15/03/2018 London News


Download Subtitles

SRT

ASS


15/03/2018

The latest news, sport and weather from London.


Similar Content

Browse content similar to 15/03/2018. Check below for episodes and series from the same categories and more!

Transcript


LineFromTo

for the Salisbury nerve attack as

the Prime Minister visits the crime

0:00:000:00:00

scene.

0:00:000:00:04

On BBC London this Thursday night:

scene.

0:00:040:00:06

For the first time,

London's Air Ambulance attends

0:00:060:00:08

to more violent attacks than road

traffic accidents -

0:00:080:00:11

And the victims are younger.

0:00:120:00:16

We're also seeing schoolchildren,

where we have to cut off their

0:00:160:00:18

school uniform to get to them to try

and help and do some operations,

0:00:180:00:22

which is just tragic.

0:00:220:00:25

We hear from a teenager who lost

a friend to knife crime.

0:00:250:00:28

Also tonight:

0:00:280:00:30

Why these children are upset

their school could close just five

0:00:300:00:33

years after it opened.

0:00:330:00:34

Plus:

0:00:340:00:36

How a company in Hertfordshire

could have found a way

0:00:360:00:39

to clean-up litter in space.

0:00:390:00:41

And...

0:00:410:00:48

# We are the kids in America...

0:00:480:00:52

And don't pretend you're

not singing along.

0:00:520:00:54

Stay with us as we catch

up with Kim Wilde.

0:00:540:01:01

Good evening, I'm Asad Ahmad.

0:01:010:01:04

For the first time in nearly 30

years, London's Air Ambulance

0:01:040:01:06

says its being called out to more

stabbings and shootings

0:01:060:01:10

than it is to road

traffic accidents.

0:01:100:01:13

Their lead clinician says it's now

not unusual for them to perform open

0:01:130:01:17

heart surgery for stab wounds twice

in a single day.

0:01:170:01:23

The news comes as another teenager

died from a knife attack,

0:01:230:01:25

while a man was shot dead in east

London.

0:01:250:01:28

Karl Mercer has spent the day

with the Air Ambulance.

0:01:280:01:37

As we were filming, another

call-out... They do this 1800 times

0:01:370:01:43

a year, nearly a third of all the

missions are to victims of stabbings

0:01:430:01:47

and shootings.

We are seeing

patients who are stabbed multiple

0:01:470:01:54

times, perhaps with much more brutal

weapons than we saw before. We are

0:01:540:01:59

still seeing people who are stabbed

once and passing away at the

0:01:590:02:05

roadside. We're also seeing

schoolchildren where we have to cut

0:02:050:02:08

off their school uniform to get to

them to try and help and do some

0:02:080:02:12

operations, which is just tragic.

For the first time, stabbings and

0:02:120:02:17

shootings account for the big

slumber of missions, bigger than

0:02:170:02:20

road accidents. 560 victims of knife

and gun crime in the last year. Many

0:02:200:02:25

in teens.

The horror is not in the

injuries. It is in the age of the

0:02:250:02:33

victims and the constant drip, drip,

drip of life, afterlife, after life,

0:02:330:02:42

being ruined by injuries. That has

got to stop.

At the end of last

0:02:420:02:48

year, BBC London filmed a week in

the Royal London hospital. This is

0:02:480:02:54

where the victims of the growing

violence are brought. On busy

0:02:540:02:59

nights, the air ambulance can bring

in several victims. The air

0:02:590:03:03

ambulance is paid for by charity

donations with the NHS paying for

0:03:030:03:07

the stuff.

Every member of the team

has a case, most shifts where they

0:03:070:03:13

come back absolutely downtrodden

because of what they have seen and

0:03:130:03:16

because they have had to break news

to relatives of those patients at

0:03:160:03:20

the scene. Which is harrowing.

Obviously more harrowing for the

0:03:200:03:25

people involved, but it does affect

all of the medical teams through the

0:03:250:03:28

system, who are trying to help.

One

of those trying to do that is

0:03:280:03:34

surging, Martin Griffiths.

