20/11/2013 Look East - West


20/11/2013

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Good evening. This evening, guilty of causing the death of the

:00:10.:00:18.

seven`week`old son. Julie Kate just 25 minutes to conflict the parents.

:00:19.:00:26.

The people ultimately responsible for his welfare they are responsible

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for taking his life. Celebrations as villagers defeat the plan for new

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housing in the village. How the once turned real works are getting a new

:00:44.:00:53.

lease of life. And tributes to the legendary Cambridge scientist who

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has died at the age of 94. Good evening. First, a jury took

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less than half an hour today to convict two parents of causing their

:01:07.:01:10.

baby boy's death. Jamie Kightley was just under eight weeks old when he

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died at his parents' Northampton flat in March 2012. He had suffered

:01:14.:01:18.

severe brain injuries and dozens of fractures. Today at Nottingham Crown

:01:19.:01:21.

Court, Jacqueline Parker and Adam Kightley were found guilty of

:01:22.:01:26.

causing or allowing his death. Our reporter Mike Cartwright was in

:01:27.:01:29.

court to hear the verdict and joins us now live. After sitting through

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all in three weeks of evidence: The jury took just 25 minutes to deliver

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their verdict. The mother and father Reverend guilty of causing the death

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of the child. Jamie Kightley Was shaken to death at just eight weeks

:01:55.:02:01.

old. His body was found with 40 fractures and covered in bruises.

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Today, the jury found his parents, Jacqueline Parker and Adam Kightley

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guilty of the death or allowing it to happen. The judge said the child

:02:17.:02:25.

was always entitled to the protection of the parents. This is

:02:26.:02:33.

the family flat in Northampton. This is where the baby was violently

:02:34.:02:42.

assaulted. This was the nine`day name call.

:02:43.:03:12.

A baby son spoken so badly he suffered brain injuries. He is here

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and the background. The parents defence was to blame each other

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They agreed that only previously, he was put to bed at six o'clock at

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night. The defence was that the other must have assaulted Genie at

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some point. The parents are responsible for making sure the

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child is free from harm and not to people who should have protected him

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were ultimately responsible for the loss of his life. ", they said they

:04:02.:04:12.

were loving, caring parents. But today, the jury decided the did

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nothing to stop the death of their child. The jury had to listen to

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some very harrowing evidence. The maximum sentence they could get his

:04:28.:04:32.

14 years. Tomorrow, the parents will find out how long it will be

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sentenced for. A man has appeared in court in Luton

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charged with murdering his sister`in`law. 70`year`old

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grandmother Mary Evans, of Liddle Close in Luton, was stabbed in her

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car as she drove along Trent Road on Monday. John Evans, who is 56 and

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lives in Trent Road, was remanded in custody. Mrs Evans married his

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brother just six weeks ago. Police still want to speak to anyone who

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may have witnessed what happened. A 16`year`old has been charged with

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trying to kill a man during a break`in at a house in Luton at the

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weekend. The victim, 47`year`old Tony Abrahams, was stabbed at his

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home in well field Avenue on Saturday morning. The teenager, who

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cannot be named because of his age, has been charged with attempted

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murder and aggravated burglary. Campaigners are celebrating tonight

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after a controversial housing scheme on the Cambridgeshire`Essex border

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was turned down by planners. Today's vote was in the fast`growing

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district of Uttlesford, covering Saffron Walden and Stansted. Over

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the next 20 years, The Office for National Statistics expects its

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population to rise by 27%, to around 100,000. If Uttlesford Council

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currently has more than 1,600 households on its waiting list. Its

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long`term plan is to build more than 2,000 homes between the villages of

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Elsenham and Henham. In a moment, we will hear from Richard Daniel with

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the campaigners, but first, Alex Dunlop on the case for many more new

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homes. They have got the room upstairs fear? She shows me the

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husband they have the flat at she and her husband have. They cannot

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afford to buy, so the rent the accommodation. If there are new

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homes in the area, would you be in favour? Yes, absolutely. Lettuces

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same story for James, who has to live with his parents still. Yes, I

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would definitely look into it. This gives you an idea of the problem. If

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you want to buy, the houses are so expensive and even their rent value

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is very high. We have to do it in a way which does not make the whole

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area. That is the $64,000 question. That was in favour of the

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development say it is much needed. It has got new facilities for the

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residents, new facilities and the likes of schools. We do have a

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housing problem in the district We have 1,600 households currently

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waiting for accommodation. They are either living with parents, as they

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are young people and they are ensuring overcrowding situations.

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There is a desperate need for new housing. The developers are likely

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to appeal against the decision. So what do the campaigners think of

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that? Richard Daniel has been to meet the villagers celebrating

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victory. It is not hard to see why people live in the two 30 villages.

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They are also close to the MA eleven on hand to Stansted Airport. For

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years, the community has fought to prevent houses being built in the

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area. This is the latest stage in a long`running and expensive fight.

