22/02/2018 London News


22/02/2018

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LineFromTo

widespread frost and the chance of

smoke too. And that is all

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On BBC London:

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Struggling

to keep the capital safe.

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Met warns it faces further

cuts to police numbers.

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They have sold of the buildings,

close down police stations, got rid

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of many police staff, reduced the

amount of community officers, all

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that is left now is police officers.

The government claims extra money

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has been made available for the Met.

Also tonight, the 13-year-old killed

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after being taken for a ride in a

Ferrari which crashed.

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The driver denies death

by careless driving.

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Plus the couple from tooting trying

to improve dementia care for the gay

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community.

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And hidden away in a sock drawer

for more than half a century,

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the Picasso and photos of the famous

artist that have come

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to light in Surrey.

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Picasso was a bit out there for him.

So he put it in his sock drawer?

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Exactly, he knew it was worth

keeping and he put it in his chest

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of drawers.

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A very warm welcome

to the programme.

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First tonight - a

warning

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from Scotland Yard today -

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that police numbers could fall

by as many as 3,000 over the next

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few years if further

funding isn't forthcoming.

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A report by the Met,

and seen by BBC London -

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also reveals how morale is falling

and an admission that the force will

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struggle to keep Londoners safe.

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It comes as the Mayor today

confirmed he was investing an extra

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£110 million in the police.

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But even he admits it's not enough

to stop officer numbers falling.

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More from our political

correspondent Karl Mercer.

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The Met police is being stretched,

it's dealing with another worrying

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rise in knife crime and has been

challenged by a year of terror

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attacks. It's also dealing with a

growing population in London, rising

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by 100,000 people a year, while

police numbers are falling. Report

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seen by BBC London News aligns the

growing pressure the police are

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under.

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This is the report that sets out

Scotland Yard's pretty

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stark vision of the future.

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Over 30-odd pages it

sets out a vision

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of what the coming years will be

like without extra

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government funding.

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It warns that unless

it gets more money.

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Cuts to workforce numbers

could be damaging.

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It says that

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pressures on its budget mean

that it is Struggling to invest

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sufficiently in crime prevention.

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It also outlines

the effect that cuts

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and rising crime are having

on officers saying that

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a lack of resources

is having a worrying

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impact on morale.

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There is also a blunt

warning on police numbers.

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The report says that without extra

money London could see

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just 27,000 officers by 2022.

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A drop of 3000.

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I've been working closely now with

the Met police force for the last

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two years. They are not emotive

people and don't use this sort of

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language very often. They've made a

prediction based upon the cuts they

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are facing. 75% of the Met police

budget goes on human beings, on

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police officers. They have cut as

much as they can, all that is

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left... They have sold of the

buildings, closed police stations,

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got rid of many police staff, they

have reduced the amount of community

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support officers. All that is left

now is police officers.

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So, what to do?

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Well, this document

is Scotland Yard's submission

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to something called

the Police Remuneration

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Review Body.

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Basically, the body that says how

much officers should get paid.

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Scotland Yard wants a 3% pay rise

for staff and also £2000 extra

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in London weighting -

measures it hopes will make the Met

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an attractive place to work.

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We are very clear about some of

those morale issues and we talk in

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the document about the fact that pay

and rewards is part of that. We hope

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that in the submission that we are

taking note of that and trying to do

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something that strikes that

difficult balance between being fair

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to our offices and making sure it is

something realistic but also

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accepting that that means there are

consequences on what money we have

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to spend on police in London.

Paying

police more may attract more

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recruits but the real sticking point

will be over who pays for that pay

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rise. Mork Dom will central

government and evermore, or will the

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Met and the mayor have to hand over

the cash? We're going to stay with

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policing for a moment because

according to an independent

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inspection, 90% of child protection

investigations in the capital have

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been unsatisfactory. In some cases

children have been left to live with

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paedophiles in London.

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The Met insists it's making progress

but points out they dealing

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with a record number of recorded

sexual offences committed

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against children.

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Chris Rogers has been studying

the latest probe commissioned

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by the Home Secretary.