It is

very concerning because we are

0:03:340:03:37

living in a society where use is

starting to degrade and people are

0:03:370:03:46

having near fatal events in their

childhoods. -- youth. We talk about

0:03:460:03:59

knife intervention at that age but

at 13, 14, where do you start the

0:03:590:04:06

intervention work?

That is a

question for wider society, but

0:04:060:04:10

while it looks for an answer, the

victims will continue to come.

0:04:100:04:14

Well, many people affected

by knife crime are teenagers

0:04:140:04:18

and the authorities are constantly

looking at ways of deterring young

0:04:180:04:20

people from carrying knives.

0:04:200:04:22

So as part of the BBC's

Annual School Report Day,

0:04:220:04:24

we asked 18-year-old Abbianca

from east London to take a look

0:04:240:04:27

at the issue for us.

0:04:270:04:28

This is her report.

0:04:280:04:30

Hello, I'm Abbianca.

0:04:300:04:35

Sixth form student at

Draper's Academy, in Harrod Hill.

0:04:350:04:38

I want to explore the ways

in which the education system can

0:04:380:04:41

help reduce knife crime.

0:04:410:04:42

This issue is very close

to my heart because in 2016,

0:04:420:04:46

I lost a dear friend of mine

who was a victim of knife crime.

0:04:460:04:49

I went to Scotland Yard to speak

to a senior police detective,

0:04:490:04:53

who deals with knife crime

on a daily basis.

0:04:530:04:56

I asked him if he thought schools

should have compulsory

0:04:560:04:59

lessons on this issue.

0:04:590:05:00

What to think about this,

do you think this can

0:05:000:05:03

make a difference?

0:05:030:05:04

I think it would make

a difference, I think we need

0:05:040:05:06

to change the messaging.

0:05:060:05:08

We have been saying for some time

that police on their own are not

0:05:080:05:12

going to arrest or enforce their way

out of this.

0:05:120:05:14

We need some answers and we need

to ask the right questions,

0:05:140:05:17

so let's get into our

communities, younger people.

0:05:170:05:19

Here I am back at my school,

Draper's Academy where I'll be

0:05:190:05:22

interviewing head of sixth form

and some students on the issue

0:05:220:05:25

of tackling knife crime.

0:05:250:05:27

Some people may carry

knives for protection,

0:05:270:05:30

especially because there's other

teenagers carrying knives anyway.

0:05:300:05:34

When community centres

are shut down and therefore,

0:05:340:05:38

the youth clubs that were held

in them get people getting bored

0:05:380:05:41

and therefore joining gangs

because they don't have the group

0:05:410:05:43

where they could have gone to.

0:05:430:05:45

If I'm being honest,

schools don't really teach

0:05:450:05:48

about knife crime that much.

0:05:480:05:52

My first talk was in year 12,

I was 16 when I had my first

0:05:520:05:56

talk about knife crime.

0:05:560:05:58

Do you think that these lessons will

make a difference and have an impact

0:05:580:06:01

on the younger generation?

0:06:010:06:02

I'm not convinced.

0:06:020:06:07

I think people who are attracted

to gangs and attracted to carrying

0:06:070:06:10

knives, they've kind of fallen out

of the education system.

0:06:100:06:16

There isn't one solution

to tackling knife crime,

0:06:160:06:19

but from my interviews,

it seems that changes

0:06:190:06:22

in the education system

could possibly contribute

0:06:220:06:24

to reduce knife crime.

0:06:240:06:26

Abbianca, BBC School Report.

0:06:260:06:30

Our thanks to Abbianca

for that report.

0:06:300:06:32

Well, it's Thursday the 15th March.

0:06:320:06:33

This is what's still

to come on the programme:

0:06:330:06:40

A small part of the Paddington basin

is being transformed. I will explain

0:06:400:06:46

how later in the programme.

0:06:460:06:54

London's Museums are some

of the best in the world,

0:06:540:06:56

but they say they're

being overlooked when

0:06:560:06:57

it comes to Brexit.

0:06:570:06:58

They argue its essential

for them to know how

0:06:580:07:00

they'll have access to art,

staff and funding after

0:07:000:07:03

the break from the EU.

