21/03/2018 London News


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21/03/2018

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A quick reminder that Newsnight is

getting

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Good evening, I'm Asad Ahmad.

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The wife of an academic

who was stabbed to death

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in Islington two years ago,

says she's having to 'crowdfund'

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in order to get legal

representation at the inquest.

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Dr Jeroen Ensink had just

become a father and had

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gone to the post box

to send cards to mark

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his daughter's birth.

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Metres from his home

he was attacked,

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by a man with mental health problems

who, just days earlier,

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had charges against him dropped

connected to knife crime.

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The widow has been

speaking of her loss.

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Caroline Davies reports.

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There were three police officers

standing in front of our door

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and I just opened the door

and you just know, your entire

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world collapses.

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They hadn't even said said a word.

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They hadn't even said,

"Is this your husband?"

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You just know.

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This was the last photo taken

of Nadja's husband, Jeroen Ensink.

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His little daughter, Fleur,

had been born just 11 days before.

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He left the house to

post cards announcing

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her birth, when he was

attacked and killed.

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Jeroen was killed by a man he'd

never met, Femi Nandap

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was suffering from a cannabis

induced psychotic

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rage when he stabbed the academic.

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Today he's serving an indefinite

sentence at Broadmoor Hospital for

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manslaughter.

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Nandap had a history of severe

mental health problems.

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In May 2015, he was

arrested and charged

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for wielding a knife in public

and attacking a police officer.

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He was released on bail.

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In December, the charges

against him were dropped

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because of insufficient evidence.

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Six days later, he killed Jeroen.

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Nadja hopes the inquest into his

death will give her some answers

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about what happened,

but while the CPS and the police

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will have legal representation

at that inquest, paid

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for by the public purse,

she's been denied legal aid.

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And without legal representation,

I won't be able to

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get the answers we need.

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As if it's not important enough.

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As if we don't count.

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The Met told us that while there had

been no misconduct, there

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had been areas of learning.

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The CPS said that

the case against the

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previous knife offence should never

have been discontinued.

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The Ministry of Justice

have said they're

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committed to reviewing the situation

on legal aid for bereaved families,

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but that review is delayed.

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In the meantime, Nadja

is crowdfunding for

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her lawyer.

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All this is going on,

I still believe in the goodness of

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people, because it's out there.

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But I don't believe in the system.

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Caroline Davies, BBC London News.

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BBC London has learnt

that an increasing

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number of care homes appear

to be 'cherry-picking'

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the patients they take-in

to keep costs down.

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A lack of funding and

increasing demand for places

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means those who need the most care

are sometimes overlooked.

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The Government accepts the system

is under huge pressure.

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Here's Helen Mulroy.

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Back to work for Alex Turner.

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It's been a long time coming

for the graphic designer,

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after he was forced to take a career

break, at just 26, when his mum,

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Sue, was diagnosed with

early-onset dementia.

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I'd get five or six phone calls

a day, members of the public

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would find her or the police

would pick her up, or she'd be

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in hospital, in different hospitals

around our area and I'd have to go

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and collect her a lot of the time.

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When she was living at home, there'd

be different carers every day.

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She wouldn't want to let them in.

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They hadn't been trained

as to how to do that.

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So, full-time jobs were impossible.

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Alex became his mum's main carer,

even living with her for a period

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of time, but her condition worsened

and she went into hospital.

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By then, it was clear the only

option was a care home.

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For the next year, Alex

looked at over 20 homes

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and applied for a place at more

than ten of them.

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But at each one, after assessing

Sue, who was still relatively young,

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physically fit and mobile,

none could offer her a place.

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It was really depressing

and demoralising and I felt really

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unsure about where she was going

to be going.

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It wasn't a nice time.

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Sadly, Alex and Sue's

story is far from unique.

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The Alzheimer's Society helpline

increasingly gets calls

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of this exact nature.

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We're finding that care homes

are picking and choosing the people

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that they accept into their homes,

largely because they don't

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have the funding to be able

to provide the specialist support

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that is needed to help

somebody with dementia.

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The national living

wage is going up soon.

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The property, and the upkeep of that

property, particularly in London,

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that can be extremely expensive.

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In contacting the Government,

we asked the Department of Health

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and Social Care what they're doing

about the lack of appropriate

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care home places.

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They told us that they've invested

an extra £2 billion in social care

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and that over the summer they're

publishing planned reforms to make

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the social care system more

sustainable for the future.

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But for Sue and Alex,

any such reform is too late.

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I've missed a chunk of my career,

I just couldn't get a job.

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My mum wouldn't have

been happy about that.

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It would have been incredibly

upsetting for my mum to know

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what I've gone through.

