11/03/2018 Breakfast


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11/03/2018

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Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Ben Thompson and Naga

0:00:040:00:07

Munchetty.

0:00:070:00:08

Traces of the nerve agent used

in the attack of a former Russian

0:00:080:00:11

spy have been detected

in a restaurant in Salisbury.

0:00:110:00:14

With more than 240 witnesses

identified and 200 pieces

0:00:140:00:16

of evidence, the Home Secretary says

police are working "at speed"

0:00:160:00:19

to identify those responsible.

0:00:190:00:22

Good morning.

0:00:410:00:41

It's Sunday, 11th March.

0:00:410:00:43

Also this morning -

an investigation is launched

0:00:430:00:46

into why thousands of homes

in England and Wales were left

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without water in the wake

of the Beast from the East.

0:00:490:00:52

"The greatest deal for the world."

0:00:520:00:53

Donald Trump defends his decision

to hold face-to-face talks

0:00:530:00:56

with the North Korean

leader, Kim Jong-un.

0:00:560:01:00

A very good morning.

0:01:000:01:02

In sport, Ireland are

the Six Nations Champions,

0:01:020:01:04

with a game to spare,

and can now complete the Grand Slam

0:01:040:01:07

against England next week.

0:01:070:01:08

And Louise has the weather.

0:01:080:01:13

Good morning. A murky start to this

Sunday. There is some fog around,

0:01:130:01:21

lifting to low cloud. Scattered

showers in the south, drier and

0:01:210:01:25

further north. More details coming

up. -- and drier and brighter

0:01:250:01:30

further north.

0:01:300:01:31

Good morning.

0:01:310:01:32

First, our main story.

0:01:320:01:33

Traces of a nerve agent

that was used to attack a former

0:01:330:01:36

Russian spy and his daughter

in Salisbury have been found

0:01:360:01:39

in the Italian restaurant

where they had eaten.

0:01:390:01:41

Sergei and Yulia Skripal were found

collapsed on a bench nearby

0:01:410:01:44

and remain critically

ill in hospital.

0:01:440:01:46

The substance was found in one part

of the city's Zizzi restaurant

0:01:460:01:49

during a continuing

forensic examination.

0:01:490:01:50

No-one who was in the restaurant

at the same time is thought

0:01:500:01:54

to be in danger.

0:01:540:01:55

Andy Moore has the latest.

0:01:550:01:57

One week after the attack with a

nerve agent, the police

0:01:570:02:01

investigation continues behind aid

Harrier at the pizzeria where Sergei

0:02:010:02:06

Skripal and Yulia Skripal eight. --

behind a barrier. Shortly after

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leaving the restaurant they were

found on a park bench, fighting for

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their lives. One of the vehicles

which took them to hospital was

0:02:170:02:20

removed by specialist military teams

for fear it might also contain

0:02:200:02:24

traces of nerve agent. Sergei

Skripal and Yulia are both

0:02:240:02:27

critically ill. Russia has denied

any involvement in their attempted

0:02:270:02:31

murder. After chairing a second

meeting of the Cobra emergency

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committee, the Home Secretary said

the investigation was proceeding at

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speed, with 200 pieces of evidence,

and more than 240 witnesses.

It is a

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really painstaking, detailed

investigation, as the police go

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through the 200 pieces of evidence,

huge amounts of CCTV. They are

0:02:500:02:53

absolutely committed to making sure

that we do that in a completely

0:02:530:02:58

professional way.

The third victim

of this attack, Detective Sergeant

0:02:580:03:02

Nick Bailey, is seriously ill,

though able to talk to his family.

0:03:020:03:07

He released a statement saying he

didn't consider himself a hero and

0:03:070:03:10

was merely doing his job.

0:03:100:03:12

The water regulator

is to investigate why thousands

0:03:120:03:15

of homes in England and Wales

suffered shortages or a total loss

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of supply following

the recent cold weather.

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Ofwat's review follows emergency

handouts of water for people

0:03:200:03:22

who were cut off.

0:03:220:03:25

Simon Jones reports.

0:03:250:03:32

Emergency water handouts on the

streets. Tens of thousands of

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customers, particularly in

south-east England and parts of

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Wales, forced to endure days of

inconvenience as the taps run dry.

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They are simply meant to get the

water fixed.

I think this is

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absolutely appalling. It is shocking

that there is such poor can

0:03:490:03:53

indication, well, zero can indicate

on.

As pipes burst in the fall which

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followed the cold spell, the water

company said they were facing an

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unprecedented situation. -- the

thaw. Ofwat said today it understood

0:04:020:04:10

how distressing it had been for

people to be left without a vital

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public service the review will

examine:

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Southern Water, for example, is

giving households who were cut off

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for more than a day, £75, condemned

as derisory by some of those

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affected. Ofwat wants to hear from

businesses, households and local

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authorities. It wants proof that

lessons will be learnt. Otherwise,

0:04:370:04:41

it says, it may be forced to act.

0:04:410:04:43

President Trump has told crowds

at an election rally in Pennsylvania

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that his proposed meeting

with the North Korean leader

0:04:460:04:49

Kim Jong-un could lead

to the "greatest deal

0:04:490:04:51

for the world."

0:04:510:04:52

During a wide-ranging speech,

the American leader warned Europe

0:04:520:04:54

about more possible tariffs,

and also launched his slogan

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for re-election in 2020.

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And he talked up the prospects

of a peace deal with North Korea.

0:04:590:05:07

They are not sending missiles up,

and I believe that. I really do. I

0:05:090:05:15

think they want to do something, I

think they want to make peace, I

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think it is time and I think we've

shown great strength. I think that's

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also important, right?

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More measures to cut the use

of plastics will be announced

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by the Chancellor

in the coming days.

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Philip Hammond will use his spring

statement on Tuesday to announce

0:05:310:05:34

plans for a public consultation

into taxing plastic waste.

0:05:340:05:36

The government's target

is to eliminate avoidable plastic

0:05:360:05:38

waste, by 2042.

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A police investigation has been

launched after anti-Muslim letters

0:05:390:05:42

were sent to a number

of people in several cities.

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The letters were delivered

to addresses in Bradford,

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Leicester, London,

Cardiff and Sheffield.

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They contained suggestions

of a series of violent acts to be

0:05:480:05:51

taken against Muslims and mosques.

0:05:510:05:54

Counter-terrorism police say they're

investigating a possible hate crime.

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New evidence has emerged about an

attempt by the construction firm

0:06:040:06:08

Karelian to get an emergency

government bailouts of £10 million

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just before it collapsed.

Carillion... The firm has wound up

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with debts of almost £1 billion.

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China's parliament,

the National People's Congress,

0:06:220:06:23

is expected to approve a ruling

today which would remove

0:06:230:06:26

the two-term limits

for the country's presidency.

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The move will allow Xi Jinping

to stay in office beyond the end

0:06:280:06:32

of his second term in 2023,

and possibly rule indefinitely.

0:06:320:06:34

We can talk to our correspondent

Stephen McDonell, who is in Beijing.

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Stephen, had to see you. How much

longer does Xi Jinping want to stay

0:06:420:06:48

in power?

Well, in the coming hours,

when the 3000 delegates here at the

0:06:480:06:58

Great Hall of the People vote for Xi

Jinping to effectively be able to

0:06:580:07:02

stay on beyond two terms, they are

giving him the green light to stay

0:07:020:07:06

on for as long as he likes. And

given the power that Xi Jinping

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already has in China, it is hard to

imagine there will be much of a

0:07:100:07:16

dissenting vote. We will know in the

coming hours what the official

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numbers are, but the Congress here

has never rejected any major

0:07:190:07:23

proposal from the Communist Party

and I don't think it is going to

0:07:230:07:26

start today. It is interesting,

there hasn't been anything like a

0:07:260:07:29

national debate about this, or

discussion in the media. It is all

0:07:290:07:34

being downplayed here, despite the

enormous ramifications of this

0:07:340:07:37

decision. So even though,

technically, as the head of the army

0:07:370:07:41

and the chairman of the Congress

party, Xi Jinping could have hung

0:07:410:07:44

around anyway without the presidency

title, it seems he wants to have a

0:07:440:07:49

title as well, and the fact that he

has gone to all this trouble to

0:07:490:07:53

change the constitution to allow him

to do it, well, it seems like you

0:07:530:07:57

can be sure that Xi Jinping is going

to be hanging around for many more

0:07:570:08:01

years to come, beyond his second

term. What time do we hear the

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announcement?

It will be coming in

the next couple of hours.

OK. We

0:08:050:08:11

will be speaking to you soon, then.

0:08:110:08:14

Rare footage of a baby western

lowland gorilla has been filmed

0:08:140:08:17

in a National Park in Congo.

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I love this.

Me too. Can you tell?

0:08:210:08:27

The baby is thought

to be a week old.

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It will now spend two to three years

clinging to its mother.

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Western lowland gorillas

are critically endangered with only

0:08:330:08:35

an estimated 100,000

left in the wild.

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We do like baby stories today. It is

Mothering Sunday.

I like that idea,

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cleaning on for several years.

Still

the same in my house. -- clinging.

0:08:480:08:56

Let's bring you up to date with the

papers. The Mail on Sunday is taking

0:08:560:09:01

a look at one charity, shame on the

Bono charity believes. They are

0:09:010:09:08

criticising certain behaviours by

workers at this charity. Being

0:09:080:09:11

subjected to a toxic culture of

leading and abuse. The reason you

0:09:110:09:16

have the picture of Bono there, he

has been representing that charity,

0:09:160:09:21

or has been a patron of that

charity.

The front of the Sunday

0:09:210:09:26

express, more on our top story

today, related to the fallout from

0:09:260:09:30

that spy story in Salisbury. This

story suggests that the poison which

0:09:300:09:35

was used might have been a

sophisticated ploy, sent by a

0:09:350:09:41

delivery service, that is how they

think it got into the country.

0:09:410:09:44

Before arriving at the home of the

people in the centre of this

0:09:440:09:49

poisoning story.

The Sunday Times is

taking a lookout is -- taking a look

0:09:490:09:56

at the spy story. Sergei Skripal,

the latest Russian to be attacked on

0:09:560:10:00

British soil. It is asking how we

should react. The picture here is

0:10:000:10:04

the Russian agent Anna Chapman, part

of a 2010s -- 2010 spy swap which

0:10:040:10:10

saw Sergei Skripal come into the UK.

And Mothering Sunday, as we have

0:10:100:10:16

been talking about, cards going

gender neutral. A supermarket is

0:10:160:10:20

sending gender neutral Mother's Day

cards as retailers reduce the use of

0:10:200:10:23

the M word, as the Sunday Times puts

it. To make today's celebration more

0:10:230:10:28

transgender inclusive.

The front of

the Sunday Telegraph, the main

0:10:280:10:33

picture here. We will be discussing

this in sport later. England

0:10:330:10:36

crashing out of the Six Nations. The

main story, corrupt Russian is

0:10:360:10:42

facing a UK VISA ban. All of this is

fallout from that scar -- spy

0:10:420:10:46

scandal. And what that could mean

for Russians living in the UK. And

0:10:460:10:50

just down the bottom as well,

accident and emergency chaos leads

0:10:500:10:53

to ambulance meltdown, as paramedics

are forced to withdraw some crews

0:10:530:11:00

amid a shortage of ambulances able

to get out to reach people.

A quick

0:11:000:11:04

look at the Observer as well. Gemma

artisan on the front page. -- Gemma

0:11:040:11:10

Arterton. Protesting in London

against male violence towards women.

0:11:100:11:17

Top paid men out strip women by four

to one, with figures showing the

0:11:170:11:21

almost four times more men than

women in Britain's highest-paid

0:11:210:11:24

posts. It shows the extent of the

glass ceiling blocking women from

0:11:240:11:29

top jobs.

Today, of course, is

Mothering Sunday. It is time to save

0:11:290:11:36

on key to our mothers are all that

they have done for us. -- time to

0:11:360:11:40

say thank you.

We should do that

every day.

Yes. Although my mother

0:11:400:11:46

might not thank me for the pictures

we are about to show you, pictures

0:11:460:11:50

of me and my mum. This is us, we

were travelling on a North Sea

0:11:500:11:57

Ferry, it was freezing.

Who are the

others?

My sister and my dad. Very

0:11:570:12:01

bad hair in that one, I know. This

is in Dubai, on the beach at night.