0:07:030:07:04

To put it all into perspective,

London's Creative industries

0:07:040:07:10

generate almost £50 billion a year,

which is around half the UK's total.

0:07:100:07:13

It also accounts for one

in six jobs in London.

0:07:130:07:17

The issue has been

discussed at a conference

0:07:170:07:19

at The National Gallery today,

from where we can hear

0:07:190:07:22

from Katharine Carpenter.

0:07:220:07:30

There are figures out today showing

this place was the second most

0:07:300:07:34

visited attraction last year in the

UK, second only to the British

0:07:340:07:39

Museum. Those stats are important to

London at the moment and this sector

0:07:390:07:43

is trying to get its voice heard in

the breadth in negotiations. Members

0:07:430:07:48

gathered here today to try to

discuss how to do that, had to try

0:07:480:07:52

and get the issues they are

concerned about heard by the

0:07:520:07:55

government, amongst other things.

There are many other common things

0:07:550:08:00

but individual concerns for

different parts of the sector, as I

0:08:000:08:07

found out to some of those who run

our galleries and museums.

0:08:070:08:09

We'll place these as we planned...

0:08:090:08:12

Putting the final touches to this

exhibition of work by Austrian

0:08:120:08:14

artist is a precise business.

0:08:140:08:16

But after being shown at this

north London gallery,

0:08:160:08:19

some of these pieces might be loaned

elsewhere in the EU,

0:08:190:08:21

a fairly simple process

while we are still members.

0:08:210:08:24

It's really relatively smooth,

it's a number of pieces of paper.

0:08:240:08:29

It means we can import and export

duty free, if you like.

0:08:290:08:37

But if administration,

bureaucracy then comes into it,

0:08:370:08:39

we'll have to employ somebody

at some stage to deal

0:08:390:08:42

with all that paperwork.

0:08:420:08:43

He says he's prepared

to make the necessary

0:08:430:08:45

changes, but needs to know

what they'll be, soon.

0:08:450:08:49

Getting clarity on these issues

is just as important

0:08:490:08:51

for large institutions.

0:08:510:08:54

Here at the natural history museum

it can take up to three or four

0:08:540:08:57

years to plan an exhibition.

0:08:570:08:58

So even if you factor

in a transition period,

0:08:580:09:00

time is beginning to run out.

0:09:010:09:07

The Museums Association warns that

London's cultural offering could be

0:09:070:09:11

affected with access to funding

and staff major concerns.

0:09:110:09:13

30% of museums in the UK

employ staff from other

0:09:130:09:16

countries in the EU.

0:09:160:09:21

There is concern that some

of will leave and the museums

0:09:210:09:25

won't be able to attract

high-quality, specialist staff

0:09:250:09:27

in very niche subject areas,

which typically they rely on to put

0:09:270:09:30

on the kind of amazing

exhibitions that you see today.

0:09:300:09:32

But some see Brexit as a chance

to widen the opportunity.

0:09:320:09:36

The fledgling group,

Artists for Brexit, hopes it

0:09:360:09:38

will create a more level playing

field globally and remind

0:09:380:09:40

creatives they need to engage

with wide audiences.

0:09:400:09:44

You finish up with artists and art

work is not actually speaking

0:09:440:09:48

with the people of the British

Isles.

0:09:480:09:52

People with whom they are supposed

to be engaging, but just

0:09:520:09:55

talking amongst themselves.

0:09:550:09:57

This is bad for the arts, long term.

0:09:570:10:00

But if some audiences

are being overlooked,

0:10:000:10:03

so too is the cultural sector

as a whole, according

0:10:030:10:05

to Alistair Brown.

0:10:060:10:08

The decisions that are being made

about things like the customs union

0:10:080:10:11

are being made at such a high level

in government and they are facing

0:10:110:10:14

so many different competing

demands from areas like

0:10:140:10:16

the city, from industry.

0:10:160:10:20

That it's difficult for museums'

concerns to be heard at that level.

0:10:200:10:23

And with so much at stake,

it's a point London's arts

0:10:230:10:26

will keep on making.