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The community has been magnificent. We have done all sorts of

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fundraising activities. These are villages that people choose to live

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in and villages that people choose to live

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objecting to. 800 houses starting here. The village 's argument is

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simple: Everyone should take their fair share of new housing across the

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country. Lunchtime and protesters arrived that the Council for the

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planning meeting. The rear defiant. They are using land that we should

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be using to produce food to feed ourselves in the future. Ever

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improve roads, does address issues. Inside the meeting, tempers flared

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and just one hour later, the decision that the campaigners wanted

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was reached. The plans were rejected for a second time. We are very

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pleased. We are over the moon. But I fear they will come back, because

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they are like a dog after a woman. The fate for free at the new homes

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should go is far from over. Companies and research bodies in the

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region are to benefit from major funding. Approved by the European

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Parliament. Today, MEP's agreed ?60 billion of cash over the next seven

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years for research and development projects across Europe. The region

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received more than ?500m last time round and local MEPs say it should

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do even better this time. This is a very significant amount of funding.

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Cambridge University say 20% of the research they are doing is being

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funded by this. We are making sure that more of this budget goes to

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science and research. The workforce at the former Railcare

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factory in Wolverton is set to double within five years, according

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to Knorr Brems, the company which bought the factory three months ago.

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Back in August, Railcare went into administration and 100 workers were

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made redundant. But now its new owners say they are confident they

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can take the factory from bust to boom. This year, it celebrated its

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175th birthday, making it the oldest factory of its kind in the world. In

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July, the celebrations turned sour. After weeks of uncertainty, it was

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agreed that the historic factory would be brought. One idea ever

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investing money and the site is that we grow this business substantially.

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The prospect of the good times returning is good news for the

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workers. Currently, the workforce is concentrating on repair work. We are

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taking out the windows and the window frames, and removing only

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fixings. We taking them out for an overhaul. The work being carried out

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will directly benefit passengers in the region because the main customer

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at the moment is greater Anglia trains. They have for Jane sheds

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like this and they say they are confident the will be able

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like this and they say they are location, it is ideally least, close

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to London, which is a real centre of real operations in the country and

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also, we have the a lot of skilled people ready to do this work. So,

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from bust to boom, a team that in July seemed possible, but now there

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is a growing possibility that it could continue to fly the flag for

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real engineering. Peterborough city Hospital says it

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is planning to recruit 50 extra nurses. It comes as Trusts across

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the country are being ordered to publish details online every month

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on ward staffing levels. . first County Council partnership in

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the country. It is, they argue, the only sensible way to go.

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Still to come tonight... We speak to one of our most senior women clerics

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as the church puts women bishops back on the agenda.

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Plus tributes to a giant of science, Dr Fred Sanger, whose work

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transformed our understanding of how genes work.

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MPs have been voting this evening on controversial changes to our armed

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forces. Under the plans, there will be a big reduction in the number of

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regular soldiers. And a big increase in the number of reservists. The

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Government was facing a possible defeat over the issue following a

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campaign by the Essex MP John Baron. Andrew Sinclair is at Westminster.

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Everyone thought this would be close, but in the last few minutes,

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John Baron lost his vote by 54 votes, rebels seemingly bought off

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by last`minute government concessions or feeling that now was

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not the time to flex their muscles. But this is a big issue in our

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region with lots of military personnel and there will be other

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votes on this issue. John Baron says this is not the end of the matter.

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A few months ago, Look East filmed with reservists with the Royal

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Anglian Regiment training in Croatia. The government wants to

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rely far more on these experienced but part`time soldiers. But among

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MPs, there is concern whether they are up to the job and if there are

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enough people who want to volunteer. We risk heading towards false

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economies and unacceptable capability gaps which people will

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not thank us for. The MP for Basildon and Billericay is one,

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worrying it is being rushed through without proper scrutiny and debate,

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and others supporting, much to the annoyance of ministers. Some people

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in the government say you are being disloyal? As an MP, it is incumbent

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to speak out on matters you think are important and certain matters

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rise above party politics. The government says the way we fight

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wars is changing and we do not need as many full`time soldiers, but

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some, like Bob Russell, feel it is dangerous, while others feel relying

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on reserve this will put a big strain on small businesses. I know

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the damage when you take one man out of five men team in an SME and I do

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not think you have thought about this impact enough. But many

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supported the government, including one who is a reserve list. Soldiers

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cannot tell the difference when on the front line. We support the

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regular army, we know we are up to the job and now the government is

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committing ?1.2 billion over the next ten years to make sure we have

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enough and training, I know this is a great deal. This is not the end of

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the matter, there will be more votes on defence reforms and more

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opposition. Do we know how all our MPs voted?