0:12:010:12:08

Looking very on message, with my BBC

T-shirt.

Did your mother used to

0:12:080:12:12

give you have gel?

Are you talking

about that second picture? It is a

0:12:120:12:19

bit wild. Mum probably won't thank

me to showing those pictures.

Your

0:12:190:12:26

mother looks absolutely lovely. It

can be a tricky day, Mothering

0:12:260:12:30

Sunday, for people who have lost

their mothers. That is something we

0:12:300:12:33

will be referred in on later on as

well.

Yes, stay tuned for that. We

0:12:330:12:38

have lots of messages for mothers

this Mothering Sunday. You are

0:12:380:12:41

watching breakfast on BBC News. Here

are the main stories this morning.

0:12:410:12:46

Traces of the nerve agent used to

poison a former Russian spy and his

0:12:460:12:50

daughter have been found at a

restaurant in Salisbury. The water

0:12:500:12:55

regulator will investigate why

thousands of homes in England and

0:12:550:12:58

Wales were left without water during

the cold weather earlier this month.

0:12:580:13:05

Let's check in on what the weather

has in store for us this Mothering

0:13:050:13:10

Sunday. Louise has the details. It

is looking at it and misty out there

0:13:100:13:15

that?

0:13:150:13:19

Yes, a murky start, but it will

improve. A relatively mild day for

0:13:190:13:22

many of us. But it is foggy in the

morning, so please bear that in mind

0:13:220:13:27

and be careful. The day will develop

into one with brief sunny spells and

0:13:270:13:31

scattered showers. Showers mostly

across England and Wales today. If

0:13:310:13:36

we look at the pressure chart, the

UK is like the jam filling for a

0:13:360:13:42

frontal sandwich. We are surrounded.

This one producing rain across the

0:13:420:13:45

extreme south-east coast, and this

one down to the south-west which

0:13:450:13:48

will arrive later on. Yesterday's

rain, that is just sitting across

0:13:480:13:52

Orkney and Shetland. We are not too

concerned about that. Not a bad

0:13:520:13:56

start for the day across Scotland

and Northern Ireland and northern

0:13:560:13:59

England. We will have this rain,

just fringing Lincolnshire and East

0:13:590:14:03

Yorkshire. A scattering of showers

developing elsewhere and stop

0:14:030:14:07

temperatures perhaps not as warm as

yesterday, but nevertheless, not too

0:14:070:14:11

bad. 9- 12 degrees. Relatively

straightforward for Mothering

0:14:110:14:14

Sunday. Going into Sunday night, we

could see more of an organised spell

0:14:140:14:21

of wet weather developing across

England and Wales. Some clearer

0:14:210:14:25

skies further north. A touch of

light frost into Scotland.

0:14:250:14:27

Temperatures close to freezing,

elsewhere would that cloud and rain,

0:14:270:14:32

we will see those temperatures

holding up. -- elsewhere with that

0:14:320:14:37

cloud. The week ahead looks

unsettled. Tuesday will probably be

0:14:370:14:41

the best day. There will be rain at

times, but it should stay mild. A

0:14:410:14:45

potential for cold weather to return

by the weekend, but let's not worry

0:14:450:14:49

about that yet. Monday, this area of

low pressure could bring persistent

0:14:490:14:53

rain across England and Wales.

Scotland, Northern in London to

0:14:530:14:57

Northern Ireland, again, a

relatively straightforward start to

0:14:570:14:59

the day. Maybe misty and murky with

light winds early in the morning.

0:14:590:15:03

This rain could be a nuisance

through the day. We will have to

0:15:030:15:07

keep an eye on that. In terms of the

feel of things we are looking at

0:15:070:15:11

around 9- 10 degrees in the north,

higher into south, but only around

0:15:110:15:15

11 degrees. A brief ridge of high

pressure looks likely to build on

0:15:150:15:19

Tuesday. A quiet day, potentially

the best day of the week. Largely

0:15:190:15:25

fine and dry. Maybe misty first

thing in the morning, but that will

0:15:250:15:29

lift away. Sunny spells coming

through. Temperatures will sit at

0:15:290:15:32

around 7- 12 degrees. Susie have

outdoor plans, and you need to get

0:15:320:15:37

into the garden, my ad bias is that

Tuesday looks likely to be the best

0:15:370:15:42

day. -- so if you have outdoor

plans.

Are you a gardener?

A

0:15:420:15:48

reluctant one. I have a garden, but

I don't like it.

Be proud of that.

0:15:480:15:54

Not everybody has to be a gardener.

My mother was the gardener, she used

0:15:540:15:59

to help me a lot. But she has a bad

back at the moment.

So I am on my

0:15:590:16:04

own. Well, we were sure that! -- we

wish her that!

0:16:040:16:10

We'll be back with a summary

of the news at 6:30am.

0:16:100:16:13

Now it's time for the Film Review.

0:16:130:16:16

Hello there, welcome

to The Film Review here on BBC News.

0:16:230:16:31

And taking us through this

week's cinema releases is,

0:16:330:16:36

who else, but Mark Kermode.

0:16:360:16:37

So Mark, what have you

got for us this week?

0:16:370:16:40

Very mixed bag.

0:16:400:16:40

We have Gringo, which is

a kind of caper movie

0:16:400:16:43

starring David Oyelowo.

0:16:430:16:44

We have You Were Never Really Here,

which is the new film

0:16:440:16:48

by Lynne Ramsay, whose work I love.

0:16:480:16:49

And Mom And Dad, a sort of satirical

horror film starring Nic Cage.

0:16:490:16:53

OK, so let's kick off with Gringo.

0:16:530:16:55

This is about a businessman who

becomes a kind of wanted criminal?

0:16:550:17:00

Yeah, so the story is,

David Oyelowo is a sort of fairly

0:17:000:17:08

hapless character working

for a drug company.

0:17:110:17:13

And he ends up faking his own

kidnapping in Mexico,

0:17:130:17:15

because he discovers essentially

that he's going to lose his job,

0:17:150:17:18

it looks like he's going to lose his

wife, he hasn't got anything else

0:17:180:17:22

to lose, so he fakes

his own kidnapping.

0:17:220:17:24

It starts off with him

going on the trip to Mexico,

0:17:240:17:27

with Joel Edgerton

and Charlize Theron,

0:17:270:17:29

both of whom are chewing the scenery

as his evil superiors.

0:17:290:17:32

Here's a clip.

0:17:320:17:33

There it is again.

0:17:330:17:34

What is that smell?

0:17:340:17:35

Barbecue - I always

bring it for Angel.

0:17:350:17:37

Angel, buenos dias.

0:17:370:17:38

There you go.

0:17:380:17:39

Gracias.

Hello.

0:17:390:17:39

New app.

Amazing.

0:17:390:17:47

New app.

Amazing.

0:17:580:18:03

Know what else is amazing

is actually learning

0:18:030:18:06

a foreign language.

0:18:060:18:06

Taco Bell, huh?

That's sensational.

0:18:060:18:11

I mean, as I said,

chewing the scenery.

0:18:110:18:13

Here's the thing with this film.

0:18:130:18:14

In terms of the plot,

it is all over the place,

0:18:140:18:17

it's one where the writers have

clearly decided to throw a bunch

0:18:170:18:21

of ideas at the wall

and see what sticks,

0:18:210:18:23

and only some of them do.

0:18:230:18:25

It gets by, however,

largely on the fact that

0:18:250:18:27

you like the cast.

0:18:270:18:28

So, David Oyelowo is a very

likeable antihero figure.

0:18:280:18:31

They are very dislikeable

villains in a real -

0:18:310:18:33

she's basically playing

Cruella Deville, and they're

0:18:330:18:35

enjoying themselves.

0:18:350:18:36

There are entire

character threads...

0:18:360:18:37

Sharlto Copley turns up

halfway through suddenly,

0:18:370:18:39

and the film takes an entire

different direction.

0:18:390:18:41

There are entire sections of it that

don't hang together,

0:18:410:18:44

and at the end you go,

none of it added up.

0:18:440:18:47

But whilst watching it,

I enjoyed it much more

0:18:470:18:49

than I thought was going to

because the individual set pieces.

0:18:490:18:52

There is one set piece

in which a drug lord demands to know

0:18:520:18:56

from the people who he's holding

hostage whether or not they agree

0:18:560:18:59

that Sergeant Pepper

is the best Beatles album.

0:18:590:19:01

And it's one of those weirdly

surreal moments that works.

0:19:010:19:04

Others don't.

0:19:040:19:10

The film could have

lost 20 or 30 minutes.

0:19:100:19:12

It could have lost

one entire thread.

0:19:120:19:14

It's shambolic, no question,

and it's a mess, no question.

0:19:140:19:17

But it's an entertaining mess,

largely because I like

0:19:170:19:19

the central characters.

0:19:190:19:20

David Oyelowo is absolutely

brilliant, and he kind of holds

0:19:200:19:23

the whole thing together.

0:19:230:19:24

Is Sergeant Pepper

the best Beatles album?

0:19:240:19:26

No.

No, OK.

0:19:260:19:26

Glad we got a verdict there.

0:19:260:19:28

Now, next, You Were

Never Really Here.

0:19:280:19:30

This is a kind of

vigilante thriller?

0:19:300:19:32

Well, it looks like

that but it isn't.

0:19:320:19:34

It's a Lynne Ramsay film.

0:19:340:19:37

Lynne Ramsay made Rat Catcher,

We Need To Talk About Kevin.

0:19:370:19:40

She is someone who makes films

entirely on her own terms.

0:19:400:19:43

This is based on a novella

by Jonathan Ames.

0:19:430:19:45

And the story is that

Joaquin Phoenix is an enforcer,

0:19:450:19:48

somebody who is a hired gun,

who specialises in retrieving lost

0:19:480:19:51

kids, lost teenagers.

0:19:510:19:52

He is sent at the beginning

of the film to get back

0:19:520:19:55

a senator's missing daughter.

0:19:550:19:56

That's the mechanics of the plot.

0:19:560:19:58

However, Lynne Ramsay isn't really

that interested in plot mechanics.

0:19:580:20:01

What she's interested in is the fact

that he's a very damaged character.

0:20:010:20:04

She described him as somebody who's

got what is like a head full

0:20:040:20:08

of broken glass.

0:20:080:20:09

And what the film does is it gives

you this nominal thriller narrative,

0:20:090:20:12

but actually it's a very poetic

portrait of somebody who's life

0:20:120:20:15

is falling apart, who's haunted

by the ghosts of the past,

0:20:150:20:18

who's haunted by past

abusive traumas.

0:20:180:20:20

Plus it upends your expectation,

because you know at the beginning

0:20:200:20:23

that he's a kind of...

0:20:230:20:24

He's a hired enforcer,

his weapon of choice is a hammer,

0:20:240:20:27

and yet he loves his mother,

he looks after his mother.

0:20:270:20:30

When they're at home,

Psycho comes on the television,

0:20:300:20:33

so you think, "Oh,

he's Norman Bates."

0:20:330:20:34

But he's not Norman Bates.

0:20:340:20:36

Later on, Shawshank Redemption

comes on the television,

0:20:360:20:38

which is very significant

if you're a Shawshank fan,

0:20:380:20:40

which I am.

0:20:400:20:41

The score is by Johnny Greenwood,

whose work is brilliant.

0:20:410:20:44

The whole film has this really

overwhelming sensory experience.

0:20:440:20:47

The whole film has this really

overwhelming sensory experience.

0:20:470:20:49

It's got a brilliant sound design.

0:20:490:20:51

See it in a cinema

that's playing it loud.

0:20:510:20:53

And I've now seen it a couple

of times, and the first time I found

0:20:530:20:58

it elliptical, almost

hard to follow the plot,

0:20:580:21:00

but you don't care because what

you're following is the characters.

0:21:000:21:03

Second time around I thought,

this is proper cinema making.

0:21:030:21:05

Lynne Ramsay is an absolute genius,

nobody makes films like her.

0:21:050:21:08

She makes few films,

and when she does they are

0:21:080:21:11

always worth it.

0:21:110:21:12

As far as I'm concerned,

she has a perfect strike rate,

0:21:120:21:15

and this is already one

of my favourite films of the year

0:21:150:21:18

and we're only in March.

0:21:180:21:20

Wow.