0:10:260:10:31

The government has got back to us on

the point of overlooking this

0:10:310:10:35

sector. It told us it wants the best

deal from the negotiations so it can

0:10:350:10:40

begin to grow and thrive. When it

set its own immigration policy after

0:10:400:10:44

Brexit it will welcome those with

the skills and expertise to allow

0:10:440:10:48

museums and galleries to continue to

do what's best. Let's speak to John,

0:10:480:10:58

are you reassured by those words?

A

small amount, they talk the right

0:10:580:11:01

talk and they are trying to be

reassuring. The issue for us, is

0:11:010:11:08

London, this incredible, welcoming

and cultural and artistic city,

0:11:080:11:11

going to be as open for business, as

open for people from across the

0:11:110:11:18

European Union to ply their trade.

That is what makes this industry so

0:11:180:11:24

intriguing, Brits and people from

far afield can work together. £92

0:11:240:11:32

billion annually, there is nothing

soft, nothing about entertainment in

0:11:320:11:37

this. This sector produces four

times as many jobs as others over

0:11:370:11:41

the last year. This is the real

powerhouse for Britain.

It is clear

0:11:410:11:46

what you want but how will you get

it, you have only got a year to go?

0:11:460:11:52

We are engaging with them all the

time but are they listening? I can

0:11:520:11:56

get out of bed either side and give

you a different answer. We have got

0:11:560:12:02

our work cut out. We have to

demonstrate that economically,

0:12:020:12:06

socially, culturally and in terms of

Britain's image abroad, the creative

0:12:060:12:10

industries and tech or the key

drivers for the economy. If they

0:12:100:12:16

don't put this sector front and

centre of the negotiations, all of

0:12:160:12:19

us in London will suffer

economically as a result.

You heard

0:12:190:12:23

a very strong case being made by the

sector, it just hopes now the

0:12:230:12:27

government will listen.

We will watch very carefully. Two of

0:12:270:12:32

the news now...

0:12:320:12:35

A ceremony has been held

to celebrate the life of Makram Ali,

0:12:350:12:37

the man killed in the Finsbury Park

terror attack in June.

0:12:370:12:40

A plaque

and a tree were unveiled

0:12:400:12:42

by his daughter and grandchildren.

0:12:430:12:46

Mr Ali was killed by a van

driven by Darren Osbourne,

0:12:460:12:49

who's been jailed for life.

0:12:490:12:50

Also in attendance, was the Police

Commissioner, Cressida Dick

0:12:500:12:52

and Mayor of London,

Sadeeq Khan.

0:12:520:12:54

A woman who posed as a survivor

of the Grenfell Tower Fire

0:12:540:12:57

has been convicted of fraud.

0:12:570:12:58

Southwark Crown Court heard that

47-year-old Joyce M-Sokeri,

0:12:580:13:01

pretended to have lost her home

and her husband so she could obtain

0:13:010:13:04

cash, donations and accommodation.

0:13:050:13:09

At the time, she was

living in Sutton.

0:13:090:13:11

M-Sokeri will be

sentenced next month.

0:13:110:13:14

Parents at a primary

school in west London,

0:13:140:13:17

which opened in 2012, have said

they're devastated after being told

0:13:170:13:19

it plans to close at

the end of next term.

0:13:190:13:22

Minerva Academy in Paddington

is only half full,

0:13:220:13:28

still on a temporary site,

and has no school playground.

0:13:280:13:30

Our Education Reporter, Marc Ashdown

has been finding out why.

0:13:300:13:34

Schools open, another

day of learning ahead,

0:13:340:13:37

something most parents

simply take for granted.

0:13:370:13:40

But school

days at Minerva Academy

0:13:400:13:42

in Paddington could be numbered.

0:13:420:13:46

Only half full, and based on this

woefully inadequate temporary site,

0:13:460:13:49

the head has told parents she plans

to shut in the summer.

0:13:490:13:52

It's so stressful,

especially for the children.

0:13:520:13:54

My son has been

two days he's not eating properly,

0:13:540:13:56

he is not sleeping good,

0:13:560:13:57

he's telling me that

"I hate learning."

0:13:570:13:59

How are you feeling?

