22/02/2018 London News


22/02/2018

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men in the charity sector, Unicef's

Justin Forsyth, has quit. We will

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here from a colleague who said he

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Good evening from BBC London News,

I'm Victoria Hollins.

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A warning from Scotland Yard today -

the Met Police will struggle to keep

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London safe and fund crime

prevention, if further

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funding isn't forthcoming.

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The message - in a police report -

comes on the same day the Mayor

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confirmed he's investing an extra

£110 million in the Met.

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But he admits it's still not enough

to stop officer numbers falling.

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Here's our political

correspondent, Karl Mercer.

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The Met Police is being stretched.

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It's dealing with another worrying

rise in knife crime and has been

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challenged by a year

of terror attacks.

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It's also dealing with a growing

population in London,

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rising by 100,000 people a year,

while police numbers are falling.

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A report seen by BBC London

underlines the growing pressure

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the police are under.

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This is the report that sets out

Scotland Yard's pretty stark

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vision of the future.

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Over 30-odd pages it sets out

a vision of what the coming years

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will be like without

extra government funding.

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It warns that unless it gets more

money cuts to workforce

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numbers could be damaging.

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It says that pressures on its budget

mean that it's struggling to invest

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sufficiently in crime prevention.

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It also outlines the effect that

cuts and rising crime

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are having on officers,

saying that a lack of resources is

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having a worrying impact on morale.

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There is also a blunt

warning on police numbers.

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The report says that without extra

money London could see just

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27,000 officers by 2022.

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That's a drop of 3000

on current levels.

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They've made a prediction based

upon the cuts they are facing.

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75% of the Met Police budget goes

on human beings, on police officers.

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They've cut as much as they can,

all that is left is the bone.

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They have sold off the buildings,

closed police stations, they've got

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rid of many police staff.

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This document is Scotland Yard's

submission to something called

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the Police Remuneration Review Body.

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Basically, the body that says how

much officers should get paid.

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Scotland Yard wants a 3% pay rise

for staff and also £2000 extra

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in London weighting -

measures it hopes will make the Met

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an attractive place to work.

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We are very clear about some

of those morale issues and we talk

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in the document about the fact that

pay and rewards is part of that.

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We hope that in the submission that

we're taking note of that and trying

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to do something that strikes that

difficult balance between being fair

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to our officers and making sure

it is something realistic,

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but also accepting that that means

there are consequences

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on what money we have to spend

on police in London.

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Paying police more may

attract more recruits,

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but the real sticking point will be

over who pays for that pay rise.

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Will central government hand over

more, or will the Met and the mayor

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have to hand over the cash?

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Staying with policing for a moment -

because according to an independent

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inspection 90 % of child protection

investigations in the capital have

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been unsatisfactory.

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In some cases children

have been left to live

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with paedophiles in London.

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The Met insists it

is making progress.

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Chris Rogers explained some

of the findings to me earlier.

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This is a quarterly report

ordered by the Home Office.

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The HM Inspectorate

have to carry out.

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This is in response to failures

within the Met Police in responding

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to crimes like this that

were highlighted last year

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and put down to budget cuts

and other pressures.

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The inspectors do highlight

new measures have been put in place

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but it's still too early to see

if there are any benefits.

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It makes a staggering read.

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Some of the cases I can

highlight for you now.

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In one incident a 13-year-old girl

was calling the police,

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saying she was being blackmailed

by a boy to send explicit

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pictures of herself,

but the police didn't

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respond for 11 days.

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In another case teachers informed

police that a seven-year-old boy

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was being abused by his parents

but he wasn't taken into care

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and continued to be

abused for four months.

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The inspectors looked at a total

of 214 child protection cases

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ranging from blackmail, exploitation

to paedophilia and of those cases

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they said almost 191 were judged

to be requiring improvement

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or there was an inadequate response.

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The backdrop to that is a rise

in the number of child protection

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cases being reported.

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A staggering 65,000 offences

between 2016 and 2017 and children's

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charities say we have to bear that

record number of cases in mind

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when we're scrutinising the police.

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The police are under pressure.

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They've had resources

cuts to the front line,

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which is making it more difficult

for them to do their jobs,

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but ultimately we want

them to be doing a lot

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more multi-agency working.

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That's really the key to most

of those child protection cases.

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The Met Police does point out

that they are pleased

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that the inspectors recognised that

significant changes have been made

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to protect children across London

in the face of demands,

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of policing in the capital in 2017.

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You have to remember one child

is abused every eight minutes

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across England and well.

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-- England and Wales macro.

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That's what the Met are up against.

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A businessman was in court today,

after being accused of dangerous

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driving. The driver said he hadn't

been showing off.

