about

squeezed him in and this is how they

3:01:023:01:09

did it from this footage. They

pieced all the pieces together. The

3:01:093:01:15

cameraman is coming downstairs to

get a view from downstairs.

3:01:153:01:23

get a view from downstairs. His 292

plaster of Paris bones weighed 22

3:01:233:01:27

tonnes in title. Even his head is 50

kilos. This was made with a 3-D

3:01:273:01:32

printer. But as you can see, a very

big animal with a very small brain.

3:01:323:01:42

I said there were 292 bones to make

up Dippy. At the moment there are

3:01:423:01:51

only 291 because we are going to put

the very last bone, a Toblerone,

3:01:513:01:56

onto Dippy right now to finish the

installation. 11-year-old Harry is

3:01:563:02:01

going to do the honours for us.

Harry, will you do that for us? It

3:02:013:02:09

is quite a delicate operation.

3:02:093:02:10

Just put it on and wriggle it.

Perfect.

How was that?

Exciting.

3:02:223:02:29

Tell me what you had to do to win

the competition?

I had to send in an

3:02:293:02:35

e-mail. What did you say? That I

love dinosaurs.

What do you love

3:02:353:02:44

about dinosaurs?

They are big

creatures for the land.

Especially

3:02:443:02:52

when you are and anyone. 150 million

years since they walked the face of

3:02:523:02:59

the Earth and 42 years he will be

going on tour. Why take him and

3:02:593:03:04

about?

It is an opportunity to

inspire and engage people and we

3:03:043:03:10

hope it will encourage people to

come back to their local museums.

3:03:103:03:14

Dorset County Museum is a fabulous

museum and there is every reason for

3:03:143:03:19

people to come back and explore it

again even if they have been here

3:03:193:03:22

before.

You have been working with

Debbie since? 1980 exhibition mark

3:03:223:03:30

what is the appeal of this bag of

bones?

He is amazing, and he has had

3:03:303:03:37

a fantastic history since being here

in 1905. Dinosaurs evoke the

3:03:373:03:41

imagination. Children have visited

him, parents have taken their

3:03:413:03:47

children, so he is the people's

dinosaurs and he is in Dorset and it

3:03:473:03:52

is so exciting to be working with

Dorset Museum to bring him to live.

3:03:523:03:57

He does feel as if he has been

brought to life. Over the next few

3:03:573:04:01

years who will be going to

Birmingham, Glasgow, Cardiff,

3:04:013:04:05

Rochdale, ending up in Norwich in

2020. You will not be able to get as

3:04:053:04:13

close as this, but pretty close. I

suppose this is what it would have

3:04:133:04:17

felt like to have been a leaf all

those years ago.

A very poignant

3:04:173:04:25

thing to imagine yourself as. How

lucky was Harry to be able to put

3:04:253:04:28

the last claw in?

3:04:283:04:31

In a moment we'll meet SuRie,

the UK's entry for this year's

3:04:313:04:34

Eurovision Song Contest.

3:04:343:04:35

First, a last look at the headlines

where you are this morning.

3:04:353:06:10

First, a last look at the headlines

temperature of 7 degrees. I am back

3:06:103:06:14

with the latest after the one

o'clock news.

3:06:143:06:20

20 years ago, the late

Sir Terry Wogan hosted

3:06:213:06:23

the Eurovision Song Contest

from Birmingham, after the UK won

3:06:233:06:26

the competition with Love Shine

a Light by Katrina and the Waves.

3:06:263:06:33

Does that feel like 20 years ago?

I

think it does.

3:06:333:06:37

I think it does.

3:06:373:06:41

In the two decades that followed,

we've sent an eclectic mix

3:06:413:06:43

of girl groups, boy bands,

duos and solo artists - covering

3:06:433:06:45

nearly every musical style -

to try and emulate that success.

3:06:453:06:48

But despite that, on only three

occasions have we made the top ten.

3:06:483:06:51

This year, SuRie will represent us

with her song, Storm.

3:06:513:06:56

This year will be different.

3:06:563:07:05

Congratulations.

Thank you very

much. Let's have a look at the highs

3:07:053:07:10

and lows of the last 20 years.

3:07:103:07:11

Let's have a look at the highs

and lows of the last 20 years.

3:07:113:07:16

# I see a picture in a frame...

3:07:163:07:18

Let's hear it for Imaani

and the United Kingdom,

3:07:183:07:20

let's make it two on the trot.

3:07:203:07:22

# Riding alone on an empty train.

3:07:223:07:24

# Where are you?

3:07:243:07:26

# Bye-bye, baby.

3:07:263:07:28

# Lie to me baby.

3:07:283:07:29

# Survive without you, baby.

3:07:293:07:31

# Baby, bye.

3:07:313:07:32

# Baby, bye-bye.

3:07:323:07:34

# There's nothing I'm afraid of.

3:07:343:07:37

# I'll show you what I'm made of.

3:07:373:07:39

# Show you all it's my time.

3:07:393:07:45

# I can, I will.

3:07:453:07:47

# I know I can.

3:07:473:07:49

# Get back up again.

3:07:493:07:55

# The way I speak the truth.

3:07:553:07:59

# I'd never lie to you.

3:07:593:08:02

# If you just believe in the things

that your eyes can see.