0:13:590:14:00

Mad, sad.

0:14:000:14:04

I will never forget this school,

it's because I've got friends that

0:14:040:14:07

I've known for seven

years, six years.

0:14:070:14:10

Minerva only opened in 2012.

0:14:100:14:12

In a letter to parents,

0:14:120:14:13

the head says falling pupil numbers

across Westminster has hit funding.

0:14:130:14:16

She says the current

site has not helped,

0:14:160:14:19

there is no playground and promises

of a brand-new building

0:14:190:14:21

seem to have evaporated.

0:14:210:14:23

It was supposed to be

here in Paddington basin,

0:14:230:14:25

apparently, but apparently

now there is nothing.

0:14:250:14:27

We were supposed to move

how many years ago?

0:14:270:14:30

Two, three years ago.

0:14:300:14:33

And everything was behind, behind,

behind, and promises.

0:14:330:14:37

And now, no school.

0:14:370:14:39

I wonder where is the new building,

what have they done with it.

0:14:390:14:42

Critics will argue this is another

example of what they have long

0:14:420:14:45

argued is a fundamental flaw

in the Government's

0:14:450:14:46

academies programme.

0:14:470:14:48

New schools are only

supposed to open

0:14:480:14:50

where there is a clear basic

need for more places

0:14:500:14:53

and in suitable buildings.

0:14:530:14:55

Here, it appears, there is neither.

0:14:550:14:58

It follows news that

Floreat Brentford is set to close,

0:14:580:15:01

another free school which could not

find a permanent home,

0:15:010:15:03

or make the money add up.

0:15:030:15:10

I do think this is chickens

coming home to roost

0:15:100:15:12

for the free school movement.

0:15:120:15:17

There's been a whole series

of stumbles and free schools,

0:15:170:15:19

with free schools failing.

0:15:190:15:21

I'm sure some have been

successful but the

0:15:210:15:22

general rule about free schools

that this is a privatised model of

0:15:220:15:25

running an education system, it's

too risky to run an education system

0:15:250:15:28

based on ideology.

0:15:280:15:29

Children have one chance

in a primary school or a

0:15:290:15:31

secondary school and we can't

play games with that.

0:15:310:15:33

Minerva is run by a multi-Academy

trust, the Board of Trustees says

0:15:330:15:36

staff are still providing a good

level of education but for a range

0:15:360:15:39

of factors, the school is no

longer financially viable.

0:15:390:15:42

If it does close, the local

authority, Westminster, says it's

0:15:420:15:44

ready to step in to make sure all 89

pupils can go to a good

0:15:440:15:48

school elsewhere.

0:15:480:15:55

Marc, what doesn't quite add up

is that we've often reported

0:15:550:15:57

on the shortage of school

places in London.

0:15:570:15:59

Now a school is closing

because there aren't enough pupils?

0:15:590:16:04

It does seem a bit odd. It is worth

explaining what academies are

0:16:040:16:09

because it can be confusing.

Originally they were Tony Blair

0:16:090:16:13

policy to turn around struggling

schools, then when the coalition

0:16:130:16:18

came in in 2010, Michael Gove

flipped it and gave outstanding

0:16:180:16:24

schools more power, and struggling

schools were forced to convert. Free

0:16:240:16:30

schools give parents the power to

start schools if they are not happy

0:16:300:16:34

with the local ones. Both academies

and free schools answer directly to

0:16:340:16:39

government, taking the council out

of the loop. I think we all agreed

0:16:390:16:45

the big problems these schools face

is trying to find buildings to open

0:16:450:16:48

in as was the case here.

We heard it

said the chickens are coming home to

0:16:480:16:58

roost, is this a sign of things to

come?

Demand is always the key. A

0:16:580:17:03

few years ago there was a population

boom, too many kids and not enough

0:17:030:17:08

places. Is this the first sign that

is starting to change around? I'm

0:17:080:17:14

not sure. Some parents still

struggle to find places. Councils

0:17:140:17:21

might be out of the loop but they

still have the duty, the legal duty

0:17:210:17:26

to educate every child in the

country so if things start to go

0:17:260:17:30

wrong, as seems to be the case here,

the council like Westminster has got

0:17:300:17:34

to step in and provide a place for

every pupil.

