15/08/2013 Look East - West


15/08/2013

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Hello. First today, an exclusive interview with the partner of an

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army veteran jailed for an armed He is very ill. He is not a bad

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army veteran jailed for an armed I am not stupid. I would not stay

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with somebody who was a bad person. The university is fighting for the

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cream of the crop. Stepping into the world of work, the students saying

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no to debt and yes to a wage packet. And a year on from Olympic bronze,

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the World Championship bar proves too high. First this evening, an

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interview with a partner of an Army veteran jailed for an armed siege

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Jane Hill—Phillips has hit out at the sentence given to Mark McLees

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post—traumatic stress disorder. the sentence given to Mark McLees

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Beds. He thought he was in a war zone, as he held police at bay for

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five hours at his home in Leighton Buzzard. She says he needed help,

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Jane Hill—Phillips is standing by her man. She believes Britain will

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do nothing to help her partner's post—traumatic stress disorder.

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Throughout her relate —— throughout their relationship she has witnessed

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his suffering. He gets quite angry. We get nightmares, he does not

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sleep. He suffers night sweats. All the typical sort of symptoms you

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get with post—traumatic stress Corporal Mark McLees believed he was

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This is the moment he was arrested after an armed stand—off in Leighton

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buzzard. This week, he was jailed for two years after pleading guilty

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to making threats with an imitation firearm. It is a sentence which

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to making threats with an imitation left his devastated. What happened

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that night and the events of that night must have been terrified ——

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terrifying. I accept that. Do I think the sentence was hired? Yes, I

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do. Mark served with the Sutherland Regiment for 18 years. He had been

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struggling to adjust to life with a civilian and had spent a number

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struggling to adjust to life with a A charity which helps ex—service

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case. Trustees say many others could situation. There is no emergency

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pick—up from this problem. Charities help, but they have got to get to

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rock bottom before anyone recognises there is a problem. The day before

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his breakdown, Mark McLees tried to seek help but without success. His

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partner accepts many people were terrified by his actions that night,

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but she wants people to know the probe soldier and not the prisoner.

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He is not a bad person. He is the most caring and lovable person I

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punished, but face prison will do more harm than good. —— she fears.

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In a statement the Ministry of Justice said: Sentencing is a matter

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for the independent judiciary. Defence, around 4% of veterans

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Stress, an organisation set up to help struggling veterans, estimates

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that around 20% have some form of mental health issues and they say

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that 3.5% of the prison population Well, earlier I spoke to Steve

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Pettitt from Combat Stress and I began by asking him, what is being

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done to ensure that more veterans don't end up being sent to prison? I

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hear a lot that we did not know don't end up being sent to prison? I

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to do, we did not know who to seek help from. It would be beneficial

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for ours if, if you have problems, contact Combat Stress or the Royal

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British Legion. That signposting is what the Government could do. But

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organisations like ourselves to what the Government could do. But

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trouble is, you see, that quite often the veteran does not know

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trouble is, you see, that quite has a problem. It is only when some

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family member or friend says that he thinks he might be suffering that he

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take stock and do something about it. That could be ten years after he

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has left the services. There will be those who say the law is the law.

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And that as tragic as it is, this punishment had to be in some shape

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or form issued as a result of the distress that was caused. I would

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agree with that. I don't think any veteran seeks exemption from the

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law, and I don't think the civilian society would expect him to. Mark

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McLees's partner thought he had society would expect him to. Mark

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harsh sentence, I could point her in the direction of people who had

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And if you or anyone you know is affected by the issues raised, you

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As you'll know it's A—level results day, and across the east students

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have been finding out how they've done. For some of our universities

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university admissions mean they done. For some of our universities

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have to work harder to attract the best students. Mike Cartwright

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nervous moments, as students open their results. Most here are hoping

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to go to university. It is not what I was hoping for, but I know I have

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got in any way. I have a scholarship I got a A in biology, and a A in

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At the University of Bedfordshire's students find a course. This year

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2,500 have enrolled. There is a relaxation of the rules, —— but

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there's a relaxation of the rules put more pressure on universities

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performance, so we are a university that takes people at all ranges

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performance, so we are a university applications this year are up. It

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has made an interesting market for higher education, and universities

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are now having to think differently about how we recruit students.

