04/08/2014 East Midlands Today


04/08/2014

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Good evening from the village of Brassington in Derbyshird

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for a special programme marking the day 100 years ago when Britain

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As the clock ticked round to 11pm on that fateful evening of

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August the 4th, 1914, no`ond could have imagined

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just how bloody and brutal the coming conflict would be.

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It left its mark on almost dvery town and village in the country

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If we step inside the church of St James, we can see the melorial

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plaque which bears the names of those men from Brassington who

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It is headed, to the glory of God and a sacred to the memory of..

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There is the list. James Banks. Joseph Henry Ellis. Frank and

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William Gould. Three separate pairs of names on this memorial plaque,

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detailing perhaps just how destructive the war was and how

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personally it would be felt in villages like this.

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It's been a day of commemoration right across

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the East Midlands as communhties have marked the 100th annivdrsary

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Marching proudly to a commeloration, old soldiers joined the people of

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Hilton in remembering their fallen. We have gathered here today to

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remember all those from this community... On a former Arly base,

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25 trees have been planted to remember the Hilton men who were

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lost in three 20th`century wars including a team from the Great War.

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We have an uncle, James Andrew, who died in the First World War, we have

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a cousin, Eric Charles Blood, who died in the Second World War. And

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also, a second cousin, Robert Blood, who also died in the First World

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War. A stone with all the n`mes was unveiled by a local man, Prhvate

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Callum Bowley of the Mercian Regiment. In Hilton Village Hall, an

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exhibition of the history of all those who died, including D`vid

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Amos, who was killed at the end of the Battle of the Somme. His effects

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are here and with his grandson, including his watch. I alwaxs wind

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it up and if you listen to ht, you can hear the ticking, I feel that is

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his heart. He was on night patrol and he was killed by an explosion.

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The union flag was lowered to half`mast. Inside, next mission

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detailing how do great work changed Nottinghamshire, as well as

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commemorating those who lost their lives. People seem to spend a long

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time in the gallery, they sdem to be bowled over by the impact of it At

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Eastwood, the Memorial Garddns have become only the second centdnary

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field in the country. It is now a protected site to mark the tltimate

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sacrifice made by local people 00 years ago. This garden will be a

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memorial for all the people in the area of Broxtall who died in those

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wars, and it will be a lasthng reminder. In Leicestershire, Ashby

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Pusey has opened its own Grdat War exhibition. `` Ashby Museum. Telling

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the stories of some of the hundreds of men from North West

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Leicestershire who died durhng World War I. This exhibition reprdsents

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just a few of the men who dhed in the North West Leicestershire area.

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They represent over 900 people who gave the ultimate sacrifice, some of

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them so young. At Stamford, a whole festival of commemoration. Ht began

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with the Mayor or procession through the town and among its ranks,

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soldiers of the future from the local Army Cadet Force. Watched by

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soldiers from past conflicts. The commemorations are conthnuing

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this evening, here and across the country, to mark

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the hour that war was declared. These Lights Out events, organised

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by the Royal British Legion, are moments for reflection hnspired

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by the words of the then Brhtish Foreign Secretary, Sir Edward Grey,

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who said on this day 100 ye`rs ago, "The lamps are going out all over

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Europe, we shall not see them lit again in

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our lifetime." 100 years ago, Europe was dominated

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by Emperors, a Kaiser and a Tsar. Closer to home,

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Britain's second city It's difficult to comprehend how

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different everyday life was in 914. Our political editor John Hdss has

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been discovering how our MPs then He starts his report in

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Downing Street. So, imagine what it must have been

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like 100 years ago as the then Prime Minister Herbert Asquith faced the

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prospect of Britain at war with Germany. Asquith was a Primd

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Minister of a coalition Govdrnment, sounds familiar? He led a Lhberal

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government in coalition with the Irish Parliamentary party. Ht was an

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issue of independence for Ireland. Our MPs were more concerned about a

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looming civil war in Ireland than the drumbeat to war in Europe. That

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all changed when Sir Edward Grey, the Foreign Secretary, warndd MPs

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that the Army of the Kaiser sweeping through Belgium would obligd Britain

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to defend Belgian neutralitx. An MP from Leicester was not convhnced.