Thanks for that.

0:17:340:17:42

A driver in Essex has

filmed a trail of

0:17:420:17:44

fly-tipping covering

a quarter of a mile.

0:17:440:17:47

It's the second time in a year that

Watery Lane in Hullbridge

0:17:470:17:49

has had to close because of rubbish.

0:17:490:17:50

It's cost the local

council £1,500 to clear

0:17:500:17:53

and caused long tailbacks

through nearby villages.

0:17:530:17:54

Local people say flytipping

in the area is a weekly problem.

0:17:540:17:57

Here's a sight you wouldn't

expect to see, especially

0:17:570:17:59

if you were on holiday in Mexico.

0:17:590:18:01

London buses.

0:18:010:18:02

The low emission ones have arrived

in Mexico City as part

0:18:020:18:06

of a one billion PESO deal,

that's over £40 million.

0:18:060:18:08

It's aimed at helping

traffic and pollution

0:18:080:18:09

in the Mexican capital.

0:18:100:18:14

It's easy to get caught up

in the pace of London life,

0:18:140:18:17

never taking time out

to enjoy the city.

0:18:170:18:20

But a new art installation

on the Regent's Canal

0:18:200:18:23

aims to get us to relax.

0:18:230:18:24

Victoria Hollins is at the

Paddington Basin to show us how.

0:18:240:18:34

If you have just walked in from work

and had a stressful day at the

0:18:370:18:42

office, you may wish you had someone

like this to spend some time. This

0:18:420:18:47

is in a redeveloped Paddington Basin

and it is an art installation which

0:18:470:18:50

has just been switched on. A

flotilla of 180 origami boats. Part

0:18:500:18:57

of the first Mindful series taking

place here, there will be yoga and

0:18:570:19:02

meditation taking place. It is

polymer paper so no fear about the

0:19:020:19:07

weather in the next few days. They

go through the process of changing

0:19:070:19:11

colour every 20 seconds or so and I

have to say it really is quite

0:19:110:19:16

peaceful. A short time ago I spoke

to the artists behind this.

The

0:19:160:19:22

thinking behind this is to have

something which is calming and

0:19:220:19:26

floating, and encourages you to take

the second and stop, and after a

0:19:260:19:41

busy day or during a busy day even,

it is something that makes you stop

0:19:490:19:52

and take a couple of minutes to

yourself. That is what the brief was

0:19:520:19:54

and what it is here to do.

These are

more to so there's no chance they

0:19:540:19:58

will float away. There is food here

as well. The only then I would like

0:19:580:20:03

to change as the temperature!

I feel relaxed already, and this is

0:20:030:20:09

making me feel even more relaxed

because this is what it is like to

0:20:090:20:13

be in space, minus the suit, the

desk and chair of course!

0:20:130:20:19

But what we forget is all

the rubbish that's out there.

0:20:190:20:21

It's been left after so many

launches into space,

0:20:210:20:23

and as there are no bins

it just floats about.

0:20:230:20:26

So Airbus in Hertfordshire

have designed a type

0:20:260:20:28

of rubbish picker to clear it up.

0:20:280:20:29

Kate Bradbrook has been

seeing if it could work.

0:20:290:20:32

Litter and waste is a growing

problem here on planet Earth,

0:20:320:20:34

but it's also becoming a serious

issue in space.

0:20:340:20:36

Old satellites and space

craft from years gone

0:20:360:20:38

by discarded in low Earth orbit.

0:20:380:20:44

As the spacecraft are orbiting

around up there, then there's

0:20:440:20:46

the risk of them colliding with each

other, and when they do,

0:20:460:20:50

they explode to create a huge amount

more debris that then can

0:20:500:20:52

collide with other spacecraft

and you just get this

0:20:520:20:54

snowballing effect.

0:20:540:21:00

But there's a possible solution,

a giant litter picker or space

0:21:000:21:02

harpoon is being tested

here at Airbus in Stevenage -

0:21:020:21:05

designed to capture debris

and safely dispose of it.