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is that time of year when students discover how they have done, and

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As the financial pressures of going to university grow, more and more

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apprenticeships. Anna Todd has been Cambridgeshire who has landed a

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Turning his back on student life, Ross Payne has landed an accountancy

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company Deloitte, to earn a decent outsider sometimes, but there has

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university has risen a lot lately. So it seems more beneficial to get

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some practical experience, and earn money in a salary rather than come

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out with a lot of debt. Kelly also became a trainee straight from

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Deloitte's bright sparks programme We are looking for very strong

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candidates. The places feel very quickly, we are recruiting now for

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next September, and the competition has definitely increased over the

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Apprenticeship Service say A—level results day is now its biggest time,

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benefits of learning and learning. If a person is apprentice trained,

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they will have a premium over the kind of qualifications. The gap

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they will have a premium over the narrowing between that which premium

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and —— between being apprentice Ross will have to get used to buying

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Well, a little earlier I spoke with John Bridge from the Chamber of

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Commerce in Cambridge, and began by asking what he thought the education

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system could do better to prepare We need to understand how we can

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equip young people much better for the work environment. We obviously

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achievements that young people have made and the results they have got

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today, but the end result is that most of them need a job or a career

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in order to earn money and get the deserve. But how do businesses get

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into the schools? This seems to deserve. But how do businesses get

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big disconnect between schools and worse. One problem is the funding

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mechanism that is being used by worse. One problem is the funding

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education department, where cash is number of pupils in sixth form.

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education department, where cash is the schools are focused on how many

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they do not want them in vocational training or in businesses because

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clearly that has an impact on the way they run the school. But between

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the age of 14 and 18 you are not thinking about your first job, you

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are thinking about University. But particular areas, they need to

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understand the type of companies we available, and the skills that they

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wherewithal as well, and they need to know where the —— this can be

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connectivity, we need to get better careers advice. At the moment what

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we are finding is that lots of careers advisers are being made

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redundant because of the current situation in the way the schools are

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focusing in a completely different way. Businesses are really concerned

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about the end product, and the young people are being disadvantaged

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because they are not equipped for Peterborough has stopped running

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Firefighters believe that a spark from a locomotive caused the fire

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which destroyed 40 acres of crops yesterday. Trains are now being

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New technology has allowed police in Cambridgeshire to drastically cut

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Operators used to answer calls within an average three minutes

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Operators used to answer calls but now 95% of calls are answered

:12:06.:12:17.

England, the Care Quality Commission and the local watchdogs say that

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they need to deal with staff shortages.

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A clamp—down on knives in Clacton seems to have paid off. In the three

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months to July there were more than 30 reported knife—point robberies.

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Extra police were drafted in and no similar robberies have been reported

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for the last month. Still to come: Another disappointing

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day for our athletes in Moscow. And invariably test state of the art

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dummies helping to train our flying medics.

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The news is all about those A—level results today, but exams,

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particularly English language exams for foreign students, are big

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business in our region. Tonight in our series looking at

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companies which export, we look at the work of Cambridge English

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Language Assessment, which has been doing business for 100 years. Dr

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written in Cambridge, printed in Cambridge, but these exam papers

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will be taken by students in 180 different countries. The company

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that produces them is part of Cambridge University, recognised the

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world over. it is very well recognised because Cambridge

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University is one of the top five recognised brands in the world. That

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has helped this business grow. It has been exporting exams for over

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100 years. The attention. This is the first exam paper that was set

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back in 1913. Among the tasks they had two hours to write an essay on

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subjects which include the effects of political movements on

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19th—century literature in England. But here are just three candidates

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sat the exam. Not one of them passed. 100 years later they now use

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computer—based tests as well. But when you sell to the world, you need

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to be able to speak to the world as well. The mac ——. we offer support