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Helen Mulroy, BBC London News.

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There's been a lot of talk

about driverless cars on our roads

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and one of the largest city trials

has been taking place in Greenwich.

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Our transport correspondent,

Tom Edwards, has been there to find

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out how safe we feel

in the vehicles.

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For 18 months these driverless

shuttles have been running around

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the Greenwich peninsula,

testing how they react to people,

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other vehicles and even dogs.

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In that case the onboard

safety pilot intervened,

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and here they're also trying to find

out our reactions to the pods.

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It felt very safe.

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The vehicle itself was very

cautious, it was very aware

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of its surroundings.

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I didn't feel at any point

that we came up to an obstacle

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and it wasn't going to stop.

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I've been following the technology

for a while, so it's been quite

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exciting to finally get in one.

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Although our pod today

was misbehaving initially.

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According to those behind

the scheme, the technology has

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performed well, even

in the recent poor weather.

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Of those people who you use

these pods in Greenwich,

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47% had a positive experience.

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43% though had concerns,

mainly around cyber

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security and road safety.

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And driverless technology has been

in the headlines after a pedestrian

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died after being hit

by a self-driving car in the US.

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Some have called that a wake-up

call for the industry.

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Others say the technology shouldn't

yet be on the roads.

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So safety is always

going to be a priority.

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We've got a lot of work

to do to develop trust.

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Some people need to feel

trust in these vehicles

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and the technology.

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London still wants

to be at the forefront

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of this new technology.

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There's still some way to go

to convince everyone that this

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is the future of transport.

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Tom Edwards, BBC

London News, Greenwich.

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A memorial has been laid in honour

of two soldiers from Islington

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who were awarded the Victoria Cross

in the First World War

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for their immense bravery.

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Lance Corporal John Sayer

and Lieutenant Colonel Frank Roberts

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were remembered at a ceremony

in north London.

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Charlotte Franks was there.

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EXPLOSION.

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It was where some of the bloodiest

battles were fought

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during the First World War.

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Millions died on the Western front,

amid the lines of mud trenches

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and fortifications dug to prevent

the enemy from advancing.

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Lieutenant Colonel Frank Roberts

lived in Highbury.

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But in 1914, 26 years old, he left

to fight on the front in France.

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On one occasion, the enemy

attacked a nearby village,

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but Lieutenant Roberts led

a counterattack, driving

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them away temporarily

so troops could withdraw.

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The fight was basically

round the church.

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But you've only got to look

at the commendation,

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the number of people he killed

and took prisoner.

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For his courage, he received

the Victoria Cross.

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John Sayer, also from Islington,

single-handedly seized and defended

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a strategic post close

to the Hindenburg Line

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in northern France, in 1918.

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For this deed, he too

was awarded the VC.

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LAST POST

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Today, both soldiers were remembered

by their families as memorials

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were unveiled in Islington to mark

the sacrifice they made fighting

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on the Western front.

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The countryside was churned up

by heavy shelling from both sides.

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It was covered in barbed wire.

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The weather made the ground

impossible in many places.

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But despite those difficult

conditions, John Sayer

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would never forget his family,

writing to his children

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on each of their birthdays.

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"Dear Eric, I'm writing this hoping

you will get it on your birthday,

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to wish you many happy returns..."

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The letter is very quiet

and personal and it makes no

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mention, really, of war

and what he must have been

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going through at that time.

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It's hoped that by laying these

stones, the memory of both soldiers'

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achievements will be kept alive,

as well as educating future

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generations about the Great War.

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Charlotte Franks, BBC London News.

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That's it for now from me,

but let's find out what

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the weather's up to with Stav.

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the weather's up to with Stav.

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Beautiful day at times today? That

is right. Temperatures have been

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recovering in fact after that very

cold weekend and ha that disruptive

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snow. It will be mild as we head

into the weekend. Tomorrow you will

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notice that when you step out of the

door. Much milder than it was this

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morning. We should get sunny

intervals as well. Overnight there

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will be quite a lot of cloud around.

Thicker cloud drifting down from the

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north anded it could just squeeze

out a few spots of rain,

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particularly towards the eastern

side of the capital. Look at the

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temperatures. First thing Thursday,

five or six Celsius. There will be

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some cloud around through the

morning. It will clear away,

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probably taking its time from the

eastern side of the country.

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Bubbling up again. This is over

doing it. We should see sunny

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intervals. Temperatures up to 12-13

Celsius given the sunshine. Winds

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will be light, coming in from the

south-west. Then really it's looking

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dry for the next few days and into

the weekend. Sunday is looking like

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being the best day of the weekend.

It will be very mild indeed. Stay

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tuned for

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