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This is a quarterly report by HM

Inspectorate of Constabulary and

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Fire And Rescue Services and they

were ordered by the Home Office

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after inspectors last year found

many cases like this were not being

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investigated because of budget cuts,

which is what we have been hearing

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about a night. It does highlight

that measures have been put in place

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but it is too soon to see if there

are any benefits, if they are

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working. Let's the incidents they

highlight, in one of them, a

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13-year-old girl called police after

a boy blackmailed her online and

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after sending explicit images but it

wasn't investigated for 11 days.

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Teaches informed police that a

seven-year-old was being abused by

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his parents but he wasn't taken into

care and continue to be abused but

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four months. Let's the wider

picture. Inspectors looked at a

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sample of 214 child protecting cases

forced above that, almost 191 were

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judged to be either requiring

improvement, or inadequate. The

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backdrop to their staggering figures

is that there is a record number of

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crimes like this being reported from

paedophilia to online abuse, and

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exportation. 65,000 offences were

recorded in 2016, and 2017, and

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children's charities say we need to

bear that figure in mind when

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scrutinising the police.

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I think there are a multitude

of issues that are causing

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this to be so, such

as

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an increase in potential

reporting of cases of

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child protection cases

that

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the police are having to deal with,

and part of that, we think,

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is probably because of a real rise

in the number

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of cases but also

the fallout of things

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like Operation Yewtree,

the

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prominence in the news

recently of child abuse.

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The police are under pressure,

they have had resources

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cuts to the front line,

which is making it more difficult

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for them to do their jobs.

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But ultimately we want them

to be doing a lot more

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multi-agency working,

that is really the key to most

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of those child protection issues.

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Some context from a child protection

charity. Has the Met responded?

They

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say they are pleased the inspectors

highlighted that they are making

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significant processes in Samaria --

making significant progress in some

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areas. Yet again they have

highlighted the huge scale of the

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crimes they are investigating and

the budget cuts they are up against.

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Chris Kamara for now, thank you.

Chris Rogers there.

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Stay with us, coming up later

in programme Stay with us,

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coming up later in programme:

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We are looking for people with their

phones out and their headphones in

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particular.

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The thieves making

a violent career out

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of swiping Londoners' phones.

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They boast it's like "stealing

candy from a baby".

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A businessman from Surrey

was in court today accused

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of causing a 13 year-old's death

through careless driving.

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Alexander Worth was thrown

from a Ferrari after

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being taken for a ride.

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The driver from Walton-on-Thames

said he hadn't been showing off.

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Steve Humphrey reports.

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Described in court as formidably

powerful, the Ferrari F50 that

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crashed was filmed on the day of

the tragedy for a promotional video.

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Later it was delivered

back to a storage unit

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in North Warnborough

in

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Hampshire that was visited by

the jury and court officials earlier

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this week.

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Matthew Cobden, seen here

with the red hair, ran the storage

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business, and he offered to give

13-year-old Alexander Worth quick

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business, and he offered to give

13-year-old Alexander Worth a quick

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spin in the car.

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The Ferrari struck a wooden post,

was launched into the

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air, and rolled over, throwing out

Mr Cobden and Alexander.

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Today in court a statement

made by Mr Cobden

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and quotes from police interviews

were read to the jury.

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Mr Cobden said he had

used a torch to make

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sure he had put his feet

on the right pedals when he first

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got into the Ferrari to move it off

a car transporter.

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Mr Cobden suffered injuries

including a broken rib and

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punctured lung.

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Alexander, from Kings Worthy

near Winchester, was

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pronounced dead at the scene.

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Mr Cobden said it was

impossible to express

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in words how terrible

he

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felt at what had happened.

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He said he'd sent

a message of sorrow and

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condolence to Alexander's

parents and was at

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a loss to explain how

the

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accident had occurred.

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The defence have told

the jury they believe a

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pre-existing fault with the Ferrari

caused it to accelerate

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uncontrollably.

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But the prosecution says

it was running normally before

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the crash.

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Mr Cobden denies causing death

by careless driving and the

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case continues.

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After eight years of going down the

latest figures suggest youth

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unemployment is once again starting

to rise.

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The government says

there are positive signs

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of new opportunities

for school leavers.

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Today the employment minister took

a tour of north London to find out

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first hand the challenges some young

people still face in finding work.

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Here's our political

editor Tim Donovan.