Yes.

0:21:200:21:20

Now, Mom And Dad, which sounds very

nice, with Nicholas Cage,

0:21:200:21:23

but it's actually parents turning

quite nasty on their children?

0:21:230:21:26

Yeah.

0:21:260:21:27

So it's one of those

"what if" horror movies,

0:21:270:21:29

what if parents suddenly decided

to turn on their kids,

0:21:290:21:32

because they've been in this case,

we think, infected either by a virus

0:21:320:21:35

or perhaps by a signal which is

coming through the television.

0:21:350:21:38

It seems to be sort of sent

through television distortion.

0:21:380:21:41

The film is directed by the guy

who is one half of Neveldine

0:21:410:21:44

and Taylor, who made films

like Crank, who are not

0:21:440:21:47

known for understatement.

0:21:470:21:48

So, at the very beginning

of the film, it starts as a kind

0:21:480:21:52

of standard thing, a mother

and father and they're resentful

0:21:520:21:54

of their children's freedoms

but they're also very protective.

0:21:540:21:57

And then this strange,

horrific outbreak happens,

0:21:570:21:59

and the parents turn

on their children, but also

0:21:590:22:01

at the same time remain weirdly,

satirically protective.

0:22:010:22:03

Here's a clip.

0:22:030:22:11

It's not what you think, Mr Ryan.

0:22:180:22:20

What are you doing in my house?

0:22:200:22:22

Is my daughter here?

0:22:220:22:23

Carly?

Joshua?

0:22:230:22:23

Is that dad?

I want dad.

0:22:230:22:25

We need to leave God damn it.

I want to get my backpack.

0:22:250:22:29

Why?

Fine just get it.

0:22:290:22:30

We need to talk.

Oh, do we need to talk?

0:22:300:22:33

Yeah, we do need to

talk you can't be hit.

0:22:330:22:35

It's not about me and Carly,

it's about what's happening.

0:22:350:22:38

I get exactly...what's happening.

0:22:380:22:39

It's called hormones.

0:22:390:22:40

Now, this is one of those films

0:22:400:22:42

in which Nic Cage goes full Nic

Cage.

0:22:420:22:49

There is a sequence

in which he attacks a pool table,

0:22:490:22:52

and it ranks alongside, you know,

Nic Cage's craziest moments.

0:22:520:22:54

The reason it works is this.

0:22:540:22:56

If you have a horror film like this,

it has to have a central truth

0:22:560:23:00

at the heart of it.

0:23:000:23:02

And the central truth is,

these parents basically resent

0:23:020:23:04

the fact that they -

they were once young,

0:23:040:23:06

crazy, free-spirited,

Nic Cage and some kind of...

0:23:060:23:09

And now their lives have changed,

because they've dedicated themselves

0:23:090:23:11

to looking after the children.

0:23:110:23:14

So, although what happens is a sort

of supernatural manifestation,

0:23:140:23:17

it's sort of clawing away at that

idea that these resentments

0:23:170:23:20

are actually real things.

0:23:200:23:21

It's a really odd film,

it's definitely not for everybody.

0:23:210:23:24

It's very taboo-breaking.

0:23:240:23:24

It's dealing with a very taboo

issue, which is parents

0:23:240:23:27

turning on children.

0:23:270:23:28

We've seen plenty of movies

with scary children,

0:23:280:23:30

you know, whether it's

Village Of the Dammed,

0:23:300:23:32

or The Excorcist.

0:23:320:23:33

This is the other way round.

0:23:330:23:35

And it works, up to a point.

0:23:350:23:37

It's completely bonkers.

0:23:370:23:43

There are several moments

in it when you think,

0:23:430:23:46

this is just preposterous.

0:23:460:23:47

But it works because it's got

a central core idea,

0:23:470:23:49

and it's not afraid, you know,

to over-crank itself.

0:23:490:23:52

And I enjoyed it, but I was very

aware after watching it,

0:23:520:23:55

I'm enjoying it as a horror fan.

0:23:550:23:57

It's not for everybody.

0:23:570:23:59

Well, I can imagine as a parent

you might find it pretty

0:23:590:24:02

uncomfortable kind of viewing.

0:24:020:24:03

Yeah, and the moments that it works

the best are exactly those moments,

0:24:030:24:06

when it taps into the idea

that this is outrageous,

0:24:060:24:09

this is terrible, but it's tapping

into a sort of parental resentment

0:24:090:24:12

idea, which is a very,

very taboo idea.

0:24:120:24:15

So it's, you know, as I said,

not for everybody, but if you're

0:24:150:24:18

a horror fan, if you like films

like Teeth, if you like films

0:24:180:24:22

like American Mary,

if you like offbeat,

0:24:220:24:24

strange, quirky American horror

movies, that dare to go into fairly

0:24:240:24:27

dark places, then I think it's

an interesting film.

0:24:270:24:29

And it is genuinely

horrifying, is it?

0:24:290:24:31

It's genuinely satirically nasty,

which is slightly different.

0:24:310:24:36

OK.

0:24:360:24:37

All right, I think we

get the distinction.

0:24:370:24:39

You're not going, I can tell.

0:24:390:24:41

I'm not going, you're

absolutely right!

0:24:410:24:43

What is best out at the moment?

0:24:430:24:45

Fantastic Woman, which just

won to the Oscar for

0:24:450:24:47

Best Foreign Language Film,

is a wonderful story

0:24:470:24:49

about a transgender woman who finds

herself shut out of her life

0:24:490:24:53

when her lover dies

and the family descend.

0:24:530:24:55

It has a brilliant performance

by Daniela Vega, who is just

0:24:550:24:58

wonderful, really mesmerising,

a great screen presence and really

0:24:580:25:00

carries the movie.

0:25:000:25:08

Sebastian Lelio, who directed it,

I think does a wonderful job

0:25:080:25:11

of mixing on the one hand, you know,

realist, gritty story elements

0:25:110:25:14

with moments of fantasy.

0:25:140:25:15

At one point it turns into a sort

of musical fantasia,

0:25:150:25:18

in which she levitates.

0:25:180:25:19

There's another moment when she's

walking down the street and the wind

0:25:190:25:22

is blowing, and it's almost

like a supernatural wind.

0:25:220:25:25

And the film is about, you know,

finding your identity,

0:25:250:25:28

finding your place,

asserting your name,

0:25:280:25:30

you know, saying, "I am

Marina, this is who I am."

0:25:300:25:32

I've seen it a few times now,

and every time I've seen I've seen

0:25:320:25:36

more in it.

0:25:360:25:37

It's really well worth watching,

and it was a deserved Oscar winner.

0:25:370:25:40

So, your recommendation?

Absolutely.

0:25:400:25:41

All right, and the best DVD?

Killing Of A Sacred Deer.

0:25:410:25:44

Killing Of A Sacred Deer

is the new film by Yorgos Lanthimos.

0:25:440:25:47

It's interesting because it was at

Cannes the same time

0:25:470:25:50

the Lynne Ramsay film was at Cannes,

and they shared the prize

0:25:500:25:53

for best screenwriting.

0:25:530:25:54

This is a very, very odd story

about a medic who has a secret

0:25:540:25:58

in his past.

0:25:580:25:59

It starts off looking like it's

a kind of strange social satire,

0:25:590:26:02

and then it turns into

a full-blooded horror movie.

0:26:020:26:05

It's more horrifying than anything

that's in Mom And Dad.

0:26:050:26:07

I mean, it's genuinely

disturbing at the end.

0:26:070:26:09

But it's a film, again,

in which it's all to do with the way

0:26:090:26:13

in which the story is told,

rather than the story itself.

0:26:130:26:16

It makes a very, very interesting

double bill with the Lynne Ramsay

0:26:160:26:20

movie, and I don't want to say it

again but the Lynne Ramsay movie,

0:26:200:26:23

everybody has to go and see.

0:26:230:26:26

There is quite a lot

around which blurs horror

0:26:260:26:29

and social satire.

0:26:290:26:30

Horror is in a fantastic

period at the moment.

0:26:300:26:32

Horror is in a period in which it

doesn't look like a single genre.

0:26:320:26:36

We are seeing horror inflecting

a whole lot of other

0:26:360:26:39

areas, and obviously...

0:26:390:26:39

That was my I grew

up on horror movies.

0:26:390:26:42

Get Out is a movie I absolutely love

- if you call that a horror movie.

0:26:420:26:46

It is absolutely a horror movie.

0:26:460:26:48

And people started saying it wasn't

a horror movie when it got nominated

0:26:480:26:51

for Oscars, because that's always

the thing which scares people off.

0:26:510:26:54

But it is a horror movie,

it's in the tradition of Ira Levin,

0:26:540:26:58

but it's also a social satire,

it has elements of comedy in it.

0:26:580:27:01

You know, horror can inflect

absolutely everything.

0:27:010:27:03

It is the genre to end all genres.

0:27:030:27:06

Well, it's your favourite genre.

It is, absolutely.

0:27:060:27:08

Fair enough.

0:27:080:27:08

Mark, thank you very much indeed.

0:27:080:27:10

Thank you.

0:27:100:27:10

Just a quick reminder before you go

that you will find more film news

0:27:100:27:14

and reviews from across the BBC

online at bbc.co.uk/MarkKermode

0:27:140:27:17

and you can find all our previous

programmes on the BBC

0:27:170:27:20

iPlayer as well.

0:27:200:27:20

But that is it for this week.

0:27:200:27:22

Thank you very much for watching,

and from us, goodbye.

0:27:220:27:25

Hello, this is Breakfast

with Ben Thompson and Naga

0:28:340:28:37

Munchetty.

0:28:370:28:39

Good morning.

0:28:390:28:39

Here's a summary of today's main

stories from BBC News.

0:28:390:28:47

Traces of a nerve agent which was

0:28:480:28:49

Traces of a nerve agent which was

used to attack a former Russian spy

0:28:490:28:51

and his daughter in Salisbury have

been found in the Italian restaurant

0:28:510:28:55

where they had eaten. The substance

was found in one part of the city's

0:28:550:29:00

Zizzi restaurant during a forensic

examination. Sergei Skripal and his

0:29:000:29:05

daughter Yulia were found collapsed

on a bench nearby and remained

0:29:050:29:08

critically ill in hospital. Home

Secretary Amber Rudd says the

0:29:080:29:11

government is using enormous

resources to try to identify those

0:29:110:29:14

responsible. The water regulator is

to identify why thousands of homes

0:29:140:29:18

in England and Wales suffered

shortages or a total loss of supply

0:29:180:29:22

following the recent cold weather.

Ofwat's review follows emergency

0:29:220:29:25

handouts of water for people who

work at. They will look at how well

0:29:250:29:31

firms communicated with customers

and if compensation levels are

0:29:310:29:33

adequate.

0:29:330:29:34

President Trump has told crowds

at an election rally in Pennsylvania

0:29:340:29:37

that his proposed meeting

with the North Korean leader

0:29:370:29:39

Kim Jong-un could lead

to the "greatest deal

0:29:390:29:41

for the world."

0:29:410:29:43

During a wide-ranging speech,

the American leader warned Europe

0:29:430:29:45

about more possible tariffs,

and also launched his slogan

0:29:450:29:48

for re-election in 2020.

0:29:480:29:50

More measures to cut the use

of plastics will be announced

0:29:500:29:53

by the Chancellor

in the coming days.

0:29:530:29:55

Philip Hammond

0:29:550:29:56

will use his Spring statement

on Tuesday to announce plans

0:29:560:29:59

for a public consultation

into taxing plastic waste.

0:29:590:30:02

The government's target

is to eliminate avoidable plastic

0:30:020:30:04

waste, by 2042.

0:30:040:30:08

A police investigation has been

launched after anti-Muslim letters

0:30:080:30:11

were sent to a number

of people in several cities.

0:30:110:30:13

The letters were delivered

to addresses in Bradford,

0:30:130:30:19

Leicester, London,

Cardiff and Sheffield.

0:30:190:30:20

They contained suggestions

of a series of violent acts to be

0:30:200:30:23

taken against Muslims and mosques.

0:30:230:30:25

Counter-terrorism police say they're

investigating a possible hate

0:30:250:30:27

crime.

