08/03/2018 London News


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08/03/2018

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LineFromTo

here on BBC One, it's time

for the news where you are.

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Good evening.

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I'm Asad Ahmad.

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The parents of a severely disabled

boy who fought doctors

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at King's College Hospital

to keep their son on life support

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say they feel "pure anger"

that it was removed,

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and Isaiah Haastrup

was allowed to die.

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The one-year-old was born

with "catastrophic" brain damage,

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after mistakes by doctors.

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His parents have been speaking

to Marc Ashdown about their loss.

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Isaiah Haastrup's short life came

to a tragic end yesterday evening.

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While he's been fighting to live,

his parents have been

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fighting his hospital,

determined he should be given

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every chance to survive.

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He had a little

cheekiness about him.

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Especially when you come

beside him and call his name,

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when he open his eyes and stuff

and turn his head towards you.

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That I'm going to miss, but,

right now, all I can feel

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is just pure anger and...

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All I know is justice

was not served - at all.

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Isaiah was born at King's College

Hospital last February.

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He suffered catastrophic

brain damage.

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After an investigation,

King's eventually apologised

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for mistakes doctors made that day.

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His parents originally

accepted his prognosis,

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but in April they saw signs of life

and disagreed he should

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simply be allowed to die.

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The hospital went to the High Court

to seek legal backing.

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In November, a judge

agreed to a second opinion

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from an independent expert.

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In January, the court ruled life

support could be removed.

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After the parents' appeals to UK

and European courts failed,

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yesterday, medical support

was removed and Isaiah passed away.

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King's told us they have always

actively sought to involve Isaiah's

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parents in his care,

and have always acted

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in his best interests.

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They say the decision to apply

to the courts to remove

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treatment was only taken

after careful consideration.

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The parents still feel let down.

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They say in court, doctors claimed

Isaiah could only breathe

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for a few minutes unaided -

he actually survived

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yesterday for seven hours.

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They'd always argued he'd

have a chance of living

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if he was weaned slowly

off life support.

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These are Isaiah's

last precious moments.

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Parents must be listened to more

and not just saying, well,

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the doctors have spoken and looking

at the parents from a prism of

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they are in grief or in pain,

they don't know what they're

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doing, they're delusional.

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But they allowed you to

get a second opinion?

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All the judges agreed

with the hospital.

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The attitude of the court is,

well, we don't care.

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They are doctors,

you're not a doctor.

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But we are the parents,

and we see our child.

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I mean, we see him every single day.

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The beauty of it is Isaiah

showed us what he can do

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and that he wanted to live.

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As a system, we let him down again,

even at that stage.

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I think we need to review our system

we need to save more kids.

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King's maintain it was always

impossible to predict how long

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Isaiah could breathe

on his own and their priority

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was to ensure he was

comfortable with his family.

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We kept talking to him,

we kept singing to him,

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to encourage him, to let him know

that we're here for him.

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And he fought,

he fought all the way.

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Takesha Thomas, Isaiah's mother,

speaking to Marc Ashdown.

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And Louisa Preston,

this is a tragic case.

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Yes, extremely upsetting for the

family, but also extremely

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distressing for the hospital staff

involved in this case and obviously

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there are lessons to be learned from

this. I think at the centre of this

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the lesson has to be learned about

trust. Any hospital manager watching

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this evening will be extremely

concerned about the fundamental

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breakdown in that level of trust

between the parents and their

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doctors. But we've seen many cases

like this before, melody Driscoll

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another young girl being treated in

Kings, we've covered her story and

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of course Charlie Gard, the case of

Charlie Gard. What they all have in

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common is that parents are

questioning the notion that the

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doctor knows best. As we go forward

what we have to think about is

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hospital staff have to think very

much about parents being involved in

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all those difficult decision-making

and making sure the parents feel

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they are being listened to,

otherwise we will see many more

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cases like this.

Louisa Gurski,

thank you. -- Louisa Preston, thank

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you.

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Police are warning that a social

media craze for cyclists to get

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as close as they can to moving cars

before swerving out the way

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will lead to deaths,

after footage emerged

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of a teenager being hit.

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The boy's mother is now supporting

a campaign to stop other

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cyclists who do the same,

who also put drivers

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at serious risk.

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Here's Yvonne Hall.

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This is the so-called game teenagers

are calling "swerve the car".

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But 15-year-old Paul Belcher

pushes his luck too far

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and doesn't swerve in time.

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Incredibly, Paul only suffers

bruising in the collision

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near St Albans in Hertfordshire.