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Words on the wall to inspire

at the Minister's first stop,

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the Octagon Academy in Wood Green

for pupils who

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found it difficult in,

or excluded from, mainstream school.

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I really changed, like,

really a lot since I started here.

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I started taking this second chance.

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I didn't want to waste

it like I wasted my

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first chance back in mainstream.

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Yeah.

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So I wanted to do things right.

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Not easy doing this with so many

teachers and government

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advisers in the room.

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In general I just want to be

helping other people

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instead of just using my skills

to do the wrong things.

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The school is working

closely with the local Job

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Centre plus but the head here knows

it's hard out there.

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I think it is a difficult time

for them coming out of

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school but if you get the right

advice, and the right information

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and guidance, which is

what we've had here,

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in conjunction with

the

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work of the Department for Work

and Pensions, you can make a real

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difference.

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There are certainly jobs in building

Tottenham's new stadium

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and the club's foundation is

promising many more in the future.

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Last year I qualified

as an FA level one coach.

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Youngsters here, attracted

by the chance to get a

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coaching qualification.

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They need independence,

they need to be

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confident in what they do.

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But learning workplace

skills leading to

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other things as well.

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The football side for many

is what allows you to

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get them through the door

because of their love

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or their interest

in

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football, and then they

learn different skills.

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A lot of them are into their

coaching but also a lot

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of them have gone

down different paths.

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Introducing what kind of work

they're looking into...

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And then to the job

Centre plus in Enfield.

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The rise in youth

unemployment may be

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small, up from 10.9 to 11%

in a year but it's the first

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time in eight years

it's headed in the wrong direction.

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Ten minutes whereby

you choose ten places...

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And there are signs

of new jobs drying up too.

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When you look at this age

group, look at the jobs

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picture, stagnating

wages, the possibility,

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the cost of housing.

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It's quite a bleak picture for young

people at the moment.

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You were with me during

the morning and you also

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saw the reaction of the young people

from the support that they are

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getting and they were

absolutely inspired.

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They are really inspired and I felt

really positive that we

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are doing the right things in terms

of providing that support, and of

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course, with that support

we need to make sure

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we are helping people

with

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the cost of living as well.

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Just a snapshot for

the Minister of one

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small area of north London, but

leaving with the hope that this rise

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in joblessness will

soon be reversed.

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Tim Donovan, BBC London News.

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Turning to something

we've reported a lot on,

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and it's on the rise.

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Robberies involving mopeds,

particularly in busy

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areas like Oxford Street,

with thieves often

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swiping someone's phone.

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Well, for the first time,

some of those involved in the crime

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have been speaking to the BBC.

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Specifically journalist

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Livvy Haydock who's here -

about about how and why they do it.

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We will talk to you in just a

moment. First, a glimpse into how

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easy they find it.

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And would you go straight

through the lights?

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Do you think people

are stupid walking around

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with their phones out like that?

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But it's so normal.

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You saw a glimpse of her before, the

journalist behind the documentary.

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Inside Britain's Moped Gangs,

Livvy Haydock is here -

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Thank you for coming in.

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They're effectively

saying 'user beware'?

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Yeah. If anything it was almost like

a list of how not to get mugged from

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the mugger, so it was extraordinary

really to get that kind of insight

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from guys who are making a living

going at stealing phones off people.

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As you say it was extraordinary.

Incredible access.

Thank you.

How

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did you get to the stage where they

allowed you in, so to speak?

There

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are so many crimes committed using

motorcycles in 2017, I think it was

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something like 23,000, so that

something like 23,000 people

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involved in crimes, so there are a

lot of people out there who have

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been involved in this, so it was a

case of approaching people, talking

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to them, explaining that I want

insight, I want to understand what

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motivates you and why you are doing

it, and what you feel is to be

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gained. It also ultimately how

people can protect themselves

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against your type of crime.

Were you

surprised by anything you saw

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experienced while you were with

them?

I was surprised at how they

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brag so much about how easy it is.

The boasting?

The boasting, yeah.