0:30:270:30:35

China's Parliament, the national

People's Congress, is expected to

0:30:350:30:38

approve a ruling today which would

remove the two term limits for the

0:30:380:30:42

country's residency. The move will

allow Xi Jinping to stay in office

0:30:420:30:46

beyond the end of his second term in

2023. It could mean he could

0:30:460:30:50

possibly rule indefinitely. The

limit was brought in more than 30

0:30:500:30:54

years ago. Internet censors have

deleted critical comments on social

0:30:540:30:58

media platforms.

0:30:580:31:01

Time to talk about sport, and I

think if you are an island fan, you

0:31:010:31:05

might have a bit of a sore head this

morning. -- Ireland.

I think so,

0:31:050:31:10

yes.

It is justified.

Completely

justified. Winning it with a game to

0:31:100:31:17

spare. They beat Scotland by 28

points, to eight. A comfortable

0:31:170:31:22

victory, a bonus point victory. That

meant England needed a bonus point

0:31:220:31:27

victory against the French in Paris,

but that didn't happen. So island

0:31:270:31:31

are the well-deserved champions. --

Ireland.

0:31:310:31:34

So the Six Nations Championship has

been decided with a game to spare.

0:31:340:31:38

But of course the match

between England and Ireland next

0:31:380:31:41

week still has a lot riding on it.

0:31:410:31:43

Ireland will want to go

unbeaten in the tournament

0:31:430:31:45

to complete the Grand Slam.

0:31:450:31:47

And as Joe Wilson reports,

it was a monumental occasion

0:31:470:31:49

in Dublin.

0:31:490:31:50

The Six Nations was supposed to be

settled next weekend, wasn't it?

0:31:500:31:53

Well, why wait. Seize the moment on

Saturday night.

The Irish!

In

0:31:530:31:58

Dublin, confidence flowed from the

moment Scotland's misfiring

0:31:580:32:01

attacking gave the ball to Jacob

Stockdale. He has been the finisher

0:32:010:32:05

for so much of Ireland's could work

in this Six Nations. Before

0:32:050:32:09

half-time he had his second try. A

third for Ireland soon followed.

0:32:090:32:16

Here, the move was finished,

blacking horn. Nice. These

0:32:160:32:20

significant dive to the line came

from Sean Cronin. Beautiful in its

0:32:200:32:24

own way, because it meant Ireland

had a bonus point to go with their

0:32:240:32:28

wind. Well, everyone was keen to get

an image of Sean Cronin and family.

0:32:280:32:34

A great story for Ireland here in

Dublin. What nobody knew at the

0:32:340:32:38

final whistle here was how things

would turn out in Paris. England

0:32:380:32:44

needed four tries against France to

keep in step with Ireland, but never

0:32:440:32:47

looked near it. This high tackle and

defence led to a penalty try to

0:32:470:32:51

France. England conceded penalties

throughout the match. Ran into the

0:32:510:32:55

French defence throughout the match.

When they finally found their way to

0:32:550:32:59

the line, it was too late. You don't

have power, you don't have momentum.

0:32:590:33:04

France suddenly have both. And

Ireland had it all tournament.

We

0:33:040:33:10

know the biggest challenge is ahead

still. It is very muted upstairs,

0:33:100:33:16

very strange to win the championship

with a game to go and so much still

0:33:160:33:20

to play for.

Islands get their own

chance to beat England next weekend.

0:33:200:33:24

-- Ireland.

0:33:240:33:27

England women's hopes of a second

successive Six Nations title took

0:33:270:33:30

a major blow as they

lost 18-17 to France.

0:33:300:33:32

Both sides were unbeaten

going into the match,

0:33:320:33:35

but Jessy Tremouliere's

dramatic late try inflicted

0:33:350:33:37

England's first defeat.

0:33:370:33:37

France are now four points clear

at the top of the table with one

0:33:370:33:41

game to play.

0:33:410:33:44

West Ham United have launched

an inquiry after supporters invaded

0:33:440:33:47

the pitch during yesterday's 3-0

defeat at home to Burnley.

0:33:470:33:50

The game had to be stopped a number

of times due to members

0:33:500:33:53

of the crowd invading

the pitch to protest

0:33:530:33:55

against the club's owners.

0:33:550:33:56

Burnley weren't distacted

by the turmoil, and went on to win

0:33:560:33:59

comfortably by 3 goals to nil,

but the West Ham protests continued

0:33:590:34:03

after the game and both

the club and the FA say

0:34:030:34:06

they will investigate.

0:34:060:34:14

The atmosphere was horrible.

Obviously we have had fans running

0:34:170:34:22

on the pitch, and we know, to be

honest, we know a lot of its isn't

0:34:220:34:27

aimed at the players. It is for

other reasons. But we have to be

0:34:270:34:33

many enough to be able to play in

that atmosphere. It is hard, don't

0:34:330:34:37

get me wrong.

0:34:370:34:38

Manchester United have opened up

a 5-point lead in the race for 2nd

0:34:380:34:42

place in the Premier League

after they beat Liverpool 2-1

0:34:420:34:45

at Old Trafford yesterday.

0:34:450:34:46

Striker Marcus Rashford scored

both of his sides goals

0:34:460:34:48

in the first half.

0:34:480:34:49

A fantastic first effort before

a deflected shot put United out

0:34:490:34:52

of reach.

0:34:520:34:54

West Bromwich Albion

are still firmly bottom of the table

0:34:540:34:57

after a 4-1 defeat at

home to Leicester City.

0:34:570:34:59

The result means the pressue

continues to pile up on manager

0:34:590:35:02

Alan Pardew having lost the last

five premier League games

0:35:020:35:05

and the club has only one

league win since August.

0:35:050:35:13

We have to kind of still believe and

still fight, and it was just that

0:35:140:35:19

last ten or 15 minutes that were

painful for us, because it kind of

0:35:190:35:23

knocked us. We had played so well in

that period. It is difficult for

0:35:230:35:28

players, sometimes. I'm not going to

make excuses for them, because we've

0:35:280:35:32

got to fight to the end in every

game. They got that message after

0:35:320:35:36

the game.

0:35:360:35:37

In the Scottish Premiership Rangers

can close the gap on Celtic to just

0:35:370:35:41

three points this afternoon

when the two teams meet

0:35:410:35:43

in the Old Firm match at Ibrox.

0:35:430:35:45

Third place Aberdeen

were held to a goalless draw

0:35:450:35:47

at Partick Thistle after only

managing this one shot on target

0:35:470:35:50

in the whole match.

0:35:500:35:51

Elsewhere St Johnstone,

Hamilton and Kilmarnock won.

0:35:510:35:55

Now whether you're a golf fan

or not, you should really keep

0:35:550:35:58

an eye on what's going on in Florida

later today because we could witness

0:35:580:36:02

one of the greatest sporting

comebacks in sport.

0:36:020:36:04

Before suffering back problems

which required surgery,

0:36:040:36:06

Tiger Woods dominated golf as world

number one and winner of 14 majors.

0:36:060:36:10

He's currently ranked 388th!

0:36:100:36:12

But at times he's looked back

to somewhere near his best

0:36:120:36:15

at the Valspar Championship.

0:36:150:36:21

He hasn't lost it!

No. What a shot

that was.

0:36:210:36:27

He'll go into today's final

round just a shot off the lead

0:36:270:36:30

with his first title for four

and a half years firmly

0:36:300:36:33

in his sights.

0:36:330:36:36

You know, I tell you...

What they

show that was.

The fans are so

0:36:360:36:42

behind him. He has had such to multi

this time in his personal life and

0:36:420:36:47

on and off the course.

But they are

firmly behind him now.

You come back

0:36:470:36:52

to a top-level sport like that

without so much pressure. Lots of

0:36:520:36:56

people behind him, but without that

pressure and expectation that you

0:36:560:37:00

are always going to win.

You can see

the talent is there, obviously.

0:37:000:37:04

Now to the Winter Paralympics

in Pyeongchang.

0:37:040:37:06

Britain has won a couple of medals

overnight and and speak

0:37:060:37:12

to our reporter Kate Gray.

0:37:120:37:13

Millie Knight and wrote wild --

Brett Wild claimed their second

0:37:130:37:21

medals in the downhill skiing. Kate?

That's right. It was a very early

0:37:210:37:32

start for the alpine skiers, going

in D super-G. I am now joined by

0:37:320:37:39

Menna Fitzpatrick and Jen Kehoe.

You'll smile say it all, but take us

0:37:390:37:45

through the last four hours? The

audience may not realise you fell in

0:37:450:37:49

the downhill yesterday, very early.

24 hours later you have won bronze

0:37:490:37:52

in the super-G.

Definitely an

emotional 24 hours. Lots of crying.

0:37:520:37:59

Today they were good tears,

thankfully. Yesterday we just had a

0:37:590:38:03

little bit too much speed,

unfortunately. And we came in with

0:38:030:38:07

90 kilometres an hour in to be

fourth gate, which isn't even the

0:38:070:38:11

fastest pass, so it was just

unfortunate that we fail. We then

0:38:110:38:19

turned it around, definitely, for

today.

Did you hurt yourself at all?

0:38:190:38:23

Were there any injuries which hit

you today?

Thankfully not!

Jen

0:38:230:38:28

Kehoe, what a responsibility for

you. Any fears for you? Being the

0:38:280:38:33

guide, you must think, was it my

fault?

It is hugely nerve-wracking.

0:38:330:38:38

Menna Fitzpatrick and I spend a lot

of time together and I could see

0:38:380:38:42

when we pushed out of the gate this

morning, I could see how nervous she

0:38:420:38:46

was. My job then becomes encouraging

her anyway that I can, get her to

0:38:460:38:50

ski confidently. So the first half

of today's run was just about, yeah,

0:38:500:38:58

building up confidence. I about

halfway down you got into it, and

0:38:580:39:03

started skiing really well. -- by

about halfway. Sauber please, an

0:39:030:39:08

amazing recovery. It is so hard when

you crashed downhill, there is often

0:39:080:39:13

quite a high injury rate. But for

me, seeing that, it is terrifying.

0:39:130:39:18

It is a huge responsibility.

A

bronze medal at your first-ever

0:39:180:39:21

games. Did you ever imagine this? Do

you think this is the first of more

0:39:210:39:27

to come?

Hopefully. We still have

three more races. It is a massive

0:39:270:39:32

dream come true for both of us. I am

just so glad we have done it

0:39:320:39:38

together.

Well, you can just tell

you are over the moon. Iron over the

0:39:380:39:43

moon for you as well. I have seen

you in training and I how hard you

0:39:430:39:47

worked. Well done. Just up data on

what else is going on here, Great

0:39:470:39:53

Britain have been competing in the

curling, but they lost to

0:39:530:39:56

Switzerland earlier today. They will

get another chance later on against

0:39:560:39:59

Finland. We will keep you updated.

Kate, thank you very much indeed.

0:39:590:40:05

Brilliant, isn't it? We have a

couple of silver medals now and a

0:40:050:40:09

bronze.

Halfway to the lower target,

I think that was 6- ten.

And one

0:40:090:40:13

week to go.

We are on our way.

0:40:130:40:17

It's Mothering Sunday today -

a chance for many of us to say thank

0:40:170:40:20

you to our mums

for all that they do.

0:40:200:40:23

You can hear the cast of viewers,

thinking, I forgot the card. --

0:40:230:40:28

gasps.

0:40:280:40:29

But for those who've lost their mum,

lost a child, or struggled to have

0:40:290:40:33

children, it can be a difficult day.

0:40:330:40:35

Over the last week BBC Radio 5 Live

has been speaking to men

0:40:350:40:39

who lost their mums

when they were children.

0:40:390:40:41

One of them, financial

expert Martin Lewis,

0:40:410:40:43

lost his mother in a riding accident

a few days before his 13th

0:40:430:40:46

birthday.

0:40:460:40:50

Nobody told me how serious it was.

And I always remember worrying,

0:40:500:40:55

because they said my mum was in

hospital, worrying that she wouldn't

0:40:550:40:59

be there for my birthday in three

days. And my grandmother, my

0:40:590:41:03

father's mother, said that she will

be here for your bar mitzvah. And I

0:41:030:41:08

thought nothing of it. And the next

day my dad told me that she had died

0:41:080:41:14

that morning. And that was... That

was the end of my childhood, that

0:41:140:41:17

moment. And I cried every day until

I was 15. And then I stopped crying.