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Described in court as formidably

powerful, the Ferrari F50 that

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crashed was filmed on the day

of the tragedy for

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a promotional video.

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Later it was delivered

back to a storage unit

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in North Warnborough in Hampshire

that was visited by the jury and

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court officials earlier this week.

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Matthew Cobden, seen

here with the red hair,

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ran the storage business,

and he offered to give

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13-year-old Alexander Worth

a quick spin in the car.

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The Ferrari struck a wooden post,

was launched into the air,

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and rolled over, throwing out

Mr Cobden and Alexander.

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Today, in court a statement made

by Mr Cobden and quotes from police

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interviews were read to the jury.

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Mr Cobden said he had used a torch

to make sure he had put his feet

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on the right pedals when he first

got into the Ferrari to move it

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off a car transporter.

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Neither of us had seat belts on,

he said, because I had no intention

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that going more than a very low

speed and just along the track.

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After negotiating a bridge, he said,

as soon as I touched the accelerator

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the car took off uncontrollably.

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I do not know if the accelerator

jammed or what had happened,

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but I'm certain that nothing I did

caused the car to speed up

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in the way that it did.

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Mr Cobden suffered injuries

including a broken rib

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and punctured lung.

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Alexander, from Kings

Worthy near Winchester,

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was pronounced dead at the scene.

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Mr Cobden said it was impossible

to express in words how terrible

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he felt at what had happened.

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He said he'd sent a message

of sorrow and condolence

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to Alexander's parents,

and was at a loss to explain how

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the accident had occurred.

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The defence have told the jury

they believe a pre-existing fault

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with the Ferrari caused it

to accelerate uncontrollably.

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But the prosecution says it was

running normally before the crash.

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Mr Cobden denies causing

death by careless driving

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and the case continues.

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His paintings sell for millions -

and he is one of the most

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influential artists

of the 20th century.

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Quite a surprise then that one

of Pablo Picasso's works,

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along with unseen photographs

of the great painter,

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have been stored at the bottom

of a sock drawer in Surrey

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for half a century.

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Sarah Harris has the story.

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That's the camera my father used

then, and that I kind of grew up

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having pointed at me

when I was a kid.

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And it took the pictures that

recorded the week his father spent

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with one of the most famous

artists of modern times.

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The plate was given to Jonathan's

father by Picasso to celebrate

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the week they spent together

in the south of France back in 1964,

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after a chance meeting on the beach.

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The Surrey amateur photographer,

pictured here with the man himself,

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kept the gift and the photos

in an old sock drawer.

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My father was not a fan

of Picasso's as an artist.

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He thought he was a lovely man

but didn't like the art.

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His taste was much more 19th-century

and Rubens and Constable and sort

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of representational stuff,

and Picasso was a bit

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out there for him.

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So he just put it

in the sock drawer!

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Absolutely, he knew it was valuable,

worth keeping, and put it

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in the bottom off his

chest of drawers.

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Picasso's work sell

for tens of million pounds.

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The photographs Jonathan's dad took

show him enjoying the company

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of friends he even sometimes used

as human canvases.

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Stanley, he says, was not fazed

by the painter's fame one jot.

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He just took it

completely in his stride.

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He was very pleased to have

met Picasso, then move

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on and do whatever is next.

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But most people

would have said "hi".

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There must have been something

magnetic about his personality

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that he invited him back to his home

and he was taking pictures

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of him the whole time.

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He just had charm, you know?

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Now a Picasso exhibition

is being curated at the local

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gallery in Woking.

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This discovery was actually

the beginning of the whole

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Picasso Fiesta, which is happening

at the Lightbox, because Jonathan

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is a great supporter of ours.

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He lives just down the road

and happened to mention in a totally

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chance conversation that he had

all these photographs.

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The exhibition starts next month.

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Jonathan says he'll not

sell his late father's

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photographs at any price.

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They are just part

of his family's history.

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Sarah Harris, BBC London News.

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What I find.

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That's it for now from me, but let's

find out what the weather's

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up to with Ben Rich.

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Today was chilly, if you thought

that was cold, there's something

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called on the way. Turning chilly

out there after a clear end to the

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day in most places. The skies remain

clear through the rest of the night

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and temperatures will dip away,

perhaps in the very centre of town

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holding just above freezing. Most

places will fall below freezing, so

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quite widespread frost to take us

tomorrow morning. But a bright start

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formally tomorrow. We will see some

good spells of sunshine around. It

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may be that we bring a bit more

clouding from East, initially Essex

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Adkins, then spreading westwards to

other areas in the afternoon. Still,

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decent spells of sunshine to be had.

Feeling chilly particularly when you

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add on a brisk easterly breeze.

Things will turn colder still as we

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had through the weekend,

particularly into next week. More

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