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But actually, if you chatted to

them, which I did, and challenged

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them, actually they know what they

are doing is wrong, there is remorse

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there. But you've got to go beyond

that. It is also partly to do with

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being young men and the adrenaline

rush, bragging, Instagram, social

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media about what they are doing, and

the stance they are doing on their

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bikes while doing these crimes. --

the stunts. Below that there is

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remorse in there and it's becoming

more or less normal for them.

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Turning now to what they do with all

of these phones, you mentioned the

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huge numbers, because there isn't

much value selling them here. I

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think we have a clip showing what

they do with them.

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Did you get any insight from being

with these gangs that this type of

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crime is slowing down or how people

should be protecting themselves

0:16:340:16:37

more?

Protecting themselves more

definitely, in terms of being more

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aware of what is going on around

you. You wouldn't walk around with

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cash in your hand but we do with our

phones and it is sad we cannot do

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that any more but it is getting to

that point. The bad weather over

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Christmas and earlier in the year

puts these youngsters off going out

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on their bikes because it is even

more dangerous.

It is quite an

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insight. Thank you for coming in.

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And you can watch Livvy Haydock's

documentary for BBC Three

0:17:100:17:12

Inside Britain's Moped Gangs.

0:17:120:17:14

It's available on the BBC iPlayer.

0:17:140:17:19

Still to come this

Thursday evening...

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The footie match which raised cash

for Grenfell survivors -

0:17:230:17:25

QPR is recognised for

its fundraising efforts.

0:17:250:17:33

For anyone

who suffers from dementia,

0:17:330:17:34

or who has a loved one

with the condition,

0:17:340:17:36

it can be an isolating time.

0:17:360:17:38

One couple has told us

how their experience has been even

0:17:380:17:43

more of a struggle because

they're gay and are now

0:17:430:17:45

trying to help others.

0:17:450:17:49

Helen Mulroy went to meet them

at their home in Tooting.

0:17:490:17:53

A happy life at home together with

his husband. It is something Mike

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Parrish has always aspired to after

coming out as gay in the 1970s.

It

0:17:580:18:04

was a difficult time, helping with

the Pride march and getting a

0:18:040:18:11

mixture of cheering and happiness

and also quite a lot of abuse. You

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would hear about people being beaten

up a lot. There was always this risk

0:18:140:18:19

if you were together that you could

be targeted and fought on it did. It

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was in the late 80s that he was

beaten up.

But with the decades,

0:18:240:18:32

society's view on homosexuality

changed and they built a life

0:18:320:18:34

together.

For us it was a nice safe

place to be. One has a huge appeal,

0:18:340:18:42

even when the law wasn't quite

right, even when things were

0:18:420:18:45

happening to us that wasn't fair, it

was easy to lose yourself in places

0:18:450:18:51

and make friends.

They never

imagined they would face prejudice

0:18:510:18:55

again in the future. That was at

least until Tom's diagnosis with

0:18:550:19:01

dementia related to HIV.

We have to

explain our relationship. I refer to

0:19:010:19:10

my partner as she rather then he. We

hear stories where people are in

0:19:100:19:16

care homes looking after people with

HIV will put rubber gloves on, they

0:19:160:19:19

will make them sit in one particular

seat, make sure their cutlery is not

0:19:190:19:25

used by other people.

And they are

not alone in their experience.

0:19:250:19:30

Dementia is challenging whatever it

is but it is more challenging if you

0:19:300:19:35

are from the LGBT community. Often

people can be marginalised. If they

0:19:350:19:39

felt this from the NHS and social

services, they might not have had a

0:19:390:19:44

great response and it will prevent

them from making contact in the

0:19:440:19:48

first place.

0:19:480:19:58

Now Mike and Tom are taking their

story on the road with the help of

0:19:590:20:02

the Alzheimer's Society through a

series of talks, hoping to drive

0:20:020:20:04

change so that in the future gay

couples dealing with HIV and

0:20:040:20:07

dementia don't have to face the

challenges they have hard.

I think

0:20:070:20:09

when I was 20 I would've thought by

62 this would have stopped. We

0:20:090:20:12

wouldn't have to keep saying, by the

way we are gay couple, but the

0:20:120:20:16

reality is for of gay people people

that never stops.

0:20:160:20:20

A football club whose

stadium is in the shadow

0:20:200:20:22

of the Grenfell Tower has been

recognised for the support

0:20:220:20:25

it has offered survivors.