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in other languages as well. the employee around 400 people. Jobs

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that depend on exporting success. Dr Mike Milanovic is the Chief

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Executive of the unit. When I spoke to him earlier and I asked him how

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the unit came into being. Originally it got involved as part of a

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programme for a teacher of modern languages. It has now grown in

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scale. Those exams 100 years ago are very different from today 's. Pretty

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different. The exam 100 years ago took over 12 hours to do. And there

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was only one exam. We are talking this week about exporting. You are

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exporting knowledge and examinations. Where does the money

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from that go? the money that we make from exams gets invested again in

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our business. We are part of a group, Cambridge Assessment. So some

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of that money will go back into the university, to support that work,

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which in turn supports us. how important is it to have the words

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Cambridge University on it? it is really important, it is one of the

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leading universities in the world. The quality that it represents

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underpins the work that we do as well. Everything that we do must

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reflect the same quality standards as are achieved in the University.

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At the moment I know you reach into 130 countries. Either more that you

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are waiting to move into? English is so important that although we are in

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more than 100 and 30 countries now, I am sure we will eventually be

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present in almost every country in the world. The developing nations

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and the fast—growing economies, China, India, countries like that

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are very, very interested in English language and an English—language

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qualifications. A lot of our growth and development over the last decade

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has come from countries like that. But it is equally true in Europe

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that, as the European policy of mother tongue plus two languages

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spread around Europe, English is very important and that context as

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well. Hundreds of thousands of children are doing our exams in

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Spain and Italy and France. A 12 hour exam! It puts those

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A—levels into perspective. If you have a serious accident or if

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you are taken seriously ill you want the best care around you want it

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fast. For more than 40 years, MAGPAS has been playing a vital role in

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providing just that. At the moment the

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Cambridgeshire—based charity provide critical care cover 18 hours a day.

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But soon they will be working 24/7. They have a new training scheme to

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help provide more paramedics and a new helicopter.

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Landing close to the new Magpas training centre in Huntingdon, the

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new orange Explorer. On the board, next Foster, the first doctor in the

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UK to specialise in prehospital emergency medicine. It has now been

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recognised as a subspecialty, like gynaecology or paediatrics. They

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have approved a curricular minute and standardise training has

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started. Magpas also claim a first, with this

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new training scheme. Already a paramedic, Chris is giving up his

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time to complete the course, which will allow him to volunteer with the

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team. Made any mistakes? yes. We are learning from previous mistakes that

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have been made. This is the place to make mistakes. the doctors and

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paramedics work on a series of highly realistic scenarios. Chris

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and his team are trying to save the life of boys hit by a car. —— a boy.

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it is nice to be tested. We get hot and bothered and a bit stressed but

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it is well worth it. We sedated the child initially to maintain his

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earwig, gain control of his pain. #.

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Using a rapid response vehicle, Magpas do several runs a day. All of

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this is designed to help people who need critical care before they get

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to hospital. As a result, saving lives.

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It has been a tough day for our athletes at the World Championships

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in Moscow. This morning it was 18—year—old Jessica Judd from Essex.

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This afternoon it was the high jumper Robbie Grabarz from St

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Neots. Jessica Field to qualify for the 800 metres final. And Robbie

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Grabarz missed out on a medal as well.

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It has not been a happy World Championships for either Greg

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Rutherford yesterday Robbie Grabarz today. Robbie actually spent his

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formative years training year at the Bedford athletic Stadium, but today

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two metres 29 centimetres was not quite good enough. It was won by a

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Ukrainian athlete. He just missed out on a world record, in fact. That

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is how high—quality it was today. Behind me you can see the sprinters

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erect Bedford County athletics club. Nigel Levine has still got a chance

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of winning a medal. He started he read Bedford as well. But Robbie

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Grabarz, like Greg, it just was not his day to day.

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They gathered to see if one of their own kid when Britain another

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priceless medal. Robbie Grabarz spent years at Bedford County

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athletics club. It has been a difficult year for him after the

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Olympics, but provided that he gets his act together now he is in with a

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chance. What do you think, is he going to be lucky today? yes, I

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think so. Bronze medal, I'm guessing.