0:41:170:41:31

And it's... You would know this, it

is probably the defining moment that

0:41:310:41:35

changed my life. I'm very proud of

what they achieved in my career.

0:41:350:41:39

Even when I made my wife, she would

go with her mother for Mother's Day,

0:41:390:41:43

and I wouldn't go with her. I

couldn't do it. I couldn't cope with

0:41:430:41:47

Mother's Day. Only now, thank God,

with the great joy of having my own

0:41:470:41:53

daughter, but my wife has become

mummy, can Mother's Day finally

0:41:530:41:56

become something that I can actually

cope with.

0:41:560:42:00

A very emotional account by Martin.

I am sure that will resonate with

0:42:000:42:04

many people watching today. We are

going to talk to somebody a bit

0:42:040:42:08

later. We will be talking about

Mothering Sunday all day today. What

0:42:080:42:11

we will also be talking to somebody

later on this morning. Claire

0:42:110:42:15

Richmond, from the child breathe and

charity, will be talking to us later

0:42:150:42:19

about that. -- child bereavement.

Louise has the weather for us today.

0:42:190:42:27

Louise, it is an interesting one out

there? Not very Mothering Sunday

0:42:270:42:31

weather?

0:42:310:42:35

No, it is horrible. Misty and foggy

at the moment. That it will improve.

0:42:350:42:40

So if you are heading off with

daffodils to tell your mother you

0:42:400:42:43

love her, hopefully the sunshine

will come through. Scattered showers

0:42:430:42:46

and sunny spells for some of us

today. We are actually surrounded by

0:42:460:42:50

frontal systems. But it isn't too

bad, because this little fellow who

0:42:500:42:54

is being a nuisance is actually

sitting off in the North Sea. We are

0:42:540:43:03

not expecting too many problems. A

scattering of showers developing

0:43:030:43:09

across central and southern areas

once the mist and fog lifts.

0:43:090:43:12

Hopefully that will lift a low cloud

which will then thin and break.

0:43:120:43:15

Northern England, Northern Ireland

Scotland, not bad afternoon. Likely

0:43:150:43:19

to see temperatures peaking at 9-

12. Think back to where we were this

0:43:190:43:24

time last week when we had just

finished with the beast from the

0:43:240:43:27

east. We still have lots of lying

snow. Overnight tonight, we will see

0:43:270:43:31

an area of low pressure drifting up

from the south-west which could

0:43:310:43:35

cause more significant outbreaks of

rain across England and Wales. The

0:43:350:43:38

key is that it will be a cold end to

the night, 5-7. Further north, with

0:43:380:43:45

clear skies, we may have a touch of

frost in the sheltered glens of

0:43:450:43:49

Scotland. Looking ahead it seems as

though we will see a bit of rain at

0:43:490:43:53

times. Dry interludes. It will stay

mild, until potentially next week.

0:43:530:43:57

We could see more cold weather

coming back. What we do need to

0:43:570:44:00

worry about that yet. Let's get

Monday out of the way. Monday, that

0:44:000:44:04

area of low pressure is still a

nuisance across England and Wales.

0:44:040:44:08

Generally speaking, the further

north you are, Scotland and northern

0:44:080:44:11

England and Northern Ireland, they

may be cloudy but hopefully it

0:44:110:44:14

should be predominantly dry with

light winds. Outbreaks of rain

0:44:140:44:17

across England and Wales as that low

pressure clears through. In terms of

0:44:170:44:22

the feel of things we are looking at

highs of around 7- 11 degrees.

0:44:220:44:26

Again, pretty much just about where

they should be, maybe one degree or

0:44:260:44:31

so down. On Tuesday, a ridge of high

pressure looks likely to build and

0:44:310:44:35

quiet things down considerably. If

you have plans, Tuesday certainly

0:44:350:44:39

looks likely to be the best day of

the week this week. Dominantly dry.

0:44:390:44:43

A scattering of showers around, and

temperatures again peaking at 7- 12.

0:44:430:44:50

It will be predominantly dry and we

should see some spells of sunshine

0:44:500:44:54

coming through. Again, the potential

for more rain to come into Northern

0:44:540:44:58

Ireland a little bit later on. That

will stay more unsettled. Generally

0:44:580:45:03

speaking, as I said, not a bad week.

Let's hope the mist and fog lifts

0:45:030:45:07

since you can get off to see mothers

and tell them you love them.

0:45:070:45:15

Yesterday on Breakfast we told you

about the robot that had been taken

0:45:150:45:20

off duty at a California burger

joint because it was too slow. It

0:45:200:45:24

was flipping burgers.

Flippy the

robot was a flop.

He couldn't keep

0:45:240:45:30

up. But that minor setback

apparently won't stop the rise of

0:45:300:45:36

artificial technology. They want to

build systems that can operate in

0:45:360:45:42

the home, workplace and sports

field. Here's Halep oche -- here's

0:45:420:45:46

more. -- from Halep Ghosh.

0:45:460:45:53

Science-fiction films have predicted

in the future we would have

0:45:530:45:57

intelligent robots. In the day the

Earth stood still, we had the

0:45:570:46:01

sinister Gort. In Forbidden Planet,

there was Robbie.

Good night, Doctor

0:46:010:46:10

Smith.

And robots in lost in space. How

0:46:100:46:13

close are we to having something

like them now?

0:46:130:46:20

Meet the soccer playing robots of

the university of the excess. They

0:46:200:46:24

are not being operated by a moat

control. Instead they're making fast

0:46:240:46:30

moving decisions as a team on their

own. That's because they've been

0:46:300:46:35

programmed with artificial

intelligence. They're able to learn

0:46:350:46:41

from their mistakes and improve

their game each time they play.

0:46:410:46:49

their game each time they play. They

are honing their skills for the

0:46:490:46:50

robot World Cup, this one from two

years ago in Leipzig. Football is

0:46:500:46:55

far harder for computers than chess

or other boardgames.

Rather than

0:46:550:47:00

turn taking, everybody's moving at

the same time. If you take too long

0:47:000:47:04

to think about what you're going to

do when you're going to pass the

0:47:040:47:08

ball the opponent can come and take

the ball away from you. It's also

0:47:080:47:12

continuous, there's not discreet

places people can be, but always

0:47:120:47:15

moving through air, space,

continuous space, so there's really

0:47:150:47:19

many challenges in contrast to some

of the boardgames.

This might look

0:47:190:47:24

like a very simple robot but what

it's trying to achieve is incredibly

0:47:240:47:29

difficult. It's attempting to work

with people in an unpredictable

0:47:290:47:33

office environment. Researchers are

now building robots more like the

0:47:330:47:37

ones you see in science-fiction

films, once you can talk to,

0:47:370:47:41

interact with, even give commands

to. This one is an office assistant.

0:47:410:47:45

You can avoid any objects or people

that get in its wake. It's one of a

0:47:450:47:50

new generation of intelligent

robots.

What should I do?

This is

0:47:500:47:58

not voice recognition.

Move a

rattling container.

The robot is

0:47:580:48:02

actually learning the meaning of the

words in the same way a baby

0:48:020:48:07

doesn't. The essential aim is to

have robots you can have a

0:48:070:48:10

conversation with.

The problem is

robots have to be able to deal with

0:48:100:48:16

the dynamics and the noise and

unpredictability that people bring

0:48:160:48:19

into the environment, so we have to

think about perception and control

0:48:190:48:23

and learning and adaptation

programmes that we have to build

0:48:230:48:26

that can deal with that sort of

dynamic.

Now, everybody stay calm,

0:48:260:48:31

he's only a mechanical man, robot

obligingly doing the shopping for

0:48:310:48:35

the busy wife of his inventor

someone in Leeds.

0:48:350:48:37

These cons of robots are still in

the realms of science fiction, but

0:48:370:48:41

with rapid strides in artificial

intelligence, it won't be long

0:48:410:48:46

before they become part of our

everyday lives. Pallab Ghosh, BBC

0:48:460:48:50

News, Austin, Texas.

0:48:500:48:52

A sign of the future.

A sign of the

past, but some of those robots are

0:48:520:48:58

terrible!

0:48:580:49:00

We'll be back with

the headlines at 7am.

0:49:000:49:02

Now it's time for the Travel Show.

0:49:020:49:05

Mauritius, a force of nature

in the middle of the Indian Ocean.

0:49:060:49:14

Mauritius is marking the 50th year

of independence from British

0:49:150:49:18

colonial rule, but the intriguing,

rich and sometimes dark story

0:49:180:49:21

of this island nation goes

back way before then.

0:49:210:49:29

On my journey, I'm going to explore

the history of Mauritius.

0:49:360:49:39

See and taste how

multiculturalism works here.

0:49:390:49:44

Mmmm, that is nice.

0:49:440:49:47

This island is so often labelled

as just a luxury beach paradise,

0:49:500:49:53

but the reality is so much more

fascinating than that.

0:49:530:49:56

Mauritius, gorgeous beaches,

turquoise waters and lush

0:50:050:50:10

vegetation, but the human story

is just as awe-inspiring.

0:50:100:50:17

Le Morne mountain on the south-west

of the island faces in the direction

0:50:170:50:20

of Madagascar and stands

555 metres high.

0:50:200:50:22

It's also at a 45-degree incline.

0:50:220:50:30

No walk in the park.

0:50:320:50:33

For the likes of me,

0:50:330:50:35

this is a challenging

climb, I've got to say.

0:50:350:50:43

In fact, I think for

anybody it's challenging.

0:50:440:50:52

Near the top I join a guy who's done

this climb up to three times a day

0:50:580:51:03

every day pretty well for 13 years.

0:51:030:51:05

You can feel it's

all, like, volcanic.

0:51:050:51:07

This is volcanic rock?

0:51:070:51:12

It's probably from the first

eruption 10 million years ago.

0:51:120:51:15

And actually it's very

good for climbing.

0:51:150:51:17

Yeah, there's lots of good grip.

0:51:170:51:18

Le Morne marks a dark but symbolic

chapter in the island's

0:51:180:51:21

history, the days of slavery under

Dutch, French and British rule.

0:51:210:51:24

This is where many escaped slaves,

called the Maroons, found refuge.

0:51:240:51:27

They could have a look

towards Madagascar and for them...

0:51:270:51:30

That's home.

0:51:300:51:38

That was home, that was the sight

and they expected one day may be

0:51:380:51:42

to build, like, a craft and go back

home and just to escape

0:51:420:51:46

from this prison.

0:51:460:51:46

Horrible.

0:51:460:51:54

It's a world away up

here from the beach resorts that

0:52:010:52:04

populate the rest of the island,

but actually this trek is almost

0:52:040:52:07

a pilgrimage to get to the very

heart of Mauritian identity.

0:52:070:52:10

There's a particularly poignant tale

told about the Maroons

0:52:100:52:13

in what should have been

their moment of celebration.

0:52:130:52:21

When slavery was abolished

here in 1835, soldiers climbed

0:52:300:52:32

the mountain to tell

the Maroons they were free,

0:52:320:52:35

but the escaped slaves thought

they were being recaptured

0:52:350:52:37

and instead chose to

jump off the mountain.

0:52:370:52:39

Why do you think this

is so important to the identity

0:52:390:52:42

of people from Mauritius?

0:52:420:52:50

Because I guess it's a unique story.

0:52:520:52:54

It's part of our story

here in Mauritius and it's one

0:52:540:52:57

of the only places we know

of that somehow the slaves

0:52:570:53:00

resisted their masters and for us,

it's almost like a venerated

0:53:000:53:03

mountain, a sacred mountain,

not only for the descendants

0:53:030:53:05

of slaves but for

Mauritians as well.

0:53:050:53:13

After slavery was abolished,

the British brought in hundreds

0:53:150:53:19

of thousands of so-called indentured

labourers from India and China

0:53:190:53:22

in what was known as

the Great Experiment.

0:53:220:53:29

Today Port Louis is the country's

capital with its colonial legacy

0:53:290:53:32

and contemporary diversity

everywhere to be seen.

0:53:320:53:40

I'm about to get a personalised

unique tour of what this city

0:53:490:53:52

and Mauritius offers in terms

of its diverse food and other

0:53:520:53:55

wares as well.

0:53:550:53:56

Hi, how do you do, nice to meet you.

Nice to meet you.

0:53:560:54:00

So this is a food place here?

Yes.

0:54:000:54:07

But you'd never know to look at it,

it's pretty low-key.