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Ramsay MacDonald is probablx better known as the Prime Minister of the

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first`ever Labour Government after the First World War, but he was also

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one of the first Labour MPs, elected to represent Leicester. In the

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Commons, Ramsay MacDonald s`id he was not convinced of the nedd for

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war and that the verdict of history may eventually agree with hhm and

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not so Redwood. Within 24 hours Britain war and Sir Edward Grey

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Craig, from the windows of the front office, made his warning, the lamps

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are going out all over Europe, they will not be lit again in our

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lifetime. Mobilisation was not without problems. Lord Kitchener

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needed recruits. The MP for Mansfield, illiberal, gained

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prominence to campaigning against underage boys being enlisted.

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Investor, recruitment was along the lowest in Britain because of the

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strong anti`war sentiment. `` in Leicester. MPs had other concerns,

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why had recruits not been issued with razors and spoons? Why were

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retired medical officers not getting a full kit allowance, Sir Hdrbert

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Raphael demanded an answer. And what of Derby's new Labour MPs, Jimmy

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Thomas, exposed businesses that were still trading with Germany, despite

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a Government trade ban. The war to end all wars may have been 000 years

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ago, yet the concerns of our MPs then seem strangely familiar now.

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I have moved down now from the church to the millennium se`t, and

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earlier this evening, the n`mes of the men who served their cotntry

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from Brassington were read out in a special roll call. Mike Rosd,

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Chairman of the local branch of the Royal British Legion, read out the

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names as a mark of respect. Joseph Henry Ellis. William Webster Gould.

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William Herbert Grattan. Well, I am joined by some of the villagers and

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members of the Royal British Legion. You have helped to organise this,

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who has it gone? Very well. It has been a beautiful might. We just

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wanted to mark the centenarx of the First World War and pay respects to

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all the millions who died. H think you have done the village proud

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Mike, what is the response? It is 100 years on, it is a long time

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since the war started. You think it is a long time, but we have to

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remember these people who wdnt to war in 18, 90 years `` 19 ydars of

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age and gave their lives for us and for how we live today lost because

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it was turning point in the century. From that point of view, I think we

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should be very grateful to them Brassington suffered a lot, there

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was a huge impact on the yotng men here. There must have been. 17

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villagers lost their lives out of about 35. One village just down the

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road had no body. One of thd thankful villages, as it was called.

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But a proud moment for the Royal British Legion, the responsd today

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and tonight? Very much so. H am pleased to see the way everxthing

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has gone. I think it has rehgnited the events in the last few days

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that suddenly, young people have realised what happened 100 xears

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ago, it has reignited that hnterest. It certainly has. Thank you very

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much to all of you. We will leave you tonight from Brassington, with a

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rendition of the last post on what has been a day of intense and

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incredible commemorations. We were there earlier at the Crich Stand in

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Derbyshire, the memorial to the men of the Sherwood Foresters who went

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to war and never came back. Those soldiers are in our minds again

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tonight. Good night. We have had a fairly quiet start, it

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has been dry and bright with a good deal of warmth. Not much ch`nging

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for the next 24 hours, we whll stay dry throughout tomorrow. Thd

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sunshine will be around through the morning and cloud will incrdase

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again in the afternoon. But temperatures going back up hnto the

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20s. A couple of showers thhs evening which are starting to fade.

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The cloud will melt away as well, so dry and clear. Like winds, so it

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will be quite cold, but temperatures are sliding into single figtres for

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some. Around eight or nine Celsius. Tomorrow, a bright start, bdautiful

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sunshine through the morning, cloud increasing as we approach the

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afternoon. The chance of a shower although most places will stay dry.

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Temperatures up to around 22. That's all from us, here is the outlook.

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Quite a fresh evening out there this evening. It's going to turn chilly

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in a few spots by the early hours of Tuesday. Underneath the clear,

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calm, tranquil conditions... Not completely clear because there are a

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few showers. You may have been caught out in some across the South

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today. After midnight, you can see the vast majority of the UK has dry

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weather, whereas Cornwall, Devon, just about nudging into Wales,

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possibly Northern Ireland and the south-west of Scotland, a few

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showers. But clear skies is the story tonight. Colder in rural

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spots. The Glens of Scotland, really nippy first thing on Tuesday. It

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starts off sunny for many of us Tuesday is going to be a bit of an

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East-West split. In the afternoon, across the south-west we will see a

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few showers, a bit of sunshine too, not such a bad

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