0:20:250:20:27

QPR football club hosted a high

profile charity match,

0:20:270:20:29

which helped raise almost a million

pounds for those

0:20:290:20:31

affected by the tragedy.

0:20:310:20:32

Chris Slegg has more.

0:20:320:20:41

Shahin Sadafi lived on the fifth

floor of Grenfell Tower. Only his

0:20:410:20:46

mother was home on the night of the

disaster. Fortunately she survived.

0:20:460:20:52

There was a place where we grew up.

It was a place where friendships

0:20:520:20:57

were made.

Immediately after the

disaster, QPR opened their stadium

0:20:570:21:02

for people to leave donations.

Within weeks they had organised a

0:21:020:21:08

fundraising football match. Playing

alongside legendary players and

0:21:080:21:12

celebrities were Grenfell residents

including Shahin Sadafi himself and

0:21:120:21:17

remains grateful for everything the

club has done.

QPR were there with

0:21:170:21:22

the community from the start, one of

the many groups that came together

0:21:220:21:26

and said let's see what we can do.

The match helped raise close to £1

0:21:260:21:33

million, an effort that has seen QPR

nominated for a prize at the

0:21:330:21:38

football awards. Les Ferdinand was

among those who played.

For me, the

0:21:380:21:45

most poignant part was after the

game when I was speaking to some

0:21:450:21:48

survivors and people that were going

back to the hotels. They were saying

0:21:480:21:53

through all of this they felt they

had been on their own and it was for

0:21:530:21:57

the first time they felt they could

come out and enjoyed a day.

At the

0:21:570:22:02

Brit awards last night, Stormzy

attacked the Government for their

0:22:020:22:07

perceived inaction.

# Theresa May where is the money for

0:22:070:22:13

Grenfell?

Downing Street's response

was that over £60,000 has been

0:22:130:22:19

committed to the Grenfell community.

Shahin are still living in a hotel.

0:22:190:22:27

The Government authorities need to

do more. There's a lot of talk but

0:22:270:22:31

it's time to take action, show what

they are made for and what action to

0:22:310:22:35

the words they are saying.

QPR say

they will continue to offer support

0:22:350:22:40

to the Grenfell community.

0:22:400:22:44

His paintings sell for millions

and he is one of the most

0:22:440:22:47

influential artists

of the 20th century.

0:22:470:22:49

Quite a surprise then that one

of Pablo Picasso's works,

0:22:490:22:52

along with unseen photographs

of the great painter,

0:22:520:22:54

have been stored at the bottom

of a sock drawer in Surrey

0:22:540:22:57

for half a century.

0:22:570:22:58

Sarah Harris has the story.

0:22:580:23:06

That's the camera my father used

then, and that I kind of grew up

0:23:060:23:09

having pointed at me

when I was a kid.

0:23:090:23:11

And it took the pictures that

recorded the week his father spent

0:23:110:23:14

with one of the most famous artists

of modern time.

0:23:140:23:18

The plate was given to Jonathan's

father by Picasso to celebrate

0:23:180:23:20

the week they spent together

in the south of France back in 1964,

0:23:200:23:24

after a chance meeting on the beach.

0:23:240:23:28

The Surrey amateur photographer,

pictured here with the man himself,

0:23:280:23:31

kept the gift and the photos

in an old sock drawer.

0:23:310:23:36

My father was not a fan

of Picasso's as an artist.

0:23:360:23:38

He thought he was a lovely man

but didn't like the art.

0:23:380:23:41

His taste was much more 19th-century

and Rubens and Constable and sort

0:23:410:23:45

of representational stuff,

and Picasso was a bit

0:23:450:23:47

out there for him.

0:23:470:23:50

So he just put it

in the sock drawer!

0:23:500:23:52

Absolutely, he knew it was valuable,

worth keeping, and put it

0:23:520:23:55

in the bottom off his

chest of drawers.

0:23:550:23:57

Pablo Picasso never stops working.

0:23:570:23:58

Ceramist, sculptor, painter,

in one medium and another...

0:23:580:24:03

Picasso's work sell

the tens of million pounds.

0:24:030:24:07

Picasso's work sell

for tens of million pounds.