0:54:070:54:11

Yes, but it's pretty famous as well.

0:54:110:54:13

He's making some deep-fried cakes,

0:54:130:54:14

Mauritians are fond

of deep-fried cakes,

0:54:140:54:21

you can deep-fry almost

everything.

0:54:210:54:22

He has this batter that he made,

it's with chickpea flour,

0:54:220:54:25

some herbs and salt.

0:54:250:54:33

Mauritius may seem isolated

in the middle of the Indian Ocean,

0:54:380:54:40

but it was actually nicely placed

on the spice route which linked

0:54:400:54:44

Asia, Africa and Europe.

0:54:440:54:49

Now he's adding all the herbs

you need for the chilly bites.

0:54:490:54:52

Chillis.

Are they strong chillis?

0:54:520:54:53

Spring onions.

0:54:530:54:59

There's a clear inference

from Gujarati traders whose

0:54:590:55:02

forefathers came over from India

in the 19th century,

0:55:020:55:04

but there's a distinctive Mauritian

accent to the food too.

0:55:040:55:07

It just hit me!

0:55:070:55:15

Now, this is a multi-ethnic,

multi-cultural, multi-lingual,

0:55:290:55:30

multi-religion country,

so Hinduism is the majority religion

0:55:300:55:33

but you've also got Christianity,

Islam, Chinese religions,

0:55:330:55:35

Buddhism, it's all here.

0:55:350:55:36

Where are we?

0:55:360:55:44

We're in a small market that is made

up of street vendors.

0:55:460:55:50

All these people used to be selling

everything from clothes,

0:55:500:55:53

to food to electronic

gadgets on the street,

0:55:530:55:55

but that was illegal so the state

gave them some spaces.

0:55:550:56:03

Ca va?

0:56:070:56:08

So this is Arthur, he used to be

on a street corner in Chinatown

0:56:080:56:12

selling dumplings with his father.

0:56:120:56:13

So now he's here.

0:56:130:56:14

Chinese-Mauritian?

Yeah.

0:56:140:56:22

This is the long fish?

0:56:230:56:25

Yes, the long fish.

That is nice, that is really good.

0:56:250:56:31

How many will years

have you working?

0:56:310:56:33

For myself, after schooling,

nearly 50 years.

0:56:330:56:35

50 years!

0:56:350:56:42

The sheer diversity of food is one

benefit of the cultural

0:56:430:56:46

hotpot in Mauritius.

0:56:460:56:48

Another is language,

French, English and Creole

0:56:480:56:49

is all spoken here.

0:56:490:56:50

And then there's music.

0:56:500:56:58

Sega is a rhythm and genre

indigenous to this island.

0:57:010:57:06

And this lady is known as the voice

of the Indian Ocean.

0:57:060:57:13

The distinctive drum

is called the ravanne,

0:57:460:57:48

a home-grown instrument.

0:57:480:57:55

And in this 50th anniversary

year of independence,

0:58:520:58:54

it seems the people of this island

have plenty to celebrate.

0:58:540:59:00

During my time here,

I've seen a strong sense

0:59:000:59:02

of nationhood amongst Mauritians,

and also realisation that precious

0:59:020:59:05

wildlife must be protected.

0:59:050:59:14

Hello, this is Breakfast,

with Ben Thompson and Naga

1:00:141:00:16

Munchetty.

1:00:161:00:17

Traces of the nerve agent used

in the attack of a former Russian

1:00:171:00:20

spy have been detected

in a restaurant in Salisbury.

1:00:201:00:23

With more than 240 witnesses

identified and 200 pieces

1:00:231:00:26

of evidence, the Home Secretary says

police are working "at speed"

1:00:261:00:29

to identify those responsible.

1:00:291:00:36

Good morning. Also on the programme,

an investigation is launched into

1:00:491:00:57

why thousands of homes in England

and Wales were left without water in

1:00:571:01:00

the wake of the beast from the east.

The greatest deal for the world.

1:01:001:01:05

Donald Trump defends his decision to

hold face-to-face talks with North

1:01:051:01:09

Korean leader Kim Jong-un. Good

morning. In sport, temp two Ireland

1:01:091:01:17

our Six Nations champions, with a

game to spare, and can now complete

1:01:171:01:21

the grand slam against England next

week. Good morning. A murky start to

1:01:211:01:25

Mothering Sunday. There is some fog

around which will lift a low cloud.

1:01:251:01:29

Scattered showers in the south. Dry

and bright and further north. More

1:01:291:01:33

details coming up.

1:01:331:01:35

Louise, thank you. It is seven

o'clock. First, our main story.

1:01:351:01:41

Traces of a nerve agent which was

used to attack a former Russian spy

1:01:411:01:45

and is thought in Salisbury have

been found in the Italian restaurant

1:01:451:01:48

where they had the meeting. Sir Guy

and Yulia Skripal were found

1:01:481:01:52

collapsed on aid engineer by and

were left critically ill in

1:01:521:01:57

hospital. -- Sergei. Nobody who was

in the Zizzi restaurant at the time

1:01:571:02:03

is thought to be in danger, after

traces of nerve agent were found

1:02:031:02:06

there.

1:02:061:02:07

One week after the attack

with a nerve agent, the police

1:02:071:02:10

investigation continues behind

a barrier at the pizzeria

1:02:101:02:12

where Sergei Skripal

and Yulia Skripal ate.

1:02:121:02:14

CCTV saw them leaving

the restaurant.

1:02:141:02:16

Shortly after, they were found

on a park bench, fighting

1:02:161:02:19

for their lives.

1:02:191:02:20

One of the vehicles which took them

to hospital was removed

1:02:201:02:23

by specialist military teams

for fear it might also contain

1:02:231:02:25

traces of nerve agent.

1:02:251:02:28

Sergei Skripal and Yulia

are both critically ill.

1:02:281:02:31

Russia has denied any involvement

in their attempted murder.

1:02:311:02:33

After chairing a second meeting

of the Cobra emergency committee,

1:02:331:02:36

the Home Secretary said

the investigation was proceeding

1:02:361:02:38

at speed, with 200 pieces

of evidence, and more

1:02:381:02:40

than 240 witnesses.

1:02:401:02:47

It is a really painstaking,

detailed investigation,

1:02:471:02:50

as the police go through the 200

pieces of evidence, huge

1:02:501:02:53

amounts of CCTV.

1:02:531:02:54

They are absolutely committed

to making sure that we do that

1:02:541:02:57

in a completely professional way.

1:02:571:03:02

The third victim of this attack,

Detective Sergeant Nick Bailey,

1:03:021:03:05

is seriously ill, though able

to talk to his family.

1:03:051:03:08

He released a statement saying

he didn't consider himself a hero

1:03:081:03:11

and was merely doing his job.

1:03:111:03:19

The water regulator

is to investigate why thousands

1:03:201:03:22

of homes in England and Wales

suffered shortages or a total loss

1:03:221:03:25

of supply following

the recent cold weather.

1:03:251:03:27

Ofwat's review follows emergency

handouts of water for people

1:03:271:03:29

who were cut off.

1:03:291:03:36

Simon Jones reports.

1:03:361:03:37

Emergency water handouts

on the streets.

1:03:371:03:38

Tens of thousands of customers,

particularly in south-east England

1:03:381:03:42

and parts of Wales, forced to endure

days of inconvenience

1:03:421:03:44

as the taps run dry.

1:03:441:03:46

They are simply meant

to get the water fixed.

1:03:461:03:49

I think this is

absolutely appalling.

1:03:491:03:51

It is shocking that there is such

poor communication -

1:03:511:03:54

well, zero communication.

1:03:541:04:00

As pipes burst in the thaw

which followed the cold spell,

1:04:001:04:03

the water company said they were

facing an unprecedented situation.

1:04:031:04:06

Ofwat said today it understood how

distressing it had been for people

1:04:061:04:09

to be left without a

vital public service.

1:04:091:04:16

The review will examine:

Southern Water, for example,

1:04:161:04:19

Southern Water, for example,

1:04:291:04:30

is giving households who were cut

off for more than a day £75 -

1:04:301:04:34

condemned as "derisory"

by some of those affected.

1:04:341:04:37

Ofwat wants to hear from businesses,

households and local authorities.

1:04:371:04:40

It wants proof that

lessons will be learnt.

1:04:401:04:42

Otherwise, it says, it

may be forced to act.

1:04:421:04:50

President Trump has told crowds

at an election rally in Pennsylvania

1:04:501:04:53

that his proposed meeting

with the North Korean leader

1:04:531:04:55

Kim Jong-un could lead

to the "greatest deal

1:04:551:04:57

for the world."

1:04:571:04:59

During a wide-ranging speech,

the American leader warned Europe

1:04:591:05:01

about more possible tariffs,

and also launched his slogan

1:05:011:05:04

for re-election in 2020.

1:05:041:05:05

And he talked up the prospects

of a peace deal with North Korea.

1:05:051:05:13

They are not sending missiles up,

and I believe that.

1:05:161:05:19

I really do.

1:05:191:05:20

I think they want to do something,

I think they want to make peace,

1:05:201:05:25

I think it's time and I think we've

shown great strength.

1:05:251:05:28

I think that's also

important, right?

1:05:281:05:32

More measures to cut the use

of plastics will be announced

1:05:321:05:35

by the Chancellor

in the coming days.

1:05:351:05:37

Philip Hammond will use his spring

statement on Tuesday to announce

1:05:371:05:40

plans for a public consultation

into taxing plastic waste.

1:05:401:05:43

Let's get more from our political

correspondent Jonathan Blake.

1:05:431:05:46

Good morning. What details on these

taxes can we expect?

Very few

1:05:461:05:53

details at the moment, but it could

EA tax on your takeaway box or a

1:05:531:05:57

bigot ill for bottled water. --

cooed be a tax. When the Chancellor

1:05:571:06:03

gives his speech on Tuesday he will

ask for a call for evidence from the

1:06:031:06:08

public, from businesses, from green

groups, on how to cut the amount of

1:06:081:06:12

public waste. He says it is a

scourge to the environment and he

1:06:121:06:15

wants the UK to lead the world on

this, creating an environment which

1:06:151:06:19

is fit for future generations. The

government is using the tax system

1:06:191:06:22

to help it achieve its aim of

eliminating all single use plastic

1:06:221:06:26

waste by the year 2042. That is

obviously a long way off. You might

1:06:261:06:32

have read in recent days about the

so-called latte levy, a suggested

1:06:321:06:37

35p charge on throw away coffee

cups, which MPs on the environment

1:06:371:06:42

committee have been looking at. It

didn't get a very positive response

1:06:421:06:46

from the government, they suggested

it might be better for coffee shops

1:06:461:06:49

to present an incentive to customers

to use reusable cups. That is

1:06:491:06:53

perhaps an example of why a lot of

us are keen on reducing the amount

1:06:531:06:59

of plastic we use, but when it comes

to paying higher taxes to help

1:06:591:07:03

achieve that, it could be a

difficult sell.

Jonathan, thank you.

1:07:031:07:07

A police investigation has been

launched after anti-Muslim letters

1:07:071:07:09

were sent to a number

of people in several cities.

1:07:091:07:12

The letters were delivered

to addresses in Bradford,

1:07:121:07:14

Leicester, London,

Cardiff and Sheffield.

1:07:141:07:16

They contained suggestions

of a series of violent acts to be

1:07:161:07:19

taken against Muslims and mosques.

1:07:191:07:20

Counter-terrorism police say they're

investigating a possible hate crime.

1:07:201:07:22

New evidence has emerged

about an attempt by the construction

1:07:221:07:30

firm Carillion to get an emergency

government bailout of £10 million

1:07:301:07:35

days before it collapsed.

1:07:351:07:37

MPs say Carillion paid out £6.4

million to professional advisers

1:07:371:07:41

on the same day it

sought financial aid.

1:07:411:07:43

The firm was wound up with debts

of almost £1 billion.

1:07:431:07:49

China's parliament,

the National People's Congress,

1:07:491:07:50

is expected to approve a ruling

today which would remove

1:07:501:07:53

the two-term limits

for the country's presidency.

1:07:531:07:55

The move will allow Xi Jinping

to stay in office beyond the end

1:07:551:07:58

of his second term in 2023,

and possibly rule indefinitely.

1:07:581:08:01

Let's talk to our correspondent

Stephen McDonell, who's in Beijing.