3:08:023:08:05

# Believe in me.

3:08:053:08:09

# Just give me your

hand and hold on.

3:08:093:08:13

# Together we'll dance

through this storm.

3:08:133:08:21

Flawless, that has to be one

of our strongest entries

3:08:213:08:24

in the last few years.

3:08:243:08:28

And hopefully that is reflected

in the votes later on.

3:08:283:08:34

What position did that one make? 50.

But she did beautifully. It was

3:08:343:08:43

stunning. We will see your entry in

a moment, but you must go into it

3:08:433:08:48

with some trepidation and cynicism

may be because of how the votes come

3:08:483:08:51

through?

I am probably one of the

most cynical people out there, but I

3:08:513:08:58

actually do not. Once you get

through the hurdle of Wednesday

3:08:583:09:03

night, you decide programme, we do

not have to qualify for the final.

3:09:033:09:07

We do not have to get through the

semi-s. We will just be a part of

3:09:073:09:12

one of the biggest night in the

calendar. It is better than the

3:09:123:09:16

Super Bowl half-time show from a

viewing point of view, so there is a

3:09:163:09:20

lot of fun to be had. I know there

is a leaderboard but...

Shall we see

3:09:203:09:24

your son?

# We can hold our hands together

3:09:243:09:32

through the storm.

# Storms do not last for ever, for

3:09:323:09:39

ever, remember.

# We can hold our hands together,

3:09:393:09:44

through the storm, through the

storm.

3:09:443:09:51

That was you in a winning

performance. Congratulations.

3:09:513:09:57

Eurovision is completely mad. The

event is madness, that is why people

3:09:573:10:01

love it so much. You seem like a

very calm and mellow person.

It is

3:10:013:10:07

very early, Charlie.

You are

entering a mad world, although you

3:10:073:10:12

have been to the event before as a

backing singer, but for non-British

3:10:123:10:17

entries.

Correct.

How does that

work?

I worked for the Belgians in

3:10:173:10:24

2015 as a backing singer and dancer

and last year in 2017 with lunch.

3:10:243:10:31

For which country?

For Belgium

again.

So the backing singers do not

3:10:313:10:38

have to be the nationality of the

country? You know, the lead artist

3:10:383:10:42

does. So you know about the

magnitude of this event having been

3:10:423:10:48

there, so you might have a bit of an

advantage?

I know what to expect,

3:10:483:10:55

the incredible team that put that

amazing, tight ship together. It is

3:10:553:11:00

a different ball game being the lead

artist and representing your

3:11:003:11:04

country, there is a different level

of responsibility. I thrive on it.

3:11:043:11:09

All performers are self obsessed

show-offs and that is what we live

3:11:093:11:12

for and that is what we do, so I

can't wait.

What do family and

3:11:123:11:17

friends say?

I can't keep up with

the messages that are coming in and

3:11:173:11:23

replying to people because it was

only yesterday, but it is very

3:11:233:11:26

exciting.

Have the days of... I have

used the word mad before, but the

3:11:263:11:39

gimmicky performances, the

extraordinary artists in the past to

3:11:393:11:42

have one extraordinary costumes and

to have done something weird to

3:11:423:11:47

generate interest, are people still

doing that? Is there the temptation

3:11:473:11:51

to come up with a stand on stage to

generate interest? You Looe it is

3:11:513:11:56

definitely an entertainment show.

With such a huge, universal appeal

3:11:563:12:01

with the songwriting, whether you

like the songs or not there is

3:12:013:12:06

something for everyone in that show.

But there are a lot of cultural

3:12:063:12:11

differences. I do not think our

British, sarcastic humour translates

3:12:113:12:15

well, but there are beautiful,

cultural differences to be respected

3:12:153:12:20

and supported and people want to put

on a colourful, wonderful or very

3:12:203:12:26

minimal, emotionally connected

performers, and have that

3:12:263:12:29

entertainment.

Have you decided how

you are going to present Storm? You

3:12:293:12:35

have got three months. We have got

fun to get into the creative

3:12:353:12:40

meetings and develop that.

A wind

machine?

Umbrellas everywhere.

3:12:403:12:45

Flowing capes. Someone from the BBC

on a ladder with a watering can.

Put

3:12:453:12:53

it in the mix and see what comes

out. Very good luck. Enjoy it.

It is

3:12:533:13:01

impossible not to.

That is nearly

it. Don't forget in an hour and 15

3:13:013:13:08

minutes BBC One is going to be

leading you up to the opening

3:13:083:13:13

ceremony to the Winter Olympics at

PyeongChang.

3:13:133:13:19

It is just getting dark there with

the time difference. We can see the

3:13:193:13:23

venue where the ceremony will be

taking place, so it is looking

3:13:233:13:26

rather dramatic with the mountains

surrounding it. All events start at

3:13:263:13:33

11

3:13:333:13:33