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I just didn't know if he was OK,

if he was dead, if he had broken any

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bones, if anyone else had been hurt.

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The impact of such a stupid game

could have been a loss of life

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in so many situations.

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For drivers, it's terrifying

and dangerous too.

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A pregnant woman in this car had

to be treated for shock.

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This is the roundabout

in Borehamwood and it's a popular

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location for teenagers playing

the so-called swerving game.

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You can see how busy it is and how

dangerous it would be to ride a bike

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straight towards these vehicles.

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But what a lot of these youngsters

probably don't realise

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is their actions are being picked up

on the CCTV camera and it

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could lead to prosecutions.

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This is really dangerous, to get

as close to the car as possible,

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usually to intimidate the driver

and it's often being recorded,

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because it's something

to put on social media

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to show their friends as a fun game.

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Well, our message is it isn't a fun

game, it's a dangerous game

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and people will end up getting

killed and seriously injured.

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Here, a cyclist even swerves

towards a police car.

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Officers say the number

of complaints they're getting

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They're now planning

a campaign in schools

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to stop more teenagers

risking theirs and

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other people's lives.

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Yvonne Hall, BBC London News.

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Today is International Women's Day,

and as part of our series hearing

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from women who help run London,

tonight we meet Metropolitan Police

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Commissioner, Cressida Dick.

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In an open and honest

conversation with Riz Lateef,

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she tells us about her personal

feelings every time there's

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a fatal stabbing in London.

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But she began by explaining

what it was like

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when she learned she was to be given

the country's top job in policing.

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I was thrilled, I was humbled,

I was astonished and I thought

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about my mum, no longer

with us, sadly.

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What would your mum have said?

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I think she'd have laughed.

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I think she'd be amazed

that her little girl

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had gone on to do this.

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How did you cope in those early

days, with the canteen culture

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and sexism in the Force?

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It was a different age,

and I was prepared to challenge.

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I stood up for what I believed in,

but I remember one of my bosses

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taking me into an office very early

on and saying, "You know,

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Cressida, if you fight every

battle at the parapets,

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you'll get shot down and that

will be the end of you".

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So I think I learned that

you can't take on absolutely

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every battle head on,

but you should stand

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up for yourself.

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Do you ever show vulnerability?

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I heard myself saying to my senior

officers the other day that we'd had

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a terrible year and I knew that some

of them would be feeling

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like crying and, actually,

sometimes it's good for a team

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to see a boss making themselves kind

of vulnerable in that way.

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In terms of the shooting

of Jean Charles de Menezes,

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you were cleared of any wrongdoing.

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You were in charge

of that operation.

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Did you ever question your

judgment after that?

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I don't think you can be

an effective operational

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leader if you don't ask

yourself hard questions.

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So, absolutely.

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Did I think that I had made,

you know, a fundamental error

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of judgment in the decisions that

I made based on the

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information I had?

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No, I didn't - but a terrible,

terrible thing happened,

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an innocent man was killed.

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Does it ever feel like a personal

failure, when you hear

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of another stabbing?

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Umm...

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I suppose in a way...

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It does.

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I feel sad, of course,

for what has happened.

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I feel sorry for everybody involved,

and I know that the public and media

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are kind of counting each one,

and quite right too, because they're

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all cherished children.

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Every death is a tragedy and we

should all feel outraged by that.

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What do you want your legacy to be?

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I want London to be seen as a safe

city, in which people can see

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that we have really taken violence

seriously and reduced the most

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pernicious sorts of violence,

and that we have done everything

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we can to prevent attacks.

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Cressida Dick, speaking to Riz

Lateef. Now for a very different

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weather forecast to the one we had

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Lateef. Now for a very different

weather forecast to the one we had

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exactly a week ago?

And greatly different, a lovely end

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to the day and the March sunshine is

starting to get strength to it. It's

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still cold enough for a touch of

frost which we will see tonight.

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Partly cloudy skies, good clear

spells and even if temperatures

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don't drop below freezing there will

be close enough for a touch of grass

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on the -- touch of frost on the

grass. The best part of the day

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early on, some sunshine in many

areas. Quickly turning hazy as cloud

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drifts up through the south and late

morning. There will be some splashes

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of rain towards the south of London.

It will turn heavier as we go into

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the night, temperatures peaking at 9

degrees. Saturday morning, while the

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start. The best of the sunshine in a

morning. More cloud into the

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afternoon with one or two showers.

It's going to be incredibly mild,

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the warmest day of the year so far.

Temperatures up to around 15. It

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stays mild into

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