1:08:011:08:09

Good morning, Stephen. Essentially,

this would create a president for

1:08:101:08:16

life, wouldn't it?

Absolutely. Here

at the Great Hall of the People in

1:08:161:08:24

Beijing, this is an absolutely

historic day, 3000 delegates will

1:08:241:08:28

decide whether or not to allow Xi

Jinping to stay on as President

1:08:281:08:32

beyond a second term, and

effectively to rule for as long as

1:08:321:08:36

he likes. Now, he could have hung

around in charge here as the head of

1:08:361:08:40

the central military commission, and

as the chairman of the Communist

1:08:401:08:43

Party. But he has obviously decided

he wants the title of resident as

1:08:431:08:46

well. -- president. Given his

enormous power here, one and a half

1:08:461:08:54

million party members have been

punished in his anticorruption

1:08:541:08:58

crackdown, you cannot imagine many

delegates having the courage to

1:08:581:09:01

stand up and vote know here today.

So it is widely anticipated that he

1:09:011:09:06

will very comfortably win this vote

is, and that's he could stay on for

1:09:061:09:12

as long as he likes. I should add,

there has been no national debate

1:09:121:09:16

here about this. It is barely

covered in the press. It is just

1:09:161:09:21

kind of discussed along the lines

of, oh, certain changes to the

1:09:211:09:25

constitution are happening. I do not

think it has sunk into many people

1:09:251:09:30

in China that this could be their

leader for decades to come. In the

1:09:301:09:34

1980s they brought in this 2-term

limit to try to stop another

1:09:341:09:39

Chairman Mao coming along here.

Well, despite those moves, it looks

1:09:391:09:44

like this vote in the next few hours

is going to put that to one side and

1:09:441:09:49

Xi Jinping can hang around for,

well, the rest of his life if he so

1:09:491:09:54

chooses.

1:09:541:09:56

Stephen, thank you. You will come

back to you later to discuss that

1:09:561:10:01

more. We know that the censors in

China have removed any sort of

1:10:011:10:04

criticism of that ten shall

president for life idea which is

1:10:041:10:08

being proposed. -- criticism of that

potential president for life idea.

1:10:081:10:15

With more than 240 witnesses

and 200 pieces of evidence,

1:10:151:10:18

the investigation into the attempted

murder of a former Russian spy

1:10:181:10:21

and his daughter in Salisbury

is said to be moving quickly.

1:10:211:10:24

Five sites, including

an Italian restuarant,

1:10:241:10:25

have been sealed off as specialist

teams search for traces of the nerve

1:10:251:10:29

agent used in the attack.

1:10:291:10:30

Let's talk now to Lee Doddridge,

a former adviser to the UK's

1:10:301:10:33

National Counter-Terrorism

Security Office.

1:10:331:10:37

Thank you for joining us this

morning. The scale of this

1:10:371:10:43

investigation, it is increasing and

increasing, lots of resources have

1:10:431:10:46

been put into this?

Yes, and quite

rightly, because of the nature of

1:10:461:10:51

the enquiry at the moment. I

wouldn't be surprised to see the

1:10:511:10:54

numbers involved increase even

further. It is key for people to

1:10:541:10:57

understand, the counterterrorism

command are being used because of

1:10:571:11:02

the complexities of the case. It is

not actually a terrorism

1:11:021:11:05

investigation. It will be an

attempted murder enquiry. They are

1:11:051:11:09

using the skills and resources of

the counterterrorism command to

1:11:091:11:12

facilitate the investigation.

What

people will be concerned about, as

1:11:121:11:17

more information comes through, we

have seen soldiers on the streets

1:11:171:11:20

and roads, helping with this

investigation in Salisbury, but also

1:11:201:11:23

that this has been in a public area?

You know, if you look back to

1:11:231:11:27

Alexander Litvinenko, when he was

poisoned, it was in a hotel room.

1:11:271:11:32

This time around it is much more

public, and this, I suppose, is why

1:11:321:11:36

there is concern among so many

members of the public.

You are

1:11:361:11:40

absolutely right. Again, that adds

to the complexities of the enquiry.

1:11:401:11:44

You do that parallel with Alexander

Litvinenko. That was a relatively

1:11:441:11:48

small crime scene for them to

examine, it again it was quite

1:11:481:11:51

complex. At the moment, as was

mentioned earlier, we have at least

1:11:511:11:55

five areas at the moment that are

being investigated, but we still

1:11:551:11:58

don't know the source of the nerve

agent or where it was first

1:11:581:12:02

administered. So there will be quite

a wide area for them to cover. But

1:12:021:12:06

what is important for members of the

public to understand is that this

1:12:061:12:10

was a week ago now. If there were

any immediate threats, any concerns

1:12:101:12:15

over health, we would have seen that

materialising among members of the

1:12:151:12:18

public.

How worrying do you think it

is at the moment that the public has

1:12:181:12:22

not been told what kind of nerve

agent was used?

Well, I think at the

1:12:221:12:27

moment, there is a balance between

keeping that information

1:12:271:12:30

confidential as part of the enquiry,

just so that they can start

1:12:301:12:34

investigating where it was sourced

from or whether it was made here in

1:12:341:12:38

the UK, and obviously identifying

whoever administered it. Obviously

1:12:381:12:42

from an enquiry perspective, you can

assume by now that they obviously

1:12:421:12:45

know what the agent is, because

they've been treating the victims in

1:12:451:12:49

hospital. But I think at some point

soon they will have to release the

1:12:491:12:53

information, as long as it doesn't

impede the enquiry, just to satisfy

1:12:531:12:56

members of the public and put their

minds at rest.

And of course there

1:12:561:13:03

has been lots of conversations about

the spy swap and whether or not this

1:13:031:13:09

man should have been left alone,

Sergei Skripal, and whether or not

1:13:091:13:14

MI6 has a duty of care to former

agents, whether it can look after

1:13:141:13:19

its agents.

Those are all valid

concerns. But I think one of the

1:13:191:13:27

questions we have to ask is, in this

day and age, for these sorts of

1:13:271:13:31

incidents to keep happening, you

know, Alexander Litvinenko was very

1:13:311:13:35

similar, and we have now seen

another attack. Back in the days of

1:13:351:13:40

the Cold War these things probably

didn't get so much publicity. But

1:13:401:13:43

these things really shouldn't be

allowed to happen on any soil, let

1:13:431:13:46

alone UK soil. MI6 do have a duty of

care, whether we are talking about

1:13:461:13:55

agents or former agents. Really,

again, in today's political climate,

1:13:551:14:00

these things should not be

happening.

Thank you very much for

1:14:001:14:05

your analysis of the situation. A

former adviser to the National

1:14:051:14:09

Counter Terrorism Security Office.

Thank you.

1:14:091:14:14

After being diagnosed with chronic

migraines which left her bedbound,

1:14:141:14:18

Air France has decided a holistic

approach to tackle her pain was

1:14:181:14:22

best. She lives in Anglesey, and

soon embarked on a challenge with

1:14:221:14:26

her partner to swim off the north

Wales coast for 100 days over

1:14:261:14:30

winter. We will find out if it has

helped her, but first, let's take a

1:14:301:14:34

look at the video diary she was

keeping.

1:14:341:14:37

I was diagnosed with a chronic

illness back in August and since

1:14:371:14:41

then I've pretty much stage in the

house, in my bed, most days, in

1:14:411:14:46

chronic pain.

1:14:461:14:50

Like, in my head.

I am doing a Ph.D. In Marine biology

1:14:501:14:56

and my partner, Andy, is an

ecologist and filmmaker. We get so

1:14:561:15:01

much of our energy being out in

major.

Look regal.

We are starting a

1:15:011:15:07

challenge to go rounds see over 100

days over the winter in North Wales.

1:15:071:15:14

I feel so much happier, I feel so

much more in control of my life and

1:15:141:15:20

my illness and that is amazing. I

can't wait to see how it's going to

1:15:201:15:24

feel after 100 days. It's

incredible.

1:15:241:15:37

That's the video diary kept by Beth

and Andy.

1:15:371:15:40

Beth and Andy are here now.

1:15:401:15:42

Good morning, nice to see you.

Good

morning.

Beth, what is it like when

1:15:421:15:47

you get a migraine? Lots of people

will watch and say it's just a bad

1:15:471:15:51

headache but what is it actually

like?

They're a really misunderstood

1:15:511:15:54

condition. The only thing I can

really describe it as is hell. They

1:15:541:16:00

are horrible. I wouldn't wish them

on anybody. When I get them, I get

1:16:001:16:07

migraines with aura, I know I will

get one, I get blind spots in my

1:16:071:16:12

vision and ringing in my ears and

things like that. I know that one is

1:16:121:16:16

coming. But when it hits, it never

gets easier to deal with them so

1:16:161:16:20

I'll get pain on one side of my head

and sometimes I will go numb down

1:16:201:16:25

one side of my body and I will be

really disorientated and sensitive

1:16:251:16:29

to things like light, sound and

smell, quite dizzy and it's actually

1:16:291:16:34

quite scary.

How long have you been

having them?

I got diagnosed when I

1:16:341:16:40

was nine.

How old are you now?

26.

How long do they tend to last?

The

1:16:401:16:46

short ones last five or six hours

and the worst ones can last anything

1:16:461:16:50

up to two days.

Do you know, you're

smiling, and it is a fabulous smile,

1:16:501:16:55

you look happy, but I don't know how

you are smiling when you been

1:16:551:16:59

suffering for 17 years. There is

seemingly no cure.

No. There isn't a

1:16:591:17:07

cure for migraines. There are

treatments, which have varying

1:17:071:17:11

levels of success, and I have tried

quite a few over the last year. But,

1:17:111:17:17

yeah, it's one of those things where

you to just have to smile because

1:17:171:17:22

otherwise it would be quite

difficult to live with.

And eat, how

1:17:221:17:29

have you approached this, when you

are around best it can be very

1:17:291:17:33

distressing?

-- Andy.

It's horrible. I hate migraines now.

1:17:331:17:39

I was like many people before I met

Beth, I had no idea what they were,

1:17:391:17:46

I assumed migraines were a bad

headache, but having seen so many, I

1:17:461:17:52

understand them more now. The worst

thing as a bystander is to seize

1:17:521:17:56

some person you love in intense

agony and pollution at times and

1:17:561:18:02

knowing you are powerless. That

really sucks.

Tell us about the

1:18:021:18:07

swimming in cold water and what

difference that makes?

IFAB

1:18:071:18:11

migraines since I was nine but in

May last year they started getting

1:18:111:18:15

really bad. Used to get a couple a

year. They were quite easy to live

1:18:151:18:20

with and they didn't feel part of my

identity back then -- are used to.

1:18:201:18:25

In May I started getting them more

frequently, up to one a day

1:18:251:18:29

throughout the summer -- I used to.

I had to take time off my Ph.D., I'm

1:18:291:18:35

doing my Ph.D. In Ocean sciences at

Bangor university, I took three

1:18:351:18:39

months off and I wasn't getting

better. I tried medical treatments

1:18:391:18:43

and it got to the point where I had

to go back so I needed to think of

1:18:431:18:48

something we could do to make it

liveable with.

You swim together?

1:18:481:18:54

Yes, every day.

There's got to be a

time when you're, like, just not

1:18:541:18:58

today! Who is the one who says,

right, we're going.

It varies

1:18:581:19:03

actually. One of us will be feeling

it more than the other some days.

Is

1:19:031:19:09

having an effect?

Yes.

We need to

say cold water swimming is not for

1:19:091:19:15

everyone.

Not at all.

And there are

safety things you need to think

1:19:151:19:18

about as well.

Absolutely.

Do you

wear wetsuits?

We started wearing

1:19:181:19:24

them in October when we started and

we frolic around in the waves for a

1:19:241:19:29

good hour or so, but as it got cold,

the idea of pushing on a wet suit

1:19:291:19:34

from the previous day became less

appealing and the hassle of taking

1:19:341:19:39

it off every day became more

difficult. At the start of the year

1:19:391:19:45

we swapped to swimwear, we charge

in, throw ourselves into the water,

1:19:451:19:49

get the blast of adrenaline from the

cold water and get out again and get

1:19:491:19:54

dry as quickly as possible.