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Not yet, but I expect Brian Binley on the list of Tory rebels. Others

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who expressed concern, and find reasons, such us may have found

:17:12.:17:20.

reasons, such as Bob Russell. But John Baron has made a name for

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himself and will keep up the fight. `` others who expressed concern, may

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have found reasons to go with the government. The Prime Minister was

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asked about other issues in Cambridge and he said he is

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listening to people's concerns, exactly what the Chancellor said to

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us, Ariel Fino and `` a real feeling we shall he some movement on the

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Cambridgeshire story very soon. Thank you very much.

:17:47.:17:50.

The Church of England could approve women bishops as early as next year

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after its governing body backed new proposals. Members of the General

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Synod voted, with 378 in favour and eight against. The Church has agreed

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to offer guidance to those parishes which reject female ministry.

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The Reverend Canon Heather Butcher is an Advisor on Women's Ministry to

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the Bishop of Norwich. How close are we now? We could be one year away

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from the final decision being made, but we have made tentative progress,

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this is the first hurdle, and we will have to see how it goes. It has

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been described as fragile, if you are betting women, which I sure

:18:30.:18:36.

you're not how fragile? I hope it will go through, but the Bishop of

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Rochester, who chaired the steering group, spoke on Monday and he said

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that there is no plan B and we are not offering a fitter, play, but we

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cannot afford to have this changed very much. `` they are not offering

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as this is accomplished. We hope it will be excepted without changing

:18:58.:19:02.

it. Some people says it could be a concession, but it looks to me like

:19:03.:19:07.

a fudge. We are trying to hold together a variety of people with

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different views. That is one of the great strengths and joys of the

:19:12.:19:16.

Church of England, that we are a broad church. But if you have people

:19:17.:19:21.

that think differently and have different theological understanding

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is, it is quite a task to hold them together, so I I suppose a bit of

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fudging could go on. What will happen before voting? I will meet

:19:35.:19:42.

people who are against the consecration of women bishops, to

:19:43.:19:45.

try to build bridges. I have met several people in the diocese and

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will continue to try to create good relationships. More broadly, the

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bishops are going to go away to think about how it would be rolled

:19:56.:20:00.

out across the whole church, so there is some kind of continuity

:20:01.:20:03.

across the whole of the Church of England. They will come back in

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February with their guidelines. And if those are proved, it then goes to

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the dioceses that we all have to have a say and talk about it. So

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long way to go? Yes, if that happens, we come back in July or

:20:20.:20:25.

November, and it may go them. And by the beginning of the year after, we

:20:26.:20:31.

might have a woman bishop? Fwe may have by 2015. Thank you very much

:20:32.:20:39.

for coming in. `` we may have won by 2015.

:20:40.:20:42.

Professor Fred Sanger, the Cambridge scientist who pioneered research

:20:43.:20:45.

into the human genome, has died at the age of 95. Uniquely, he won two

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Nobel Prizes for chemistry. The first was in 1958 for his work on

:20:50.:20:53.

the structure of insulin. The second for his breakthrough research on DNA

:20:54.:20:56.

which laid the foundation for the de`coding of the human genome.

:20:57.:21:01.

As a young scholar. Fred Sanger described himself as above average.

:21:02.:21:06.

But nothing special. He went on to become a giant of science. His work

:21:07.:21:09.

laid the foundations for understanding and reading the

:21:10.:21:11.

structure of DNA. The building blocks of all life. I think it is

:21:12.:21:16.

difficult to compare these things, really, and to me it is very

:21:17.:21:22.

gratifying and it will be useful. Such modesty was typical of the man,

:21:23.:21:26.

whose work went on to win him two Nobel Prizes for chemistry. He was

:21:27.:21:32.

the only person in history, and still is, to have one two Nobel

:21:33.:21:40.

Prize is in chemistry, which are awarded for outstanding merit its

:21:41.:21:42.

contributions to science and to win it twice my many years apart as well

:21:43.:21:49.

is quite outstanding. Professor Sanger spent his whole scientific

:21:50.:21:52.

career in Cambridge. His name was adopted by Cambridge's Sanger

:21:53.:21:55.

Institute which first mapped the human genome. And it has helped

:21:56.:21:58.

apply its findings to the development of medicine. Fred

:21:59.:22:01.

Sanger's achievements, his legacy, will resonate in the world of

:22:02.:22:05.

science for years to come. As one fellow professor said, the impact of

:22:06.:22:08.

his work is impossible to exaggerate.

:22:09.:22:17.

Well, one man who know Fred Sanger better than most was his fellow

:22:18.:22:20.

Nobel Laureate Professor Sir John Walker. The pair worked together at

:22:21.:22:25.

the Medical Research Council's laboratory of molecular biology in

:22:26.:22:30.