0:21:050:21:11

Each harpoon like this

one will be travelling

0:21:110:21:12

at 25 metres per second,

that's 56 mph, slower than a bullet

0:21:120:21:15

but fast enough to spear its target.

0:21:150:21:20

With 18,000 pieces of smaller

junk in orbit, there

0:21:200:21:22

is a tool for that too.

0:21:220:21:27

It's designed to harpoon small

spacecraft up to around the size

0:21:270:21:30

of a washing machine,

and reel them in so can

0:21:300:21:32

be safely deorbited.

0:21:320:21:35

This one is called Envisat,

it's a non-functioning satellite

0:21:350:21:37

that's around the size

of a double-decker bus.

0:21:370:21:39

It's about eight tonnes

so it's much too large

0:21:390:21:41

for our small harpoon to handle,

so we've developed this,

0:21:410:21:44

which is a clean space harpoon.

0:21:440:21:47

In many ways it's very similar,

it has a lot of the same

0:21:470:21:50

technology behind it.

0:21:500:21:51

We pierce the satellite,

deploy the barbs, we are now locked

0:21:510:21:54

in so we can have a mechanical

interface with our satellite

0:21:540:21:56

and we can use our tether

here to turn it back

0:21:560:21:59

into the atmosphere

where it can be safely destroyed.

0:21:590:22:03

Testing in space will

begin later this year.

0:22:030:22:05

By the mid 2020s, this could provide

the answer to our cosmic clean up.

0:22:050:22:08

Kate Bradbrook, BBC London News.

0:22:080:22:18

And that's why they say the best

ideas are the simple ones.

0:22:180:22:22

OK, pop pickers.

0:22:230:22:24

Here's one to take

you back to the '80s.

0:22:240:22:26

Because one of the best known

singers of the decade

0:22:260:22:28

is about to go on the road

again after successfully

0:22:280:22:30

dabbling as a gardener,

becoming a YouTube hit

0:22:300:22:32

and a radio DJ.

0:22:320:22:33

Wendy Hurrell has

been talking to her.

0:22:330:22:35

Who is it? This lady...

0:22:350:22:37

# Looking out a dirty old window

0:22:370:22:40

# Down below the cars in the city go

rushing by...#

0:22:400:22:41

The song that

propelled Kim Wilde to stardom

0:22:410:22:43

was a family effort,

written by her brother Ricky

0:22:430:22:46

and father Marty.

0:22:460:22:48

# We're the kids in America (whoa)

# We're the kids in America (whoa)

0:22:480:22:54

She's gone on to sell

30 million albums worldwide.

0:22:540:22:57

I love the original song

and I love to sing it still.

0:22:570:23:00

I love to see how the audience react

to it when I sing that song.

0:23:000:23:06

# We're the kids in America (whoa)

# We're the kids in America (whoa)

0:23:060:23:09

Then this viral video.

0:23:090:23:11

Two slightly tiddly Wildes

after a Christmas party in 2012,

0:23:110:23:14

serenading passengers on a train.

0:23:140:23:19

My brother was falling over

backwards and my antlers fell off.

0:23:190:23:21

It's just the most ridiculous thing!

0:23:210:23:24

It's all a bit of a blur as you can

imagine, but it was really good fun.

0:23:240:23:28

The public were really sweet

about how they responded to another

0:23:280:23:36

over-refreshed icon on a train.

0:23:360:23:39

That unlikely catalyst

revived her musical career and now

0:23:390:23:41

they are back, less

wobbly, with a new album.

0:23:410:23:47

And from March the 31st,

Kim is off on her first UK tour

0:23:470:23:50

in more than 30 years.

0:23:500:23:52

# Pop pop music, give me

pop pop music

0:23:520:23:55

# Don't stop, give me pop,

give me pop pop...#

0:23:550:24:01

So she's kicking her other career

as an award-winning landscape

0:24:010:24:03

gardener into the long grass

for a bit.

0:24:030:24:07

It's a tour in April,

I think you're just trying to get

0:24:070:24:10

out of the weeding and the pruning

and everything else that needs

0:24:100:24:12

to be done in the garden.