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Robbie ran into trouble at two metres and 29 centimetres.

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He cleared it on the next attempt but it was last chance win at two

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metres and 32 centimetres after two failures.

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Two metres 29 centimetres was good enough for Bobby to win bronze last

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year. One year and the bar has been raised higher and Robbie could not

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make it over. The high jump collective stayed to watch the rest

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of the high—class competition. Earlier and another of Bedford 's

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finest, Nigel Levine, was rescued as his relay team—mates qualified for

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the final. But disappointment for Jessica Judd who failed to reach the

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final. A—level results wait at home for her, hopefully what is inside

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will be less of a disappointment. I am so disappointed, so many people

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have worked hard to get your. I thought I was going to do it and

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then my legs just went, but maybe that is something the site had lost.

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I am just so happy to be here in one piece and I wanted so much more than

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that. Not the best day for our region 's

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athletes but Jess and Robbie will both be back.

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Robbie presented the award tear at the ceremony last year, so he will

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certainly be back at Bedford. We have the young high jumpers at

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Bedford going through their paces now. One or two of them have

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actually broken his records that he set your all those years ago. This

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is their head coach. You know Robbie and his mum very well, how

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disappointed I you today? Very disappointed. He was expected to get

:23:58.:24:02.

towards the medals, we know that he had a problem with his knee, but we

:24:02.:24:08.

expected him to get through. He did look impressive up until the 229. It

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was sad that he did not get into the top. he will be back, that's for

:24:14.:24:21.

sure. You have some talent year. Quite a bit of talent. This girl is

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new to it, one for the future. This is my son. He is 12. He broke Robbie

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's under 13 record 13 years to the day the other week. A lot of talent

:24:41.:24:49.

here. We hope to see 12 of these at the stage that Robbie has. my eldest

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son has broken Robbie 's under 17 record year. He went to the World

:24:59.:25:03.

Championships and got a personal best. Your dynasty is certainly

:25:03.:25:09.

doing well year. Sadly for Robbie, not the case today.

:25:09.:25:10.

And time for the weather. Some very changeable weather

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conditions today. The pressure at the moment is more like what you

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would expect in the autumn. At the moment there is a mass of rain out

:25:25.:25:30.

to the West working. That will be with us into the early hours of

:25:30.:25:35.

tomorrow morning. Today we have had that perfect combination of

:25:35.:25:38.

humidity, warmth and sunshine. That has triggered showers. Pretty much

:25:38.:25:45.

anywhere is at risk of catching a sharp shower before the end of the

:25:45.:25:51.

evening. The first part of the night looks quite drivers clear spells. It

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can quickly turn cloudy. Much of this rain expected to arrive

:25:57.:26:01.

overnight. Quite a good soaking in places which may well be welcome for

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gardens and fields. In terms of temperatures once more and mild

:26:05.:26:14.

night. A moderate wind, still breezy. That weather front will take

:26:14.:26:20.

its time clearing tomorrow, so for the Eastern half it will be sticking

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around, bringing us these cloudy conditions and a wet start pretty

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much everywhere. It will gladly clearer way and at the end of the

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day we will see something a bit brighter, especially across the

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western half. Some rain, but not raining all of the time. A lot of

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cloud left a class this Eastern half. —— across. The temperatures

:26:42.:26:50.

could shoot up if we start to see some sunshine. We could see one to

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sharp showers into the evening where afternoon and they could turn

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thundery. This is not going to spoil the day

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froze because the rain is not expected to arrive until the

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evening. Much of Saturday looks dry. Brighter spells perhaps to start

:27:14.:27:17.

with but turning increasingly cloudy. Outbreaks of heavy rain,

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strong winds and gusts in excess of 30 mph. We have some blustery,

:27:21.:27:29.

westerly winds for Sunday and Monday. That could mean some

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showers. Overnight lows here and a quick barometer cheque for you.

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That is all from us. Have a great evening.

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