Cambridge. He joins us now. Can you tell us more about Fred Sanger the

:22:31.:22:37.

man? He was wonderful man to be around, a great inspiration a

:22:38.:22:40.

fantastic experimentalists, who did very complicated experiments with

:22:41.:22:45.

complicated `` with simple equipment, and he did not like

:22:46.:22:50.

complex equipment. He preferred to invent his own ways of doing things.

:22:51.:22:57.

He had enormous persistence, he could not have solved the problems

:22:58.:23:01.

he did without that persistence and stamina. He was full of insight. He

:23:02.:23:06.

was an inspiration to everybody around him. He set a standard for

:23:07.:23:15.

other people to follow. It is hard to over emphasise how important his

:23:16.:23:23.

work was to all of us. Yes, I am so glad he was able to see the fruits

:23:24.:23:27.

of his own accomplishments in the form of the human gene on `` genome

:23:28.:23:36.

and he saw the impact it was having on biosciences, medicine, and

:23:37.:23:40.

society in general. His name will not just live for a few years to

:23:41.:23:49.

come, but whatever. And he `` you work for him, and he got you to work

:23:50.:23:57.

there, and he? Yes, we met in Paris and he asked if I thought about

:23:58.:24:00.

coming back to England and I thought I would, and so, I rang him up a few

:24:01.:24:07.

days later and as the fit would be possible to work with him in

:24:08.:24:10.

Cambridge and he agreed that I could come for three months, and that was

:24:11.:24:18.

in 1974 and I am still here. Such a modest man, but described today as

:24:19.:24:22.

one of the greatest scientists in any generation, would you agree?

:24:23.:24:30.

Absolutely, very few scientists with equivalent accomplishments, possibly

:24:31.:24:36.

Marie Curie, he could be compared with her, but otherwise unique. We

:24:37.:24:43.

will not meet another person in our lifetime again. When I met him, he

:24:44.:24:50.

was very proud to have the Sanger Institute named after him. He was,

:24:51.:24:56.

he was a modest person, wearing his fame lightly, he was famous,

:24:57.:25:00.

becoming an icon amongst students, who loved him, flocking to hear him

:25:01.:25:06.

talk, but I remember when he agreed his name could be associated with

:25:07.:25:09.

the Sanger Institute, he said something along the lines, I have

:25:10.:25:14.

allowed you to use my name, make sure this place is a success.

:25:15.:25:19.

Professor Sir John Walker, thank you very much. You are welcome. Now for

:25:20.:25:23.

the weather. The wind hazard is with us. We had a

:25:24.:25:33.

weather front through this morning bringing some and pleasant

:25:34.:25:38.

conditions. Then brighter skies, but bands of showers forming behind,

:25:39.:25:41.

affecting many areas through this evening. This poses a problem, like

:25:42.:25:49.

wind at the moment, and any gap in the showers, clear spells, means

:25:50.:25:52.

temperatures getting below freezing, was in some problems with Frost and

:25:53.:25:58.

ice, but not necessarily widespread or for the whole of the night,

:25:59.:26:04.

mainly between now and midnight. The showers falling as sleet, with a

:26:05.:26:12.

wintry flavour. After midnight, more cloud, the showers keeping going,

:26:13.:26:17.

and some wind preventing frost later. We end the night with

:26:18.:26:23.

temperatures above freezing. A cloudy start with showers around

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first thing, the feature will be the north`easterly wind, making it feel

:26:30.:26:33.

very cold tomorrow, but in proving through the day, starting with

:26:34.:26:36.

showers which gradually become lighter and fewer. But still some of

:26:37.:26:41.

them across the eastern half, parts of Norfolk and Suffolk

:26:42.:26:46.

particularly. Temperature is not high, seven or eight degrees. And

:26:47.:26:50.

the wind speed will make it feel very cold. By the end of the day,

:26:51.:26:55.

less showers, but still the chance of some, and falling as sleet and

:26:56.:27:03.

snow. Beyond that, high`pressure building, meaning much lighter wind,

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and clearer skies, so that throws up the hazard of much colder nights.

:27:09.:27:12.

Although for the next couple of nights, it is quite windy, so just

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about free of cost, by the weekend, we start to bring those numbers

:27:18.:27:21.

down. `` free of frost. Bringing those numbers down means some frost,

:27:22.:27:27.

possibly some freezing fog. This showers by the weekend, sunny

:27:28.:27:34.

spells, but feeling quite cold. Thank you very much, I think.

:27:35.:27:40.

That is all from us, good night. Goodbye.

:27:41.:28:07.

I'm Nigel Slater, a cook. And I'm Adam Henson, a farmer.

:28:08.:28:11.

all back in touch with where our food really comes from.

:28:12.:28:15.

You asked me to grow some durum wheat to produce your pasta.

:28:16.:28:18.

Our own eggs, our own flour - couldn't ask for more, really.

:28:19.:28:24.

# Through stormy weather and bottles of wine... #

:28:25.:28:27.

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