0:24:120:24:14

It's too true!

0:24:140:24:15

I'm looking at the garden and I'm

thinking I'm going to have

0:24:150:24:18

to get my old man sorting out

the garden because I

0:24:180:24:20

ain't can be here!

0:24:200:24:22

There's a lot of work can be done

in a garden in April so I'm just

0:24:220:24:25

going to have to leave all that,

rush in in May and ruin my nails!

0:24:250:24:29

Oh, God!

0:24:290:24:31

The horticulture at home

in Hertfordshire for

0:24:320:24:34

now will have to wait.

0:24:340:24:36

Wendy Hurrell, BBC London News.

0:24:360:24:45

It's great she has come out with

some new songs but the old ones are

0:24:450:24:49

classics. I will tell you about it

later!

0:24:490:24:53

It was one of those days to start

with, it needed to cheer up a little

0:24:560:25:01

bit. This was the scene in the City

of London, looking rather grey, then

0:25:010:25:07

it had a happy ending for most of

us. It's going to go downhill though

0:25:070:25:15

through the rest of this evening and

overnight. We have got some heavy

0:25:150:25:20

rain, a bit like last night, it kept

me awake for a while and it might

0:25:200:25:25

have done new too. Not a

particularly cold night, seven or 8

0:25:250:25:30

degrees but yet again it will make

for something of a wet commute

0:25:300:25:34

first. A breeze coming in, and

noticed there is some darkness

0:25:340:25:39

around the rain as we show it coming

up and across just about all parts.

0:25:390:25:43

Then things do improve, the clearer

skies coming in behind so some

0:25:430:25:50

sunshine, yes, temperatures

responding.

0:25:500:26:01

It got today, I had to take my coat

off, spring almost. Then showers,

0:26:040:26:06

and I have moved you through to

Saturday and you are thinking where

0:26:060:26:09

has the sunshine gone. There is a

snow shower working its way through

0:26:090:26:12

southern and eastern parts of London

and down through Kent and there will

0:26:120:26:14

be plenty of them late in the day.

Up to four degrees only, and that

0:26:140:26:17

really sets us up for the weekend

because on Sunday we have a flow of

0:26:170:26:24

cold, bitter air coming in from

Scandinavia and Siberia and that

0:26:240:26:28

will last us into the start of next

week when we begin to see a recovery

0:26:280:26:36

on the temperatures. Sunday could be

tricky, Saturday night and Sunday,

0:26:360:26:40

not just because of the two degrees

is a maximum but there may well be

0:26:400:26:46

some significant snow. More on that

tomorrow.

0:26:460:26:50

some significant snow. More on that

tomorrow.

0:26:500:26:53

Just before we go and leave

you in the safe hands

0:26:530:26:55

of The One Show, let me remind

you of the day's

0:26:550:26:58

main news headlines.

0:26:580:27:00

The Prime Minister has said

Britain's allies are taking a united

0:27:000:27:02

stance against Russia,

after the chemical

0:27:020:27:03

attack in Salisbury.

0:27:030:27:04

Today Theresa May visited the town

where the ex-Russian spy

0:27:040:27:06

and his daughter were poisoned.

0:27:070:27:08

In Syria, thousands of people have

fled part of Eastern Ghouta,

0:27:080:27:10

after it came under ferocious

attack.

0:27:100:27:12

A humanitarian corridor

was opened up by advancing

0:27:120:27:14

Syrian government forces,

allowing civilians to escape.

0:27:140:27:18

The police investigation

into the Grenfell Tower Fire

0:27:180:27:21

has found that a fire door installed

in the block could only hold back

0:27:210:27:24

flames for around 15 minutes.

0:27:250:27:26

That's half the time

it was supposed to.

0:27:260:27:33

That's it.

0:27:330:27:34

If you missed any part

of the programme or want

0:27:340:27:37

to see some of it again -

you can on the BBC iPlayer.

0:27:370:27:40

I'll be back at 10.30 on BBC One.

0:27:400:27:42

Join me then if you can.

0:27:420:27:43

Bye for now.

0:27:430:27:47