I'm glad

it's having an impact. Thank you so

1:19:541:19:58

much and thank you for being so

chirpy first thing on a Sunday

1:19:581:20:02

morning. For anyone thinking about

this, take advice if you are

1:20:021:20:05

swimming in cold water, it can

affect your muscles, if you feel

1:20:051:20:09

weak it is a sign your body isn't

able to heat itself so be mindful

1:20:091:20:13

when you're swimming in cold water.

Thanks very much.

Nice to see you.

1:20:131:20:20

Today is Mothering Sunday,

a time for us to say thanks

1:20:201:20:23

to our mums for all they do for us.

1:20:231:20:25

In case you've forgotten to send a

card there is still some time to do

1:20:251:20:30

it.

I forgot to send my card.

You

can make up for it now, though.

1:20:301:20:37

And here's me with my mum.

1:20:371:20:40

Naked on television! How old were

you here?

That is graduation, 21.

1:20:401:20:49

You were winding me up about the use

of hair products.

Oh my god, that is

1:20:491:20:54

bad hair! You have to laugh at the

outfits. Can we laugh at Louise

1:20:541:20:59

first? You can't laugh at that,

Louise looks great, trust Louise to

1:20:591:21:05

be so stylish.

1:21:051:21:06

And here's a picture

of Louise with her

1:21:061:21:08

mum and dad.

1:21:081:21:09

We'd love you to get in touch to let

us know what makes your mum special.

1:21:091:21:13

You can get in touch with us by

Twitter, e-mail or Facebook.

1:21:131:21:19

You Saul Niguez, she has the weather

for us this morning. A bit misty and

1:21:191:21:24

murky for Mother's Day?

-- you Saul

Niguez. Your mum and dad looked

1:21:241:21:29

lovely.

That was their diamond

wedding anniversary.

How many years

1:21:291:21:33

is that?

60 years, 81 and 83 and

they look much better than me in

1:21:331:21:38

that photo. Happy Mother's Day, she

has a back operation tomorrow so

1:21:381:21:44

good luck for tomorrow. She watches

them all, Naga, you are her

1:21:441:21:48

favourite!

1:21:481:21:49

Misty and foggy around at the moment

but it is going to lift and lifting

1:21:511:21:55

for most of us to a reasonably quiet

day, a few showers around, just a

1:21:551:21:59

bit of a nuisance so you might have

to dodge them if you're thinking of

1:21:591:22:03

going out for a mothering Sunday

stroll later. We are surrounded by

1:22:031:22:09

weather fronts so the forecast is

looking too bad considering. This

1:22:091:22:13

will be a nuisance later today and

this front here down across East

1:22:131:22:17

Anglia and in Kent, not causing too

much of an issue, just brushing with

1:22:171:22:21

the east coast as we speak but we're

not too concerned about that,

1:22:211:22:25

hopefully it will drift into the

North Sea. A scattering of showers

1:22:251:22:28

developing into the south Midlands

and generally in the south, any fog

1:22:281:22:32

lifted into low cloud but the best

of the weather is likely to be

1:22:321:22:36

Scotland, northern England, Northern

Ireland, some sunny spells as we go

1:22:361:22:40

through the day. In terms of the

feel of things for Scotland,

1:22:401:22:46

noticeably better, certainly in

comparison to the last few days, top

1:22:461:22:49

temperatures of around ten. Through

the overnight it looks like cloud

1:22:491:22:52

and rain will start to drift from

the south, that will sit across

1:22:521:22:56

parts of Wales, the Midlands and

southern England. Here temperatures

1:22:561:22:59

will hold up above freezing. It just

leads us into the week ahead, which

1:22:591:23:04

will still bring some rain at times,

some drier interludes, but mild for

1:23:041:23:10

most of us. The colder weather

expected to return, though, into the

1:23:101:23:14

weekend. I'll try and put some

detail on that for you. An area of

1:23:141:23:18

low pressure will continue to drift

from the south-west and that will

1:23:181:23:22

sit across England and Wales for

Monday, unfortunately there could be

1:23:221:23:25

some rain around for the start of

the new week. But Scotland, northern

1:23:251:23:28

England and Northern Ireland, a much

better day. The crowd should break

1:23:281:23:32

up for a bit of brightness here and

there and we're likely to see

1:23:321:23:37

temperatures peaking at 7-9. In the

south, we could see a maximum of 12

1:23:371:23:41

but there could be outbreaks to

dodge. The best of the day looks

1:23:411:23:45

likely to be choose day, a ridge of

high pressure building from the

1:23:451:23:49

west, quietening things down nicely

and winds will remain light,

1:23:491:23:53

brightness, so if you have any

outdoor plans next week, head for

1:23:531:23:57

Tuesday, that looks like the best of

the week and it looks like we will

1:23:571:24:02

see temperatures again peaking

between seven and 12 degrees. More

1:24:021:24:04

from the later.

1:24:041:24:08

Louise, thanks very much, we will

speak to you later.

1:24:081:24:12

Andrew Marr is on BBC One

at 9am this morning.

1:24:121:24:15

What have you got lined up, Andrew?

1:24:151:24:20

A very rare thing happened in

today's papers, there was a cheerful

1:24:201:24:25

optimistic article by Philip

Hammond, the economy on the turn,

1:24:251:24:29

productivity up, unemployment down,

like at the end of the tunnel, he

1:24:291:24:32

says. But what does that mean for

people watching? Affected by welfare

1:24:321:24:36

cuts and cuts elsewhere. I have the

Chancellor in the studio and I will

1:24:361:24:42

be talking to his Labour opposite

number John McDonnell on the big

1:24:421:24:46

story about the Russian poisoning. I

will speak to the widow of Alexander

1:24:461:24:51

Litvinenko, who was killed almost

certainly by the Russians there. She

1:24:511:24:55

has a special message for Theresa

May on the show. A busy, Sirius,

1:24:551:25:00

invigorating hour as ever at 9am.

We

will see you at 9am on BBC One. --

1:25:001:25:05

serious.

1:25:051:25:08

You're watching

Breakfast from BBC News.

1:25:081:25:10

Time now

for a look at the newspapers.

1:25:101:25:12

Journalist and broadcaster

Angela Epstein

1:25:121:25:13

is here to tell us

what's caught her eye.

1:25:131:25:16

Good morning.

Good morning.

We were

showing pictures of mothers,

1:25:161:25:19

Louise's parents, my mum, your mum

passed away?

About four years ago.

1:25:191:25:25

We are talking a lot about Mothering

Sunday today, you have seen Martin

1:25:251:25:28

Lewis talk about the impact of his

mother dying just before his 13th

1:25:281:25:33

birthday and how he avoided

Mothering Sunday, but now he's a

1:25:331:25:37

father it is changing. The impact on

you?

The Martin Lewis story in

1:25:371:25:42

particular when he was 12, he barely

had lessons, the most terribly

1:25:421:25:50

traumatic way meant one minute his

mum was there and the next she

1:25:501:25:53

wasn't. My mum was in her early 80s,

she was ill for about six months,

1:25:531:25:57

but before then she was a sprightly,

lively, lovely, lovely, wonderful

1:25:571:26:02

lady and the thing is, you think

mums like that are like Duracell

1:26:021:26:06

Bunnies, they will keep going for

ever. But I don't mind. One of the

1:26:061:26:10

stories we will talk about is the

introduction of transgender

1:26:101:26:15

inclusive Mother's Day cards by

Waitrose. The idea being that nobody

1:26:151:26:19

should miss out on Mother's Day. I

appreciate there are those who will

1:26:191:26:23

find Mother's Day a bit difficult

because they've lost their mum or

1:26:231:26:27

because maybe they've got a

difficult relationship, for whatever

1:26:271:26:30

reason, but this idea of mass

inclusivity for the sake of not

1:26:301:26:34

offending anybody is so ridiculously

politically correct. I lost my mum,

1:26:341:26:40

I can remember her every day, used

to find Mother's Day a bit of a bind

1:26:401:26:45

because I used to hate the idea I'm

us, defying the relationship and I

1:26:451:26:49

had to write something down. It's

always worth because my sister is a

1:26:491:26:53

great poet and I had to write

something rubbish on my card.

I have

1:26:531:26:58

a grump about Valentine's Day. You

find this funny, I know. It's being

1:26:581:27:03

forced to say you love someone. If

you're going to be kind to someone,

1:27:031:27:07

do it everyday.

On Valentine's Day

my husband sent me flowers, he said

1:27:071:27:11

Guess who, these didn't come from a

garage.

Isn't the point of this

1:27:111:27:18

story, this is brilliant

commercialism. There are card

1:27:181:27:22

combinations for everybody now,

third cousin twice removed happy

1:27:221:27:25

birthday cards, it is a way of

selling cards?

It is, it's made the

1:27:251:27:32

front page of a national newspaper,

a national supermarket has a PR

1:27:321:27:37

boost. As well as being commercially

savvy, it is tapping into the

1:27:371:27:42

cultural notion that we mustn't

offend anybody. There's lots of

1:27:421:27:46

things to be offended over, racism,

sexism, but Mother's Day cards, we

1:27:461:27:50

have better things to be offended

over.

Did you see the thing about

1:27:501:27:56

the school is having a festival on

their websites as a special person's

1:27:561:27:59

date?

It taps into what you said a

moment ago about Valentine's Day,

1:27:591:28:05

why do we have to literally

commodify and categorise how we feel

1:28:051:28:09

about individuals?

Love yourselves! A story, not sure

1:28:091:28:14

the paper it is from, bricklayers

and plasterers earning more than

1:28:141:28:19

architects. This is something we

have talked about a lot in the

1:28:191:28:22

business section of the programme,

the fact skilled labourers, skilled

1:28:221:28:26

work men, are in really short really

short supply right now.

1:28:261:28:29

This story suggests that bricklayers

are paid 10% more than architects.

1:28:291:28:35

Architects are a member of the

educated classes, they are a

1:28:351:28:40

professional organisation, you spend

seven years at a university for it,

1:28:401:28:44

a particularly long course and the

idea which is we want this team and

1:28:441:28:48

clarity with the white-collar

professions and the more hands-on

1:28:481:28:54

professions cash esteem. Because

there's a university for all policy

1:28:541:28:57

now and everyone is to go to

university, golf studies at the

1:28:571:29:02

university of nowhere, it's better

to tell our young people, being

1:29:021:29:07

academic is not the one size fits

all approach. Take an

1:29:071:29:11

apprenticeship, use your hands, I

will pay anything if I need a

1:29:111:29:14

plumber in the middle of the night,

it's unlikely I will need an

1:29:141:29:17

architect in the middle of the

night.

There are warnings that

1:29:171:29:20

changes to immigration rules after

Brexit could make it worse?

It could

1:29:201:29:25

exacerbate it by a skills

demographic that disappears but a

1:29:251:29:28

parent shouldn't feel they are

shortchanging their kids by not

1:29:281:29:32

encouraging them to go to

university.

You mentioned Brexit, a

1:29:321:29:37

legal bid sparking a second

referendum?

Let me try and stay

1:29:371:29:41

awake for this one.

You picked it!

Not for the story but for the notion

1:29:411:29:46

of trying to tinker with what Best

for Britain are saying is an

1:29:461:29:53

unconstitutional referendum, I'm

Brexiteer, I don't have a beef with

1:29:531:30:00

it because of that, this is

1:30:001:30:04

Brexiteer, I don't have a beef with

it because of that, this is, they

1:30:041:30:07

say, it's like the motorcar, have

any colour as long as it is black.

1:30:071:30:12

It troubles me in a democratic

system that because we haven't got

1:30:121:30:17

the result we want, how many times

will we do it I'm astonished this is

1:30:171:30:23

all happening again.

A quick word on

T-shirts?

If you have a grim old

1:30:231:30:30

rocker's T-shirt in your wardrobe...

Ayedou.

You do? Naga, you have

1:30:301:30:36

shattered all my allusions, so

glossy and professional. -- Ayedou.

1:30:361:30:41

If you have an old Led Zepplin

T-shirt there's a real for them.

1:30:411:30:47

Visa tour T-shirts. There's a

T-shirt that mimicked the Beatles

1:30:471:30:53

album only available in America --

these are tour T-shirts. It's

1:30:531:30:59

available on eBay for £2000. I hate

rock T-shirts. Doesn't really do it

1:30:591:31:05

for me.

Each to their own.

1:31:051:31:08