0:24:070:24:09

The photographs Jonathan's dad took

show him enjoying the company

0:24:090:24:13

of friends he even sometimes used

as human canvases.

0:24:130:24:16

Stanley, he says, was not fazed

by the painter's fame one jot.

0:24:160:24:20

He just took it

completely in his stride.

0:24:200:24:23

He was very pleased to have

met Picasso, then move

0:24:230:24:26

on and do whatever is next.

0:24:260:24:27

But most people would have said hi.

0:24:270:24:29

There must have been something

magnetic about his personality

0:24:290:24:31

that he invited him back to his home

and he was taking pictures

0:24:310:24:34

of him the whole time.

0:24:340:24:35

He just had charm, you know?

0:24:350:24:37

He was one of these people

who could walk into a room

0:24:370:24:40

at a party and everyone knew

he was there and

0:24:400:24:42

everybody loved him.

0:24:420:24:43

Now a Picasso exhibition

is being curated at the local

0:24:430:24:46

gallery in Woking.

0:24:460:24:47

This discovery was actually

the beginning of the whole

0:24:470:24:50

Picasso Fiesta, which is happening

at the Light Box because Jonathan

0:24:500:24:54

is a great supporter of ours.

0:24:540:24:57

He lives just down the road

and happened to mention in a totally

0:24:570:25:00

chance conversation that he had

all these photographs.

0:25:000:25:07

The exhibition starts next month.

0:25:070:25:09

Jonathan says he'll not

sell his late father's

0:25:090:25:10

photographs at any price.

0:25:100:25:13

They are just part

of his family's history.

0:25:130:25:16

Sarah Harris, BBC London news.

0:25:160:25:23

Let's see how the weather's

0:25:230:25:28

looking with Louise Lear -

colder is how it's feeling.

0:25:280:25:34

Yes, you might need to venture into

that sock drawer over the next

0:25:340:25:37

Yes, you might need to venture into

that sock drawer over the next

0:25:370:25:38

couple of days, you will need extra

layers but today has been a tale of

0:25:380:25:43

two halves. We started off gloomy,

but into the afternoon what a

0:25:430:25:48

change. A beautiful afternoon. The

cloud broke up, the sunshine came

0:25:480:25:54

through. That is chilly out there

but this helps to compensate.

0:25:540:25:58

Through the evening the clear skies

will stay with us and the

0:25:580:26:02

temperatures will fall away. It will

be acquired quiet weather theme over

0:26:020:26:07

the next few days. There will be

cloud hit and miss chiefly to the

0:26:070:26:11

north of London across parts of

Hertfordshire and into six, but the

0:26:110:26:16

temperatures are likely to fall low

as minus three degrees. Again some

0:26:160:26:25

lovely spells of sunshine and

through the day we will see

0:26:250:26:28

fairweather cloud being dragged in

from the North Sea, but that will

0:26:280:26:31

melt away into the afternoon and we

keep sunshine so we also keep the

0:26:310:26:36

clear skies. By day a maximum of up

to 6 degrees, factor in the strength

0:26:360:26:42

of the winds and it will feel cold.

We keep the clear skies, a cold and

0:26:420:26:47

frosty start into Saturday, and

again on those exposed coasts down

0:26:470:26:52

to Essex and Kent it will be cold.

Further inland more chance of seeing

0:26:520:26:57

sunshine on Saturday, a glorious day

and not much change as we head into

0:26:570:27:01

the second half of the weekend. This

high pressure dominating the story

0:27:010:27:07

across Scandinavia, and if we trace

the wind direction back to the Artic

0:27:070:27:11

that's the reason it will feel so

cold. Moving across the North Sea,

0:27:110:27:16

it will feel cold. It will stay cold

all week and in fact temperatures

0:27:160:27:22

perhaps by day will struggle to

climb above freezing. And yes there

0:27:220:27:26

is the potential maybe for some snow

on Tuesday night into Wednesday

0:27:260:27:30

morning. Keep watching the

forecasts.

0:27:300:27:32

morning. Keep watching the

forecasts.

0:27:320:27:35

I think we will, thank you. That's

all for now, from me and all of the

0:27:350:27:45

team, thanks for watching and have a

lovely evening.

0:27:450:27:48

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